Alaska

States - Big Screen

With the official slogan being, "Beyond your Dreams, within your Reach," the state of Alaska understands the importance of promoting employment opportunities for everyone, including individuals with disabilities.  

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Alaska's VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
-0.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
739,795
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.19%
Change from
2016 to 2017
53,087
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.15%
Change from
2016 to 2017
23,815
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.69%
Change from
2016 to 2017
44.86%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.54%
Change from
2016 to 2017
75.71%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 738,432 741,894 739,795
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 47,039 50,330 53,087
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 19,951 24,090 23,815
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 314,346 309,682 300,380
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 42.41% 47.86% 44.86%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.07% 76.12% 75.71%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.30% 6.60% 7.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 13.40% 14.50% 15.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.10% 9.40% 10.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 43,821 46,496 49,987
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 38,923 40,656 40,411
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 53,318 55,707 57,928
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 3,158 2,583 4,021
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 4,876 6,411 4,754
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 14,213 16,151 13,858
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 3,878 5,243 4,439
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 792 753 N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 6,183 5,022 7,170
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 792 1,693 1,969

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 722 724 738
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.60% 6.60% 6.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 12,620 12,562 12,317

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,591 2,521 2,295
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 4,456 4,691 4,199
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 8,302 8,524 7,153
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 31.20% 29.60% 32.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.20% 4.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.30% 1.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 0.50% 1.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 133 100 256
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 129 108 123
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A 43 66
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,715 4,449 4,434
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 9 22 22
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 8 14 14
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 89.00% 64.00% 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.09 1.90 1.90

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
974
1,021
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 39 34 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 70 63 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 265 287 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 234 219 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 242 319 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 124 99 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.90% 31.60% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 505 491 423
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 21,233 21,242 21,190
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 45 42 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 47 49 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $6,454,000 $7,599,000 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $40,419,000 $44,552,000 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 23.00% 23.00% N/A
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,856 1,991 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 60.30 64.20 N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 77.47% 63.39% 63.71%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 6.05% 8.84% 9.05%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.74% 2.73% 2.85%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.81% 97.65% 96.95%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 12.59% 13.48% 15.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 43.94% 49.41% 55.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 56.29% 63.83% 66.05%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 31.35% 36.93% 40.53%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. N/A
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 193,961
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 193,961
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 297
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 297
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,663,597

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2 2 2
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2 2 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 22 53 53
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 22 53 53

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Alaska’s “Employment First” legislation calls for “competitive integrated employment” as the preferred outcome for those with disabilities. DOLWD has executed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Health and Social Services; and is obtaining MOU signature with Education and Early Development to ensure progress towards that goal. The MOU includes commitments for active participation on the Interagency Council on Employment First, under the auspices of the Employment First State Coordinator.  (Page 45) Title I

DVR has a cooperative agreement and participates with the Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative (AIEI), which consists of a consortium of agencies committed to working together to improve employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and the Employment First Initiative. The cooperative agreement outlines the goals and collaboration needed to successfully achieve increased employment outcomes for youth with I/DD. The results of this collaboration were published in the Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, vol. 47, no. 3, 2017. (Page 147) Title I
 

Customized Employment

~~DVR provides the services necessary to achieve competitive, integrated employment, such as guidance and counseling, assessment, vocational and other training, transportation, diagnosis and treatment, on-the-job training, job-related services, customized employment, and supported employment.  (Page 28) Title I

In addition, DVR has an on—going commitment to quality SE services, as evidenced by the recent formation and active participation in several cross—agency SE related initiatives such as the Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative and piloting the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model with DBH. DVR has sustained the principles of the system change customized employment grant that focused on wrap—around services for the most severely disabled. DVR continues to be involved in an advisory capacity with different organizations that focus on groups that may often require SE services, such as those individuals with traumatic brain injury, those diagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and individuals with severe mental illness. (Page 154) Title I
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The Alaska Youth Works project has established a multifaceted approach, building on existing systems and services, by creating a bridge framework to provide for coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to career pathway programs and lead to self-sustaining employment. By utilizing resources and leveraging funds, the grant has guided partner agencies in system changes that will sustain their new models after the ending of the grant cycle. (Page 27) Title I

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) “Alaska Youth Works” grant will continue to build a cohesive system with DVR and other partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth with disabilities, ages 14 to 24, by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers. The Alaska Youth Works project will complement DVR services through coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to Pre-Employment Transition Services, career pathway programs and ultimately lead to self-sustaining employment. (Page 168) Title I

Priority 1.3: Continue to improve VR services to rural Alaskans.
Strategies:
• Ensure DVR's rural work group and local TVR partners will meet to identify realistic goals for rural services, develop strategies for meeting these goals, and convey this information to VR field staff.
• Continue to leverage relationships with TVR, LEAs, CRPs, other state agencies and Job Center partners.
• Ensure all rural hubs have a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) timely assigned and trained to meet the needs of rural participants. (Page 173) Title IV

SCSEP coordinates with 75 host sites and leverages resources to ensure successful outcomes for SCSEP participants that foster individual economic self-sufficiency and promote useful opportunities in community service activities. The State provides a wide range of programs and services to seniors, spanning multiple divisions and other private and public entities. Funds from OAA are leveraged with WIOA, other federal programs, and resources from Alaska’s State Employment and Training Program.

SCSEP works closely with DVR to ensure those with special needs or disabilities are enrolled in community service training to work. Once a participant is deemed work ready, DVR’s has an approved provisional hire process and SCSEP works directly with recruitment staff to obtain necessary approval to hire in 9 steps. The provisional hire may be used for any State permanent or non-permanent positions. (Page 206-207) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~DOLWD received a Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) - Round VI grant entitled “Alaska Youth Works” to serve youth with disabilities in 2015. This project will continue to build a cohesive system with multiple partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth with disabilities, aged 14 to 24, by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers. The Alaska Youth Works project has established a multifaceted approach, building on existing systems and services, by creating a bridge framework to provide for coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to career pathway programs and lead to self-sustaining employment. By utilizing resources and leveraging funds, the grant has guided partner agencies in system changes that will sustain their new models after the ending of the grant cycle. (Page 27) Title I

DOLWD supports integration of services through a single delivery system for both businesses and individuals. This efficient use of resources includes integrating all WIOA core programs with Unemployment Insurance (UI), veterans’ programs, the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP), the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program, apprenticeship and sector partnership development, and the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). (Page 53) Title I

The referral process among the core programs is implemented on an individualized basis depending on the specific needs of the individual. All DOLWD staff are trained and expected to be knowledgeable in the requirements and eligibility of other core programs to ensure an appropriate program referral. Appropriate referrals are necessary to leverage resources and maximize service delivery to individuals while ensuring non-duplication of services. For example, AJC staff that provide initial intake and career services have been trained through the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) to appropriately identify and refer individuals to disability services such as the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation, and other supporting entities. This training has provided a high level of thoughtfulness to the reason for each referral, increasing the success for the participant when obtaining needed services. Coordinated data collection mechanisms will be implemented to capture cross-agency referrals. (Pages 54-55) Title I

DETS administers many programs that are covered by the laws, regulations, and policies encompassing POS. These include the WIOA Adult, Youth, and Dislocated Worker programs, Wagner-Peyser, Trade Act programs, National Emergency Grants, SCSEP, Helmets to Hardhats, and the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). (Page 87) Title I

o As a result of 3 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants, all AJC staff have and will continue to receive Disability Resource Coordinator I (DRC I) training, which includes awareness of programmatic and physical barriers to accessibility and covers familiarity of the “ADA checklist for Readily Achievable Barrier Removal.” The ADA checklist is completed annually at each facility and any needed corrective action is identified and implemented;
o The DRC I training is an integrated and mandated part of new-hire training for all AJC staff;
o Each regional office has a higher-level staff member trained to the Disability Resource Coordinator II (DRC II) level, who is the disability and accessibility subject matter expert for the region. The DRC II functions as the technical assistance advisor for all staff on disability and accessibility related issues;
o The DRC IIs, the statewide lead for the DEI, and the Training Coordinator identify periodic and on-going training in specialized topics to augment standardized training and ensure continual learning and awareness in improving access to all services within the AJC system for individuals with disabilities; (Pages 89-90) Title I

The state intends to use the governor’s set-aside funding to enhance services to one or more of Alaska’s priority populations, including youth and adults with disabilities. DOLWD will use these funds to leverage other programs and initiatives, for example, DOLWD’s DEI Grant for Youth and American Apprenticeship Initiative for Health Care. DOLWD may continue to support projects such as the Department of Health and Social Services’ development of the “Disability Benefits 101 (DB101)” online tool. Including incorporating DB101 training for AJC staff and other counselors in using the tool with clients, as well as other programs targeted at serving those with disabilities and multiple barriers to employment. (Page 98) Title I

Youth project operators are procured from the 6 economic regions of the state via a competitive process. Project operators provide academic, employment, and training services to eligible in-school and out-of-school youth ages 14-24. The project operators offer a comprehensive workforce development program that prepares youth for post-secondary education, employment, career development, and can provide accommodations and support services for youth with disabilities. Project operators are familiar with the division’s Disability Employment Initiative youth program and will co-enroll youth with disabilities with the DEI to coordinate work experience and other training and supportive services. (Page 114) Title I

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) “Alaska Youth Works” grant will continue to build a cohesive system with DVR and other partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth with disabilities, ages 14 to 24, by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers. The Alaska Youth Works project will complement DVR services through coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to Pre-Employment Transition Services, career pathway programs and ultimately lead to self-sustaining employment. (Page 168) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows eligible persons with disabilities to secure a “taxed advantaged” savings account of up to $100,000 without affecting public benefit limits. Calculating benefits and ABLE savings is a critical tool for achieving quality long-term outcomes. After the website was completed, AJC and partner staff were trained in using the tool with clients. DOLWD’s Disability Employment Initiative will collaborate with the Department of Health and Social Services’ Work Incentives Planning & Assistance Project (WIPA) on work incentive counseling for Social Security beneficiaries. These projects will build a system with multiple partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth and adults with disabilities by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers through comprehensive access to benefits planning by certified Community Work Incentive Counselors (CWICs). (Page 44) Title I

School to Work Transition

~~Through DVR, Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) provides the following required activities to students with disabilities (16- to 21-year-olds) who are eligible or potentially eligible for vocational rehabilitation services: (1) job exploration counseling, (2) work-based learning opportunities, (3) counseling on postsecondary educational opportunities (4) workplace readiness training, and (5) instruction in self-advocacy. Implementation of (Pre-ETS) has resulted in increased coordination among local school districts and DVR. (Page 45) Title I

DVR has a Transition Services policy that is currently under revision. Additionally, DVR is also drafting new Pre-Employment Transition Services policy and procedures. ADVR has set a policy completion goal of October 2018. In the interim, DVR has created Business Practice Revisions, which provide specific guidance to staff to carry out the Pre—Employment Transition Services activities specified in WIOA. DVR is coordinating with state and local education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from education services to provision of VR services, including having completely revamped the referral process from education agencies to DVR for Pre-Employment Transition Services and VR Services to ensure a smoother transition. Referral forms having been provided to local education officials across Alaska and DVR’s website has been updated to provide information on which regional office is responsible for each school district throughout the state. DVR has established. DVR has prioritized that individualized plans for employment are developed within 90 days or, prior to graduation if an applicant is in the final semester of their final year. (Pages 148-149) Title I

DEED’s Special Education Unit, Division of Teacher and Learning Support (TLS) and DVR have updated their interagency agreement designed to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services. The agreement includes:
• DVR’s assurance of the development and implementation of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services within 90 days of eligibility or at least before the student leaves school;

• Providing or arranging for the provision of pre-employment transition services to all students with disabilities identified as requiring these services;
• Designation of a regional DVR contact in each school district who is responsible for clarifying questions and concerns relating to the implementation of the agreements with the local school districts, including access to DVR’s Transition Coordinator as needed for additional coordination and technical assistance needs to be provided locally or at other events in which a TLS or DVR representative may connect; (Pages 149-150) Title I

Introduction and guidance of students with disabilities to post-school alternatives which include, but are not limited to employment, post-secondary education, vocational training, and adult education, by TLS transition coordinators and ADVR staff. Planning may also include coordination of social or vocational experiences for students with disabilities in real life work settings to improve competitive integrated employment outcomes; and

• DVR’s assurance that the core tenets, principles, and career goals stated in each student’s Individual Education Program (IEP) will be incorporated into the development of their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). EED’s Special Education Unit also provides funding for members of the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee to travel to events related to transition students such as the annual Statewide Special Education Conference. (Page 150) Title I

DVR implemented the simplified Secondary Transition Referral form in 2014 in coordination with DEED. Efforts to encourage referrals through this refined process include DVR/DEED joint training to special education directors at the annual Special Education Director Training and to teachers at the Alaska Statewide Special Education Conference. The form provides teachers with an easy and efficient way to connect a student with the VR counselor serving the school and provides the teacher with an avenue to request a joint conference with the student and counselor. Teachers can access the referral form directly through links on EED’s IEP form, DEED’s transitions resources web page, and DVR’s Transition Tools for Teachers web page. DVR played a pivotal role with the expansion of the ATOP project, by conducting 16 Transition Camps in PY17 including increased coordination with the Division of Juvenile Justice, Office of Children’s Services (OCS), and American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation projects. (Pages 151-152) Title I

DVR Transition Services — DVR reaches out to teachers throughout Alaska in order to provide information on appropriate referral processes to foster students’ transition from secondary school into vocational/academic training and into the world of work. DVR counselors within each regional office are assigned to specific schools to streamline the referral process, ensure counselor participation in Individual Education Plan (IEP) development, and ensure that all schools and students are informed of DVR services. DVR contacts schools on a monthly basis during the school year. Rural and village schools communicate with DVR through their special education staff, as well as DVR staff who are assigned and travel to that rural region. This coordination allows for on-going coordination and education between both LEA staff and local DVR staff. (Page 165) Title I

Under WIOA, VR agencies are required to set aside 15 percent of their federal award to provide required Pre-Employment Transition Services youth currently in school. The 2010-2014 American Community Survey estimated 3,575 Alaskans aged 16-21 who reported experiencing a disability. DVR provides Pre-Employment Transition Services to students with disabilities aged 14-21 who are receiving services under an Individualized Education Program (IEP), eligible for section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, or are otherwise potentially eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation services. In FFY16, ADVR provided Pre-Employment Transition Services to approximately 11 percent of this population. During Program Year 17, the number of students who were provided these services increased to 957 students or approximately 27 percent of the ACS population. This exceeded DVR’s target goal of providing required Pre-Employment Transition Services to 16 percent (585) of new students with a disability annually. This population has been surveyed directly to obtain input into needs and goals for transition information and services and for future CSNA purposes. Barriers that were identified in DVR’s prior CSNA included transportation obstacles, lack of existing programs to meet specific disability needs, unstable living situations, and lack of family support. (Page 169) Title I

DVR supports and participates in the Tapestry Postsecondary Transition Program through the University of Alaska's Center for Human Development. This partnership between DVR, UAA and the Anchorage School District provides students with disabilities Pre-ETS self—advocacy, career exploration, counseling towards postsecondary education, work readiness and a work experience. This program is specifically geared towards a population that could benefit from postsecondary education but needs assistance with overcoming barriers before they can fully participate. The partnership with the school district allows students, not eligible for further transition services through the district, to defer their diploma for a 1-year intensive program on the UAA campus. (Page 180) Title I

Career Pathways

~~The Department of Health and Social Services developed a website called “Disability Benefits 101 (DB101),” an online tool for those with disabilities that provides available work incentives and helps individuals determine how their SSI, SSDI, or other public benefits may be impacted by employment. The Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows eligible persons with disabilities to secure a “taxed advantaged” savings account of up to $100,000 without affecting public benefit limits. Calculating benefits and ABLE savings is a critical tool for achieving quality long-term outcomes. After the website was completed, AJC and partner staff were trained in using the tool with clients. DOLWD’s Disability Employment Initiative will collaborate with the Department of Health and Social Services’ Work Incentives Planning & Assistance Project (WIPA) on work incentive counseling for Social Security beneficiaries. These projects will build a system with multiple partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth and adults with disabilities by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers through comprehensive access to benefits planning by certified Community Work Incentive Counselors (CWICs). (Page 44) Title I

DVR works closely with local school districts, hospitals, and CRPs to implement the national Project SEARCH model in the Matanuska—Susitna, Kenai, Anchorage, and Fairbanks school districts. A collaborative internship model was developed in FFY2012 to provide youth with developmental or intellectual disabilities opportunities to learn real job skills in 1—year, school—to—work internship positions set up throughout the 3 hospitals involved. Sites were at Mat—Su Regional Medical Center, Central Peninsula Hospital, Providence Medical Center, and Fairbanks Memorial Hospital. Total workplace immersion facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and OJT and support through internships or worksite rotations. The goal for each participant is obtaining integrated employment using the skills learned through the internships. The State of Alaska has adopted this model for student interns with developmental disabilities. For SY17, 24 youth participated in Project SEARCH, and 22 successfully completed their internships at the hospitals with 14 of those individuals now working in paid, competitive employment. Project SEARCH is no longer being funded by the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education. The Project SEARCH model is being used to provide Pre—Employment Transition Services to Students with Disabilities under the Client Services Component. (Page 180) Title IV

Apprenticeship
Additionally, the American Apprenticeship Initiative grant will increase the number of Registered Apprentices in Alaska’s health care industry. The project will significantly increase career awareness, strengthen existing career pathways, introduce new career pathways, and significantly help employers fill entry-level positions in high-demand health care sector occupations. DVR will promote the availability of this project to individuals with disabilities who are interested in pursuing occupations in the health care industry. In the pre-apprenticeship program, 9 percent self-identified as having a disability, through calendar year 2017. ETS is unable to provide specific information on whether these individuals are being served by DVR. (Page 168) Title IV
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~DOLWD’s Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) will continue to provide training for AJC and partner staff working with clients who have disabilities. Alaska has implemented the Ticket to Work program and is reaching out to those on Social Security Insurance (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) to encourage them to go to an AJC for those services. DOLWD has a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Divisions of Vocational Rehabilitation and Division of Employment and Training Services to provide seamless Partnership Plus services for beneficiaries of Social Security benefits. Both divisions will work to expand this program to other agencies and programs, such as the Division of Behavioral Health; the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services; the Division of Public Assistance Work Services; and Centers for Independent Living.
The Department of Health and Social Services developed a website called “Disability Benefits 101 (DB101),” an online tool for those with disabilities that provides available work incentives and helps individuals determine how their SSI, SSDI, or other public benefits may be impacted by employment. (Page 44) Title I

To ensure these activities are carried out to the maximum extent possible, DVR will:
- Ensure DETS staff are regularly trained or made aware of DVR and its services. This is especially true of DETS locations that are served by DVR on an itinerant basis.
- DVR leadership team and managers continue to identify functional DETS issues that require on-going work at all levels of the division including integration and the local management teams.
- Work with DETS staff to develop a means to provide information about DVR to individuals who self-identify as having a disability and who receive job training services through DETS programs.
- Develop a referral process to the DETS employment networks.
- Train DVR staff to use DETS services. (Pages 168-169) Title IV

Priority 3.5: Evaluate Social Security Reimbursement Process
Strategies:
• Implement a new Ticket To Work (TTW) tracking system.
• Monitor ticket reimbursement amounts. Performance Indicators:
• Software implemented and staff trained.
• Continued collection of Social Security Reimbursements.
• Improved capability to capture all available reimbursements. (Page 176) Title IV

Priority 3. Evaluate Social Security Reimbursement Process.
• Strategies contributing to success:
o Purchased new software that automates the process for submitting claims to SSA for the Ticket to Work program. (Page 188) Title IV

Another long-term strategy to improve SCSEP services is to include discussion with participants on financial and work incentives, to provide information on Social Security 1619b Medicaid While Working, and to explore specialized work incentives through programs including Ticket to Work, Impairment-Related Work Expenses, Blind Work Expenses, and Plan to Achieve Self-Support, and to provide referrals to those in need of these services. (Page 210) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Employer service representatives, particularly Business Connection staff, pay attention to local labor market trends to match employers with skilled job seekers. Staff work with employers to coordinate recruitments, plan job fairs, post job orders, provide applicant pre-screening and referrals, develop jobs, provide space for job recruitments, and offer employment and training service plans. Using a mass e-mail distribution list of employers and other interested parties, staff send daily messages on new job postings, recruitments at the AJCs, and upcoming job fairs. DOLWD has identified that the health care, oil and gas, and mining industries are the highest-demand industries and continually engages industry leaders in these fields. Under WIOA, Business Connection staff will be provided more in-depth training to work with the various industry sector partnerships to meet training and labor needs for those industries. (Page 56) Title I

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) partners with employers to promote the hiring of individuals with disabilities. DVR has implemented the dual customer model to deliver services to employers. DVR has created a Business Employment Services Team (DVR-BEST), which is tasked with providing employers with the four required services as outlined in Section 109 of the Rehabilitation Act within WIOA, to secure competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities, which is part of DOLWD’s strategy to focus on serving those with disabilities. (Page 58) Title I

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) utilizes a management information system called AWARE. AWARE was developed based on Vocation Rehabilitation (VR) business practices and federal requirements. AWARE offers a comprehensive set of cases, financial, and organizational modules. The features and procedures in AWARE are consistent and standardized throughout all modules, and are designed around the natural flow of the VR case process, making it intuitive for VR Counselors. (Page 65) Title I

AWIB members come from a variety of industries and represent all geographic and economic regions of the state. They bring the voice of employers, educational institutions, Alaska Native regional corporations, and other workforce partners in their respective regions. The AWIB focuses on employer engagement, connecting education and training strategies through building career pathways; supporting work-based learning; and improving career results for all job seekers and employers alike, based on the demographics and needs of each economic region. The AWIB will continue to successfully carry out the functions of both a state board and a local board, as it has for over a decade. (Page 95) Title I

Most AWIB members are representatives of business and the private sector. Board members come from a variety of industries throughout the state and are committed to bringing the voice of employers to the table and reaching out to others to engage them in the workforce system. In addition, in response to feedback from ETA, two chief local elected officials have been appointed to the board. The AWIB will continue to focus not only on employer engagement but on connecting education and training strategies through building career pathways, supporting work-based learning, and improving career results for all job seekers and employers alike. (Pages 119-120) Title I

DVR partners with employers to promote the hiring of individuals with disabilities. DVR implemented the dual customer model to deliver services to employers. DVR has a Business Employment Services Team (BEST) that is tasked with providing employers four core services as outlined in WIOA.

1. Training and Technical Assistance in:

• Understanding the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its application to a workplace situation; referral to the ADA partners’ project;
• Disability awareness training provided to HR, managers, staff, boards, and other interested groups;
• Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs regulations;
• U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission regulations;
• Balancing the application of federal, state, and local employment laws and regulations.

2. Creating Opportunities for Placement by:

• Developing opportunities for both adults and youth to provide a full range of unpaid work experiences, informational interviews, job shadows, and On—the—Job Training (OJT);
• Offering recruitment supports, assisting in workforce development including placement, OJT, Schedule A, and Provisional Hire;
• OJT, Job Coaching, and external training (not at worksite).3. Network Development through:
• Connecting with community partners and employers, locally and nationally. The BEST has connected over 50 employers with the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs staffers, the Governor’s Council on Disabilities & Special Education, the AJC’s Business Connection, and the VA VR&E’s employment support team. (Pages 154-155) Title IV

DVR’s most underserved population continues to be rural Alaskans. This has been an ongoing challenge for the Rural Development Team, as there are so few jobs within remote and rural communities. Available employment opportunities and employers are much more available in urban areas. The Rural Team strategizes ways to obtain more CRPs in rural areas, which are traditionally underserved. The Business Employment Services Team has been created specifically to provide outreach and training services to employers, with the goal of encouraging more employers to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. (Page 181) Title IV

Performance measure 6: Effectiveness in Serving Employers.

• DVR is working with the Business Development Team to develop and track contacts and services/training provided to employers. (Page 192) Title IV

Data Collection
The department has initiated the procurement process for a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) system to replace both the primary WIOA title 1-B database, Individual Case Management (ICM), and the Wagner-Peyser labor exchange services ALEXsys database. Anticipated to be fully implemented during state fiscal year 2019, the COTS system may require significant changes in the data collection process, but will result in more accurate WIOA reporting. Implementation of this new system represents a significant step forward toward the eventual common reporting anticipated for all programs, and the combined system will promote integrated service delivery, improved efficiency, and reduced duplication of services. All references in this Combined Plan relative to data collected in or reported from ICM and ALEXsys will continue, possibly with greater accuracy, under the new system. (Page 84) Title I Priority 3.2: DVR will meet or exceed state and federal common performance measures Strategies: • Negotiate targets for required common performance measures, based on baseline data collected. • Work with WIOA Core partners to implement activities identified in the Alaska Combined State Plan, including common performance measures. • Amend Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Key Performance Indicators, Missions & Measures (M&Ms) to more closely align with WIOA performance measures. (Page 175) Title IV Priority 3.3: Implement federally required RSA-911changes to the AWARE case management system Strategies: • Analyze all changes to case management (AWARE) software and determine their impact on field and accounting staff. • Train staff in timely manner. Performance Indicators: • Required data is collected accurately. • Federal reports produced on time and accurately. • DVR services are not negatively impacted (Page 176) Title IV Priority 2. Implement all federally mandated changes to RSA-911 report. • Strategies contributing to success: o Case Management Software is managed by Alliance Enterprises and they have been very responsive to incorporating changes in the data collection. o Other State programs have been generous in sharing time, resources, and their interpretation of required elements. o Both RSA and Alliance Enterprises have developed edit programs which enable DVR to produce error-free reports. o Able to plan and execute state-wide training on new data collection requirements. (Pages 187-188) Title IV DVR has not reported, nor historically collected data, on the 6 performance accountability indicators under section 116 of WIOA. DVR is unable to predict its future performance on any of the 6 performance indicators, including the SE program goals, until baseline targets have been established. DVR has data sharing agreements with DOLWD’s Unemployment Insurance and Research and Analysis units in order to establish the data collection necessary for determining baseline indicators and future reporting. As DVR is still accumulating baseline data, all indicators are marked as “To Be Determined” in Appendix C of the Combined State Plan, per instructions. (Page 191) Title IV
511

~~The State of Alaska has a State Rehabilitation Council consistent with Section 105 of the Act and 34 CFR 361.17. The State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee (SVRC) serves as the State Rehabilitation Council. At every SVRC quarterly meeting, the focus is on a particular region of the state, such as Anchorage, Northern, rural, etc. Agenda items include reports from the Director, Chief and the specific area manager; general DVR operations, major initiatives and regional and statewide challenges. In addition, there are reports from various partners such as the Alaska Workforce Investment Board, Tribal VR programs, Parent Training representative, Client Assistance Program, the State Independent Living Council and the Governor’s Council of Disabilities and Special Education. During this past year, the quarterly meetings included guest presentations addressing such topics as DVR’s Pre-ETS programs, transition from corrections/incarceration, repealing subminimum wage regulations, new WIOA requirements, the ABLE Act in Alaska, Peer Mentoring, and DVR’s collaboration with University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation programs, Alaska Job Centers, Independent Living Center Access Alaska’s efforts to better serve Barrow and the North Slope. (Page 145) Title IV

DVR has, or is in the process of developing, cooperative agreements with all levels of educational institutions within the state, including local school districts, the Department of Education & Early Development (DEED), and the University of Alaska statewide system. DVRs agreement with DEED has not yet been finalized, however there is a target date of August 2018 as an effective date. The agreement, which will form the basis for LEA agreements outlines the overarching purpose of the transition from high school or the education of those students and youth with disabilities. Additionally, respective definitions are described in order to ensure programmatic understanding. These agreements will, or do contain specific information regarding consultation and technical assistance, transition planning for students, roles and responsibilities for each agency, coordination for employment in subminimum wage (which is now a moot point), assurances, and financial responsibilities of each agency. (Page 149) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
The assessment of One-Stop delivery system partner program services is based on participant outcomes identified under their statutorily required performance and reporting requirements. However, the WIOA joint performance measures, which consist of six customer outcomes specific to core indicators of performance and employer satisfaction, demonstrate value in promoting integration of services and boosting accessibility and transparency within the workforce system. Therefore, if possible, the same measures and methodologies are applied to other One-Stop partner programs that are applied to the core programs, in addition to any program-specific measures required by federal or state regulations. Regardless of whether a program is a core program or a partner program, or whether a measure is required by WIOA or partner program law and regulation, performance measures and performance evaluations will be applied at the customer level first and then may be aggregated by program or population. (Pages 77-78) Title IV The state’s One-Stop system of Alaska Job Centers (AJCs) has developed a comprehensive approach to ensure accessibility and inclusion of all customers, including those with disabilities, to all facilities, programs, and services. Physical and programmatic accessibility are continuously evaluated with an annual Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) assessment and continuous improvement strategies planned and implemented when needed. Alaska will continue to refine the policies, training, and continuous improvement strategies to ensure compliance with WIOA and continued compliance with ADA. Additionally, the State of Alaska recently hired an ADA Coordinator who ensures accessibility of state offices for both the public and employees. The One-Stop system’s approach to ADA compliance includes: o Physical and programmatic accessibility; o Staff training and accountability; o Adaptive technology and other accommodations; and o On-going survey of effectiveness and continuous improvement. (Pages 88-89) Title I o Job centers provide individuals with disabilities access to information, resources, programs and activities in a manner that allows each individual, no matter their disability, the opportunity of full inclusion. All workshops, public access, programs, etc. are fully accessible, to ensure that the opportunities and benefits provided by the job center are available to individuals with disabilities in an equally effective and integrated manner; o “Alaska Job Center Universal Access for Customers with Disabilities” policy plays a vital role in establishing the working-level framework for outlining and improving the accessibility, capacity, and accountability of AJCs to serve customers with disabilities. The policy covers both physical and programmatic accessibility within AJCs and outlines the assistive technologies available and required staff training; o Each location has appropriate signage identifying the policy that no individual with a disability shall, by reason of such disability, be excluded from participation in, or be denied the benefit of, the services, programs, or activities of the AJCs; o All job centers use universal design with printed materials. All posters, flyers, brochures, etc. use common principles throughout the design. The outreach and marketing materials developed for distribution from the AJCs to partners, job seekers, and employers contain notice of the availability of auxiliary aids and services for needed accommodations to access programs and services; (Page 89) Title I o Each AJC is equipped with a Universal Access Accessibility Station that is designed to improve the quality of the job applicant’s experience, no matter the disability. Each station is designed with state-of -the art technology that can help job seekers with disabilities navigation the World of Work with based on their personal independence level. o Assistive Technology (AT) available includes screen readers, magnifiers, adaptive software, virtual sign language interpretation, closed captioning on scrolling program and services video, motorized adjustable workstations, specialized keyboards and mice, TTY phones, and personal voice amplification device; o “Tips for Improving Access to Workshops and Training” has been developed and disseminated to staff. This document offers guidance and suggestions on increasing accessibility and success for individuals attending AJC workshops and training sessions and is broken down by disability type. The document outlines ways the facilitator or trainer can incorporate accommodations and adaptations into the class to ensure an optimal learning environment for all; and o Any program and service may be accommodated for full inclusion on an “as needed” basis with the accommodation being dependent on the needs of the individual customer and provided through the AJCs in collaboration with partners. (Page 90) Title I o AJC certification occurs annually and is a collaborative process involving all partners of the One-Stop delivery system. The joint AJC management team collectively completes the documents and surveys for the certification and submits them to the AWIB for approval. Certification involves reviewing site working agreements, cost allocations, self-assessment surveys, and the ADA accessibility survey. In addition to reviewing all submitted documents, members of the AWIB conduct an on-site review identifying best practices and need for corrective action planning. Based on their review and findings, the AWIB recommends and approves certification; (Page 90) Title I Information on physical and programmatic accessibility for individuals with disabilities is supported by statewide activities funding and reinforced by the AJC Universal Access for Individuals with Disability Policy 07-516 (Page 98) Title I DVR continues to work with the Department of Administration, Division of Personnel and Labor Relations, the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, and the State of Alaska as a Model Employer for Individuals with Disabilities. In order to create a baseline, an extensive state employee survey was conducted so state employees may self-disclose their ADA defined disability. This survey will assist with ensuring reasonable accommodations for these employees. DVR continues to see considerable progress in expanding and improving Alaska’s Provisional Hire program as part of this effort. Additionally, the State of Alaska recently hired a full time ADA Coordinator to ensure accessibility for all employees. DVR continues to have an Interagency Agreement in place with the Department of Veterans Affairs Vocational Rehabilitation & Education (VR&E) to cooperate, coordinate, and collaborate for the creation of a powerful force within the rehabilitation community to increase vocational opportunities for veterans of the military service in the United States, regardless of the level of disability, by including DVR as a partner in a comprehensive system of case management. DVR has assigned a VRC to attend monthly meetings with VR&E to strengthen collaboration and coordination of services for this population. (Pages 146-148) Title IV
Vets
The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) is administered by DOLWD and serves unemployed, low-income persons who are at least 55 years of age and have a family income of no more than 125 percent of the federal poverty level. Enrollment priority is given to veterans and qualified spouses, then to individuals who are over 65, have a disability, low literacy skills or limited English proficiency, and who reside in a rural area, are homeless or at risk of homelessness, have low employment prospects, or have failed to find employment after using services through the Alaska Job Centers (AJCs). (Page 29) Title I Some AJCs have Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans’ Employment Representative (LVER) staff funded by the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG). These staff members provide vital services to both veterans and employers seeking employment-related assistance. DETS complies with all federal guidance for JVSG staff and seeks to fully utilize the expertise of DVOPs and LVERs. DETS developed a referral process to direct veterans to the appropriate staff member to ensure a client-centered approach to the delivery of career and training services. When job seekers indicate veteran status upon initial entry to an AJC, staff members are trained to engage them to determine if they are eligible for DVOP services. Veterans are asked a series of questions and handed a checklist of the eligibility criteria to see a DVOP, which is reviewed with the veteran. If veterans indicate they meet one of the eligibility criteria, staff attempt to immediately connect them with a DVOP. If a DVOP is unavailable, eligible veterans will receive the DVOP’s contact information and staff will ensure the appropriate DVOP receives the veteran’s information so they can connect with one another. AJCs follow a team approach to serving customers, including providing services to veterans. Teams work together to support the roles of LVERs and DVOPs in providing services to veterans. All staff are trained to deliver as many services to veterans as possible to ease the burden on DVOPs. DETS encourages staff to engage veterans and insists that all AJC staff are veterans’ representatives, not just JVSG-funded staff. The state follows all Special Grant Provisions, Veterans’ Program Letters, USDOL/VETS Law 107- 288, and United States Code Title 38. (Page 88) Title I A large percentage of claimants selected for RESEA will be military veterans, a group who are always a top priority in Alaska. Some of the veterans will be recently separated from the military and others will be veterans who meet the criteria associated with the most likely to exhaust UI benefits. The latter are veterans who are homeless, disabled, or have other significant barriers to reemployment. In the three RESEA AJCs with on-site Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) staff, a personal introduction and referral to the DVOP will be the norm. In other AJCs, RESEA staff will telephonically introduce the RESEA participant to the DVOPs who serve veterans itinerantly for that region. (Pages 125-126) Title I DVR continues to have an Interagency Agreement in place with the Department of Veterans Affairs Vocational Rehabilitation & Education (VR&E) to cooperate, coordinate, and collaborate for the creation of a powerful force within the rehabilitation community to increase vocational opportunities for veterans of the military service in the United States, regardless of the level of disability, by including DVR as a partner in a comprehensive system of case management. DVR has assigned a VRC to attend monthly meetings with VR&E to strengthen collaboration and coordination of services for this population. (Pages 147-148) Title I Additionally, DVR has developed in-house staff responsible for expanding DVRs presence in local communities for both employment opportunities and to increase referral sources as well. DVR attends all local job fairs whenever possible, the largest being the Veterans job fair every November. DVR staff frequently presents at partnership meetings across the state. (Page 180) Title I
Mental Health

~~DVR continues to work with individuals assigned to the Anchorage Mental Health Court. Mental Health Courts are designed to divert people with mental disabilities, charged with misdemeanor offenses, from incarceration and into community treatment and services including mental health counseling and vocational rehabilitation as appropriate. The hope is to prevent further contacts with the criminal justice system. (Pages 146-147) Title I

The current MOU between DVR and the Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) is in the process of being updated to clarify roles and responsibilities relative to common consumers and assure services are provided in accordance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and WIOA. A preliminary draft of a MOU document is almost complete. DVR provided DHB with the draft MOU on January 31, 2018. Both agencies have identified the Individual Placement and Support model to pilot in at least two regions. DBH is requesting proposals from providers who will provide IPS in Kenai and Anchorage. This model is designed for individuals with significant mental health disabilities to better prepare them for long-term employment. Additionally, DHS is now moving towards providing long-term supports for this population, making pursing supported employment a better option for this population. Each agency has assigned staff to resolve any issues or questions and it is anticipated that the MOU will be executed no later than late 2018. (Page 157) Title IV

• Work with the Center for Human Development, the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority, the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, and other partners to increase provider capacity for employment services and supports. (Page 179) Title IV

Strategies contributing to success:

• Continued efforts coordinated with the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education.

• Continued to work with the Center for Human Development and the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority to increase provider capacity for employment services and supports.

• Continued to increase use of the Provisional Hire process. (Pages 190-191) Title IV

Goals and Priorities for the FFY2017—FFY2020 supported employment (SE) program:

1. DVR will provide SE services to 200 eligible individuals.

2. DVR will set aside 50 percent of the SE award to provide services to youth with the most significant disabilities.

3. DVR will assist 50 SE eligible individuals to obtain competitive employment.

4. DVR will be able to provide all the identified required VR services to all SE eligible individuals.

5. Explore opportunities for CRPs and other entities to become employment networks to provide long—term supports.

6. Work with the community mental health system to increase and establish work—related programs within that system.

7. Emphasize community—based, integrated employment settings with the Governor’s Council on Disability and Special Education, the Alaska Mental Health Board, community behavioral health programs, and the Alaska Mental Health Trust to increase vocational programs within the mental health service delivery system. (Pages 192-193) Title IV

4. DVR has continued to work with the community mental health system to increase and/or to reinstate work related programs within that system of providers. (Page 193) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
The Wagner-Peyser program provides services for job seekers and employers. Services for job seekers, including MSFWs, include an extensive online job bank for researching job openings; referrals to job openings, training or other employment services; job search consulting and workshops; aptitude, interest and proficiency tests; career guidance; area business job fairs; special services to veterans, migrant seasonal farm workers and individuals with disabilities; and re-employment services to claimants identified through the state’s Unemployment Insurance system as high-risk for exhausting benefits prior to re-employment, including recently separated veterans. (Page 131) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 76

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“United Way of Anchorage (UWA) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” population that is disproportionately without access to coverage or care and may lack knowledge about affordable options. Including, but not limited to—re-entry population, the unemployed, hourly wage workers, seasonal workers (ie: commercial fishers), variable income workers and low-income families with children, immigrants, young adults, and university students. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.. They will partner with  Alaska Primary Care Association, Community health centers, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Mat-Su Health Services, Aging and Disability Resource Center, Alaska Division of Public Assistance, Anchorage Project Access,  and Alaska 2-1-1.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:Sue BroganPhone: ( 907) 263-3821Email: SBrogan@ak.org

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

1115 Behavioral Health Medicaid Waiver - 06/27/2019

~~“Medicaid Section 1115 Demonstration Waivers provide states with flexibility to test new approaches within Medicaid to aid in redesigning and improving their health systems without increasing costs.Alaska’s 1115 Waiver

In January 2018, Alaska applied to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for approval of an 1115 behavioral health waiver that would create a data-driven, integrated behavioral health system of care for Alaskans experiencing serious mental illness, severe emotional disturbance, substance use disorder (SUD), co-occurring substance use and mental illness, and at-risk families and children.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Student Summer Work Programs - 05/27/2019

~~“We have paid summer work programs in a variety of communities. Most are 4-6 weeks long and provide students with valuable work experience. Program content varies depending on the community. See list of programs below for details.Who Can ApplyA student with a disability is: an individual age 14-21 and enrolled in secondary education (high school) who:• Is on an IEP or 504 plan, or• Is a student who is potentially eligible for DVR services because of a physical, sensory, intellectual, mental health, and communication disabilities and whose disability could be a barrier to postsecondary education or employment.”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Work Incentive Planning & Assistance (WIPA) - 05/06/2019

~~“The Alaska WIPA Project provides assistance to beneficiaries who are working at wage employment, self-employment, or who have a job offer pending. Assistance is offered to help understand the various work incentive programs that might be available, and provide advice about how to manage one’s benefits during the transition to paid employment. We provide both initial and follow along assistance to beneficiaries. Benefits Counseling and a written Benefits Summary Analysis (BSA) is provided free of charge.

If you are currently working, about to begin work, or are self-employed, please contact the Alaska WIPA Project.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development Veterans Employment Services - 04/15/2019

~~“The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development has 21 Job Centers across the state. The Anchorage (Midtown and Muldoon), Fairbanks, and Wasilla Job Centers have on-site Veteran Representatives; however, all Job Centers provide priority services to qualified Veterans and their eligible Spouse.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Alaska Job Centers - 04/01/2019

~~This page iscontains a list of the Job Centers in Alaska with addresses, telephone numbers and links.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Veteran Services - 02/06/2019

~~Alaska Department of Labor offers a priority of service and benefits to veterans, and eligible spouses or caregivers, seeking employment, apprenticeship opportunities, and on-the-job training programs that pay veterans while they prepare for a sustainable career. Eligibility for these services:

Veterans who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released under conditions other than dishonorable,; special disabled veterans who have significant barriers to employment, as well as eligible spouses and caregivers, are eligible for specialized intensive services to obtain or retain employment.Veteran Services

Examples of priority of service for veterans are described by linking to the website.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Senate Bill 174 - 08/25/2018

~~"Alaska Senate Bill 174 reinforced person-centered support services planning and reaffirmed that the policy of the state encourages and enables persons with physical and mental disabilities to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Alaska Transition Plan for HCBS - 08/22/2018

~~“The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Senior and Disabilities Services (SDS) now submits for public review and comment the fourth version of its Transition Plan (“Plan”) in accordance with CFR 42 §441.301(c)(6). This describes what SDS and providers have been working on to ensure that Alaska’s HCBS settings achieve compliance with the elements of the final rule.  The State has described how compliance has been assessed; what the outcomes are; what educational strategies have been used; how providers have achieved compliance through remediation strategies; and what collaborative strategies will be used to ensure ongoing compliance after the deadline of March 22, 2019”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Webinar-On-Demand and Quiz - 07/12/2018

~~A training about the home and community based settings rules, what Program Administrators need to know and do, and how to request and complete the required self - assessment survey. This training is for Administrators or those applying to be administrators for the following services: Supported Employment, Residential Habilitation: Group home, Residential Habilitation: Family Home Habilitation, Residential Habilitation: Supported Living, Congregate Meals, Adult Day Services, Day Habilitation, and Residential Supported Living.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Senate Bill 174 - 08/25/2018

~~"Alaska Senate Bill 174 reinforced person-centered support services planning and reaffirmed that the policy of the state encourages and enables persons with physical and mental disabilities to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Minimum wage exemption for persons with disabilities eliminated - 02/16/2018

~~“JUNEAU, Alaska— Following a regulatory change that goes into effect today, Alaska employers are no longer allowed to pay less than minimum wage to workers who experience disabilities. In repealing 8 AAC 15.120, Alaska joins New Hampshire and Maryland as the first states in the nation to eliminate payment of subminimum wages for persons with disabilities. An exemption from paying minimum wage to persons with disabilities has existed for many years, beginning at the federal level with the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and in Alaska regulations since 1978. Historically, minimum wage exemptions were considered necessary to help people with disabilities gain employment. Experience over the past two decades has shown that workers with disabilities can succeed in jobs earning minimum wage or more. “Workers who experience disabilities are valued members of Alaska’s workforce,” said Department of Labor and Workforce Development Acting Commissioner Greg Cashen. “They deserve minimum wage protections as much as any other Alaskan worker.” The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development received written comments expressing support for repealing the regulation that allowed the minimum wage exemption from the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Alaska Workforce Investment Board. The elimination of the minimum wage exemption brings employment practices into alignment with Alaska Employment First Act of 2014, which requires vocational services help people with disabilities to become gainfully employed at or above the minimum wage.” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Alaska House Bill 188 “ABLE Accounts Bill” - 08/08/2016

Summary An Act establishing a program for financial accounts for individuals with disabilities; exempting the procurement of contracts for the program from the State Procurement Code; exempting certain information on participants in the program from being subject to inspection as a public record; providing that an account under the program for an individual with a disability is not a security; allowing a state to file a claim against an individual's financial account under the program to recover Medicaid payments after the individual's death; and providing for an effective date. The bill was enrolled on July 8, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Alaska ABLE Savings Program Act - 04/11/2015

An Act relating to financial accounts for persons with disabilities; relating to financial institutions; relating to property exemptions; relating to securities; and providing for an effective date.

Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Alaska HB 211 - Making Alaska an “Employment First State" - 09/19/2014

An Act relating to the education and employment of individuals with disabilities."  Signed into law on 9/19/14 by Governor Sean Parnell. Sec. 23.15.095. Gainful employment of individuals with disabilities. (a) When providing vocational training, vocational rehabilitation, or employment placement of an individual with a disability, the agency's primary objective and preferred outcome is to help the individual become gainfully employed in an integrated workplace where individuals with disabilities work with and alongside of individuals without disabilities.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Alaska House Bill 139 - 03/05/2014

“Sec. 2. AS 18.80.200 is amended to read:

(b) Therefore, it is the policy of the state and the purpose of this chapter to eliminate and prevent discrimination in employment, in credit and financing practices, in places of public accommodation, in the sale, lease, or rental of real property because of race, religion, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, physical or mental disability, marital status, changes in marital status, pregnancy or parenthood. It is also the policy of the state to encourage and enable physically and mentally disabled persons to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state and to engage in remunerative employment. It is not the purpose of this chapter to supersede laws pertaining to child labor, the age of majority, or other age restrictions or requirements.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 30

Student Summer Work Programs - 05/27/2019

~~“We have paid summer work programs in a variety of communities. Most are 4-6 weeks long and provide students with valuable work experience. Program content varies depending on the community. See list of programs below for details.Who Can ApplyA student with a disability is: an individual age 14-21 and enrolled in secondary education (high school) who:• Is on an IEP or 504 plan, or• Is a student who is potentially eligible for DVR services because of a physical, sensory, intellectual, mental health, and communication disabilities and whose disability could be a barrier to postsecondary education or employment.”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development Veterans Employment Services - 04/15/2019

~~“The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development has 21 Job Centers across the state. The Anchorage (Midtown and Muldoon), Fairbanks, and Wasilla Job Centers have on-site Veteran Representatives; however, all Job Centers provide priority services to qualified Veterans and their eligible Spouse.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Alaska Job Centers - 04/01/2019

~~This page iscontains a list of the Job Centers in Alaska with addresses, telephone numbers and links.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Veteran Services - 02/06/2019

~~Alaska Department of Labor offers a priority of service and benefits to veterans, and eligible spouses or caregivers, seeking employment, apprenticeship opportunities, and on-the-job training programs that pay veterans while they prepare for a sustainable career. Eligibility for these services:

Veterans who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released under conditions other than dishonorable,; special disabled veterans who have significant barriers to employment, as well as eligible spouses and caregivers, are eligible for specialized intensive services to obtain or retain employment.Veteran Services

Examples of priority of service for veterans are described by linking to the website.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Webinar-On-Demand and Quiz - 07/12/2018

~~A training about the home and community based settings rules, what Program Administrators need to know and do, and how to request and complete the required self - assessment survey. This training is for Administrators or those applying to be administrators for the following services: Supported Employment, Residential Habilitation: Group home, Residential Habilitation: Family Home Habilitation, Residential Habilitation: Supported Living, Congregate Meals, Adult Day Services, Day Habilitation, and Residential Supported Living.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Alaska Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Combined Plan 2018 Update - 04/02/2018

~~Alaska’s “Employment First” legislation calls for “competitive integrated employment” as the preferred outcome for those with disabilities. DOLWD has executed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) withHealth and Social Services; and is obtaining MOU signature with Education and Early Development to ensure progress towards that goal. The MOU includes commitments for active participation on the Interagency Council on Employment First, under the   auspices of the Employment First State Coordinator. 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

Minimum wage exemption for persons with disabilities eliminated - 02/16/2018

~~“JUNEAU, Alaska— Following a regulatory change that goes into effect today, Alaska employers are no longer allowed to pay less than minimum wage to workers who experience disabilities. In repealing 8 AAC 15.120, Alaska joins New Hampshire and Maryland as the first states in the nation to eliminate payment of subminimum wages for persons with disabilities. An exemption from paying minimum wage to persons with disabilities has existed for many years, beginning at the federal level with the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and in Alaska regulations since 1978. Historically, minimum wage exemptions were considered necessary to help people with disabilities gain employment. Experience over the past two decades has shown that workers with disabilities can succeed in jobs earning minimum wage or more. “Workers who experience disabilities are valued members of Alaska’s workforce,” said Department of Labor and Workforce Development Acting Commissioner Greg Cashen. “They deserve minimum wage protections as much as any other Alaskan worker.” The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development received written comments expressing support for repealing the regulation that allowed the minimum wage exemption from the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Alaska Workforce Investment Board. The elimination of the minimum wage exemption brings employment practices into alignment with Alaska Employment First Act of 2014, which requires vocational services help people with disabilities to become gainfully employed at or above the minimum wage.” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Minimum wage exemption for persons with disabilities eliminated - 02/16/2018

JUNEAU, Alaska— Following a regulatory change that goes into effect today, Alaska employers are no longer allowed to pay less than minimum wage to workers who experience disabilities. In repealing 8 AAC 15.120, Alaska joins New Hampshire and Maryland as the first states in the nation to eliminate payment of subminimum wages for persons with disabilities. An exemption from paying minimum wage to persons with disabilities has existed for many years, beginning at the federal level with the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and in Alaska regulations since 1978. Historically, minimum wage exemptions were considered necessary to help people with disabilities gain employment. Experience over the past two decades has shown that workers with disabilities can succeed in jobs earning minimum wage or more.  “Workers who experience disabilities are valued members of Alaska’s workforce,” said Department of Labor and Workforce Development Acting Commissioner Greg Cashen. “They deserve minimum wage protections as much as any other Alaskan worker.” The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development received written comments expressing support for repealing the regulation that allowed the minimum wage exemption from the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Alaska Workforce Investment Board.  The elimination of the minimum wage exemption brings employment practices into alignment with Alaska Employment First Act of 2014, which requires vocational services help people with disabilities to become gainfully employed at or above the minimum wage.  

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit - 11/16/2017

~~“The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit is responsible for monitoring service providers and supports systems serving individuals who experience an intellectual or developmental disability. The IDD Unit oversees the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities waiver (IDD waiver) and, in spring 2018, the new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW).

The new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW) was developed to replace the Community Developmental Disabilities Grant (CDDG) program, which will end June 30, 2018. The ISW will also extend supports to individuals who had not been covered by the grant program.”

The purpose of both waivers is to offer qualified participants a choice between home and community-based services or supports in an institutional setting.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Services Conditions of Participation - 11/05/2017

~~“Supported employment services may be provided to assist recipients to acquire and maintain the work-related skills necessary to become self-employed or for employment in an integrated work setting in the general workforce, at or above minimum wage with the level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals who are not recipients.  These services focus on activities that will meet the recipients’ personal and career goals, lead to an appropriate job match for the recipient and the employer, and may include vocational or job-related discovery or assessment, person-centered employment planning, job placement, job development, negotiation with prospective employers, job analysis, job carving, training and systematic instruction, and career advancement activities. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Information on the Formal Interagency Agreement with the State Educational Agency - 06/30/2018

~~DEED’s Special Education Unit and DVR have an interagency agreement that is designed to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services. The agreement includes: • DVR’s assurance of the development and implementation of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services before the student leaves school; • Designation of a regional DVR contact who is responsible for clarifying questions and concerns relating to the implementation of the agreements with local school districts; and • DVR’s assurance that the core tenets, principles, and career goals stated in each student’s Individual Education Program (IEP) will be incorporated into the development of their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). EED’s Special Education Unit also provides funding for members of the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee to travel to events related to transition students such as the annual Statewide Special Education Conference.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Project Search - 11/30/2017

~~“This unique program provides real-life work experience to help youth, with significant disabilities, make successful transitions from school to adult life. Meant to serve as a student’s last year in high schoolAnchorage Fairbanks Central Peninsula    Mat-Su

Project SEARCH is an international trademarked and copyrighted program model, which focuses solely on employment for Project SEARCH interns. Successful outcomes for this project include:    Employment in an integrated setting (working alongside people without disabilities)        Year-round work        20 hours/week or more        Minimum wage or higher”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Alaska Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education “State 5-Year Plan FFY 2017-2021 Public Comment Draft”

“GOAL # 2: Employment Alaskans with disabilities and their families will receive the necessary employment services and supports needed to become competitively employed in an integrated setting. Objective 2.1: Provide support for the implementation of Alaska state laws increasing the employment of individuals with disabilities which lead to 3 new or improved policies, procedures, or regulations per year. Activities: Monitor legislation relating to employment for individuals with disabilities and provide support for advocacy and research, as needed. Provide support for the implementation of the Alaska Employment First Act with at least one improved policy, procedure, or regulation per year. Provide support for the implementation of the Alaska Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act as it relates to empowering employment for individuals with disabilities with at least one improved policy, procedure, or regulation per year

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

AK Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education

Alaska' unique geographical area with a relatively small population requires a management system tailored to meet the needs of Alaskans. The Governor's Council on Disabilities & Special Education was created to meet Alaska's diverse needs. The Council uses planning, capacity building, systems change, and advocacy to create change for people with disabilities. Consistent with our State Plan we work towards systems change in areas including:

housing employment early intervention special education lifelong learning independent living inclusion in the community.

 

The council serves as the interdepartmental planning/coordinating agency of the Department of Health and Social Services, the Department of Education and Early Development, and other departments which deliver services to people with disabilities or provide special education.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Announcing Community First Choice Program (CFC) - 07/01/2018

~~Community First Choice Personal Care Service (CFC-PCS) – the number of hours of personal care service per week are determined by an assessment conducted by the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services.Supervision and reminders – Additional CFC-PCS time may be available to recipients shown to have cognitive impairment or behavior issues.Personal Emergency Response system (PERS) – Recipients may be eligible to receive a personal emergency response system or medical alert system that calls for help at the push of a button in the event of an emergency.Skills training – Recipients may be eligible to receive skills training from a personal care assistant (PCA), so that the recipient can learn to do activities more independently.Worker supervision - Recipients can receive training to help manage their PCAs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

AK Integrated Employment Initiative (AIEI) 2015 Reported Outcomes - 02/01/2015

The Partnerships in Employment (PIE) Systems Change Grant is intended to increase integrated, competitive employment (ICE) opportunities for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). As one of the eight states participating in PIE, Alaska’s Integrated Employment Initiative (AIEI) presented outcomes including the unanimous passage of Employment First Legislation, data systems enhancement to improve system efficacy, policy and regulation leveraging, close collaboration and partnership with other agencies, and the promotion of the State as a Model Employer (SAME) Task Force.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Alaska Disability Employment Initiative - 10/23/2013

AKDEI will hire five regional Disability Resource Coordinator/EN Counselors and build on the successes of AKDEI 1 and 4 projects to improve employment opportunities and outcomes for youth by expanding access to employment and career pathways that will prepare youth for in-demand careers.  This will be accomplished through a multi-faceted approach.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Alaska AIDD Integrated Employment Initiative - 09/30/2012

"The Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative prioritizes employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities across Alaska. Partnerships with the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Education and Early Development, Disability Law Center of Alaska, and the Center for Human Development will address barriers and develop replicable, sustainable strategies using a three-pronged approach: (1) policy development; (2) capacity building; and (3) resource leveraging."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Alaska Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

BrainWorks for Self-Employment, University of AK - Anchorage Center for Human Development

BrainWorks is an innovative new project to assist individuals with brain injury in starting a business. This is part of a two-year research project funded by the Kessler Foundation. The BrainWorks program was developed by individuals with brain injury who are self-employed, self-employment facilitators who are knowledgeable about self employment and have experience working with people with disabilities, and research staff at the Center for Human Development.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative (AIDD PIE)

A consortium of partners consisting of the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education (lead entity), the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services (State I/DD agency), the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Education and Early Development, Disability Law Center of Alaska, and the Center for Human Development will develop sustainable strategies to increase the employment of youth and young adults with I/DD. The project intends to increase the percent of youth and young adults served by DVR from 20% to 25%; 2) increase hours worked by DVR participants with I/DD from 13 to 20 hours per week (comparable to other youth with disabilities); and 3) double the number of youth and young adults with I/DD served by SDS who are employed or self-employed from 139-278.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“United Way of Anchorage (UWA) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” population that is disproportionately without access to coverage or care and may lack knowledge about affordable options. Including, but not limited to—re-entry population, the unemployed, hourly wage workers, seasonal workers (ie: commercial fishers), variable income workers and low-income families with children, immigrants, young adults, and university students. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.. They will partner with  Alaska Primary Care Association, Community health centers, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Mat-Su Health Services, Aging and Disability Resource Center, Alaska Division of Public Assistance, Anchorage Project Access,  and Alaska 2-1-1.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:Sue BroganPhone: ( 907) 263-3821Email: SBrogan@ak.org

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Work Incentive Planning & Assistance (WIPA) - 05/06/2019

~~“The Alaska WIPA Project provides assistance to beneficiaries who are working at wage employment, self-employment, or who have a job offer pending. Assistance is offered to help understand the various work incentive programs that might be available, and provide advice about how to manage one’s benefits during the transition to paid employment. We provide both initial and follow along assistance to beneficiaries. Benefits Counseling and a written Benefits Summary Analysis (BSA) is provided free of charge.

If you are currently working, about to begin work, or are self-employed, please contact the Alaska WIPA Project.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

SDS Training - Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Self - Assessment Survey - 07/01/2017

~~“Join SDS staff for a training about the Settings rules, the self - assessment survey, and what Program Administrators need to know and do. This training is for Administrators or those applying to administrate: Supported Employment, Residential Habilitation: Group home, Residential Habilitation: Family Home Habilitation, Residential Habilitation: Supported Living, Congregate Meals, Adult Day Services, Day Habilitation, and Residential Supported Living. SDS has been working with CMS and providers on a Transition Plan to bring Alaska into settings compliance since 2014. CMS requires all states to comply with new settings rules per 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4)-(5) . The purpose of these changes is to make sure that states use Home and Community Based funding for programs that truly work to integrate Alaskans with disabilities and/or who are frail elders into the community at every opportunity.

Training is offered as a video:HCBS Program Administrator Training: HCBS Settings Self – Assessment Survey.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Care Coordination Training Guide - 06/02/2017

~~“We’re glad you’ve chosen to study Senior and Disabilities Service Care Coordination. This guide is designed to provide you with basic information and procedures. It is not intended to solely qualify you as a Care Coordinator. The qualifications needed to become a Care Coordinator are set forth in the guide. Even with the basic qualifications, for a new Care Coordinator, best practice is to spend a lot of time with a mentor. You may consider contacting a local Care Coordinator to see about mentorship possibilities. You may also choose to join your local Care Coordination Network association.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

AK Customized Employment - PowerPoint - 01/01/2008

This is a PowerPoint presentation addressing Customized Employment in Alaska with an emphasis on maintaining a client-centered team.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

AK Customized Employment Service Provider Manual - 05/01/2007

Our mission is to support the rights of those living with life complexities and disabilities to participate in all aspects of vocational services, while striving to eliminate barriers to employment. Together we form partnerships with individuals, families, employers, service providers, and the community at large to support the creation of expanded work options and meaningful employment, promote economic opportunities and independence, encourage self‐determination, and support the inclusion of people with complex lives into the community.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Industry-Driven Support Model

The Industry-Driven Support Model is being developed and tested as a resource for low income entrepreneurs with disabilities. The model is focused on bringing entrepreneurs from all parts of Alaska with various disabilities together through one common theme, owning a small business within a similar industry. The training sessions focus on a specific topic (e.g., Finances or Marketing) for a specific industry (e.g., arts and crafts or service businesses). The networking sessions focus on discussions around the training topics and how to network within and outside of one’s own community

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Alaska Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Policy Manual

The purpose of this manual is to provide clear guidance to ADVR staff for the consistent and legal implementation of the vocational rehabilitation program in Alaska.  ADVR staff is expected to provide services pursuant to the policies and procedures outlined in this manual. 

The manual provides comprehensive information pertaining to the subject, including not only the division’s policy, but also basic procedures, legal citations, resources and answers to frequently asked questions about the subject.  The procedures are not prescriptive, as VR services are determined by an individual’s needs, although they are reflective of ADVR’s business practices.   

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Alaska DVR -– “Service Definitions, Requirements and Hourly Rat Range” for Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP)

Alaska DVR has authorized the CRPs listed to provide the identified services. These services should only be purchased from authorized CRPs. Some of the authorized services include situational assessments, benefits analysis/ counseling, job search assistance, job readiness training, on-the-job evaluations, job supports, and business development services, among others.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Proposed Model of Employment Services for Individuals with Behavioral Health Disabilities

This is the proposed model of employment services of individuals with behavioral disabilities for providers as well as select government agencies within the state of Alaska. It focuses on training, technical assistance and required resources.

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

1115 Behavioral Health Medicaid Waiver - 06/27/2019

~~“Medicaid Section 1115 Demonstration Waivers provide states with flexibility to test new approaches within Medicaid to aid in redesigning and improving their health systems without increasing costs.Alaska’s 1115 Waiver

In January 2018, Alaska applied to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for approval of an 1115 behavioral health waiver that would create a data-driven, integrated behavioral health system of care for Alaskans experiencing serious mental illness, severe emotional disturbance, substance use disorder (SUD), co-occurring substance use and mental illness, and at-risk families and children.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Alaska Transition Plan for HCBS - 08/22/2018

~~“The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Senior and Disabilities Services (SDS) now submits for public review and comment the fourth version of its Transition Plan (“Plan”) in accordance with CFR 42 §441.301(c)(6). This describes what SDS and providers have been working on to ensure that Alaska’s HCBS settings achieve compliance with the elements of the final rule.  The State has described how compliance has been assessed; what the outcomes are; what educational strategies have been used; how providers have achieved compliance through remediation strategies; and what collaborative strategies will be used to ensure ongoing compliance after the deadline of March 22, 2019”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Announcing Community First Choice Program (CFC) - 07/01/2018

~~This is a “new program that is part of the Medicaid reform initiative also known as 1915(k).Provides Personal Care Services and other supports in the recipient’s home as an alternative to institutional care.All recipients who currently meet an institutional level of care and receive both Home and Community Based Waiver Services and Personal Care Services have predetermined eligibility; these recipients have received a letter of notification* (see link to letter below).

What Services are Available from the CFC Program?....Skills training – Recipients may be eligible to receive skills training from a personal care assistant (PCA), so that the recipient can learn to do activities more independently.Worker supervision - Recipients can receive training to help manage their PCAs.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Transition Plan and Provider Requirements: Settings Final Rule Compliance Status - 06/11/2018

~~The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) issued a new regulation (42 CFR §441.301(c)(6)) that requires that all Medicaid-funded services be provided in settings that exhibit home and community-based characteristics and do not isolate recipients. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, have full access to benefits of community living, and opportunities to receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive home and community based services….The State of Alaska has been working with CMS and providers on a transition plan to bring Alaska into settings compliance since 2014 when the “final rule” was published.

This chart shows the percentages of providers in each compliance category as of May 4, 2018.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit - 11/16/2017

~~“The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit is responsible for monitoring service providers and supports systems serving individuals who experience an intellectual or developmental disability. The IDD Unit oversees the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities waiver (IDD waiver) and, in spring 2018, the new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW).

The new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW) was developed to replace the Community Developmental Disabilities Grant (CDDG) program, which will end June 30, 2018. The ISW will also extend supports to individuals who had not been covered by the grant program.”

The purpose of both waivers is to offer qualified participants a choice between home and community-based services or supports in an institutional setting.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Approved SDS Forms (Senior and Disability Services) - 09/01/2017

~~“Please Note: SDS is continuously making improvements to its many program forms so please check back frequently to ensure the most current version is utilized. You can refer to the “Revision Date” printed on the bottom left margin of each form to determine appropriate precedence.  Specific programmatic questions about a particular form should be addressed to the associated SDS program staff.” 

This page has IDD and CCMC Waiver Program Forms” three of which were updated as of September 1, 2017.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Transition Period for Compliance with Home and Community-Based Settings Criteria - 07/03/2017

~~“A CMS Informational Bulletin was released on May 9, 2017, indicating that the transition period for complying with home and community-based settings criteria is extended until March 17, 2022. In the Bulletin, CMS indicated that states may still choose to meet the original March 17, 2019 deadline. The State of Alaska values the person-centered transformation that will result from providers meeting the settings criteria, and acknowledges the progress made to bring Alaska’s providers into compliance. Accordingly, Alaska will retain the original March 17, 2019 deadline for settings to become compliant with the CMS home and community-based settings criteria.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About the Community Developmental Disabilities grants - 12/15/2016

~~A FAQ that provides information on applying for Medicaid services and waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State of Alaska’s 1915( c) Waiver Renewal Applications - 07/01/2016

This is a power point presentation on the state of Alaska’s most recent application for renewing four 1915(c) Waivers for a five year period. These waivers include ones for “Adults with Physical and Developmental Disabilities” and “Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities”. The number of people to be placed on the IDD waiver is limited to 50 per year. Persons placed on the APDD waiver could have a reassessment using a Truncated Consumer Assessment Tool. These waivers would be for the period of FY 2017 – 2021 which started on July 1, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Alaska HCBS Transition Plan (9/2015) - 09/14/2015

The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Senior and Disabilities Services (SDS) submits this transition plan in accordance with CFR 42 §441.301(c)(6).  The state process leading to development of the plan included analysis of all settings where home and community-based services are provided under the Alaska’s 1915(c) home and community-based waiver programs. This plan describes the three components of SDS settings evaluation activities:   Part 1) the efforts made by SDS to inform and educate providers and other stakeholders about the changes to federal regulations, and to  gain insight into how the changes will impact service delivery;   Part 2) the process used to determine the extent to which existing state regulations and practices encompass the requirements for home and community-based settings, and the actions taken to assess the home and community-based characteristics of the locations where services are delivered currently; and     Part 3) the state plan to achieve compliance with federal regulations.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

With the official slogan being, "Beyond your Dreams, within your Reach," the state of Alaska understands the importance of promoting employment opportunities for everyone, including individuals with disabilities.  

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Alaska's VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
-0.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
739,795
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.19%
Change from
2016 to 2017
53,087
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.15%
Change from
2016 to 2017
23,815
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.69%
Change from
2016 to 2017
44.86%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.54%
Change from
2016 to 2017
75.71%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 738,432 741,894 739,795
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 47,039 50,330 53,087
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 19,951 24,090 23,815
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 314,346 309,682 300,380
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 42.41% 47.86% 44.86%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.07% 76.12% 75.71%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.30% 6.60% 7.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 13.40% 14.50% 15.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.10% 9.40% 10.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 43,821 46,496 49,987
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 38,923 40,656 40,411
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 53,318 55,707 57,928
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 3,158 2,583 4,021
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 4,876 6,411 4,754
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 14,213 16,151 13,858
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 3,878 5,243 4,439
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 792 753 N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 6,183 5,022 7,170
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 792 1,693 1,969

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 722 724 738
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.60% 6.60% 6.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 12,620 12,562 12,317

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,591 2,521 2,295
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 4,456 4,691 4,199
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 8,302 8,524 7,153
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 31.20% 29.60% 32.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.20% 4.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.30% 1.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 0.50% 1.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 133 100 256
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 129 108 123
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A 43 66
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,715 4,449 4,434
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 9 22 22
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 8 14 14
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 89.00% 64.00% 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.09 1.90 1.90

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
974
1,021
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 39 34 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 70 63 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 265 287 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 234 219 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 242 319 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 124 99 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.90% 31.60% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 505 491 423
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 21,233 21,242 21,190
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 45 42 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 47 49 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $6,454,000 $7,599,000 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $40,419,000 $44,552,000 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 23.00% 23.00% N/A
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,856 1,991 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 60.30 64.20 N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 77.47% 63.39% 63.71%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 6.05% 8.84% 9.05%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.74% 2.73% 2.85%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.81% 97.65% 96.95%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 12.59% 13.48% 15.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 43.94% 49.41% 55.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 56.29% 63.83% 66.05%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 31.35% 36.93% 40.53%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. N/A
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 193,961
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 193,961
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 297
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 297
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,663,597

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2 2 2
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2 2 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 22 53 53
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 22 53 53

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Alaska’s “Employment First” legislation calls for “competitive integrated employment” as the preferred outcome for those with disabilities. DOLWD has executed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Health and Social Services; and is obtaining MOU signature with Education and Early Development to ensure progress towards that goal. The MOU includes commitments for active participation on the Interagency Council on Employment First, under the auspices of the Employment First State Coordinator.  (Page 45) Title I

DVR has a cooperative agreement and participates with the Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative (AIEI), which consists of a consortium of agencies committed to working together to improve employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and the Employment First Initiative. The cooperative agreement outlines the goals and collaboration needed to successfully achieve increased employment outcomes for youth with I/DD. The results of this collaboration were published in the Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, vol. 47, no. 3, 2017. (Page 147) Title I
 

Customized Employment

~~DVR provides the services necessary to achieve competitive, integrated employment, such as guidance and counseling, assessment, vocational and other training, transportation, diagnosis and treatment, on-the-job training, job-related services, customized employment, and supported employment.  (Page 28) Title I

In addition, DVR has an on—going commitment to quality SE services, as evidenced by the recent formation and active participation in several cross—agency SE related initiatives such as the Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative and piloting the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model with DBH. DVR has sustained the principles of the system change customized employment grant that focused on wrap—around services for the most severely disabled. DVR continues to be involved in an advisory capacity with different organizations that focus on groups that may often require SE services, such as those individuals with traumatic brain injury, those diagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and individuals with severe mental illness. (Page 154) Title I
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The Alaska Youth Works project has established a multifaceted approach, building on existing systems and services, by creating a bridge framework to provide for coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to career pathway programs and lead to self-sustaining employment. By utilizing resources and leveraging funds, the grant has guided partner agencies in system changes that will sustain their new models after the ending of the grant cycle. (Page 27) Title I

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) “Alaska Youth Works” grant will continue to build a cohesive system with DVR and other partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth with disabilities, ages 14 to 24, by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers. The Alaska Youth Works project will complement DVR services through coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to Pre-Employment Transition Services, career pathway programs and ultimately lead to self-sustaining employment. (Page 168) Title I

Priority 1.3: Continue to improve VR services to rural Alaskans.
Strategies:
• Ensure DVR's rural work group and local TVR partners will meet to identify realistic goals for rural services, develop strategies for meeting these goals, and convey this information to VR field staff.
• Continue to leverage relationships with TVR, LEAs, CRPs, other state agencies and Job Center partners.
• Ensure all rural hubs have a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) timely assigned and trained to meet the needs of rural participants. (Page 173) Title IV

SCSEP coordinates with 75 host sites and leverages resources to ensure successful outcomes for SCSEP participants that foster individual economic self-sufficiency and promote useful opportunities in community service activities. The State provides a wide range of programs and services to seniors, spanning multiple divisions and other private and public entities. Funds from OAA are leveraged with WIOA, other federal programs, and resources from Alaska’s State Employment and Training Program.

SCSEP works closely with DVR to ensure those with special needs or disabilities are enrolled in community service training to work. Once a participant is deemed work ready, DVR’s has an approved provisional hire process and SCSEP works directly with recruitment staff to obtain necessary approval to hire in 9 steps. The provisional hire may be used for any State permanent or non-permanent positions. (Page 206-207) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~DOLWD received a Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) - Round VI grant entitled “Alaska Youth Works” to serve youth with disabilities in 2015. This project will continue to build a cohesive system with multiple partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth with disabilities, aged 14 to 24, by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers. The Alaska Youth Works project has established a multifaceted approach, building on existing systems and services, by creating a bridge framework to provide for coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to career pathway programs and lead to self-sustaining employment. By utilizing resources and leveraging funds, the grant has guided partner agencies in system changes that will sustain their new models after the ending of the grant cycle. (Page 27) Title I

DOLWD supports integration of services through a single delivery system for both businesses and individuals. This efficient use of resources includes integrating all WIOA core programs with Unemployment Insurance (UI), veterans’ programs, the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP), the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program, apprenticeship and sector partnership development, and the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). (Page 53) Title I

The referral process among the core programs is implemented on an individualized basis depending on the specific needs of the individual. All DOLWD staff are trained and expected to be knowledgeable in the requirements and eligibility of other core programs to ensure an appropriate program referral. Appropriate referrals are necessary to leverage resources and maximize service delivery to individuals while ensuring non-duplication of services. For example, AJC staff that provide initial intake and career services have been trained through the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) to appropriately identify and refer individuals to disability services such as the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation, and other supporting entities. This training has provided a high level of thoughtfulness to the reason for each referral, increasing the success for the participant when obtaining needed services. Coordinated data collection mechanisms will be implemented to capture cross-agency referrals. (Pages 54-55) Title I

DETS administers many programs that are covered by the laws, regulations, and policies encompassing POS. These include the WIOA Adult, Youth, and Dislocated Worker programs, Wagner-Peyser, Trade Act programs, National Emergency Grants, SCSEP, Helmets to Hardhats, and the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). (Page 87) Title I

o As a result of 3 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants, all AJC staff have and will continue to receive Disability Resource Coordinator I (DRC I) training, which includes awareness of programmatic and physical barriers to accessibility and covers familiarity of the “ADA checklist for Readily Achievable Barrier Removal.” The ADA checklist is completed annually at each facility and any needed corrective action is identified and implemented;
o The DRC I training is an integrated and mandated part of new-hire training for all AJC staff;
o Each regional office has a higher-level staff member trained to the Disability Resource Coordinator II (DRC II) level, who is the disability and accessibility subject matter expert for the region. The DRC II functions as the technical assistance advisor for all staff on disability and accessibility related issues;
o The DRC IIs, the statewide lead for the DEI, and the Training Coordinator identify periodic and on-going training in specialized topics to augment standardized training and ensure continual learning and awareness in improving access to all services within the AJC system for individuals with disabilities; (Pages 89-90) Title I

The state intends to use the governor’s set-aside funding to enhance services to one or more of Alaska’s priority populations, including youth and adults with disabilities. DOLWD will use these funds to leverage other programs and initiatives, for example, DOLWD’s DEI Grant for Youth and American Apprenticeship Initiative for Health Care. DOLWD may continue to support projects such as the Department of Health and Social Services’ development of the “Disability Benefits 101 (DB101)” online tool. Including incorporating DB101 training for AJC staff and other counselors in using the tool with clients, as well as other programs targeted at serving those with disabilities and multiple barriers to employment. (Page 98) Title I

Youth project operators are procured from the 6 economic regions of the state via a competitive process. Project operators provide academic, employment, and training services to eligible in-school and out-of-school youth ages 14-24. The project operators offer a comprehensive workforce development program that prepares youth for post-secondary education, employment, career development, and can provide accommodations and support services for youth with disabilities. Project operators are familiar with the division’s Disability Employment Initiative youth program and will co-enroll youth with disabilities with the DEI to coordinate work experience and other training and supportive services. (Page 114) Title I

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) “Alaska Youth Works” grant will continue to build a cohesive system with DVR and other partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth with disabilities, ages 14 to 24, by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers. The Alaska Youth Works project will complement DVR services through coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to Pre-Employment Transition Services, career pathway programs and ultimately lead to self-sustaining employment. (Page 168) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows eligible persons with disabilities to secure a “taxed advantaged” savings account of up to $100,000 without affecting public benefit limits. Calculating benefits and ABLE savings is a critical tool for achieving quality long-term outcomes. After the website was completed, AJC and partner staff were trained in using the tool with clients. DOLWD’s Disability Employment Initiative will collaborate with the Department of Health and Social Services’ Work Incentives Planning & Assistance Project (WIPA) on work incentive counseling for Social Security beneficiaries. These projects will build a system with multiple partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth and adults with disabilities by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers through comprehensive access to benefits planning by certified Community Work Incentive Counselors (CWICs). (Page 44) Title I

School to Work Transition

~~Through DVR, Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) provides the following required activities to students with disabilities (16- to 21-year-olds) who are eligible or potentially eligible for vocational rehabilitation services: (1) job exploration counseling, (2) work-based learning opportunities, (3) counseling on postsecondary educational opportunities (4) workplace readiness training, and (5) instruction in self-advocacy. Implementation of (Pre-ETS) has resulted in increased coordination among local school districts and DVR. (Page 45) Title I

DVR has a Transition Services policy that is currently under revision. Additionally, DVR is also drafting new Pre-Employment Transition Services policy and procedures. ADVR has set a policy completion goal of October 2018. In the interim, DVR has created Business Practice Revisions, which provide specific guidance to staff to carry out the Pre—Employment Transition Services activities specified in WIOA. DVR is coordinating with state and local education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from education services to provision of VR services, including having completely revamped the referral process from education agencies to DVR for Pre-Employment Transition Services and VR Services to ensure a smoother transition. Referral forms having been provided to local education officials across Alaska and DVR’s website has been updated to provide information on which regional office is responsible for each school district throughout the state. DVR has established. DVR has prioritized that individualized plans for employment are developed within 90 days or, prior to graduation if an applicant is in the final semester of their final year. (Pages 148-149) Title I

DEED’s Special Education Unit, Division of Teacher and Learning Support (TLS) and DVR have updated their interagency agreement designed to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services. The agreement includes:
• DVR’s assurance of the development and implementation of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services within 90 days of eligibility or at least before the student leaves school;

• Providing or arranging for the provision of pre-employment transition services to all students with disabilities identified as requiring these services;
• Designation of a regional DVR contact in each school district who is responsible for clarifying questions and concerns relating to the implementation of the agreements with the local school districts, including access to DVR’s Transition Coordinator as needed for additional coordination and technical assistance needs to be provided locally or at other events in which a TLS or DVR representative may connect; (Pages 149-150) Title I

Introduction and guidance of students with disabilities to post-school alternatives which include, but are not limited to employment, post-secondary education, vocational training, and adult education, by TLS transition coordinators and ADVR staff. Planning may also include coordination of social or vocational experiences for students with disabilities in real life work settings to improve competitive integrated employment outcomes; and

• DVR’s assurance that the core tenets, principles, and career goals stated in each student’s Individual Education Program (IEP) will be incorporated into the development of their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). EED’s Special Education Unit also provides funding for members of the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee to travel to events related to transition students such as the annual Statewide Special Education Conference. (Page 150) Title I

DVR implemented the simplified Secondary Transition Referral form in 2014 in coordination with DEED. Efforts to encourage referrals through this refined process include DVR/DEED joint training to special education directors at the annual Special Education Director Training and to teachers at the Alaska Statewide Special Education Conference. The form provides teachers with an easy and efficient way to connect a student with the VR counselor serving the school and provides the teacher with an avenue to request a joint conference with the student and counselor. Teachers can access the referral form directly through links on EED’s IEP form, DEED’s transitions resources web page, and DVR’s Transition Tools for Teachers web page. DVR played a pivotal role with the expansion of the ATOP project, by conducting 16 Transition Camps in PY17 including increased coordination with the Division of Juvenile Justice, Office of Children’s Services (OCS), and American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation projects. (Pages 151-152) Title I

DVR Transition Services — DVR reaches out to teachers throughout Alaska in order to provide information on appropriate referral processes to foster students’ transition from secondary school into vocational/academic training and into the world of work. DVR counselors within each regional office are assigned to specific schools to streamline the referral process, ensure counselor participation in Individual Education Plan (IEP) development, and ensure that all schools and students are informed of DVR services. DVR contacts schools on a monthly basis during the school year. Rural and village schools communicate with DVR through their special education staff, as well as DVR staff who are assigned and travel to that rural region. This coordination allows for on-going coordination and education between both LEA staff and local DVR staff. (Page 165) Title I

Under WIOA, VR agencies are required to set aside 15 percent of their federal award to provide required Pre-Employment Transition Services youth currently in school. The 2010-2014 American Community Survey estimated 3,575 Alaskans aged 16-21 who reported experiencing a disability. DVR provides Pre-Employment Transition Services to students with disabilities aged 14-21 who are receiving services under an Individualized Education Program (IEP), eligible for section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, or are otherwise potentially eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation services. In FFY16, ADVR provided Pre-Employment Transition Services to approximately 11 percent of this population. During Program Year 17, the number of students who were provided these services increased to 957 students or approximately 27 percent of the ACS population. This exceeded DVR’s target goal of providing required Pre-Employment Transition Services to 16 percent (585) of new students with a disability annually. This population has been surveyed directly to obtain input into needs and goals for transition information and services and for future CSNA purposes. Barriers that were identified in DVR’s prior CSNA included transportation obstacles, lack of existing programs to meet specific disability needs, unstable living situations, and lack of family support. (Page 169) Title I

DVR supports and participates in the Tapestry Postsecondary Transition Program through the University of Alaska's Center for Human Development. This partnership between DVR, UAA and the Anchorage School District provides students with disabilities Pre-ETS self—advocacy, career exploration, counseling towards postsecondary education, work readiness and a work experience. This program is specifically geared towards a population that could benefit from postsecondary education but needs assistance with overcoming barriers before they can fully participate. The partnership with the school district allows students, not eligible for further transition services through the district, to defer their diploma for a 1-year intensive program on the UAA campus. (Page 180) Title I

Career Pathways

~~The Department of Health and Social Services developed a website called “Disability Benefits 101 (DB101),” an online tool for those with disabilities that provides available work incentives and helps individuals determine how their SSI, SSDI, or other public benefits may be impacted by employment. The Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows eligible persons with disabilities to secure a “taxed advantaged” savings account of up to $100,000 without affecting public benefit limits. Calculating benefits and ABLE savings is a critical tool for achieving quality long-term outcomes. After the website was completed, AJC and partner staff were trained in using the tool with clients. DOLWD’s Disability Employment Initiative will collaborate with the Department of Health and Social Services’ Work Incentives Planning & Assistance Project (WIPA) on work incentive counseling for Social Security beneficiaries. These projects will build a system with multiple partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth and adults with disabilities by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers through comprehensive access to benefits planning by certified Community Work Incentive Counselors (CWICs). (Page 44) Title I

DVR works closely with local school districts, hospitals, and CRPs to implement the national Project SEARCH model in the Matanuska—Susitna, Kenai, Anchorage, and Fairbanks school districts. A collaborative internship model was developed in FFY2012 to provide youth with developmental or intellectual disabilities opportunities to learn real job skills in 1—year, school—to—work internship positions set up throughout the 3 hospitals involved. Sites were at Mat—Su Regional Medical Center, Central Peninsula Hospital, Providence Medical Center, and Fairbanks Memorial Hospital. Total workplace immersion facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and OJT and support through internships or worksite rotations. The goal for each participant is obtaining integrated employment using the skills learned through the internships. The State of Alaska has adopted this model for student interns with developmental disabilities. For SY17, 24 youth participated in Project SEARCH, and 22 successfully completed their internships at the hospitals with 14 of those individuals now working in paid, competitive employment. Project SEARCH is no longer being funded by the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education. The Project SEARCH model is being used to provide Pre—Employment Transition Services to Students with Disabilities under the Client Services Component. (Page 180) Title IV

Apprenticeship
Additionally, the American Apprenticeship Initiative grant will increase the number of Registered Apprentices in Alaska’s health care industry. The project will significantly increase career awareness, strengthen existing career pathways, introduce new career pathways, and significantly help employers fill entry-level positions in high-demand health care sector occupations. DVR will promote the availability of this project to individuals with disabilities who are interested in pursuing occupations in the health care industry. In the pre-apprenticeship program, 9 percent self-identified as having a disability, through calendar year 2017. ETS is unable to provide specific information on whether these individuals are being served by DVR. (Page 168) Title IV
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~DOLWD’s Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) will continue to provide training for AJC and partner staff working with clients who have disabilities. Alaska has implemented the Ticket to Work program and is reaching out to those on Social Security Insurance (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) to encourage them to go to an AJC for those services. DOLWD has a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Divisions of Vocational Rehabilitation and Division of Employment and Training Services to provide seamless Partnership Plus services for beneficiaries of Social Security benefits. Both divisions will work to expand this program to other agencies and programs, such as the Division of Behavioral Health; the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services; the Division of Public Assistance Work Services; and Centers for Independent Living.
The Department of Health and Social Services developed a website called “Disability Benefits 101 (DB101),” an online tool for those with disabilities that provides available work incentives and helps individuals determine how their SSI, SSDI, or other public benefits may be impacted by employment. (Page 44) Title I

To ensure these activities are carried out to the maximum extent possible, DVR will:
- Ensure DETS staff are regularly trained or made aware of DVR and its services. This is especially true of DETS locations that are served by DVR on an itinerant basis.
- DVR leadership team and managers continue to identify functional DETS issues that require on-going work at all levels of the division including integration and the local management teams.
- Work with DETS staff to develop a means to provide information about DVR to individuals who self-identify as having a disability and who receive job training services through DETS programs.
- Develop a referral process to the DETS employment networks.
- Train DVR staff to use DETS services. (Pages 168-169) Title IV

Priority 3.5: Evaluate Social Security Reimbursement Process
Strategies:
• Implement a new Ticket To Work (TTW) tracking system.
• Monitor ticket reimbursement amounts. Performance Indicators:
• Software implemented and staff trained.
• Continued collection of Social Security Reimbursements.
• Improved capability to capture all available reimbursements. (Page 176) Title IV

Priority 3. Evaluate Social Security Reimbursement Process.
• Strategies contributing to success:
o Purchased new software that automates the process for submitting claims to SSA for the Ticket to Work program. (Page 188) Title IV

Another long-term strategy to improve SCSEP services is to include discussion with participants on financial and work incentives, to provide information on Social Security 1619b Medicaid While Working, and to explore specialized work incentives through programs including Ticket to Work, Impairment-Related Work Expenses, Blind Work Expenses, and Plan to Achieve Self-Support, and to provide referrals to those in need of these services. (Page 210) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Employer service representatives, particularly Business Connection staff, pay attention to local labor market trends to match employers with skilled job seekers. Staff work with employers to coordinate recruitments, plan job fairs, post job orders, provide applicant pre-screening and referrals, develop jobs, provide space for job recruitments, and offer employment and training service plans. Using a mass e-mail distribution list of employers and other interested parties, staff send daily messages on new job postings, recruitments at the AJCs, and upcoming job fairs. DOLWD has identified that the health care, oil and gas, and mining industries are the highest-demand industries and continually engages industry leaders in these fields. Under WIOA, Business Connection staff will be provided more in-depth training to work with the various industry sector partnerships to meet training and labor needs for those industries. (Page 56) Title I

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) partners with employers to promote the hiring of individuals with disabilities. DVR has implemented the dual customer model to deliver services to employers. DVR has created a Business Employment Services Team (DVR-BEST), which is tasked with providing employers with the four required services as outlined in Section 109 of the Rehabilitation Act within WIOA, to secure competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities, which is part of DOLWD’s strategy to focus on serving those with disabilities. (Page 58) Title I

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) utilizes a management information system called AWARE. AWARE was developed based on Vocation Rehabilitation (VR) business practices and federal requirements. AWARE offers a comprehensive set of cases, financial, and organizational modules. The features and procedures in AWARE are consistent and standardized throughout all modules, and are designed around the natural flow of the VR case process, making it intuitive for VR Counselors. (Page 65) Title I

AWIB members come from a variety of industries and represent all geographic and economic regions of the state. They bring the voice of employers, educational institutions, Alaska Native regional corporations, and other workforce partners in their respective regions. The AWIB focuses on employer engagement, connecting education and training strategies through building career pathways; supporting work-based learning; and improving career results for all job seekers and employers alike, based on the demographics and needs of each economic region. The AWIB will continue to successfully carry out the functions of both a state board and a local board, as it has for over a decade. (Page 95) Title I

Most AWIB members are representatives of business and the private sector. Board members come from a variety of industries throughout the state and are committed to bringing the voice of employers to the table and reaching out to others to engage them in the workforce system. In addition, in response to feedback from ETA, two chief local elected officials have been appointed to the board. The AWIB will continue to focus not only on employer engagement but on connecting education and training strategies through building career pathways, supporting work-based learning, and improving career results for all job seekers and employers alike. (Pages 119-120) Title I

DVR partners with employers to promote the hiring of individuals with disabilities. DVR implemented the dual customer model to deliver services to employers. DVR has a Business Employment Services Team (BEST) that is tasked with providing employers four core services as outlined in WIOA.

1. Training and Technical Assistance in:

• Understanding the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its application to a workplace situation; referral to the ADA partners’ project;
• Disability awareness training provided to HR, managers, staff, boards, and other interested groups;
• Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs regulations;
• U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission regulations;
• Balancing the application of federal, state, and local employment laws and regulations.

2. Creating Opportunities for Placement by:

• Developing opportunities for both adults and youth to provide a full range of unpaid work experiences, informational interviews, job shadows, and On—the—Job Training (OJT);
• Offering recruitment supports, assisting in workforce development including placement, OJT, Schedule A, and Provisional Hire;
• OJT, Job Coaching, and external training (not at worksite).3. Network Development through:
• Connecting with community partners and employers, locally and nationally. The BEST has connected over 50 employers with the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs staffers, the Governor’s Council on Disabilities & Special Education, the AJC’s Business Connection, and the VA VR&E’s employment support team. (Pages 154-155) Title IV

DVR’s most underserved population continues to be rural Alaskans. This has been an ongoing challenge for the Rural Development Team, as there are so few jobs within remote and rural communities. Available employment opportunities and employers are much more available in urban areas. The Rural Team strategizes ways to obtain more CRPs in rural areas, which are traditionally underserved. The Business Employment Services Team has been created specifically to provide outreach and training services to employers, with the goal of encouraging more employers to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. (Page 181) Title IV

Performance measure 6: Effectiveness in Serving Employers.

• DVR is working with the Business Development Team to develop and track contacts and services/training provided to employers. (Page 192) Title IV

Data Collection
The department has initiated the procurement process for a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) system to replace both the primary WIOA title 1-B database, Individual Case Management (ICM), and the Wagner-Peyser labor exchange services ALEXsys database. Anticipated to be fully implemented during state fiscal year 2019, the COTS system may require significant changes in the data collection process, but will result in more accurate WIOA reporting. Implementation of this new system represents a significant step forward toward the eventual common reporting anticipated for all programs, and the combined system will promote integrated service delivery, improved efficiency, and reduced duplication of services. All references in this Combined Plan relative to data collected in or reported from ICM and ALEXsys will continue, possibly with greater accuracy, under the new system. (Page 84) Title I Priority 3.2: DVR will meet or exceed state and federal common performance measures Strategies: • Negotiate targets for required common performance measures, based on baseline data collected. • Work with WIOA Core partners to implement activities identified in the Alaska Combined State Plan, including common performance measures. • Amend Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Key Performance Indicators, Missions & Measures (M&Ms) to more closely align with WIOA performance measures. (Page 175) Title IV Priority 3.3: Implement federally required RSA-911changes to the AWARE case management system Strategies: • Analyze all changes to case management (AWARE) software and determine their impact on field and accounting staff. • Train staff in timely manner. Performance Indicators: • Required data is collected accurately. • Federal reports produced on time and accurately. • DVR services are not negatively impacted (Page 176) Title IV Priority 2. Implement all federally mandated changes to RSA-911 report. • Strategies contributing to success: o Case Management Software is managed by Alliance Enterprises and they have been very responsive to incorporating changes in the data collection. o Other State programs have been generous in sharing time, resources, and their interpretation of required elements. o Both RSA and Alliance Enterprises have developed edit programs which enable DVR to produce error-free reports. o Able to plan and execute state-wide training on new data collection requirements. (Pages 187-188) Title IV DVR has not reported, nor historically collected data, on the 6 performance accountability indicators under section 116 of WIOA. DVR is unable to predict its future performance on any of the 6 performance indicators, including the SE program goals, until baseline targets have been established. DVR has data sharing agreements with DOLWD’s Unemployment Insurance and Research and Analysis units in order to establish the data collection necessary for determining baseline indicators and future reporting. As DVR is still accumulating baseline data, all indicators are marked as “To Be Determined” in Appendix C of the Combined State Plan, per instructions. (Page 191) Title IV
511

~~The State of Alaska has a State Rehabilitation Council consistent with Section 105 of the Act and 34 CFR 361.17. The State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee (SVRC) serves as the State Rehabilitation Council. At every SVRC quarterly meeting, the focus is on a particular region of the state, such as Anchorage, Northern, rural, etc. Agenda items include reports from the Director, Chief and the specific area manager; general DVR operations, major initiatives and regional and statewide challenges. In addition, there are reports from various partners such as the Alaska Workforce Investment Board, Tribal VR programs, Parent Training representative, Client Assistance Program, the State Independent Living Council and the Governor’s Council of Disabilities and Special Education. During this past year, the quarterly meetings included guest presentations addressing such topics as DVR’s Pre-ETS programs, transition from corrections/incarceration, repealing subminimum wage regulations, new WIOA requirements, the ABLE Act in Alaska, Peer Mentoring, and DVR’s collaboration with University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation programs, Alaska Job Centers, Independent Living Center Access Alaska’s efforts to better serve Barrow and the North Slope. (Page 145) Title IV

DVR has, or is in the process of developing, cooperative agreements with all levels of educational institutions within the state, including local school districts, the Department of Education & Early Development (DEED), and the University of Alaska statewide system. DVRs agreement with DEED has not yet been finalized, however there is a target date of August 2018 as an effective date. The agreement, which will form the basis for LEA agreements outlines the overarching purpose of the transition from high school or the education of those students and youth with disabilities. Additionally, respective definitions are described in order to ensure programmatic understanding. These agreements will, or do contain specific information regarding consultation and technical assistance, transition planning for students, roles and responsibilities for each agency, coordination for employment in subminimum wage (which is now a moot point), assurances, and financial responsibilities of each agency. (Page 149) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
The assessment of One-Stop delivery system partner program services is based on participant outcomes identified under their statutorily required performance and reporting requirements. However, the WIOA joint performance measures, which consist of six customer outcomes specific to core indicators of performance and employer satisfaction, demonstrate value in promoting integration of services and boosting accessibility and transparency within the workforce system. Therefore, if possible, the same measures and methodologies are applied to other One-Stop partner programs that are applied to the core programs, in addition to any program-specific measures required by federal or state regulations. Regardless of whether a program is a core program or a partner program, or whether a measure is required by WIOA or partner program law and regulation, performance measures and performance evaluations will be applied at the customer level first and then may be aggregated by program or population. (Pages 77-78) Title IV The state’s One-Stop system of Alaska Job Centers (AJCs) has developed a comprehensive approach to ensure accessibility and inclusion of all customers, including those with disabilities, to all facilities, programs, and services. Physical and programmatic accessibility are continuously evaluated with an annual Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) assessment and continuous improvement strategies planned and implemented when needed. Alaska will continue to refine the policies, training, and continuous improvement strategies to ensure compliance with WIOA and continued compliance with ADA. Additionally, the State of Alaska recently hired an ADA Coordinator who ensures accessibility of state offices for both the public and employees. The One-Stop system’s approach to ADA compliance includes: o Physical and programmatic accessibility; o Staff training and accountability; o Adaptive technology and other accommodations; and o On-going survey of effectiveness and continuous improvement. (Pages 88-89) Title I o Job centers provide individuals with disabilities access to information, resources, programs and activities in a manner that allows each individual, no matter their disability, the opportunity of full inclusion. All workshops, public access, programs, etc. are fully accessible, to ensure that the opportunities and benefits provided by the job center are available to individuals with disabilities in an equally effective and integrated manner; o “Alaska Job Center Universal Access for Customers with Disabilities” policy plays a vital role in establishing the working-level framework for outlining and improving the accessibility, capacity, and accountability of AJCs to serve customers with disabilities. The policy covers both physical and programmatic accessibility within AJCs and outlines the assistive technologies available and required staff training; o Each location has appropriate signage identifying the policy that no individual with a disability shall, by reason of such disability, be excluded from participation in, or be denied the benefit of, the services, programs, or activities of the AJCs; o All job centers use universal design with printed materials. All posters, flyers, brochures, etc. use common principles throughout the design. The outreach and marketing materials developed for distribution from the AJCs to partners, job seekers, and employers contain notice of the availability of auxiliary aids and services for needed accommodations to access programs and services; (Page 89) Title I o Each AJC is equipped with a Universal Access Accessibility Station that is designed to improve the quality of the job applicant’s experience, no matter the disability. Each station is designed with state-of -the art technology that can help job seekers with disabilities navigation the World of Work with based on their personal independence level. o Assistive Technology (AT) available includes screen readers, magnifiers, adaptive software, virtual sign language interpretation, closed captioning on scrolling program and services video, motorized adjustable workstations, specialized keyboards and mice, TTY phones, and personal voice amplification device; o “Tips for Improving Access to Workshops and Training” has been developed and disseminated to staff. This document offers guidance and suggestions on increasing accessibility and success for individuals attending AJC workshops and training sessions and is broken down by disability type. The document outlines ways the facilitator or trainer can incorporate accommodations and adaptations into the class to ensure an optimal learning environment for all; and o Any program and service may be accommodated for full inclusion on an “as needed” basis with the accommodation being dependent on the needs of the individual customer and provided through the AJCs in collaboration with partners. (Page 90) Title I o AJC certification occurs annually and is a collaborative process involving all partners of the One-Stop delivery system. The joint AJC management team collectively completes the documents and surveys for the certification and submits them to the AWIB for approval. Certification involves reviewing site working agreements, cost allocations, self-assessment surveys, and the ADA accessibility survey. In addition to reviewing all submitted documents, members of the AWIB conduct an on-site review identifying best practices and need for corrective action planning. Based on their review and findings, the AWIB recommends and approves certification; (Page 90) Title I Information on physical and programmatic accessibility for individuals with disabilities is supported by statewide activities funding and reinforced by the AJC Universal Access for Individuals with Disability Policy 07-516 (Page 98) Title I DVR continues to work with the Department of Administration, Division of Personnel and Labor Relations, the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, and the State of Alaska as a Model Employer for Individuals with Disabilities. In order to create a baseline, an extensive state employee survey was conducted so state employees may self-disclose their ADA defined disability. This survey will assist with ensuring reasonable accommodations for these employees. DVR continues to see considerable progress in expanding and improving Alaska’s Provisional Hire program as part of this effort. Additionally, the State of Alaska recently hired a full time ADA Coordinator to ensure accessibility for all employees. DVR continues to have an Interagency Agreement in place with the Department of Veterans Affairs Vocational Rehabilitation & Education (VR&E) to cooperate, coordinate, and collaborate for the creation of a powerful force within the rehabilitation community to increase vocational opportunities for veterans of the military service in the United States, regardless of the level of disability, by including DVR as a partner in a comprehensive system of case management. DVR has assigned a VRC to attend monthly meetings with VR&E to strengthen collaboration and coordination of services for this population. (Pages 146-148) Title IV
Vets
The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) is administered by DOLWD and serves unemployed, low-income persons who are at least 55 years of age and have a family income of no more than 125 percent of the federal poverty level. Enrollment priority is given to veterans and qualified spouses, then to individuals who are over 65, have a disability, low literacy skills or limited English proficiency, and who reside in a rural area, are homeless or at risk of homelessness, have low employment prospects, or have failed to find employment after using services through the Alaska Job Centers (AJCs). (Page 29) Title I Some AJCs have Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans’ Employment Representative (LVER) staff funded by the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG). These staff members provide vital services to both veterans and employers seeking employment-related assistance. DETS complies with all federal guidance for JVSG staff and seeks to fully utilize the expertise of DVOPs and LVERs. DETS developed a referral process to direct veterans to the appropriate staff member to ensure a client-centered approach to the delivery of career and training services. When job seekers indicate veteran status upon initial entry to an AJC, staff members are trained to engage them to determine if they are eligible for DVOP services. Veterans are asked a series of questions and handed a checklist of the eligibility criteria to see a DVOP, which is reviewed with the veteran. If veterans indicate they meet one of the eligibility criteria, staff attempt to immediately connect them with a DVOP. If a DVOP is unavailable, eligible veterans will receive the DVOP’s contact information and staff will ensure the appropriate DVOP receives the veteran’s information so they can connect with one another. AJCs follow a team approach to serving customers, including providing services to veterans. Teams work together to support the roles of LVERs and DVOPs in providing services to veterans. All staff are trained to deliver as many services to veterans as possible to ease the burden on DVOPs. DETS encourages staff to engage veterans and insists that all AJC staff are veterans’ representatives, not just JVSG-funded staff. The state follows all Special Grant Provisions, Veterans’ Program Letters, USDOL/VETS Law 107- 288, and United States Code Title 38. (Page 88) Title I A large percentage of claimants selected for RESEA will be military veterans, a group who are always a top priority in Alaska. Some of the veterans will be recently separated from the military and others will be veterans who meet the criteria associated with the most likely to exhaust UI benefits. The latter are veterans who are homeless, disabled, or have other significant barriers to reemployment. In the three RESEA AJCs with on-site Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) staff, a personal introduction and referral to the DVOP will be the norm. In other AJCs, RESEA staff will telephonically introduce the RESEA participant to the DVOPs who serve veterans itinerantly for that region. (Pages 125-126) Title I DVR continues to have an Interagency Agreement in place with the Department of Veterans Affairs Vocational Rehabilitation & Education (VR&E) to cooperate, coordinate, and collaborate for the creation of a powerful force within the rehabilitation community to increase vocational opportunities for veterans of the military service in the United States, regardless of the level of disability, by including DVR as a partner in a comprehensive system of case management. DVR has assigned a VRC to attend monthly meetings with VR&E to strengthen collaboration and coordination of services for this population. (Pages 147-148) Title I Additionally, DVR has developed in-house staff responsible for expanding DVRs presence in local communities for both employment opportunities and to increase referral sources as well. DVR attends all local job fairs whenever possible, the largest being the Veterans job fair every November. DVR staff frequently presents at partnership meetings across the state. (Page 180) Title I
Mental Health

~~DVR continues to work with individuals assigned to the Anchorage Mental Health Court. Mental Health Courts are designed to divert people with mental disabilities, charged with misdemeanor offenses, from incarceration and into community treatment and services including mental health counseling and vocational rehabilitation as appropriate. The hope is to prevent further contacts with the criminal justice system. (Pages 146-147) Title I

The current MOU between DVR and the Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) is in the process of being updated to clarify roles and responsibilities relative to common consumers and assure services are provided in accordance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and WIOA. A preliminary draft of a MOU document is almost complete. DVR provided DHB with the draft MOU on January 31, 2018. Both agencies have identified the Individual Placement and Support model to pilot in at least two regions. DBH is requesting proposals from providers who will provide IPS in Kenai and Anchorage. This model is designed for individuals with significant mental health disabilities to better prepare them for long-term employment. Additionally, DHS is now moving towards providing long-term supports for this population, making pursing supported employment a better option for this population. Each agency has assigned staff to resolve any issues or questions and it is anticipated that the MOU will be executed no later than late 2018. (Page 157) Title IV

• Work with the Center for Human Development, the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority, the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, and other partners to increase provider capacity for employment services and supports. (Page 179) Title IV

Strategies contributing to success:

• Continued efforts coordinated with the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education.

• Continued to work with the Center for Human Development and the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority to increase provider capacity for employment services and supports.

• Continued to increase use of the Provisional Hire process. (Pages 190-191) Title IV

Goals and Priorities for the FFY2017—FFY2020 supported employment (SE) program:

1. DVR will provide SE services to 200 eligible individuals.

2. DVR will set aside 50 percent of the SE award to provide services to youth with the most significant disabilities.

3. DVR will assist 50 SE eligible individuals to obtain competitive employment.

4. DVR will be able to provide all the identified required VR services to all SE eligible individuals.

5. Explore opportunities for CRPs and other entities to become employment networks to provide long—term supports.

6. Work with the community mental health system to increase and establish work—related programs within that system.

7. Emphasize community—based, integrated employment settings with the Governor’s Council on Disability and Special Education, the Alaska Mental Health Board, community behavioral health programs, and the Alaska Mental Health Trust to increase vocational programs within the mental health service delivery system. (Pages 192-193) Title IV

4. DVR has continued to work with the community mental health system to increase and/or to reinstate work related programs within that system of providers. (Page 193) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
The Wagner-Peyser program provides services for job seekers and employers. Services for job seekers, including MSFWs, include an extensive online job bank for researching job openings; referrals to job openings, training or other employment services; job search consulting and workshops; aptitude, interest and proficiency tests; career guidance; area business job fairs; special services to veterans, migrant seasonal farm workers and individuals with disabilities; and re-employment services to claimants identified through the state’s Unemployment Insurance system as high-risk for exhausting benefits prior to re-employment, including recently separated veterans. (Page 131) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 76

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“United Way of Anchorage (UWA) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” population that is disproportionately without access to coverage or care and may lack knowledge about affordable options. Including, but not limited to—re-entry population, the unemployed, hourly wage workers, seasonal workers (ie: commercial fishers), variable income workers and low-income families with children, immigrants, young adults, and university students. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.. They will partner with  Alaska Primary Care Association, Community health centers, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Mat-Su Health Services, Aging and Disability Resource Center, Alaska Division of Public Assistance, Anchorage Project Access,  and Alaska 2-1-1.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:Sue BroganPhone: ( 907) 263-3821Email: SBrogan@ak.org

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

1115 Behavioral Health Medicaid Waiver - 06/27/2019

~~“Medicaid Section 1115 Demonstration Waivers provide states with flexibility to test new approaches within Medicaid to aid in redesigning and improving their health systems without increasing costs.Alaska’s 1115 Waiver

In January 2018, Alaska applied to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for approval of an 1115 behavioral health waiver that would create a data-driven, integrated behavioral health system of care for Alaskans experiencing serious mental illness, severe emotional disturbance, substance use disorder (SUD), co-occurring substance use and mental illness, and at-risk families and children.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Student Summer Work Programs - 05/27/2019

~~“We have paid summer work programs in a variety of communities. Most are 4-6 weeks long and provide students with valuable work experience. Program content varies depending on the community. See list of programs below for details.Who Can ApplyA student with a disability is: an individual age 14-21 and enrolled in secondary education (high school) who:• Is on an IEP or 504 plan, or• Is a student who is potentially eligible for DVR services because of a physical, sensory, intellectual, mental health, and communication disabilities and whose disability could be a barrier to postsecondary education or employment.”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Work Incentive Planning & Assistance (WIPA) - 05/06/2019

~~“The Alaska WIPA Project provides assistance to beneficiaries who are working at wage employment, self-employment, or who have a job offer pending. Assistance is offered to help understand the various work incentive programs that might be available, and provide advice about how to manage one’s benefits during the transition to paid employment. We provide both initial and follow along assistance to beneficiaries. Benefits Counseling and a written Benefits Summary Analysis (BSA) is provided free of charge.

If you are currently working, about to begin work, or are self-employed, please contact the Alaska WIPA Project.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development Veterans Employment Services - 04/15/2019

~~“The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development has 21 Job Centers across the state. The Anchorage (Midtown and Muldoon), Fairbanks, and Wasilla Job Centers have on-site Veteran Representatives; however, all Job Centers provide priority services to qualified Veterans and their eligible Spouse.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Alaska Job Centers - 04/01/2019

~~This page iscontains a list of the Job Centers in Alaska with addresses, telephone numbers and links.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Veteran Services - 02/06/2019

~~Alaska Department of Labor offers a priority of service and benefits to veterans, and eligible spouses or caregivers, seeking employment, apprenticeship opportunities, and on-the-job training programs that pay veterans while they prepare for a sustainable career. Eligibility for these services:

Veterans who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released under conditions other than dishonorable,; special disabled veterans who have significant barriers to employment, as well as eligible spouses and caregivers, are eligible for specialized intensive services to obtain or retain employment.Veteran Services

Examples of priority of service for veterans are described by linking to the website.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Senate Bill 174 - 08/25/2018

~~"Alaska Senate Bill 174 reinforced person-centered support services planning and reaffirmed that the policy of the state encourages and enables persons with physical and mental disabilities to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Alaska Transition Plan for HCBS - 08/22/2018

~~“The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Senior and Disabilities Services (SDS) now submits for public review and comment the fourth version of its Transition Plan (“Plan”) in accordance with CFR 42 §441.301(c)(6). This describes what SDS and providers have been working on to ensure that Alaska’s HCBS settings achieve compliance with the elements of the final rule.  The State has described how compliance has been assessed; what the outcomes are; what educational strategies have been used; how providers have achieved compliance through remediation strategies; and what collaborative strategies will be used to ensure ongoing compliance after the deadline of March 22, 2019”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Webinar-On-Demand and Quiz - 07/12/2018

~~A training about the home and community based settings rules, what Program Administrators need to know and do, and how to request and complete the required self - assessment survey. This training is for Administrators or those applying to be administrators for the following services: Supported Employment, Residential Habilitation: Group home, Residential Habilitation: Family Home Habilitation, Residential Habilitation: Supported Living, Congregate Meals, Adult Day Services, Day Habilitation, and Residential Supported Living.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Senate Bill 174 - 08/25/2018

~~"Alaska Senate Bill 174 reinforced person-centered support services planning and reaffirmed that the policy of the state encourages and enables persons with physical and mental disabilities to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Minimum wage exemption for persons with disabilities eliminated - 02/16/2018

~~“JUNEAU, Alaska— Following a regulatory change that goes into effect today, Alaska employers are no longer allowed to pay less than minimum wage to workers who experience disabilities. In repealing 8 AAC 15.120, Alaska joins New Hampshire and Maryland as the first states in the nation to eliminate payment of subminimum wages for persons with disabilities. An exemption from paying minimum wage to persons with disabilities has existed for many years, beginning at the federal level with the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and in Alaska regulations since 1978. Historically, minimum wage exemptions were considered necessary to help people with disabilities gain employment. Experience over the past two decades has shown that workers with disabilities can succeed in jobs earning minimum wage or more. “Workers who experience disabilities are valued members of Alaska’s workforce,” said Department of Labor and Workforce Development Acting Commissioner Greg Cashen. “They deserve minimum wage protections as much as any other Alaskan worker.” The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development received written comments expressing support for repealing the regulation that allowed the minimum wage exemption from the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Alaska Workforce Investment Board. The elimination of the minimum wage exemption brings employment practices into alignment with Alaska Employment First Act of 2014, which requires vocational services help people with disabilities to become gainfully employed at or above the minimum wage.” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Alaska House Bill 188 “ABLE Accounts Bill” - 08/08/2016

Summary An Act establishing a program for financial accounts for individuals with disabilities; exempting the procurement of contracts for the program from the State Procurement Code; exempting certain information on participants in the program from being subject to inspection as a public record; providing that an account under the program for an individual with a disability is not a security; allowing a state to file a claim against an individual's financial account under the program to recover Medicaid payments after the individual's death; and providing for an effective date. The bill was enrolled on July 8, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Alaska ABLE Savings Program Act - 04/11/2015

An Act relating to financial accounts for persons with disabilities; relating to financial institutions; relating to property exemptions; relating to securities; and providing for an effective date.

Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Alaska HB 211 - Making Alaska an “Employment First State" - 09/19/2014

An Act relating to the education and employment of individuals with disabilities."  Signed into law on 9/19/14 by Governor Sean Parnell. Sec. 23.15.095. Gainful employment of individuals with disabilities. (a) When providing vocational training, vocational rehabilitation, or employment placement of an individual with a disability, the agency's primary objective and preferred outcome is to help the individual become gainfully employed in an integrated workplace where individuals with disabilities work with and alongside of individuals without disabilities.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Alaska House Bill 139 - 03/05/2014

“Sec. 2. AS 18.80.200 is amended to read:

(b) Therefore, it is the policy of the state and the purpose of this chapter to eliminate and prevent discrimination in employment, in credit and financing practices, in places of public accommodation, in the sale, lease, or rental of real property because of race, religion, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, physical or mental disability, marital status, changes in marital status, pregnancy or parenthood. It is also the policy of the state to encourage and enable physically and mentally disabled persons to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state and to engage in remunerative employment. It is not the purpose of this chapter to supersede laws pertaining to child labor, the age of majority, or other age restrictions or requirements.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 30

Student Summer Work Programs - 05/27/2019

~~“We have paid summer work programs in a variety of communities. Most are 4-6 weeks long and provide students with valuable work experience. Program content varies depending on the community. See list of programs below for details.Who Can ApplyA student with a disability is: an individual age 14-21 and enrolled in secondary education (high school) who:• Is on an IEP or 504 plan, or• Is a student who is potentially eligible for DVR services because of a physical, sensory, intellectual, mental health, and communication disabilities and whose disability could be a barrier to postsecondary education or employment.”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development Veterans Employment Services - 04/15/2019

~~“The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development has 21 Job Centers across the state. The Anchorage (Midtown and Muldoon), Fairbanks, and Wasilla Job Centers have on-site Veteran Representatives; however, all Job Centers provide priority services to qualified Veterans and their eligible Spouse.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Alaska Job Centers - 04/01/2019

~~This page iscontains a list of the Job Centers in Alaska with addresses, telephone numbers and links.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Veteran Services - 02/06/2019

~~Alaska Department of Labor offers a priority of service and benefits to veterans, and eligible spouses or caregivers, seeking employment, apprenticeship opportunities, and on-the-job training programs that pay veterans while they prepare for a sustainable career. Eligibility for these services:

Veterans who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released under conditions other than dishonorable,; special disabled veterans who have significant barriers to employment, as well as eligible spouses and caregivers, are eligible for specialized intensive services to obtain or retain employment.Veteran Services

Examples of priority of service for veterans are described by linking to the website.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Webinar-On-Demand and Quiz - 07/12/2018

~~A training about the home and community based settings rules, what Program Administrators need to know and do, and how to request and complete the required self - assessment survey. This training is for Administrators or those applying to be administrators for the following services: Supported Employment, Residential Habilitation: Group home, Residential Habilitation: Family Home Habilitation, Residential Habilitation: Supported Living, Congregate Meals, Adult Day Services, Day Habilitation, and Residential Supported Living.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Alaska Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Combined Plan 2018 Update - 04/02/2018

~~Alaska’s “Employment First” legislation calls for “competitive integrated employment” as the preferred outcome for those with disabilities. DOLWD has executed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) withHealth and Social Services; and is obtaining MOU signature with Education and Early Development to ensure progress towards that goal. The MOU includes commitments for active participation on the Interagency Council on Employment First, under the   auspices of the Employment First State Coordinator. 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

Minimum wage exemption for persons with disabilities eliminated - 02/16/2018

~~“JUNEAU, Alaska— Following a regulatory change that goes into effect today, Alaska employers are no longer allowed to pay less than minimum wage to workers who experience disabilities. In repealing 8 AAC 15.120, Alaska joins New Hampshire and Maryland as the first states in the nation to eliminate payment of subminimum wages for persons with disabilities. An exemption from paying minimum wage to persons with disabilities has existed for many years, beginning at the federal level with the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and in Alaska regulations since 1978. Historically, minimum wage exemptions were considered necessary to help people with disabilities gain employment. Experience over the past two decades has shown that workers with disabilities can succeed in jobs earning minimum wage or more. “Workers who experience disabilities are valued members of Alaska’s workforce,” said Department of Labor and Workforce Development Acting Commissioner Greg Cashen. “They deserve minimum wage protections as much as any other Alaskan worker.” The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development received written comments expressing support for repealing the regulation that allowed the minimum wage exemption from the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Alaska Workforce Investment Board. The elimination of the minimum wage exemption brings employment practices into alignment with Alaska Employment First Act of 2014, which requires vocational services help people with disabilities to become gainfully employed at or above the minimum wage.” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Minimum wage exemption for persons with disabilities eliminated - 02/16/2018

JUNEAU, Alaska— Following a regulatory change that goes into effect today, Alaska employers are no longer allowed to pay less than minimum wage to workers who experience disabilities. In repealing 8 AAC 15.120, Alaska joins New Hampshire and Maryland as the first states in the nation to eliminate payment of subminimum wages for persons with disabilities. An exemption from paying minimum wage to persons with disabilities has existed for many years, beginning at the federal level with the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and in Alaska regulations since 1978. Historically, minimum wage exemptions were considered necessary to help people with disabilities gain employment. Experience over the past two decades has shown that workers with disabilities can succeed in jobs earning minimum wage or more.  “Workers who experience disabilities are valued members of Alaska’s workforce,” said Department of Labor and Workforce Development Acting Commissioner Greg Cashen. “They deserve minimum wage protections as much as any other Alaskan worker.” The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development received written comments expressing support for repealing the regulation that allowed the minimum wage exemption from the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Alaska Workforce Investment Board.  The elimination of the minimum wage exemption brings employment practices into alignment with Alaska Employment First Act of 2014, which requires vocational services help people with disabilities to become gainfully employed at or above the minimum wage.  

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit - 11/16/2017

~~“The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit is responsible for monitoring service providers and supports systems serving individuals who experience an intellectual or developmental disability. The IDD Unit oversees the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities waiver (IDD waiver) and, in spring 2018, the new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW).

The new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW) was developed to replace the Community Developmental Disabilities Grant (CDDG) program, which will end June 30, 2018. The ISW will also extend supports to individuals who had not been covered by the grant program.”

The purpose of both waivers is to offer qualified participants a choice between home and community-based services or supports in an institutional setting.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Services Conditions of Participation - 11/05/2017

~~“Supported employment services may be provided to assist recipients to acquire and maintain the work-related skills necessary to become self-employed or for employment in an integrated work setting in the general workforce, at or above minimum wage with the level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals who are not recipients.  These services focus on activities that will meet the recipients’ personal and career goals, lead to an appropriate job match for the recipient and the employer, and may include vocational or job-related discovery or assessment, person-centered employment planning, job placement, job development, negotiation with prospective employers, job analysis, job carving, training and systematic instruction, and career advancement activities. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Information on the Formal Interagency Agreement with the State Educational Agency - 06/30/2018

~~DEED’s Special Education Unit and DVR have an interagency agreement that is designed to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services. The agreement includes: • DVR’s assurance of the development and implementation of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services before the student leaves school; • Designation of a regional DVR contact who is responsible for clarifying questions and concerns relating to the implementation of the agreements with local school districts; and • DVR’s assurance that the core tenets, principles, and career goals stated in each student’s Individual Education Program (IEP) will be incorporated into the development of their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). EED’s Special Education Unit also provides funding for members of the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee to travel to events related to transition students such as the annual Statewide Special Education Conference.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Project Search - 11/30/2017

~~“This unique program provides real-life work experience to help youth, with significant disabilities, make successful transitions from school to adult life. Meant to serve as a student’s last year in high schoolAnchorage Fairbanks Central Peninsula    Mat-Su

Project SEARCH is an international trademarked and copyrighted program model, which focuses solely on employment for Project SEARCH interns. Successful outcomes for this project include:    Employment in an integrated setting (working alongside people without disabilities)        Year-round work        20 hours/week or more        Minimum wage or higher”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Alaska Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education “State 5-Year Plan FFY 2017-2021 Public Comment Draft”

“GOAL # 2: Employment Alaskans with disabilities and their families will receive the necessary employment services and supports needed to become competitively employed in an integrated setting. Objective 2.1: Provide support for the implementation of Alaska state laws increasing the employment of individuals with disabilities which lead to 3 new or improved policies, procedures, or regulations per year. Activities: Monitor legislation relating to employment for individuals with disabilities and provide support for advocacy and research, as needed. Provide support for the implementation of the Alaska Employment First Act with at least one improved policy, procedure, or regulation per year. Provide support for the implementation of the Alaska Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act as it relates to empowering employment for individuals with disabilities with at least one improved policy, procedure, or regulation per year

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

AK Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education

Alaska' unique geographical area with a relatively small population requires a management system tailored to meet the needs of Alaskans. The Governor's Council on Disabilities & Special Education was created to meet Alaska's diverse needs. The Council uses planning, capacity building, systems change, and advocacy to create change for people with disabilities. Consistent with our State Plan we work towards systems change in areas including:

housing employment early intervention special education lifelong learning independent living inclusion in the community.

 

The council serves as the interdepartmental planning/coordinating agency of the Department of Health and Social Services, the Department of Education and Early Development, and other departments which deliver services to people with disabilities or provide special education.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Announcing Community First Choice Program (CFC) - 07/01/2018

~~Community First Choice Personal Care Service (CFC-PCS) – the number of hours of personal care service per week are determined by an assessment conducted by the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services.Supervision and reminders – Additional CFC-PCS time may be available to recipients shown to have cognitive impairment or behavior issues.Personal Emergency Response system (PERS) – Recipients may be eligible to receive a personal emergency response system or medical alert system that calls for help at the push of a button in the event of an emergency.Skills training – Recipients may be eligible to receive skills training from a personal care assistant (PCA), so that the recipient can learn to do activities more independently.Worker supervision - Recipients can receive training to help manage their PCAs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

AK Integrated Employment Initiative (AIEI) 2015 Reported Outcomes - 02/01/2015

The Partnerships in Employment (PIE) Systems Change Grant is intended to increase integrated, competitive employment (ICE) opportunities for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). As one of the eight states participating in PIE, Alaska’s Integrated Employment Initiative (AIEI) presented outcomes including the unanimous passage of Employment First Legislation, data systems enhancement to improve system efficacy, policy and regulation leveraging, close collaboration and partnership with other agencies, and the promotion of the State as a Model Employer (SAME) Task Force.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Alaska Disability Employment Initiative - 10/23/2013

AKDEI will hire five regional Disability Resource Coordinator/EN Counselors and build on the successes of AKDEI 1 and 4 projects to improve employment opportunities and outcomes for youth by expanding access to employment and career pathways that will prepare youth for in-demand careers.  This will be accomplished through a multi-faceted approach.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Alaska AIDD Integrated Employment Initiative - 09/30/2012

"The Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative prioritizes employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities across Alaska. Partnerships with the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Education and Early Development, Disability Law Center of Alaska, and the Center for Human Development will address barriers and develop replicable, sustainable strategies using a three-pronged approach: (1) policy development; (2) capacity building; and (3) resource leveraging."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Alaska Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

BrainWorks for Self-Employment, University of AK - Anchorage Center for Human Development

BrainWorks is an innovative new project to assist individuals with brain injury in starting a business. This is part of a two-year research project funded by the Kessler Foundation. The BrainWorks program was developed by individuals with brain injury who are self-employed, self-employment facilitators who are knowledgeable about self employment and have experience working with people with disabilities, and research staff at the Center for Human Development.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative (AIDD PIE)

A consortium of partners consisting of the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education (lead entity), the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services (State I/DD agency), the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Education and Early Development, Disability Law Center of Alaska, and the Center for Human Development will develop sustainable strategies to increase the employment of youth and young adults with I/DD. The project intends to increase the percent of youth and young adults served by DVR from 20% to 25%; 2) increase hours worked by DVR participants with I/DD from 13 to 20 hours per week (comparable to other youth with disabilities); and 3) double the number of youth and young adults with I/DD served by SDS who are employed or self-employed from 139-278.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“United Way of Anchorage (UWA) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” population that is disproportionately without access to coverage or care and may lack knowledge about affordable options. Including, but not limited to—re-entry population, the unemployed, hourly wage workers, seasonal workers (ie: commercial fishers), variable income workers and low-income families with children, immigrants, young adults, and university students. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.. They will partner with  Alaska Primary Care Association, Community health centers, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Mat-Su Health Services, Aging and Disability Resource Center, Alaska Division of Public Assistance, Anchorage Project Access,  and Alaska 2-1-1.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:Sue BroganPhone: ( 907) 263-3821Email: SBrogan@ak.org

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Work Incentive Planning & Assistance (WIPA) - 05/06/2019

~~“The Alaska WIPA Project provides assistance to beneficiaries who are working at wage employment, self-employment, or who have a job offer pending. Assistance is offered to help understand the various work incentive programs that might be available, and provide advice about how to manage one’s benefits during the transition to paid employment. We provide both initial and follow along assistance to beneficiaries. Benefits Counseling and a written Benefits Summary Analysis (BSA) is provided free of charge.

If you are currently working, about to begin work, or are self-employed, please contact the Alaska WIPA Project.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

SDS Training - Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Self - Assessment Survey - 07/01/2017

~~“Join SDS staff for a training about the Settings rules, the self - assessment survey, and what Program Administrators need to know and do. This training is for Administrators or those applying to administrate: Supported Employment, Residential Habilitation: Group home, Residential Habilitation: Family Home Habilitation, Residential Habilitation: Supported Living, Congregate Meals, Adult Day Services, Day Habilitation, and Residential Supported Living. SDS has been working with CMS and providers on a Transition Plan to bring Alaska into settings compliance since 2014. CMS requires all states to comply with new settings rules per 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4)-(5) . The purpose of these changes is to make sure that states use Home and Community Based funding for programs that truly work to integrate Alaskans with disabilities and/or who are frail elders into the community at every opportunity.

Training is offered as a video:HCBS Program Administrator Training: HCBS Settings Self – Assessment Survey.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Care Coordination Training Guide - 06/02/2017

~~“We’re glad you’ve chosen to study Senior and Disabilities Service Care Coordination. This guide is designed to provide you with basic information and procedures. It is not intended to solely qualify you as a Care Coordinator. The qualifications needed to become a Care Coordinator are set forth in the guide. Even with the basic qualifications, for a new Care Coordinator, best practice is to spend a lot of time with a mentor. You may consider contacting a local Care Coordinator to see about mentorship possibilities. You may also choose to join your local Care Coordination Network association.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

AK Customized Employment - PowerPoint - 01/01/2008

This is a PowerPoint presentation addressing Customized Employment in Alaska with an emphasis on maintaining a client-centered team.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

AK Customized Employment Service Provider Manual - 05/01/2007

Our mission is to support the rights of those living with life complexities and disabilities to participate in all aspects of vocational services, while striving to eliminate barriers to employment. Together we form partnerships with individuals, families, employers, service providers, and the community at large to support the creation of expanded work options and meaningful employment, promote economic opportunities and independence, encourage self‐determination, and support the inclusion of people with complex lives into the community.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Industry-Driven Support Model

The Industry-Driven Support Model is being developed and tested as a resource for low income entrepreneurs with disabilities. The model is focused on bringing entrepreneurs from all parts of Alaska with various disabilities together through one common theme, owning a small business within a similar industry. The training sessions focus on a specific topic (e.g., Finances or Marketing) for a specific industry (e.g., arts and crafts or service businesses). The networking sessions focus on discussions around the training topics and how to network within and outside of one’s own community

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Alaska Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Policy Manual

The purpose of this manual is to provide clear guidance to ADVR staff for the consistent and legal implementation of the vocational rehabilitation program in Alaska.  ADVR staff is expected to provide services pursuant to the policies and procedures outlined in this manual. 

The manual provides comprehensive information pertaining to the subject, including not only the division’s policy, but also basic procedures, legal citations, resources and answers to frequently asked questions about the subject.  The procedures are not prescriptive, as VR services are determined by an individual’s needs, although they are reflective of ADVR’s business practices.   

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Alaska DVR -– “Service Definitions, Requirements and Hourly Rat Range” for Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP)

Alaska DVR has authorized the CRPs listed to provide the identified services. These services should only be purchased from authorized CRPs. Some of the authorized services include situational assessments, benefits analysis/ counseling, job search assistance, job readiness training, on-the-job evaluations, job supports, and business development services, among others.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Proposed Model of Employment Services for Individuals with Behavioral Health Disabilities

This is the proposed model of employment services of individuals with behavioral disabilities for providers as well as select government agencies within the state of Alaska. It focuses on training, technical assistance and required resources.

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

1115 Behavioral Health Medicaid Waiver - 06/27/2019

~~“Medicaid Section 1115 Demonstration Waivers provide states with flexibility to test new approaches within Medicaid to aid in redesigning and improving their health systems without increasing costs.Alaska’s 1115 Waiver

In January 2018, Alaska applied to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for approval of an 1115 behavioral health waiver that would create a data-driven, integrated behavioral health system of care for Alaskans experiencing serious mental illness, severe emotional disturbance, substance use disorder (SUD), co-occurring substance use and mental illness, and at-risk families and children.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Alaska Transition Plan for HCBS - 08/22/2018

~~“The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Senior and Disabilities Services (SDS) now submits for public review and comment the fourth version of its Transition Plan (“Plan”) in accordance with CFR 42 §441.301(c)(6). This describes what SDS and providers have been working on to ensure that Alaska’s HCBS settings achieve compliance with the elements of the final rule.  The State has described how compliance has been assessed; what the outcomes are; what educational strategies have been used; how providers have achieved compliance through remediation strategies; and what collaborative strategies will be used to ensure ongoing compliance after the deadline of March 22, 2019”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Announcing Community First Choice Program (CFC) - 07/01/2018

~~This is a “new program that is part of the Medicaid reform initiative also known as 1915(k).Provides Personal Care Services and other supports in the recipient’s home as an alternative to institutional care.All recipients who currently meet an institutional level of care and receive both Home and Community Based Waiver Services and Personal Care Services have predetermined eligibility; these recipients have received a letter of notification* (see link to letter below).

What Services are Available from the CFC Program?....Skills training – Recipients may be eligible to receive skills training from a personal care assistant (PCA), so that the recipient can learn to do activities more independently.Worker supervision - Recipients can receive training to help manage their PCAs.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Transition Plan and Provider Requirements: Settings Final Rule Compliance Status - 06/11/2018

~~The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) issued a new regulation (42 CFR §441.301(c)(6)) that requires that all Medicaid-funded services be provided in settings that exhibit home and community-based characteristics and do not isolate recipients. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, have full access to benefits of community living, and opportunities to receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive home and community based services….The State of Alaska has been working with CMS and providers on a transition plan to bring Alaska into settings compliance since 2014 when the “final rule” was published.

This chart shows the percentages of providers in each compliance category as of May 4, 2018.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit - 11/16/2017

~~“The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit is responsible for monitoring service providers and supports systems serving individuals who experience an intellectual or developmental disability. The IDD Unit oversees the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities waiver (IDD waiver) and, in spring 2018, the new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW).

The new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW) was developed to replace the Community Developmental Disabilities Grant (CDDG) program, which will end June 30, 2018. The ISW will also extend supports to individuals who had not been covered by the grant program.”

The purpose of both waivers is to offer qualified participants a choice between home and community-based services or supports in an institutional setting.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Approved SDS Forms (Senior and Disability Services) - 09/01/2017

~~“Please Note: SDS is continuously making improvements to its many program forms so please check back frequently to ensure the most current version is utilized. You can refer to the “Revision Date” printed on the bottom left margin of each form to determine appropriate precedence.  Specific programmatic questions about a particular form should be addressed to the associated SDS program staff.” 

This page has IDD and CCMC Waiver Program Forms” three of which were updated as of September 1, 2017.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Transition Period for Compliance with Home and Community-Based Settings Criteria - 07/03/2017

~~“A CMS Informational Bulletin was released on May 9, 2017, indicating that the transition period for complying with home and community-based settings criteria is extended until March 17, 2022. In the Bulletin, CMS indicated that states may still choose to meet the original March 17, 2019 deadline. The State of Alaska values the person-centered transformation that will result from providers meeting the settings criteria, and acknowledges the progress made to bring Alaska’s providers into compliance. Accordingly, Alaska will retain the original March 17, 2019 deadline for settings to become compliant with the CMS home and community-based settings criteria.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About the Community Developmental Disabilities grants - 12/15/2016

~~A FAQ that provides information on applying for Medicaid services and waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State of Alaska’s 1915( c) Waiver Renewal Applications - 07/01/2016

This is a power point presentation on the state of Alaska’s most recent application for renewing four 1915(c) Waivers for a five year period. These waivers include ones for “Adults with Physical and Developmental Disabilities” and “Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities”. The number of people to be placed on the IDD waiver is limited to 50 per year. Persons placed on the APDD waiver could have a reassessment using a Truncated Consumer Assessment Tool. These waivers would be for the period of FY 2017 – 2021 which started on July 1, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Alaska HCBS Transition Plan (9/2015) - 09/14/2015

The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Senior and Disabilities Services (SDS) submits this transition plan in accordance with CFR 42 §441.301(c)(6).  The state process leading to development of the plan included analysis of all settings where home and community-based services are provided under the Alaska’s 1915(c) home and community-based waiver programs. This plan describes the three components of SDS settings evaluation activities:   Part 1) the efforts made by SDS to inform and educate providers and other stakeholders about the changes to federal regulations, and to  gain insight into how the changes will impact service delivery;   Part 2) the process used to determine the extent to which existing state regulations and practices encompass the requirements for home and community-based settings, and the actions taken to assess the home and community-based characteristics of the locations where services are delivered currently; and     Part 3) the state plan to achieve compliance with federal regulations.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

With the official slogan being, "Beyond your Dreams, within your Reach," the state of Alaska understands the importance of promoting employment opportunities for everyone, including individuals with disabilities.  

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Alaska's VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
-0.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
739,795
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.19%
Change from
2016 to 2017
53,087
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.15%
Change from
2016 to 2017
23,815
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.69%
Change from
2016 to 2017
44.86%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.54%
Change from
2016 to 2017
75.71%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 738,432 741,894 739,795
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 47,039 50,330 53,087
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 19,951 24,090 23,815
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 314,346 309,682 300,380
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 42.41% 47.86% 44.86%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.07% 76.12% 75.71%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.30% 6.60% 7.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 13.40% 14.50% 15.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.10% 9.40% 10.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 43,821 46,496 49,987
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 38,923 40,656 40,411
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 53,318 55,707 57,928
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 3,158 2,583 4,021
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 4,876 6,411 4,754
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 14,213 16,151 13,858
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 3,878 5,243 4,439
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 792 753 N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 6,183 5,022 7,170
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 792 1,693 1,969

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 722 724 738
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.60% 6.60% 6.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 12,620 12,562 12,317

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,591 2,521 2,295
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 4,456 4,691 4,199
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 8,302 8,524 7,153
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 31.20% 29.60% 32.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.20% 4.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.30% 1.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 0.50% 1.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 133 100 256
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 129 108 123
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A 43 66
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,715 4,449 4,434
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 9 22 22
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 8 14 14
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 89.00% 64.00% 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.09 1.90 1.90

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
974
1,021
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 39 34 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 70 63 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 265 287 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 234 219 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 242 319 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 124 99 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.90% 31.60% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 505 491 423
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 21,233 21,242 21,190
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 45 42 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 47 49 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $6,454,000 $7,599,000 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $40,419,000 $44,552,000 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 23.00% 23.00% N/A
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,856 1,991 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 60.30 64.20 N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 77.47% 63.39% 63.71%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 6.05% 8.84% 9.05%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.74% 2.73% 2.85%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.81% 97.65% 96.95%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 12.59% 13.48% 15.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 43.94% 49.41% 55.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 56.29% 63.83% 66.05%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 31.35% 36.93% 40.53%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. N/A
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 193,961
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 193,961
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 297
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 297
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,663,597

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2 2 2
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2 2 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 22 53 53
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 22 53 53

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Alaska’s “Employment First” legislation calls for “competitive integrated employment” as the preferred outcome for those with disabilities. DOLWD has executed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Health and Social Services; and is obtaining MOU signature with Education and Early Development to ensure progress towards that goal. The MOU includes commitments for active participation on the Interagency Council on Employment First, under the auspices of the Employment First State Coordinator.  (Page 45) Title I

DVR has a cooperative agreement and participates with the Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative (AIEI), which consists of a consortium of agencies committed to working together to improve employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and the Employment First Initiative. The cooperative agreement outlines the goals and collaboration needed to successfully achieve increased employment outcomes for youth with I/DD. The results of this collaboration were published in the Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, vol. 47, no. 3, 2017. (Page 147) Title I
 

Customized Employment

~~DVR provides the services necessary to achieve competitive, integrated employment, such as guidance and counseling, assessment, vocational and other training, transportation, diagnosis and treatment, on-the-job training, job-related services, customized employment, and supported employment.  (Page 28) Title I

In addition, DVR has an on—going commitment to quality SE services, as evidenced by the recent formation and active participation in several cross—agency SE related initiatives such as the Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative and piloting the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model with DBH. DVR has sustained the principles of the system change customized employment grant that focused on wrap—around services for the most severely disabled. DVR continues to be involved in an advisory capacity with different organizations that focus on groups that may often require SE services, such as those individuals with traumatic brain injury, those diagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and individuals with severe mental illness. (Page 154) Title I
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The Alaska Youth Works project has established a multifaceted approach, building on existing systems and services, by creating a bridge framework to provide for coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to career pathway programs and lead to self-sustaining employment. By utilizing resources and leveraging funds, the grant has guided partner agencies in system changes that will sustain their new models after the ending of the grant cycle. (Page 27) Title I

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) “Alaska Youth Works” grant will continue to build a cohesive system with DVR and other partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth with disabilities, ages 14 to 24, by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers. The Alaska Youth Works project will complement DVR services through coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to Pre-Employment Transition Services, career pathway programs and ultimately lead to self-sustaining employment. (Page 168) Title I

Priority 1.3: Continue to improve VR services to rural Alaskans.
Strategies:
• Ensure DVR's rural work group and local TVR partners will meet to identify realistic goals for rural services, develop strategies for meeting these goals, and convey this information to VR field staff.
• Continue to leverage relationships with TVR, LEAs, CRPs, other state agencies and Job Center partners.
• Ensure all rural hubs have a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) timely assigned and trained to meet the needs of rural participants. (Page 173) Title IV

SCSEP coordinates with 75 host sites and leverages resources to ensure successful outcomes for SCSEP participants that foster individual economic self-sufficiency and promote useful opportunities in community service activities. The State provides a wide range of programs and services to seniors, spanning multiple divisions and other private and public entities. Funds from OAA are leveraged with WIOA, other federal programs, and resources from Alaska’s State Employment and Training Program.

SCSEP works closely with DVR to ensure those with special needs or disabilities are enrolled in community service training to work. Once a participant is deemed work ready, DVR’s has an approved provisional hire process and SCSEP works directly with recruitment staff to obtain necessary approval to hire in 9 steps. The provisional hire may be used for any State permanent or non-permanent positions. (Page 206-207) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~DOLWD received a Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) - Round VI grant entitled “Alaska Youth Works” to serve youth with disabilities in 2015. This project will continue to build a cohesive system with multiple partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth with disabilities, aged 14 to 24, by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers. The Alaska Youth Works project has established a multifaceted approach, building on existing systems and services, by creating a bridge framework to provide for coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to career pathway programs and lead to self-sustaining employment. By utilizing resources and leveraging funds, the grant has guided partner agencies in system changes that will sustain their new models after the ending of the grant cycle. (Page 27) Title I

DOLWD supports integration of services through a single delivery system for both businesses and individuals. This efficient use of resources includes integrating all WIOA core programs with Unemployment Insurance (UI), veterans’ programs, the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP), the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program, apprenticeship and sector partnership development, and the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). (Page 53) Title I

The referral process among the core programs is implemented on an individualized basis depending on the specific needs of the individual. All DOLWD staff are trained and expected to be knowledgeable in the requirements and eligibility of other core programs to ensure an appropriate program referral. Appropriate referrals are necessary to leverage resources and maximize service delivery to individuals while ensuring non-duplication of services. For example, AJC staff that provide initial intake and career services have been trained through the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) to appropriately identify and refer individuals to disability services such as the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation, and other supporting entities. This training has provided a high level of thoughtfulness to the reason for each referral, increasing the success for the participant when obtaining needed services. Coordinated data collection mechanisms will be implemented to capture cross-agency referrals. (Pages 54-55) Title I

DETS administers many programs that are covered by the laws, regulations, and policies encompassing POS. These include the WIOA Adult, Youth, and Dislocated Worker programs, Wagner-Peyser, Trade Act programs, National Emergency Grants, SCSEP, Helmets to Hardhats, and the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). (Page 87) Title I

o As a result of 3 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants, all AJC staff have and will continue to receive Disability Resource Coordinator I (DRC I) training, which includes awareness of programmatic and physical barriers to accessibility and covers familiarity of the “ADA checklist for Readily Achievable Barrier Removal.” The ADA checklist is completed annually at each facility and any needed corrective action is identified and implemented;
o The DRC I training is an integrated and mandated part of new-hire training for all AJC staff;
o Each regional office has a higher-level staff member trained to the Disability Resource Coordinator II (DRC II) level, who is the disability and accessibility subject matter expert for the region. The DRC II functions as the technical assistance advisor for all staff on disability and accessibility related issues;
o The DRC IIs, the statewide lead for the DEI, and the Training Coordinator identify periodic and on-going training in specialized topics to augment standardized training and ensure continual learning and awareness in improving access to all services within the AJC system for individuals with disabilities; (Pages 89-90) Title I

The state intends to use the governor’s set-aside funding to enhance services to one or more of Alaska’s priority populations, including youth and adults with disabilities. DOLWD will use these funds to leverage other programs and initiatives, for example, DOLWD’s DEI Grant for Youth and American Apprenticeship Initiative for Health Care. DOLWD may continue to support projects such as the Department of Health and Social Services’ development of the “Disability Benefits 101 (DB101)” online tool. Including incorporating DB101 training for AJC staff and other counselors in using the tool with clients, as well as other programs targeted at serving those with disabilities and multiple barriers to employment. (Page 98) Title I

Youth project operators are procured from the 6 economic regions of the state via a competitive process. Project operators provide academic, employment, and training services to eligible in-school and out-of-school youth ages 14-24. The project operators offer a comprehensive workforce development program that prepares youth for post-secondary education, employment, career development, and can provide accommodations and support services for youth with disabilities. Project operators are familiar with the division’s Disability Employment Initiative youth program and will co-enroll youth with disabilities with the DEI to coordinate work experience and other training and supportive services. (Page 114) Title I

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) “Alaska Youth Works” grant will continue to build a cohesive system with DVR and other partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth with disabilities, ages 14 to 24, by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers. The Alaska Youth Works project will complement DVR services through coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to Pre-Employment Transition Services, career pathway programs and ultimately lead to self-sustaining employment. (Page 168) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows eligible persons with disabilities to secure a “taxed advantaged” savings account of up to $100,000 without affecting public benefit limits. Calculating benefits and ABLE savings is a critical tool for achieving quality long-term outcomes. After the website was completed, AJC and partner staff were trained in using the tool with clients. DOLWD’s Disability Employment Initiative will collaborate with the Department of Health and Social Services’ Work Incentives Planning & Assistance Project (WIPA) on work incentive counseling for Social Security beneficiaries. These projects will build a system with multiple partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth and adults with disabilities by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers through comprehensive access to benefits planning by certified Community Work Incentive Counselors (CWICs). (Page 44) Title I

School to Work Transition

~~Through DVR, Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) provides the following required activities to students with disabilities (16- to 21-year-olds) who are eligible or potentially eligible for vocational rehabilitation services: (1) job exploration counseling, (2) work-based learning opportunities, (3) counseling on postsecondary educational opportunities (4) workplace readiness training, and (5) instruction in self-advocacy. Implementation of (Pre-ETS) has resulted in increased coordination among local school districts and DVR. (Page 45) Title I

DVR has a Transition Services policy that is currently under revision. Additionally, DVR is also drafting new Pre-Employment Transition Services policy and procedures. ADVR has set a policy completion goal of October 2018. In the interim, DVR has created Business Practice Revisions, which provide specific guidance to staff to carry out the Pre—Employment Transition Services activities specified in WIOA. DVR is coordinating with state and local education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from education services to provision of VR services, including having completely revamped the referral process from education agencies to DVR for Pre-Employment Transition Services and VR Services to ensure a smoother transition. Referral forms having been provided to local education officials across Alaska and DVR’s website has been updated to provide information on which regional office is responsible for each school district throughout the state. DVR has established. DVR has prioritized that individualized plans for employment are developed within 90 days or, prior to graduation if an applicant is in the final semester of their final year. (Pages 148-149) Title I

DEED’s Special Education Unit, Division of Teacher and Learning Support (TLS) and DVR have updated their interagency agreement designed to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services. The agreement includes:
• DVR’s assurance of the development and implementation of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services within 90 days of eligibility or at least before the student leaves school;

• Providing or arranging for the provision of pre-employment transition services to all students with disabilities identified as requiring these services;
• Designation of a regional DVR contact in each school district who is responsible for clarifying questions and concerns relating to the implementation of the agreements with the local school districts, including access to DVR’s Transition Coordinator as needed for additional coordination and technical assistance needs to be provided locally or at other events in which a TLS or DVR representative may connect; (Pages 149-150) Title I

Introduction and guidance of students with disabilities to post-school alternatives which include, but are not limited to employment, post-secondary education, vocational training, and adult education, by TLS transition coordinators and ADVR staff. Planning may also include coordination of social or vocational experiences for students with disabilities in real life work settings to improve competitive integrated employment outcomes; and

• DVR’s assurance that the core tenets, principles, and career goals stated in each student’s Individual Education Program (IEP) will be incorporated into the development of their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). EED’s Special Education Unit also provides funding for members of the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee to travel to events related to transition students such as the annual Statewide Special Education Conference. (Page 150) Title I

DVR implemented the simplified Secondary Transition Referral form in 2014 in coordination with DEED. Efforts to encourage referrals through this refined process include DVR/DEED joint training to special education directors at the annual Special Education Director Training and to teachers at the Alaska Statewide Special Education Conference. The form provides teachers with an easy and efficient way to connect a student with the VR counselor serving the school and provides the teacher with an avenue to request a joint conference with the student and counselor. Teachers can access the referral form directly through links on EED’s IEP form, DEED’s transitions resources web page, and DVR’s Transition Tools for Teachers web page. DVR played a pivotal role with the expansion of the ATOP project, by conducting 16 Transition Camps in PY17 including increased coordination with the Division of Juvenile Justice, Office of Children’s Services (OCS), and American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation projects. (Pages 151-152) Title I

DVR Transition Services — DVR reaches out to teachers throughout Alaska in order to provide information on appropriate referral processes to foster students’ transition from secondary school into vocational/academic training and into the world of work. DVR counselors within each regional office are assigned to specific schools to streamline the referral process, ensure counselor participation in Individual Education Plan (IEP) development, and ensure that all schools and students are informed of DVR services. DVR contacts schools on a monthly basis during the school year. Rural and village schools communicate with DVR through their special education staff, as well as DVR staff who are assigned and travel to that rural region. This coordination allows for on-going coordination and education between both LEA staff and local DVR staff. (Page 165) Title I

Under WIOA, VR agencies are required to set aside 15 percent of their federal award to provide required Pre-Employment Transition Services youth currently in school. The 2010-2014 American Community Survey estimated 3,575 Alaskans aged 16-21 who reported experiencing a disability. DVR provides Pre-Employment Transition Services to students with disabilities aged 14-21 who are receiving services under an Individualized Education Program (IEP), eligible for section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, or are otherwise potentially eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation services. In FFY16, ADVR provided Pre-Employment Transition Services to approximately 11 percent of this population. During Program Year 17, the number of students who were provided these services increased to 957 students or approximately 27 percent of the ACS population. This exceeded DVR’s target goal of providing required Pre-Employment Transition Services to 16 percent (585) of new students with a disability annually. This population has been surveyed directly to obtain input into needs and goals for transition information and services and for future CSNA purposes. Barriers that were identified in DVR’s prior CSNA included transportation obstacles, lack of existing programs to meet specific disability needs, unstable living situations, and lack of family support. (Page 169) Title I

DVR supports and participates in the Tapestry Postsecondary Transition Program through the University of Alaska's Center for Human Development. This partnership between DVR, UAA and the Anchorage School District provides students with disabilities Pre-ETS self—advocacy, career exploration, counseling towards postsecondary education, work readiness and a work experience. This program is specifically geared towards a population that could benefit from postsecondary education but needs assistance with overcoming barriers before they can fully participate. The partnership with the school district allows students, not eligible for further transition services through the district, to defer their diploma for a 1-year intensive program on the UAA campus. (Page 180) Title I

Career Pathways

~~The Department of Health and Social Services developed a website called “Disability Benefits 101 (DB101),” an online tool for those with disabilities that provides available work incentives and helps individuals determine how their SSI, SSDI, or other public benefits may be impacted by employment. The Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows eligible persons with disabilities to secure a “taxed advantaged” savings account of up to $100,000 without affecting public benefit limits. Calculating benefits and ABLE savings is a critical tool for achieving quality long-term outcomes. After the website was completed, AJC and partner staff were trained in using the tool with clients. DOLWD’s Disability Employment Initiative will collaborate with the Department of Health and Social Services’ Work Incentives Planning & Assistance Project (WIPA) on work incentive counseling for Social Security beneficiaries. These projects will build a system with multiple partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth and adults with disabilities by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers through comprehensive access to benefits planning by certified Community Work Incentive Counselors (CWICs). (Page 44) Title I

DVR works closely with local school districts, hospitals, and CRPs to implement the national Project SEARCH model in the Matanuska—Susitna, Kenai, Anchorage, and Fairbanks school districts. A collaborative internship model was developed in FFY2012 to provide youth with developmental or intellectual disabilities opportunities to learn real job skills in 1—year, school—to—work internship positions set up throughout the 3 hospitals involved. Sites were at Mat—Su Regional Medical Center, Central Peninsula Hospital, Providence Medical Center, and Fairbanks Memorial Hospital. Total workplace immersion facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and OJT and support through internships or worksite rotations. The goal for each participant is obtaining integrated employment using the skills learned through the internships. The State of Alaska has adopted this model for student interns with developmental disabilities. For SY17, 24 youth participated in Project SEARCH, and 22 successfully completed their internships at the hospitals with 14 of those individuals now working in paid, competitive employment. Project SEARCH is no longer being funded by the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education. The Project SEARCH model is being used to provide Pre—Employment Transition Services to Students with Disabilities under the Client Services Component. (Page 180) Title IV

Apprenticeship
Additionally, the American Apprenticeship Initiative grant will increase the number of Registered Apprentices in Alaska’s health care industry. The project will significantly increase career awareness, strengthen existing career pathways, introduce new career pathways, and significantly help employers fill entry-level positions in high-demand health care sector occupations. DVR will promote the availability of this project to individuals with disabilities who are interested in pursuing occupations in the health care industry. In the pre-apprenticeship program, 9 percent self-identified as having a disability, through calendar year 2017. ETS is unable to provide specific information on whether these individuals are being served by DVR. (Page 168) Title IV
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~DOLWD’s Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) will continue to provide training for AJC and partner staff working with clients who have disabilities. Alaska has implemented the Ticket to Work program and is reaching out to those on Social Security Insurance (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) to encourage them to go to an AJC for those services. DOLWD has a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Divisions of Vocational Rehabilitation and Division of Employment and Training Services to provide seamless Partnership Plus services for beneficiaries of Social Security benefits. Both divisions will work to expand this program to other agencies and programs, such as the Division of Behavioral Health; the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services; the Division of Public Assistance Work Services; and Centers for Independent Living.
The Department of Health and Social Services developed a website called “Disability Benefits 101 (DB101),” an online tool for those with disabilities that provides available work incentives and helps individuals determine how their SSI, SSDI, or other public benefits may be impacted by employment. (Page 44) Title I

To ensure these activities are carried out to the maximum extent possible, DVR will:
- Ensure DETS staff are regularly trained or made aware of DVR and its services. This is especially true of DETS locations that are served by DVR on an itinerant basis.
- DVR leadership team and managers continue to identify functional DETS issues that require on-going work at all levels of the division including integration and the local management teams.
- Work with DETS staff to develop a means to provide information about DVR to individuals who self-identify as having a disability and who receive job training services through DETS programs.
- Develop a referral process to the DETS employment networks.
- Train DVR staff to use DETS services. (Pages 168-169) Title IV

Priority 3.5: Evaluate Social Security Reimbursement Process
Strategies:
• Implement a new Ticket To Work (TTW) tracking system.
• Monitor ticket reimbursement amounts. Performance Indicators:
• Software implemented and staff trained.
• Continued collection of Social Security Reimbursements.
• Improved capability to capture all available reimbursements. (Page 176) Title IV

Priority 3. Evaluate Social Security Reimbursement Process.
• Strategies contributing to success:
o Purchased new software that automates the process for submitting claims to SSA for the Ticket to Work program. (Page 188) Title IV

Another long-term strategy to improve SCSEP services is to include discussion with participants on financial and work incentives, to provide information on Social Security 1619b Medicaid While Working, and to explore specialized work incentives through programs including Ticket to Work, Impairment-Related Work Expenses, Blind Work Expenses, and Plan to Achieve Self-Support, and to provide referrals to those in need of these services. (Page 210) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Employer service representatives, particularly Business Connection staff, pay attention to local labor market trends to match employers with skilled job seekers. Staff work with employers to coordinate recruitments, plan job fairs, post job orders, provide applicant pre-screening and referrals, develop jobs, provide space for job recruitments, and offer employment and training service plans. Using a mass e-mail distribution list of employers and other interested parties, staff send daily messages on new job postings, recruitments at the AJCs, and upcoming job fairs. DOLWD has identified that the health care, oil and gas, and mining industries are the highest-demand industries and continually engages industry leaders in these fields. Under WIOA, Business Connection staff will be provided more in-depth training to work with the various industry sector partnerships to meet training and labor needs for those industries. (Page 56) Title I

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) partners with employers to promote the hiring of individuals with disabilities. DVR has implemented the dual customer model to deliver services to employers. DVR has created a Business Employment Services Team (DVR-BEST), which is tasked with providing employers with the four required services as outlined in Section 109 of the Rehabilitation Act within WIOA, to secure competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities, which is part of DOLWD’s strategy to focus on serving those with disabilities. (Page 58) Title I

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) utilizes a management information system called AWARE. AWARE was developed based on Vocation Rehabilitation (VR) business practices and federal requirements. AWARE offers a comprehensive set of cases, financial, and organizational modules. The features and procedures in AWARE are consistent and standardized throughout all modules, and are designed around the natural flow of the VR case process, making it intuitive for VR Counselors. (Page 65) Title I

AWIB members come from a variety of industries and represent all geographic and economic regions of the state. They bring the voice of employers, educational institutions, Alaska Native regional corporations, and other workforce partners in their respective regions. The AWIB focuses on employer engagement, connecting education and training strategies through building career pathways; supporting work-based learning; and improving career results for all job seekers and employers alike, based on the demographics and needs of each economic region. The AWIB will continue to successfully carry out the functions of both a state board and a local board, as it has for over a decade. (Page 95) Title I

Most AWIB members are representatives of business and the private sector. Board members come from a variety of industries throughout the state and are committed to bringing the voice of employers to the table and reaching out to others to engage them in the workforce system. In addition, in response to feedback from ETA, two chief local elected officials have been appointed to the board. The AWIB will continue to focus not only on employer engagement but on connecting education and training strategies through building career pathways, supporting work-based learning, and improving career results for all job seekers and employers alike. (Pages 119-120) Title I

DVR partners with employers to promote the hiring of individuals with disabilities. DVR implemented the dual customer model to deliver services to employers. DVR has a Business Employment Services Team (BEST) that is tasked with providing employers four core services as outlined in WIOA.

1. Training and Technical Assistance in:

• Understanding the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its application to a workplace situation; referral to the ADA partners’ project;
• Disability awareness training provided to HR, managers, staff, boards, and other interested groups;
• Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs regulations;
• U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission regulations;
• Balancing the application of federal, state, and local employment laws and regulations.

2. Creating Opportunities for Placement by:

• Developing opportunities for both adults and youth to provide a full range of unpaid work experiences, informational interviews, job shadows, and On—the—Job Training (OJT);
• Offering recruitment supports, assisting in workforce development including placement, OJT, Schedule A, and Provisional Hire;
• OJT, Job Coaching, and external training (not at worksite).3. Network Development through:
• Connecting with community partners and employers, locally and nationally. The BEST has connected over 50 employers with the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs staffers, the Governor’s Council on Disabilities & Special Education, the AJC’s Business Connection, and the VA VR&E’s employment support team. (Pages 154-155) Title IV

DVR’s most underserved population continues to be rural Alaskans. This has been an ongoing challenge for the Rural Development Team, as there are so few jobs within remote and rural communities. Available employment opportunities and employers are much more available in urban areas. The Rural Team strategizes ways to obtain more CRPs in rural areas, which are traditionally underserved. The Business Employment Services Team has been created specifically to provide outreach and training services to employers, with the goal of encouraging more employers to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. (Page 181) Title IV

Performance measure 6: Effectiveness in Serving Employers.

• DVR is working with the Business Development Team to develop and track contacts and services/training provided to employers. (Page 192) Title IV

Data Collection
The department has initiated the procurement process for a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) system to replace both the primary WIOA title 1-B database, Individual Case Management (ICM), and the Wagner-Peyser labor exchange services ALEXsys database. Anticipated to be fully implemented during state fiscal year 2019, the COTS system may require significant changes in the data collection process, but will result in more accurate WIOA reporting. Implementation of this new system represents a significant step forward toward the eventual common reporting anticipated for all programs, and the combined system will promote integrated service delivery, improved efficiency, and reduced duplication of services. All references in this Combined Plan relative to data collected in or reported from ICM and ALEXsys will continue, possibly with greater accuracy, under the new system. (Page 84) Title I Priority 3.2: DVR will meet or exceed state and federal common performance measures Strategies: • Negotiate targets for required common performance measures, based on baseline data collected. • Work with WIOA Core partners to implement activities identified in the Alaska Combined State Plan, including common performance measures. • Amend Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Key Performance Indicators, Missions & Measures (M&Ms) to more closely align with WIOA performance measures. (Page 175) Title IV Priority 3.3: Implement federally required RSA-911changes to the AWARE case management system Strategies: • Analyze all changes to case management (AWARE) software and determine their impact on field and accounting staff. • Train staff in timely manner. Performance Indicators: • Required data is collected accurately. • Federal reports produced on time and accurately. • DVR services are not negatively impacted (Page 176) Title IV Priority 2. Implement all federally mandated changes to RSA-911 report. • Strategies contributing to success: o Case Management Software is managed by Alliance Enterprises and they have been very responsive to incorporating changes in the data collection. o Other State programs have been generous in sharing time, resources, and their interpretation of required elements. o Both RSA and Alliance Enterprises have developed edit programs which enable DVR to produce error-free reports. o Able to plan and execute state-wide training on new data collection requirements. (Pages 187-188) Title IV DVR has not reported, nor historically collected data, on the 6 performance accountability indicators under section 116 of WIOA. DVR is unable to predict its future performance on any of the 6 performance indicators, including the SE program goals, until baseline targets have been established. DVR has data sharing agreements with DOLWD’s Unemployment Insurance and Research and Analysis units in order to establish the data collection necessary for determining baseline indicators and future reporting. As DVR is still accumulating baseline data, all indicators are marked as “To Be Determined” in Appendix C of the Combined State Plan, per instructions. (Page 191) Title IV
511

~~The State of Alaska has a State Rehabilitation Council consistent with Section 105 of the Act and 34 CFR 361.17. The State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee (SVRC) serves as the State Rehabilitation Council. At every SVRC quarterly meeting, the focus is on a particular region of the state, such as Anchorage, Northern, rural, etc. Agenda items include reports from the Director, Chief and the specific area manager; general DVR operations, major initiatives and regional and statewide challenges. In addition, there are reports from various partners such as the Alaska Workforce Investment Board, Tribal VR programs, Parent Training representative, Client Assistance Program, the State Independent Living Council and the Governor’s Council of Disabilities and Special Education. During this past year, the quarterly meetings included guest presentations addressing such topics as DVR’s Pre-ETS programs, transition from corrections/incarceration, repealing subminimum wage regulations, new WIOA requirements, the ABLE Act in Alaska, Peer Mentoring, and DVR’s collaboration with University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation programs, Alaska Job Centers, Independent Living Center Access Alaska’s efforts to better serve Barrow and the North Slope. (Page 145) Title IV

DVR has, or is in the process of developing, cooperative agreements with all levels of educational institutions within the state, including local school districts, the Department of Education & Early Development (DEED), and the University of Alaska statewide system. DVRs agreement with DEED has not yet been finalized, however there is a target date of August 2018 as an effective date. The agreement, which will form the basis for LEA agreements outlines the overarching purpose of the transition from high school or the education of those students and youth with disabilities. Additionally, respective definitions are described in order to ensure programmatic understanding. These agreements will, or do contain specific information regarding consultation and technical assistance, transition planning for students, roles and responsibilities for each agency, coordination for employment in subminimum wage (which is now a moot point), assurances, and financial responsibilities of each agency. (Page 149) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
The assessment of One-Stop delivery system partner program services is based on participant outcomes identified under their statutorily required performance and reporting requirements. However, the WIOA joint performance measures, which consist of six customer outcomes specific to core indicators of performance and employer satisfaction, demonstrate value in promoting integration of services and boosting accessibility and transparency within the workforce system. Therefore, if possible, the same measures and methodologies are applied to other One-Stop partner programs that are applied to the core programs, in addition to any program-specific measures required by federal or state regulations. Regardless of whether a program is a core program or a partner program, or whether a measure is required by WIOA or partner program law and regulation, performance measures and performance evaluations will be applied at the customer level first and then may be aggregated by program or population. (Pages 77-78) Title IV The state’s One-Stop system of Alaska Job Centers (AJCs) has developed a comprehensive approach to ensure accessibility and inclusion of all customers, including those with disabilities, to all facilities, programs, and services. Physical and programmatic accessibility are continuously evaluated with an annual Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) assessment and continuous improvement strategies planned and implemented when needed. Alaska will continue to refine the policies, training, and continuous improvement strategies to ensure compliance with WIOA and continued compliance with ADA. Additionally, the State of Alaska recently hired an ADA Coordinator who ensures accessibility of state offices for both the public and employees. The One-Stop system’s approach to ADA compliance includes: o Physical and programmatic accessibility; o Staff training and accountability; o Adaptive technology and other accommodations; and o On-going survey of effectiveness and continuous improvement. (Pages 88-89) Title I o Job centers provide individuals with disabilities access to information, resources, programs and activities in a manner that allows each individual, no matter their disability, the opportunity of full inclusion. All workshops, public access, programs, etc. are fully accessible, to ensure that the opportunities and benefits provided by the job center are available to individuals with disabilities in an equally effective and integrated manner; o “Alaska Job Center Universal Access for Customers with Disabilities” policy plays a vital role in establishing the working-level framework for outlining and improving the accessibility, capacity, and accountability of AJCs to serve customers with disabilities. The policy covers both physical and programmatic accessibility within AJCs and outlines the assistive technologies available and required staff training; o Each location has appropriate signage identifying the policy that no individual with a disability shall, by reason of such disability, be excluded from participation in, or be denied the benefit of, the services, programs, or activities of the AJCs; o All job centers use universal design with printed materials. All posters, flyers, brochures, etc. use common principles throughout the design. The outreach and marketing materials developed for distribution from the AJCs to partners, job seekers, and employers contain notice of the availability of auxiliary aids and services for needed accommodations to access programs and services; (Page 89) Title I o Each AJC is equipped with a Universal Access Accessibility Station that is designed to improve the quality of the job applicant’s experience, no matter the disability. Each station is designed with state-of -the art technology that can help job seekers with disabilities navigation the World of Work with based on their personal independence level. o Assistive Technology (AT) available includes screen readers, magnifiers, adaptive software, virtual sign language interpretation, closed captioning on scrolling program and services video, motorized adjustable workstations, specialized keyboards and mice, TTY phones, and personal voice amplification device; o “Tips for Improving Access to Workshops and Training” has been developed and disseminated to staff. This document offers guidance and suggestions on increasing accessibility and success for individuals attending AJC workshops and training sessions and is broken down by disability type. The document outlines ways the facilitator or trainer can incorporate accommodations and adaptations into the class to ensure an optimal learning environment for all; and o Any program and service may be accommodated for full inclusion on an “as needed” basis with the accommodation being dependent on the needs of the individual customer and provided through the AJCs in collaboration with partners. (Page 90) Title I o AJC certification occurs annually and is a collaborative process involving all partners of the One-Stop delivery system. The joint AJC management team collectively completes the documents and surveys for the certification and submits them to the AWIB for approval. Certification involves reviewing site working agreements, cost allocations, self-assessment surveys, and the ADA accessibility survey. In addition to reviewing all submitted documents, members of the AWIB conduct an on-site review identifying best practices and need for corrective action planning. Based on their review and findings, the AWIB recommends and approves certification; (Page 90) Title I Information on physical and programmatic accessibility for individuals with disabilities is supported by statewide activities funding and reinforced by the AJC Universal Access for Individuals with Disability Policy 07-516 (Page 98) Title I DVR continues to work with the Department of Administration, Division of Personnel and Labor Relations, the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, and the State of Alaska as a Model Employer for Individuals with Disabilities. In order to create a baseline, an extensive state employee survey was conducted so state employees may self-disclose their ADA defined disability. This survey will assist with ensuring reasonable accommodations for these employees. DVR continues to see considerable progress in expanding and improving Alaska’s Provisional Hire program as part of this effort. Additionally, the State of Alaska recently hired a full time ADA Coordinator to ensure accessibility for all employees. DVR continues to have an Interagency Agreement in place with the Department of Veterans Affairs Vocational Rehabilitation & Education (VR&E) to cooperate, coordinate, and collaborate for the creation of a powerful force within the rehabilitation community to increase vocational opportunities for veterans of the military service in the United States, regardless of the level of disability, by including DVR as a partner in a comprehensive system of case management. DVR has assigned a VRC to attend monthly meetings with VR&E to strengthen collaboration and coordination of services for this population. (Pages 146-148) Title IV
Vets
The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) is administered by DOLWD and serves unemployed, low-income persons who are at least 55 years of age and have a family income of no more than 125 percent of the federal poverty level. Enrollment priority is given to veterans and qualified spouses, then to individuals who are over 65, have a disability, low literacy skills or limited English proficiency, and who reside in a rural area, are homeless or at risk of homelessness, have low employment prospects, or have failed to find employment after using services through the Alaska Job Centers (AJCs). (Page 29) Title I Some AJCs have Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans’ Employment Representative (LVER) staff funded by the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG). These staff members provide vital services to both veterans and employers seeking employment-related assistance. DETS complies with all federal guidance for JVSG staff and seeks to fully utilize the expertise of DVOPs and LVERs. DETS developed a referral process to direct veterans to the appropriate staff member to ensure a client-centered approach to the delivery of career and training services. When job seekers indicate veteran status upon initial entry to an AJC, staff members are trained to engage them to determine if they are eligible for DVOP services. Veterans are asked a series of questions and handed a checklist of the eligibility criteria to see a DVOP, which is reviewed with the veteran. If veterans indicate they meet one of the eligibility criteria, staff attempt to immediately connect them with a DVOP. If a DVOP is unavailable, eligible veterans will receive the DVOP’s contact information and staff will ensure the appropriate DVOP receives the veteran’s information so they can connect with one another. AJCs follow a team approach to serving customers, including providing services to veterans. Teams work together to support the roles of LVERs and DVOPs in providing services to veterans. All staff are trained to deliver as many services to veterans as possible to ease the burden on DVOPs. DETS encourages staff to engage veterans and insists that all AJC staff are veterans’ representatives, not just JVSG-funded staff. The state follows all Special Grant Provisions, Veterans’ Program Letters, USDOL/VETS Law 107- 288, and United States Code Title 38. (Page 88) Title I A large percentage of claimants selected for RESEA will be military veterans, a group who are always a top priority in Alaska. Some of the veterans will be recently separated from the military and others will be veterans who meet the criteria associated with the most likely to exhaust UI benefits. The latter are veterans who are homeless, disabled, or have other significant barriers to reemployment. In the three RESEA AJCs with on-site Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) staff, a personal introduction and referral to the DVOP will be the norm. In other AJCs, RESEA staff will telephonically introduce the RESEA participant to the DVOPs who serve veterans itinerantly for that region. (Pages 125-126) Title I DVR continues to have an Interagency Agreement in place with the Department of Veterans Affairs Vocational Rehabilitation & Education (VR&E) to cooperate, coordinate, and collaborate for the creation of a powerful force within the rehabilitation community to increase vocational opportunities for veterans of the military service in the United States, regardless of the level of disability, by including DVR as a partner in a comprehensive system of case management. DVR has assigned a VRC to attend monthly meetings with VR&E to strengthen collaboration and coordination of services for this population. (Pages 147-148) Title I Additionally, DVR has developed in-house staff responsible for expanding DVRs presence in local communities for both employment opportunities and to increase referral sources as well. DVR attends all local job fairs whenever possible, the largest being the Veterans job fair every November. DVR staff frequently presents at partnership meetings across the state. (Page 180) Title I
Mental Health

~~DVR continues to work with individuals assigned to the Anchorage Mental Health Court. Mental Health Courts are designed to divert people with mental disabilities, charged with misdemeanor offenses, from incarceration and into community treatment and services including mental health counseling and vocational rehabilitation as appropriate. The hope is to prevent further contacts with the criminal justice system. (Pages 146-147) Title I

The current MOU between DVR and the Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) is in the process of being updated to clarify roles and responsibilities relative to common consumers and assure services are provided in accordance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and WIOA. A preliminary draft of a MOU document is almost complete. DVR provided DHB with the draft MOU on January 31, 2018. Both agencies have identified the Individual Placement and Support model to pilot in at least two regions. DBH is requesting proposals from providers who will provide IPS in Kenai and Anchorage. This model is designed for individuals with significant mental health disabilities to better prepare them for long-term employment. Additionally, DHS is now moving towards providing long-term supports for this population, making pursing supported employment a better option for this population. Each agency has assigned staff to resolve any issues or questions and it is anticipated that the MOU will be executed no later than late 2018. (Page 157) Title IV

• Work with the Center for Human Development, the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority, the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, and other partners to increase provider capacity for employment services and supports. (Page 179) Title IV

Strategies contributing to success:

• Continued efforts coordinated with the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education.

• Continued to work with the Center for Human Development and the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority to increase provider capacity for employment services and supports.

• Continued to increase use of the Provisional Hire process. (Pages 190-191) Title IV

Goals and Priorities for the FFY2017—FFY2020 supported employment (SE) program:

1. DVR will provide SE services to 200 eligible individuals.

2. DVR will set aside 50 percent of the SE award to provide services to youth with the most significant disabilities.

3. DVR will assist 50 SE eligible individuals to obtain competitive employment.

4. DVR will be able to provide all the identified required VR services to all SE eligible individuals.

5. Explore opportunities for CRPs and other entities to become employment networks to provide long—term supports.

6. Work with the community mental health system to increase and establish work—related programs within that system.

7. Emphasize community—based, integrated employment settings with the Governor’s Council on Disability and Special Education, the Alaska Mental Health Board, community behavioral health programs, and the Alaska Mental Health Trust to increase vocational programs within the mental health service delivery system. (Pages 192-193) Title IV

4. DVR has continued to work with the community mental health system to increase and/or to reinstate work related programs within that system of providers. (Page 193) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
The Wagner-Peyser program provides services for job seekers and employers. Services for job seekers, including MSFWs, include an extensive online job bank for researching job openings; referrals to job openings, training or other employment services; job search consulting and workshops; aptitude, interest and proficiency tests; career guidance; area business job fairs; special services to veterans, migrant seasonal farm workers and individuals with disabilities; and re-employment services to claimants identified through the state’s Unemployment Insurance system as high-risk for exhausting benefits prior to re-employment, including recently separated veterans. (Page 131) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 76

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“United Way of Anchorage (UWA) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” population that is disproportionately without access to coverage or care and may lack knowledge about affordable options. Including, but not limited to—re-entry population, the unemployed, hourly wage workers, seasonal workers (ie: commercial fishers), variable income workers and low-income families with children, immigrants, young adults, and university students. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.. They will partner with  Alaska Primary Care Association, Community health centers, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Mat-Su Health Services, Aging and Disability Resource Center, Alaska Division of Public Assistance, Anchorage Project Access,  and Alaska 2-1-1.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:Sue BroganPhone: ( 907) 263-3821Email: SBrogan@ak.org

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

1115 Behavioral Health Medicaid Waiver - 06/27/2019

~~“Medicaid Section 1115 Demonstration Waivers provide states with flexibility to test new approaches within Medicaid to aid in redesigning and improving their health systems without increasing costs.Alaska’s 1115 Waiver

In January 2018, Alaska applied to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for approval of an 1115 behavioral health waiver that would create a data-driven, integrated behavioral health system of care for Alaskans experiencing serious mental illness, severe emotional disturbance, substance use disorder (SUD), co-occurring substance use and mental illness, and at-risk families and children.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Student Summer Work Programs - 05/27/2019

~~“We have paid summer work programs in a variety of communities. Most are 4-6 weeks long and provide students with valuable work experience. Program content varies depending on the community. See list of programs below for details.Who Can ApplyA student with a disability is: an individual age 14-21 and enrolled in secondary education (high school) who:• Is on an IEP or 504 plan, or• Is a student who is potentially eligible for DVR services because of a physical, sensory, intellectual, mental health, and communication disabilities and whose disability could be a barrier to postsecondary education or employment.”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Work Incentive Planning & Assistance (WIPA) - 05/06/2019

~~“The Alaska WIPA Project provides assistance to beneficiaries who are working at wage employment, self-employment, or who have a job offer pending. Assistance is offered to help understand the various work incentive programs that might be available, and provide advice about how to manage one’s benefits during the transition to paid employment. We provide both initial and follow along assistance to beneficiaries. Benefits Counseling and a written Benefits Summary Analysis (BSA) is provided free of charge.

If you are currently working, about to begin work, or are self-employed, please contact the Alaska WIPA Project.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development Veterans Employment Services - 04/15/2019

~~“The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development has 21 Job Centers across the state. The Anchorage (Midtown and Muldoon), Fairbanks, and Wasilla Job Centers have on-site Veteran Representatives; however, all Job Centers provide priority services to qualified Veterans and their eligible Spouse.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Alaska Job Centers - 04/01/2019

~~This page iscontains a list of the Job Centers in Alaska with addresses, telephone numbers and links.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Veteran Services - 02/06/2019

~~Alaska Department of Labor offers a priority of service and benefits to veterans, and eligible spouses or caregivers, seeking employment, apprenticeship opportunities, and on-the-job training programs that pay veterans while they prepare for a sustainable career. Eligibility for these services:

Veterans who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released under conditions other than dishonorable,; special disabled veterans who have significant barriers to employment, as well as eligible spouses and caregivers, are eligible for specialized intensive services to obtain or retain employment.Veteran Services

Examples of priority of service for veterans are described by linking to the website.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Senate Bill 174 - 08/25/2018

~~"Alaska Senate Bill 174 reinforced person-centered support services planning and reaffirmed that the policy of the state encourages and enables persons with physical and mental disabilities to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Alaska Transition Plan for HCBS - 08/22/2018

~~“The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Senior and Disabilities Services (SDS) now submits for public review and comment the fourth version of its Transition Plan (“Plan”) in accordance with CFR 42 §441.301(c)(6). This describes what SDS and providers have been working on to ensure that Alaska’s HCBS settings achieve compliance with the elements of the final rule.  The State has described how compliance has been assessed; what the outcomes are; what educational strategies have been used; how providers have achieved compliance through remediation strategies; and what collaborative strategies will be used to ensure ongoing compliance after the deadline of March 22, 2019”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Webinar-On-Demand and Quiz - 07/12/2018

~~A training about the home and community based settings rules, what Program Administrators need to know and do, and how to request and complete the required self - assessment survey. This training is for Administrators or those applying to be administrators for the following services: Supported Employment, Residential Habilitation: Group home, Residential Habilitation: Family Home Habilitation, Residential Habilitation: Supported Living, Congregate Meals, Adult Day Services, Day Habilitation, and Residential Supported Living.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Senate Bill 174 - 08/25/2018

~~"Alaska Senate Bill 174 reinforced person-centered support services planning and reaffirmed that the policy of the state encourages and enables persons with physical and mental disabilities to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Minimum wage exemption for persons with disabilities eliminated - 02/16/2018

~~“JUNEAU, Alaska— Following a regulatory change that goes into effect today, Alaska employers are no longer allowed to pay less than minimum wage to workers who experience disabilities. In repealing 8 AAC 15.120, Alaska joins New Hampshire and Maryland as the first states in the nation to eliminate payment of subminimum wages for persons with disabilities. An exemption from paying minimum wage to persons with disabilities has existed for many years, beginning at the federal level with the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and in Alaska regulations since 1978. Historically, minimum wage exemptions were considered necessary to help people with disabilities gain employment. Experience over the past two decades has shown that workers with disabilities can succeed in jobs earning minimum wage or more. “Workers who experience disabilities are valued members of Alaska’s workforce,” said Department of Labor and Workforce Development Acting Commissioner Greg Cashen. “They deserve minimum wage protections as much as any other Alaskan worker.” The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development received written comments expressing support for repealing the regulation that allowed the minimum wage exemption from the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Alaska Workforce Investment Board. The elimination of the minimum wage exemption brings employment practices into alignment with Alaska Employment First Act of 2014, which requires vocational services help people with disabilities to become gainfully employed at or above the minimum wage.” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Alaska House Bill 188 “ABLE Accounts Bill” - 08/08/2016

Summary An Act establishing a program for financial accounts for individuals with disabilities; exempting the procurement of contracts for the program from the State Procurement Code; exempting certain information on participants in the program from being subject to inspection as a public record; providing that an account under the program for an individual with a disability is not a security; allowing a state to file a claim against an individual's financial account under the program to recover Medicaid payments after the individual's death; and providing for an effective date. The bill was enrolled on July 8, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Alaska ABLE Savings Program Act - 04/11/2015

An Act relating to financial accounts for persons with disabilities; relating to financial institutions; relating to property exemptions; relating to securities; and providing for an effective date.

Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Alaska HB 211 - Making Alaska an “Employment First State" - 09/19/2014

An Act relating to the education and employment of individuals with disabilities."  Signed into law on 9/19/14 by Governor Sean Parnell. Sec. 23.15.095. Gainful employment of individuals with disabilities. (a) When providing vocational training, vocational rehabilitation, or employment placement of an individual with a disability, the agency's primary objective and preferred outcome is to help the individual become gainfully employed in an integrated workplace where individuals with disabilities work with and alongside of individuals without disabilities.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Alaska House Bill 139 - 03/05/2014

“Sec. 2. AS 18.80.200 is amended to read:

(b) Therefore, it is the policy of the state and the purpose of this chapter to eliminate and prevent discrimination in employment, in credit and financing practices, in places of public accommodation, in the sale, lease, or rental of real property because of race, religion, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, physical or mental disability, marital status, changes in marital status, pregnancy or parenthood. It is also the policy of the state to encourage and enable physically and mentally disabled persons to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state and to engage in remunerative employment. It is not the purpose of this chapter to supersede laws pertaining to child labor, the age of majority, or other age restrictions or requirements.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 30

Student Summer Work Programs - 05/27/2019

~~“We have paid summer work programs in a variety of communities. Most are 4-6 weeks long and provide students with valuable work experience. Program content varies depending on the community. See list of programs below for details.Who Can ApplyA student with a disability is: an individual age 14-21 and enrolled in secondary education (high school) who:• Is on an IEP or 504 plan, or• Is a student who is potentially eligible for DVR services because of a physical, sensory, intellectual, mental health, and communication disabilities and whose disability could be a barrier to postsecondary education or employment.”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development Veterans Employment Services - 04/15/2019

~~“The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development has 21 Job Centers across the state. The Anchorage (Midtown and Muldoon), Fairbanks, and Wasilla Job Centers have on-site Veteran Representatives; however, all Job Centers provide priority services to qualified Veterans and their eligible Spouse.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Alaska Job Centers - 04/01/2019

~~This page iscontains a list of the Job Centers in Alaska with addresses, telephone numbers and links.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Veteran Services - 02/06/2019

~~Alaska Department of Labor offers a priority of service and benefits to veterans, and eligible spouses or caregivers, seeking employment, apprenticeship opportunities, and on-the-job training programs that pay veterans while they prepare for a sustainable career. Eligibility for these services:

Veterans who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released under conditions other than dishonorable,; special disabled veterans who have significant barriers to employment, as well as eligible spouses and caregivers, are eligible for specialized intensive services to obtain or retain employment.Veteran Services

Examples of priority of service for veterans are described by linking to the website.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Webinar-On-Demand and Quiz - 07/12/2018

~~A training about the home and community based settings rules, what Program Administrators need to know and do, and how to request and complete the required self - assessment survey. This training is for Administrators or those applying to be administrators for the following services: Supported Employment, Residential Habilitation: Group home, Residential Habilitation: Family Home Habilitation, Residential Habilitation: Supported Living, Congregate Meals, Adult Day Services, Day Habilitation, and Residential Supported Living.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Alaska Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Combined Plan 2018 Update - 04/02/2018

~~Alaska’s “Employment First” legislation calls for “competitive integrated employment” as the preferred outcome for those with disabilities. DOLWD has executed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) withHealth and Social Services; and is obtaining MOU signature with Education and Early Development to ensure progress towards that goal. The MOU includes commitments for active participation on the Interagency Council on Employment First, under the   auspices of the Employment First State Coordinator. 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

Minimum wage exemption for persons with disabilities eliminated - 02/16/2018

~~“JUNEAU, Alaska— Following a regulatory change that goes into effect today, Alaska employers are no longer allowed to pay less than minimum wage to workers who experience disabilities. In repealing 8 AAC 15.120, Alaska joins New Hampshire and Maryland as the first states in the nation to eliminate payment of subminimum wages for persons with disabilities. An exemption from paying minimum wage to persons with disabilities has existed for many years, beginning at the federal level with the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and in Alaska regulations since 1978. Historically, minimum wage exemptions were considered necessary to help people with disabilities gain employment. Experience over the past two decades has shown that workers with disabilities can succeed in jobs earning minimum wage or more. “Workers who experience disabilities are valued members of Alaska’s workforce,” said Department of Labor and Workforce Development Acting Commissioner Greg Cashen. “They deserve minimum wage protections as much as any other Alaskan worker.” The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development received written comments expressing support for repealing the regulation that allowed the minimum wage exemption from the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Alaska Workforce Investment Board. The elimination of the minimum wage exemption brings employment practices into alignment with Alaska Employment First Act of 2014, which requires vocational services help people with disabilities to become gainfully employed at or above the minimum wage.” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Minimum wage exemption for persons with disabilities eliminated - 02/16/2018

JUNEAU, Alaska— Following a regulatory change that goes into effect today, Alaska employers are no longer allowed to pay less than minimum wage to workers who experience disabilities. In repealing 8 AAC 15.120, Alaska joins New Hampshire and Maryland as the first states in the nation to eliminate payment of subminimum wages for persons with disabilities. An exemption from paying minimum wage to persons with disabilities has existed for many years, beginning at the federal level with the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and in Alaska regulations since 1978. Historically, minimum wage exemptions were considered necessary to help people with disabilities gain employment. Experience over the past two decades has shown that workers with disabilities can succeed in jobs earning minimum wage or more.  “Workers who experience disabilities are valued members of Alaska’s workforce,” said Department of Labor and Workforce Development Acting Commissioner Greg Cashen. “They deserve minimum wage protections as much as any other Alaskan worker.” The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development received written comments expressing support for repealing the regulation that allowed the minimum wage exemption from the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Alaska Workforce Investment Board.  The elimination of the minimum wage exemption brings employment practices into alignment with Alaska Employment First Act of 2014, which requires vocational services help people with disabilities to become gainfully employed at or above the minimum wage.  

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit - 11/16/2017

~~“The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit is responsible for monitoring service providers and supports systems serving individuals who experience an intellectual or developmental disability. The IDD Unit oversees the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities waiver (IDD waiver) and, in spring 2018, the new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW).

The new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW) was developed to replace the Community Developmental Disabilities Grant (CDDG) program, which will end June 30, 2018. The ISW will also extend supports to individuals who had not been covered by the grant program.”

The purpose of both waivers is to offer qualified participants a choice between home and community-based services or supports in an institutional setting.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Services Conditions of Participation - 11/05/2017

~~“Supported employment services may be provided to assist recipients to acquire and maintain the work-related skills necessary to become self-employed or for employment in an integrated work setting in the general workforce, at or above minimum wage with the level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals who are not recipients.  These services focus on activities that will meet the recipients’ personal and career goals, lead to an appropriate job match for the recipient and the employer, and may include vocational or job-related discovery or assessment, person-centered employment planning, job placement, job development, negotiation with prospective employers, job analysis, job carving, training and systematic instruction, and career advancement activities. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Information on the Formal Interagency Agreement with the State Educational Agency - 06/30/2018

~~DEED’s Special Education Unit and DVR have an interagency agreement that is designed to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services. The agreement includes: • DVR’s assurance of the development and implementation of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services before the student leaves school; • Designation of a regional DVR contact who is responsible for clarifying questions and concerns relating to the implementation of the agreements with local school districts; and • DVR’s assurance that the core tenets, principles, and career goals stated in each student’s Individual Education Program (IEP) will be incorporated into the development of their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). EED’s Special Education Unit also provides funding for members of the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee to travel to events related to transition students such as the annual Statewide Special Education Conference.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Project Search - 11/30/2017

~~“This unique program provides real-life work experience to help youth, with significant disabilities, make successful transitions from school to adult life. Meant to serve as a student’s last year in high schoolAnchorage Fairbanks Central Peninsula    Mat-Su

Project SEARCH is an international trademarked and copyrighted program model, which focuses solely on employment for Project SEARCH interns. Successful outcomes for this project include:    Employment in an integrated setting (working alongside people without disabilities)        Year-round work        20 hours/week or more        Minimum wage or higher”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Alaska Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education “State 5-Year Plan FFY 2017-2021 Public Comment Draft”

“GOAL # 2: Employment Alaskans with disabilities and their families will receive the necessary employment services and supports needed to become competitively employed in an integrated setting. Objective 2.1: Provide support for the implementation of Alaska state laws increasing the employment of individuals with disabilities which lead to 3 new or improved policies, procedures, or regulations per year. Activities: Monitor legislation relating to employment for individuals with disabilities and provide support for advocacy and research, as needed. Provide support for the implementation of the Alaska Employment First Act with at least one improved policy, procedure, or regulation per year. Provide support for the implementation of the Alaska Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act as it relates to empowering employment for individuals with disabilities with at least one improved policy, procedure, or regulation per year

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

AK Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education

Alaska' unique geographical area with a relatively small population requires a management system tailored to meet the needs of Alaskans. The Governor's Council on Disabilities & Special Education was created to meet Alaska's diverse needs. The Council uses planning, capacity building, systems change, and advocacy to create change for people with disabilities. Consistent with our State Plan we work towards systems change in areas including:

housing employment early intervention special education lifelong learning independent living inclusion in the community.

 

The council serves as the interdepartmental planning/coordinating agency of the Department of Health and Social Services, the Department of Education and Early Development, and other departments which deliver services to people with disabilities or provide special education.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Announcing Community First Choice Program (CFC) - 07/01/2018

~~Community First Choice Personal Care Service (CFC-PCS) – the number of hours of personal care service per week are determined by an assessment conducted by the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services.Supervision and reminders – Additional CFC-PCS time may be available to recipients shown to have cognitive impairment or behavior issues.Personal Emergency Response system (PERS) – Recipients may be eligible to receive a personal emergency response system or medical alert system that calls for help at the push of a button in the event of an emergency.Skills training – Recipients may be eligible to receive skills training from a personal care assistant (PCA), so that the recipient can learn to do activities more independently.Worker supervision - Recipients can receive training to help manage their PCAs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

AK Integrated Employment Initiative (AIEI) 2015 Reported Outcomes - 02/01/2015

The Partnerships in Employment (PIE) Systems Change Grant is intended to increase integrated, competitive employment (ICE) opportunities for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). As one of the eight states participating in PIE, Alaska’s Integrated Employment Initiative (AIEI) presented outcomes including the unanimous passage of Employment First Legislation, data systems enhancement to improve system efficacy, policy and regulation leveraging, close collaboration and partnership with other agencies, and the promotion of the State as a Model Employer (SAME) Task Force.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Alaska Disability Employment Initiative - 10/23/2013

AKDEI will hire five regional Disability Resource Coordinator/EN Counselors and build on the successes of AKDEI 1 and 4 projects to improve employment opportunities and outcomes for youth by expanding access to employment and career pathways that will prepare youth for in-demand careers.  This will be accomplished through a multi-faceted approach.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Alaska AIDD Integrated Employment Initiative - 09/30/2012

"The Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative prioritizes employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities across Alaska. Partnerships with the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Education and Early Development, Disability Law Center of Alaska, and the Center for Human Development will address barriers and develop replicable, sustainable strategies using a three-pronged approach: (1) policy development; (2) capacity building; and (3) resource leveraging."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Alaska Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

BrainWorks for Self-Employment, University of AK - Anchorage Center for Human Development

BrainWorks is an innovative new project to assist individuals with brain injury in starting a business. This is part of a two-year research project funded by the Kessler Foundation. The BrainWorks program was developed by individuals with brain injury who are self-employed, self-employment facilitators who are knowledgeable about self employment and have experience working with people with disabilities, and research staff at the Center for Human Development.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative (AIDD PIE)

A consortium of partners consisting of the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education (lead entity), the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services (State I/DD agency), the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Education and Early Development, Disability Law Center of Alaska, and the Center for Human Development will develop sustainable strategies to increase the employment of youth and young adults with I/DD. The project intends to increase the percent of youth and young adults served by DVR from 20% to 25%; 2) increase hours worked by DVR participants with I/DD from 13 to 20 hours per week (comparable to other youth with disabilities); and 3) double the number of youth and young adults with I/DD served by SDS who are employed or self-employed from 139-278.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“United Way of Anchorage (UWA) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” population that is disproportionately without access to coverage or care and may lack knowledge about affordable options. Including, but not limited to—re-entry population, the unemployed, hourly wage workers, seasonal workers (ie: commercial fishers), variable income workers and low-income families with children, immigrants, young adults, and university students. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.. They will partner with  Alaska Primary Care Association, Community health centers, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Mat-Su Health Services, Aging and Disability Resource Center, Alaska Division of Public Assistance, Anchorage Project Access,  and Alaska 2-1-1.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:Sue BroganPhone: ( 907) 263-3821Email: SBrogan@ak.org

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Work Incentive Planning & Assistance (WIPA) - 05/06/2019

~~“The Alaska WIPA Project provides assistance to beneficiaries who are working at wage employment, self-employment, or who have a job offer pending. Assistance is offered to help understand the various work incentive programs that might be available, and provide advice about how to manage one’s benefits during the transition to paid employment. We provide both initial and follow along assistance to beneficiaries. Benefits Counseling and a written Benefits Summary Analysis (BSA) is provided free of charge.

If you are currently working, about to begin work, or are self-employed, please contact the Alaska WIPA Project.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

SDS Training - Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Self - Assessment Survey - 07/01/2017

~~“Join SDS staff for a training about the Settings rules, the self - assessment survey, and what Program Administrators need to know and do. This training is for Administrators or those applying to administrate: Supported Employment, Residential Habilitation: Group home, Residential Habilitation: Family Home Habilitation, Residential Habilitation: Supported Living, Congregate Meals, Adult Day Services, Day Habilitation, and Residential Supported Living. SDS has been working with CMS and providers on a Transition Plan to bring Alaska into settings compliance since 2014. CMS requires all states to comply with new settings rules per 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4)-(5) . The purpose of these changes is to make sure that states use Home and Community Based funding for programs that truly work to integrate Alaskans with disabilities and/or who are frail elders into the community at every opportunity.

Training is offered as a video:HCBS Program Administrator Training: HCBS Settings Self – Assessment Survey.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Care Coordination Training Guide - 06/02/2017

~~“We’re glad you’ve chosen to study Senior and Disabilities Service Care Coordination. This guide is designed to provide you with basic information and procedures. It is not intended to solely qualify you as a Care Coordinator. The qualifications needed to become a Care Coordinator are set forth in the guide. Even with the basic qualifications, for a new Care Coordinator, best practice is to spend a lot of time with a mentor. You may consider contacting a local Care Coordinator to see about mentorship possibilities. You may also choose to join your local Care Coordination Network association.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

AK Customized Employment - PowerPoint - 01/01/2008

This is a PowerPoint presentation addressing Customized Employment in Alaska with an emphasis on maintaining a client-centered team.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

AK Customized Employment Service Provider Manual - 05/01/2007

Our mission is to support the rights of those living with life complexities and disabilities to participate in all aspects of vocational services, while striving to eliminate barriers to employment. Together we form partnerships with individuals, families, employers, service providers, and the community at large to support the creation of expanded work options and meaningful employment, promote economic opportunities and independence, encourage self‐determination, and support the inclusion of people with complex lives into the community.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Industry-Driven Support Model

The Industry-Driven Support Model is being developed and tested as a resource for low income entrepreneurs with disabilities. The model is focused on bringing entrepreneurs from all parts of Alaska with various disabilities together through one common theme, owning a small business within a similar industry. The training sessions focus on a specific topic (e.g., Finances or Marketing) for a specific industry (e.g., arts and crafts or service businesses). The networking sessions focus on discussions around the training topics and how to network within and outside of one’s own community

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Alaska Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Policy Manual

The purpose of this manual is to provide clear guidance to ADVR staff for the consistent and legal implementation of the vocational rehabilitation program in Alaska.  ADVR staff is expected to provide services pursuant to the policies and procedures outlined in this manual. 

The manual provides comprehensive information pertaining to the subject, including not only the division’s policy, but also basic procedures, legal citations, resources and answers to frequently asked questions about the subject.  The procedures are not prescriptive, as VR services are determined by an individual’s needs, although they are reflective of ADVR’s business practices.   

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Alaska DVR -– “Service Definitions, Requirements and Hourly Rat Range” for Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP)

Alaska DVR has authorized the CRPs listed to provide the identified services. These services should only be purchased from authorized CRPs. Some of the authorized services include situational assessments, benefits analysis/ counseling, job search assistance, job readiness training, on-the-job evaluations, job supports, and business development services, among others.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Proposed Model of Employment Services for Individuals with Behavioral Health Disabilities

This is the proposed model of employment services of individuals with behavioral disabilities for providers as well as select government agencies within the state of Alaska. It focuses on training, technical assistance and required resources.

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

1115 Behavioral Health Medicaid Waiver - 06/27/2019

~~“Medicaid Section 1115 Demonstration Waivers provide states with flexibility to test new approaches within Medicaid to aid in redesigning and improving their health systems without increasing costs.Alaska’s 1115 Waiver

In January 2018, Alaska applied to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for approval of an 1115 behavioral health waiver that would create a data-driven, integrated behavioral health system of care for Alaskans experiencing serious mental illness, severe emotional disturbance, substance use disorder (SUD), co-occurring substance use and mental illness, and at-risk families and children.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Alaska Transition Plan for HCBS - 08/22/2018

~~“The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Senior and Disabilities Services (SDS) now submits for public review and comment the fourth version of its Transition Plan (“Plan”) in accordance with CFR 42 §441.301(c)(6). This describes what SDS and providers have been working on to ensure that Alaska’s HCBS settings achieve compliance with the elements of the final rule.  The State has described how compliance has been assessed; what the outcomes are; what educational strategies have been used; how providers have achieved compliance through remediation strategies; and what collaborative strategies will be used to ensure ongoing compliance after the deadline of March 22, 2019”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Announcing Community First Choice Program (CFC) - 07/01/2018

~~This is a “new program that is part of the Medicaid reform initiative also known as 1915(k).Provides Personal Care Services and other supports in the recipient’s home as an alternative to institutional care.All recipients who currently meet an institutional level of care and receive both Home and Community Based Waiver Services and Personal Care Services have predetermined eligibility; these recipients have received a letter of notification* (see link to letter below).

What Services are Available from the CFC Program?....Skills training – Recipients may be eligible to receive skills training from a personal care assistant (PCA), so that the recipient can learn to do activities more independently.Worker supervision - Recipients can receive training to help manage their PCAs.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Transition Plan and Provider Requirements: Settings Final Rule Compliance Status - 06/11/2018

~~The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) issued a new regulation (42 CFR §441.301(c)(6)) that requires that all Medicaid-funded services be provided in settings that exhibit home and community-based characteristics and do not isolate recipients. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, have full access to benefits of community living, and opportunities to receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive home and community based services….The State of Alaska has been working with CMS and providers on a transition plan to bring Alaska into settings compliance since 2014 when the “final rule” was published.

This chart shows the percentages of providers in each compliance category as of May 4, 2018.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit - 11/16/2017

~~“The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit is responsible for monitoring service providers and supports systems serving individuals who experience an intellectual or developmental disability. The IDD Unit oversees the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities waiver (IDD waiver) and, in spring 2018, the new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW).

The new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW) was developed to replace the Community Developmental Disabilities Grant (CDDG) program, which will end June 30, 2018. The ISW will also extend supports to individuals who had not been covered by the grant program.”

The purpose of both waivers is to offer qualified participants a choice between home and community-based services or supports in an institutional setting.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Approved SDS Forms (Senior and Disability Services) - 09/01/2017

~~“Please Note: SDS is continuously making improvements to its many program forms so please check back frequently to ensure the most current version is utilized. You can refer to the “Revision Date” printed on the bottom left margin of each form to determine appropriate precedence.  Specific programmatic questions about a particular form should be addressed to the associated SDS program staff.” 

This page has IDD and CCMC Waiver Program Forms” three of which were updated as of September 1, 2017.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Transition Period for Compliance with Home and Community-Based Settings Criteria - 07/03/2017

~~“A CMS Informational Bulletin was released on May 9, 2017, indicating that the transition period for complying with home and community-based settings criteria is extended until March 17, 2022. In the Bulletin, CMS indicated that states may still choose to meet the original March 17, 2019 deadline. The State of Alaska values the person-centered transformation that will result from providers meeting the settings criteria, and acknowledges the progress made to bring Alaska’s providers into compliance. Accordingly, Alaska will retain the original March 17, 2019 deadline for settings to become compliant with the CMS home and community-based settings criteria.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About the Community Developmental Disabilities grants - 12/15/2016

~~A FAQ that provides information on applying for Medicaid services and waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State of Alaska’s 1915( c) Waiver Renewal Applications - 07/01/2016

This is a power point presentation on the state of Alaska’s most recent application for renewing four 1915(c) Waivers for a five year period. These waivers include ones for “Adults with Physical and Developmental Disabilities” and “Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities”. The number of people to be placed on the IDD waiver is limited to 50 per year. Persons placed on the APDD waiver could have a reassessment using a Truncated Consumer Assessment Tool. These waivers would be for the period of FY 2017 – 2021 which started on July 1, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Alaska HCBS Transition Plan (9/2015) - 09/14/2015

The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Senior and Disabilities Services (SDS) submits this transition plan in accordance with CFR 42 §441.301(c)(6).  The state process leading to development of the plan included analysis of all settings where home and community-based services are provided under the Alaska’s 1915(c) home and community-based waiver programs. This plan describes the three components of SDS settings evaluation activities:   Part 1) the efforts made by SDS to inform and educate providers and other stakeholders about the changes to federal regulations, and to  gain insight into how the changes will impact service delivery;   Part 2) the process used to determine the extent to which existing state regulations and practices encompass the requirements for home and community-based settings, and the actions taken to assess the home and community-based characteristics of the locations where services are delivered currently; and     Part 3) the state plan to achieve compliance with federal regulations.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

With the official slogan being, "Beyond your Dreams, within your Reach," the state of Alaska understands the importance of promoting employment opportunities for everyone, including individuals with disabilities.  

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Alaska's VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
-0.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
739,795
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.19%
Change from
2016 to 2017
53,087
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.15%
Change from
2016 to 2017
23,815
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.69%
Change from
2016 to 2017
44.86%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.54%
Change from
2016 to 2017
75.71%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 739,795
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 53,087
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 23,815
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 300,380
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 44.86%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.71%
State/National unemployment rate. 7.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 15.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 49,987
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 40,411
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 57,928
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 4,021
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 4,754
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 13,858
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,439
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 7,170
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,969

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 738
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 12,317

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,295
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 4,199
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 7,153
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 32.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 256
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 123
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 66
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,434
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 22
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 14
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.90

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 423
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 21,190
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. N/A
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.71%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.05%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.85%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.95%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 15.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 55.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 66.05%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 40.53%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. N/A
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 193,961
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 193,961
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 297
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 297
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,663,597

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 53
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 53

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Alaska’s “Employment First” legislation calls for “competitive integrated employment” as the preferred outcome for those with disabilities. DOLWD has executed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Health and Social Services; and is obtaining MOU signature with Education and Early Development to ensure progress towards that goal. The MOU includes commitments for active participation on the Interagency Council on Employment First, under the auspices of the Employment First State Coordinator.  (Page 45) Title I

DVR has a cooperative agreement and participates with the Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative (AIEI), which consists of a consortium of agencies committed to working together to improve employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and the Employment First Initiative. The cooperative agreement outlines the goals and collaboration needed to successfully achieve increased employment outcomes for youth with I/DD. The results of this collaboration were published in the Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, vol. 47, no. 3, 2017. (Page 147) Title I
 

Customized Employment

~~DVR provides the services necessary to achieve competitive, integrated employment, such as guidance and counseling, assessment, vocational and other training, transportation, diagnosis and treatment, on-the-job training, job-related services, customized employment, and supported employment.  (Page 28) Title I

In addition, DVR has an on—going commitment to quality SE services, as evidenced by the recent formation and active participation in several cross—agency SE related initiatives such as the Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative and piloting the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model with DBH. DVR has sustained the principles of the system change customized employment grant that focused on wrap—around services for the most severely disabled. DVR continues to be involved in an advisory capacity with different organizations that focus on groups that may often require SE services, such as those individuals with traumatic brain injury, those diagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and individuals with severe mental illness. (Page 154) Title I
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The Alaska Youth Works project has established a multifaceted approach, building on existing systems and services, by creating a bridge framework to provide for coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to career pathway programs and lead to self-sustaining employment. By utilizing resources and leveraging funds, the grant has guided partner agencies in system changes that will sustain their new models after the ending of the grant cycle. (Page 27) Title I

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) “Alaska Youth Works” grant will continue to build a cohesive system with DVR and other partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth with disabilities, ages 14 to 24, by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers. The Alaska Youth Works project will complement DVR services through coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to Pre-Employment Transition Services, career pathway programs and ultimately lead to self-sustaining employment. (Page 168) Title I

Priority 1.3: Continue to improve VR services to rural Alaskans.
Strategies:
• Ensure DVR's rural work group and local TVR partners will meet to identify realistic goals for rural services, develop strategies for meeting these goals, and convey this information to VR field staff.
• Continue to leverage relationships with TVR, LEAs, CRPs, other state agencies and Job Center partners.
• Ensure all rural hubs have a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) timely assigned and trained to meet the needs of rural participants. (Page 173) Title IV

SCSEP coordinates with 75 host sites and leverages resources to ensure successful outcomes for SCSEP participants that foster individual economic self-sufficiency and promote useful opportunities in community service activities. The State provides a wide range of programs and services to seniors, spanning multiple divisions and other private and public entities. Funds from OAA are leveraged with WIOA, other federal programs, and resources from Alaska’s State Employment and Training Program.

SCSEP works closely with DVR to ensure those with special needs or disabilities are enrolled in community service training to work. Once a participant is deemed work ready, DVR’s has an approved provisional hire process and SCSEP works directly with recruitment staff to obtain necessary approval to hire in 9 steps. The provisional hire may be used for any State permanent or non-permanent positions. (Page 206-207) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~DOLWD received a Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) - Round VI grant entitled “Alaska Youth Works” to serve youth with disabilities in 2015. This project will continue to build a cohesive system with multiple partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth with disabilities, aged 14 to 24, by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers. The Alaska Youth Works project has established a multifaceted approach, building on existing systems and services, by creating a bridge framework to provide for coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to career pathway programs and lead to self-sustaining employment. By utilizing resources and leveraging funds, the grant has guided partner agencies in system changes that will sustain their new models after the ending of the grant cycle. (Page 27) Title I

DOLWD supports integration of services through a single delivery system for both businesses and individuals. This efficient use of resources includes integrating all WIOA core programs with Unemployment Insurance (UI), veterans’ programs, the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP), the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program, apprenticeship and sector partnership development, and the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). (Page 53) Title I

The referral process among the core programs is implemented on an individualized basis depending on the specific needs of the individual. All DOLWD staff are trained and expected to be knowledgeable in the requirements and eligibility of other core programs to ensure an appropriate program referral. Appropriate referrals are necessary to leverage resources and maximize service delivery to individuals while ensuring non-duplication of services. For example, AJC staff that provide initial intake and career services have been trained through the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) to appropriately identify and refer individuals to disability services such as the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation, and other supporting entities. This training has provided a high level of thoughtfulness to the reason for each referral, increasing the success for the participant when obtaining needed services. Coordinated data collection mechanisms will be implemented to capture cross-agency referrals. (Pages 54-55) Title I

DETS administers many programs that are covered by the laws, regulations, and policies encompassing POS. These include the WIOA Adult, Youth, and Dislocated Worker programs, Wagner-Peyser, Trade Act programs, National Emergency Grants, SCSEP, Helmets to Hardhats, and the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). (Page 87) Title I

o As a result of 3 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants, all AJC staff have and will continue to receive Disability Resource Coordinator I (DRC I) training, which includes awareness of programmatic and physical barriers to accessibility and covers familiarity of the “ADA checklist for Readily Achievable Barrier Removal.” The ADA checklist is completed annually at each facility and any needed corrective action is identified and implemented;
o The DRC I training is an integrated and mandated part of new-hire training for all AJC staff;
o Each regional office has a higher-level staff member trained to the Disability Resource Coordinator II (DRC II) level, who is the disability and accessibility subject matter expert for the region. The DRC II functions as the technical assistance advisor for all staff on disability and accessibility related issues;
o The DRC IIs, the statewide lead for the DEI, and the Training Coordinator identify periodic and on-going training in specialized topics to augment standardized training and ensure continual learning and awareness in improving access to all services within the AJC system for individuals with disabilities; (Pages 89-90) Title I

The state intends to use the governor’s set-aside funding to enhance services to one or more of Alaska’s priority populations, including youth and adults with disabilities. DOLWD will use these funds to leverage other programs and initiatives, for example, DOLWD’s DEI Grant for Youth and American Apprenticeship Initiative for Health Care. DOLWD may continue to support projects such as the Department of Health and Social Services’ development of the “Disability Benefits 101 (DB101)” online tool. Including incorporating DB101 training for AJC staff and other counselors in using the tool with clients, as well as other programs targeted at serving those with disabilities and multiple barriers to employment. (Page 98) Title I

Youth project operators are procured from the 6 economic regions of the state via a competitive process. Project operators provide academic, employment, and training services to eligible in-school and out-of-school youth ages 14-24. The project operators offer a comprehensive workforce development program that prepares youth for post-secondary education, employment, career development, and can provide accommodations and support services for youth with disabilities. Project operators are familiar with the division’s Disability Employment Initiative youth program and will co-enroll youth with disabilities with the DEI to coordinate work experience and other training and supportive services. (Page 114) Title I

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) “Alaska Youth Works” grant will continue to build a cohesive system with DVR and other partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth with disabilities, ages 14 to 24, by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers. The Alaska Youth Works project will complement DVR services through coordination, resource leveraging, and blending and braiding of funds to increase access to Pre-Employment Transition Services, career pathway programs and ultimately lead to self-sustaining employment. (Page 168) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows eligible persons with disabilities to secure a “taxed advantaged” savings account of up to $100,000 without affecting public benefit limits. Calculating benefits and ABLE savings is a critical tool for achieving quality long-term outcomes. After the website was completed, AJC and partner staff were trained in using the tool with clients. DOLWD’s Disability Employment Initiative will collaborate with the Department of Health and Social Services’ Work Incentives Planning & Assistance Project (WIPA) on work incentive counseling for Social Security beneficiaries. These projects will build a system with multiple partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth and adults with disabilities by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers through comprehensive access to benefits planning by certified Community Work Incentive Counselors (CWICs). (Page 44) Title I

School to Work Transition

~~Through DVR, Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) provides the following required activities to students with disabilities (16- to 21-year-olds) who are eligible or potentially eligible for vocational rehabilitation services: (1) job exploration counseling, (2) work-based learning opportunities, (3) counseling on postsecondary educational opportunities (4) workplace readiness training, and (5) instruction in self-advocacy. Implementation of (Pre-ETS) has resulted in increased coordination among local school districts and DVR. (Page 45) Title I

DVR has a Transition Services policy that is currently under revision. Additionally, DVR is also drafting new Pre-Employment Transition Services policy and procedures. ADVR has set a policy completion goal of October 2018. In the interim, DVR has created Business Practice Revisions, which provide specific guidance to staff to carry out the Pre—Employment Transition Services activities specified in WIOA. DVR is coordinating with state and local education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from education services to provision of VR services, including having completely revamped the referral process from education agencies to DVR for Pre-Employment Transition Services and VR Services to ensure a smoother transition. Referral forms having been provided to local education officials across Alaska and DVR’s website has been updated to provide information on which regional office is responsible for each school district throughout the state. DVR has established. DVR has prioritized that individualized plans for employment are developed within 90 days or, prior to graduation if an applicant is in the final semester of their final year. (Pages 148-149) Title I

DEED’s Special Education Unit, Division of Teacher and Learning Support (TLS) and DVR have updated their interagency agreement designed to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services. The agreement includes:
• DVR’s assurance of the development and implementation of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services within 90 days of eligibility or at least before the student leaves school;

• Providing or arranging for the provision of pre-employment transition services to all students with disabilities identified as requiring these services;
• Designation of a regional DVR contact in each school district who is responsible for clarifying questions and concerns relating to the implementation of the agreements with the local school districts, including access to DVR’s Transition Coordinator as needed for additional coordination and technical assistance needs to be provided locally or at other events in which a TLS or DVR representative may connect; (Pages 149-150) Title I

Introduction and guidance of students with disabilities to post-school alternatives which include, but are not limited to employment, post-secondary education, vocational training, and adult education, by TLS transition coordinators and ADVR staff. Planning may also include coordination of social or vocational experiences for students with disabilities in real life work settings to improve competitive integrated employment outcomes; and

• DVR’s assurance that the core tenets, principles, and career goals stated in each student’s Individual Education Program (IEP) will be incorporated into the development of their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). EED’s Special Education Unit also provides funding for members of the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee to travel to events related to transition students such as the annual Statewide Special Education Conference. (Page 150) Title I

DVR implemented the simplified Secondary Transition Referral form in 2014 in coordination with DEED. Efforts to encourage referrals through this refined process include DVR/DEED joint training to special education directors at the annual Special Education Director Training and to teachers at the Alaska Statewide Special Education Conference. The form provides teachers with an easy and efficient way to connect a student with the VR counselor serving the school and provides the teacher with an avenue to request a joint conference with the student and counselor. Teachers can access the referral form directly through links on EED’s IEP form, DEED’s transitions resources web page, and DVR’s Transition Tools for Teachers web page. DVR played a pivotal role with the expansion of the ATOP project, by conducting 16 Transition Camps in PY17 including increased coordination with the Division of Juvenile Justice, Office of Children’s Services (OCS), and American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation projects. (Pages 151-152) Title I

DVR Transition Services — DVR reaches out to teachers throughout Alaska in order to provide information on appropriate referral processes to foster students’ transition from secondary school into vocational/academic training and into the world of work. DVR counselors within each regional office are assigned to specific schools to streamline the referral process, ensure counselor participation in Individual Education Plan (IEP) development, and ensure that all schools and students are informed of DVR services. DVR contacts schools on a monthly basis during the school year. Rural and village schools communicate with DVR through their special education staff, as well as DVR staff who are assigned and travel to that rural region. This coordination allows for on-going coordination and education between both LEA staff and local DVR staff. (Page 165) Title I

Under WIOA, VR agencies are required to set aside 15 percent of their federal award to provide required Pre-Employment Transition Services youth currently in school. The 2010-2014 American Community Survey estimated 3,575 Alaskans aged 16-21 who reported experiencing a disability. DVR provides Pre-Employment Transition Services to students with disabilities aged 14-21 who are receiving services under an Individualized Education Program (IEP), eligible for section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, or are otherwise potentially eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation services. In FFY16, ADVR provided Pre-Employment Transition Services to approximately 11 percent of this population. During Program Year 17, the number of students who were provided these services increased to 957 students or approximately 27 percent of the ACS population. This exceeded DVR’s target goal of providing required Pre-Employment Transition Services to 16 percent (585) of new students with a disability annually. This population has been surveyed directly to obtain input into needs and goals for transition information and services and for future CSNA purposes. Barriers that were identified in DVR’s prior CSNA included transportation obstacles, lack of existing programs to meet specific disability needs, unstable living situations, and lack of family support. (Page 169) Title I

DVR supports and participates in the Tapestry Postsecondary Transition Program through the University of Alaska's Center for Human Development. This partnership between DVR, UAA and the Anchorage School District provides students with disabilities Pre-ETS self—advocacy, career exploration, counseling towards postsecondary education, work readiness and a work experience. This program is specifically geared towards a population that could benefit from postsecondary education but needs assistance with overcoming barriers before they can fully participate. The partnership with the school district allows students, not eligible for further transition services through the district, to defer their diploma for a 1-year intensive program on the UAA campus. (Page 180) Title I

Career Pathways

~~The Department of Health and Social Services developed a website called “Disability Benefits 101 (DB101),” an online tool for those with disabilities that provides available work incentives and helps individuals determine how their SSI, SSDI, or other public benefits may be impacted by employment. The Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows eligible persons with disabilities to secure a “taxed advantaged” savings account of up to $100,000 without affecting public benefit limits. Calculating benefits and ABLE savings is a critical tool for achieving quality long-term outcomes. After the website was completed, AJC and partner staff were trained in using the tool with clients. DOLWD’s Disability Employment Initiative will collaborate with the Department of Health and Social Services’ Work Incentives Planning & Assistance Project (WIPA) on work incentive counseling for Social Security beneficiaries. These projects will build a system with multiple partners to meet the needs of Alaska’s youth and adults with disabilities by expanding access to employment and career pathways to prepare for in-demand careers through comprehensive access to benefits planning by certified Community Work Incentive Counselors (CWICs). (Page 44) Title I

DVR works closely with local school districts, hospitals, and CRPs to implement the national Project SEARCH model in the Matanuska—Susitna, Kenai, Anchorage, and Fairbanks school districts. A collaborative internship model was developed in FFY2012 to provide youth with developmental or intellectual disabilities opportunities to learn real job skills in 1—year, school—to—work internship positions set up throughout the 3 hospitals involved. Sites were at Mat—Su Regional Medical Center, Central Peninsula Hospital, Providence Medical Center, and Fairbanks Memorial Hospital. Total workplace immersion facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and OJT and support through internships or worksite rotations. The goal for each participant is obtaining integrated employment using the skills learned through the internships. The State of Alaska has adopted this model for student interns with developmental disabilities. For SY17, 24 youth participated in Project SEARCH, and 22 successfully completed their internships at the hospitals with 14 of those individuals now working in paid, competitive employment. Project SEARCH is no longer being funded by the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education. The Project SEARCH model is being used to provide Pre—Employment Transition Services to Students with Disabilities under the Client Services Component. (Page 180) Title IV

Apprenticeship
Additionally, the American Apprenticeship Initiative grant will increase the number of Registered Apprentices in Alaska’s health care industry. The project will significantly increase career awareness, strengthen existing career pathways, introduce new career pathways, and significantly help employers fill entry-level positions in high-demand health care sector occupations. DVR will promote the availability of this project to individuals with disabilities who are interested in pursuing occupations in the health care industry. In the pre-apprenticeship program, 9 percent self-identified as having a disability, through calendar year 2017. ETS is unable to provide specific information on whether these individuals are being served by DVR. (Page 168) Title IV
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~DOLWD’s Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) will continue to provide training for AJC and partner staff working with clients who have disabilities. Alaska has implemented the Ticket to Work program and is reaching out to those on Social Security Insurance (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) to encourage them to go to an AJC for those services. DOLWD has a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Divisions of Vocational Rehabilitation and Division of Employment and Training Services to provide seamless Partnership Plus services for beneficiaries of Social Security benefits. Both divisions will work to expand this program to other agencies and programs, such as the Division of Behavioral Health; the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services; the Division of Public Assistance Work Services; and Centers for Independent Living.
The Department of Health and Social Services developed a website called “Disability Benefits 101 (DB101),” an online tool for those with disabilities that provides available work incentives and helps individuals determine how their SSI, SSDI, or other public benefits may be impacted by employment. (Page 44) Title I

To ensure these activities are carried out to the maximum extent possible, DVR will:
- Ensure DETS staff are regularly trained or made aware of DVR and its services. This is especially true of DETS locations that are served by DVR on an itinerant basis.
- DVR leadership team and managers continue to identify functional DETS issues that require on-going work at all levels of the division including integration and the local management teams.
- Work with DETS staff to develop a means to provide information about DVR to individuals who self-identify as having a disability and who receive job training services through DETS programs.
- Develop a referral process to the DETS employment networks.
- Train DVR staff to use DETS services. (Pages 168-169) Title IV

Priority 3.5: Evaluate Social Security Reimbursement Process
Strategies:
• Implement a new Ticket To Work (TTW) tracking system.
• Monitor ticket reimbursement amounts. Performance Indicators:
• Software implemented and staff trained.
• Continued collection of Social Security Reimbursements.
• Improved capability to capture all available reimbursements. (Page 176) Title IV

Priority 3. Evaluate Social Security Reimbursement Process.
• Strategies contributing to success:
o Purchased new software that automates the process for submitting claims to SSA for the Ticket to Work program. (Page 188) Title IV

Another long-term strategy to improve SCSEP services is to include discussion with participants on financial and work incentives, to provide information on Social Security 1619b Medicaid While Working, and to explore specialized work incentives through programs including Ticket to Work, Impairment-Related Work Expenses, Blind Work Expenses, and Plan to Achieve Self-Support, and to provide referrals to those in need of these services. (Page 210) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Employer service representatives, particularly Business Connection staff, pay attention to local labor market trends to match employers with skilled job seekers. Staff work with employers to coordinate recruitments, plan job fairs, post job orders, provide applicant pre-screening and referrals, develop jobs, provide space for job recruitments, and offer employment and training service plans. Using a mass e-mail distribution list of employers and other interested parties, staff send daily messages on new job postings, recruitments at the AJCs, and upcoming job fairs. DOLWD has identified that the health care, oil and gas, and mining industries are the highest-demand industries and continually engages industry leaders in these fields. Under WIOA, Business Connection staff will be provided more in-depth training to work with the various industry sector partnerships to meet training and labor needs for those industries. (Page 56) Title I

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) partners with employers to promote the hiring of individuals with disabilities. DVR has implemented the dual customer model to deliver services to employers. DVR has created a Business Employment Services Team (DVR-BEST), which is tasked with providing employers with the four required services as outlined in Section 109 of the Rehabilitation Act within WIOA, to secure competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities, which is part of DOLWD’s strategy to focus on serving those with disabilities. (Page 58) Title I

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) utilizes a management information system called AWARE. AWARE was developed based on Vocation Rehabilitation (VR) business practices and federal requirements. AWARE offers a comprehensive set of cases, financial, and organizational modules. The features and procedures in AWARE are consistent and standardized throughout all modules, and are designed around the natural flow of the VR case process, making it intuitive for VR Counselors. (Page 65) Title I

AWIB members come from a variety of industries and represent all geographic and economic regions of the state. They bring the voice of employers, educational institutions, Alaska Native regional corporations, and other workforce partners in their respective regions. The AWIB focuses on employer engagement, connecting education and training strategies through building career pathways; supporting work-based learning; and improving career results for all job seekers and employers alike, based on the demographics and needs of each economic region. The AWIB will continue to successfully carry out the functions of both a state board and a local board, as it has for over a decade. (Page 95) Title I

Most AWIB members are representatives of business and the private sector. Board members come from a variety of industries throughout the state and are committed to bringing the voice of employers to the table and reaching out to others to engage them in the workforce system. In addition, in response to feedback from ETA, two chief local elected officials have been appointed to the board. The AWIB will continue to focus not only on employer engagement but on connecting education and training strategies through building career pathways, supporting work-based learning, and improving career results for all job seekers and employers alike. (Pages 119-120) Title I

DVR partners with employers to promote the hiring of individuals with disabilities. DVR implemented the dual customer model to deliver services to employers. DVR has a Business Employment Services Team (BEST) that is tasked with providing employers four core services as outlined in WIOA.

1. Training and Technical Assistance in:

• Understanding the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its application to a workplace situation; referral to the ADA partners’ project;
• Disability awareness training provided to HR, managers, staff, boards, and other interested groups;
• Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs regulations;
• U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission regulations;
• Balancing the application of federal, state, and local employment laws and regulations.

2. Creating Opportunities for Placement by:

• Developing opportunities for both adults and youth to provide a full range of unpaid work experiences, informational interviews, job shadows, and On—the—Job Training (OJT);
• Offering recruitment supports, assisting in workforce development including placement, OJT, Schedule A, and Provisional Hire;
• OJT, Job Coaching, and external training (not at worksite).3. Network Development through:
• Connecting with community partners and employers, locally and nationally. The BEST has connected over 50 employers with the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs staffers, the Governor’s Council on Disabilities & Special Education, the AJC’s Business Connection, and the VA VR&E’s employment support team. (Pages 154-155) Title IV

DVR’s most underserved population continues to be rural Alaskans. This has been an ongoing challenge for the Rural Development Team, as there are so few jobs within remote and rural communities. Available employment opportunities and employers are much more available in urban areas. The Rural Team strategizes ways to obtain more CRPs in rural areas, which are traditionally underserved. The Business Employment Services Team has been created specifically to provide outreach and training services to employers, with the goal of encouraging more employers to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. (Page 181) Title IV

Performance measure 6: Effectiveness in Serving Employers.

• DVR is working with the Business Development Team to develop and track contacts and services/training provided to employers. (Page 192) Title IV

Data Collection
The department has initiated the procurement process for a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) system to replace both the primary WIOA title 1-B database, Individual Case Management (ICM), and the Wagner-Peyser labor exchange services ALEXsys database. Anticipated to be fully implemented during state fiscal year 2019, the COTS system may require significant changes in the data collection process, but will result in more accurate WIOA reporting. Implementation of this new system represents a significant step forward toward the eventual common reporting anticipated for all programs, and the combined system will promote integrated service delivery, improved efficiency, and reduced duplication of services. All references in this Combined Plan relative to data collected in or reported from ICM and ALEXsys will continue, possibly with greater accuracy, under the new system. (Page 84) Title I Priority 3.2: DVR will meet or exceed state and federal common performance measures Strategies: • Negotiate targets for required common performance measures, based on baseline data collected. • Work with WIOA Core partners to implement activities identified in the Alaska Combined State Plan, including common performance measures. • Amend Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Key Performance Indicators, Missions & Measures (M&Ms) to more closely align with WIOA performance measures. (Page 175) Title IV Priority 3.3: Implement federally required RSA-911changes to the AWARE case management system Strategies: • Analyze all changes to case management (AWARE) software and determine their impact on field and accounting staff. • Train staff in timely manner. Performance Indicators: • Required data is collected accurately. • Federal reports produced on time and accurately. • DVR services are not negatively impacted (Page 176) Title IV Priority 2. Implement all federally mandated changes to RSA-911 report. • Strategies contributing to success: o Case Management Software is managed by Alliance Enterprises and they have been very responsive to incorporating changes in the data collection. o Other State programs have been generous in sharing time, resources, and their interpretation of required elements. o Both RSA and Alliance Enterprises have developed edit programs which enable DVR to produce error-free reports. o Able to plan and execute state-wide training on new data collection requirements. (Pages 187-188) Title IV DVR has not reported, nor historically collected data, on the 6 performance accountability indicators under section 116 of WIOA. DVR is unable to predict its future performance on any of the 6 performance indicators, including the SE program goals, until baseline targets have been established. DVR has data sharing agreements with DOLWD’s Unemployment Insurance and Research and Analysis units in order to establish the data collection necessary for determining baseline indicators and future reporting. As DVR is still accumulating baseline data, all indicators are marked as “To Be Determined” in Appendix C of the Combined State Plan, per instructions. (Page 191) Title IV
511

~~The State of Alaska has a State Rehabilitation Council consistent with Section 105 of the Act and 34 CFR 361.17. The State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee (SVRC) serves as the State Rehabilitation Council. At every SVRC quarterly meeting, the focus is on a particular region of the state, such as Anchorage, Northern, rural, etc. Agenda items include reports from the Director, Chief and the specific area manager; general DVR operations, major initiatives and regional and statewide challenges. In addition, there are reports from various partners such as the Alaska Workforce Investment Board, Tribal VR programs, Parent Training representative, Client Assistance Program, the State Independent Living Council and the Governor’s Council of Disabilities and Special Education. During this past year, the quarterly meetings included guest presentations addressing such topics as DVR’s Pre-ETS programs, transition from corrections/incarceration, repealing subminimum wage regulations, new WIOA requirements, the ABLE Act in Alaska, Peer Mentoring, and DVR’s collaboration with University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation programs, Alaska Job Centers, Independent Living Center Access Alaska’s efforts to better serve Barrow and the North Slope. (Page 145) Title IV

DVR has, or is in the process of developing, cooperative agreements with all levels of educational institutions within the state, including local school districts, the Department of Education & Early Development (DEED), and the University of Alaska statewide system. DVRs agreement with DEED has not yet been finalized, however there is a target date of August 2018 as an effective date. The agreement, which will form the basis for LEA agreements outlines the overarching purpose of the transition from high school or the education of those students and youth with disabilities. Additionally, respective definitions are described in order to ensure programmatic understanding. These agreements will, or do contain specific information regarding consultation and technical assistance, transition planning for students, roles and responsibilities for each agency, coordination for employment in subminimum wage (which is now a moot point), assurances, and financial responsibilities of each agency. (Page 149) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
The assessment of One-Stop delivery system partner program services is based on participant outcomes identified under their statutorily required performance and reporting requirements. However, the WIOA joint performance measures, which consist of six customer outcomes specific to core indicators of performance and employer satisfaction, demonstrate value in promoting integration of services and boosting accessibility and transparency within the workforce system. Therefore, if possible, the same measures and methodologies are applied to other One-Stop partner programs that are applied to the core programs, in addition to any program-specific measures required by federal or state regulations. Regardless of whether a program is a core program or a partner program, or whether a measure is required by WIOA or partner program law and regulation, performance measures and performance evaluations will be applied at the customer level first and then may be aggregated by program or population. (Pages 77-78) Title IV The state’s One-Stop system of Alaska Job Centers (AJCs) has developed a comprehensive approach to ensure accessibility and inclusion of all customers, including those with disabilities, to all facilities, programs, and services. Physical and programmatic accessibility are continuously evaluated with an annual Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) assessment and continuous improvement strategies planned and implemented when needed. Alaska will continue to refine the policies, training, and continuous improvement strategies to ensure compliance with WIOA and continued compliance with ADA. Additionally, the State of Alaska recently hired an ADA Coordinator who ensures accessibility of state offices for both the public and employees. The One-Stop system’s approach to ADA compliance includes: o Physical and programmatic accessibility; o Staff training and accountability; o Adaptive technology and other accommodations; and o On-going survey of effectiveness and continuous improvement. (Pages 88-89) Title I o Job centers provide individuals with disabilities access to information, resources, programs and activities in a manner that allows each individual, no matter their disability, the opportunity of full inclusion. All workshops, public access, programs, etc. are fully accessible, to ensure that the opportunities and benefits provided by the job center are available to individuals with disabilities in an equally effective and integrated manner; o “Alaska Job Center Universal Access for Customers with Disabilities” policy plays a vital role in establishing the working-level framework for outlining and improving the accessibility, capacity, and accountability of AJCs to serve customers with disabilities. The policy covers both physical and programmatic accessibility within AJCs and outlines the assistive technologies available and required staff training; o Each location has appropriate signage identifying the policy that no individual with a disability shall, by reason of such disability, be excluded from participation in, or be denied the benefit of, the services, programs, or activities of the AJCs; o All job centers use universal design with printed materials. All posters, flyers, brochures, etc. use common principles throughout the design. The outreach and marketing materials developed for distribution from the AJCs to partners, job seekers, and employers contain notice of the availability of auxiliary aids and services for needed accommodations to access programs and services; (Page 89) Title I o Each AJC is equipped with a Universal Access Accessibility Station that is designed to improve the quality of the job applicant’s experience, no matter the disability. Each station is designed with state-of -the art technology that can help job seekers with disabilities navigation the World of Work with based on their personal independence level. o Assistive Technology (AT) available includes screen readers, magnifiers, adaptive software, virtual sign language interpretation, closed captioning on scrolling program and services video, motorized adjustable workstations, specialized keyboards and mice, TTY phones, and personal voice amplification device; o “Tips for Improving Access to Workshops and Training” has been developed and disseminated to staff. This document offers guidance and suggestions on increasing accessibility and success for individuals attending AJC workshops and training sessions and is broken down by disability type. The document outlines ways the facilitator or trainer can incorporate accommodations and adaptations into the class to ensure an optimal learning environment for all; and o Any program and service may be accommodated for full inclusion on an “as needed” basis with the accommodation being dependent on the needs of the individual customer and provided through the AJCs in collaboration with partners. (Page 90) Title I o AJC certification occurs annually and is a collaborative process involving all partners of the One-Stop delivery system. The joint AJC management team collectively completes the documents and surveys for the certification and submits them to the AWIB for approval. Certification involves reviewing site working agreements, cost allocations, self-assessment surveys, and the ADA accessibility survey. In addition to reviewing all submitted documents, members of the AWIB conduct an on-site review identifying best practices and need for corrective action planning. Based on their review and findings, the AWIB recommends and approves certification; (Page 90) Title I Information on physical and programmatic accessibility for individuals with disabilities is supported by statewide activities funding and reinforced by the AJC Universal Access for Individuals with Disability Policy 07-516 (Page 98) Title I DVR continues to work with the Department of Administration, Division of Personnel and Labor Relations, the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, and the State of Alaska as a Model Employer for Individuals with Disabilities. In order to create a baseline, an extensive state employee survey was conducted so state employees may self-disclose their ADA defined disability. This survey will assist with ensuring reasonable accommodations for these employees. DVR continues to see considerable progress in expanding and improving Alaska’s Provisional Hire program as part of this effort. Additionally, the State of Alaska recently hired a full time ADA Coordinator to ensure accessibility for all employees. DVR continues to have an Interagency Agreement in place with the Department of Veterans Affairs Vocational Rehabilitation & Education (VR&E) to cooperate, coordinate, and collaborate for the creation of a powerful force within the rehabilitation community to increase vocational opportunities for veterans of the military service in the United States, regardless of the level of disability, by including DVR as a partner in a comprehensive system of case management. DVR has assigned a VRC to attend monthly meetings with VR&E to strengthen collaboration and coordination of services for this population. (Pages 146-148) Title IV
Vets
The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) is administered by DOLWD and serves unemployed, low-income persons who are at least 55 years of age and have a family income of no more than 125 percent of the federal poverty level. Enrollment priority is given to veterans and qualified spouses, then to individuals who are over 65, have a disability, low literacy skills or limited English proficiency, and who reside in a rural area, are homeless or at risk of homelessness, have low employment prospects, or have failed to find employment after using services through the Alaska Job Centers (AJCs). (Page 29) Title I Some AJCs have Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans’ Employment Representative (LVER) staff funded by the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG). These staff members provide vital services to both veterans and employers seeking employment-related assistance. DETS complies with all federal guidance for JVSG staff and seeks to fully utilize the expertise of DVOPs and LVERs. DETS developed a referral process to direct veterans to the appropriate staff member to ensure a client-centered approach to the delivery of career and training services. When job seekers indicate veteran status upon initial entry to an AJC, staff members are trained to engage them to determine if they are eligible for DVOP services. Veterans are asked a series of questions and handed a checklist of the eligibility criteria to see a DVOP, which is reviewed with the veteran. If veterans indicate they meet one of the eligibility criteria, staff attempt to immediately connect them with a DVOP. If a DVOP is unavailable, eligible veterans will receive the DVOP’s contact information and staff will ensure the appropriate DVOP receives the veteran’s information so they can connect with one another. AJCs follow a team approach to serving customers, including providing services to veterans. Teams work together to support the roles of LVERs and DVOPs in providing services to veterans. All staff are trained to deliver as many services to veterans as possible to ease the burden on DVOPs. DETS encourages staff to engage veterans and insists that all AJC staff are veterans’ representatives, not just JVSG-funded staff. The state follows all Special Grant Provisions, Veterans’ Program Letters, USDOL/VETS Law 107- 288, and United States Code Title 38. (Page 88) Title I A large percentage of claimants selected for RESEA will be military veterans, a group who are always a top priority in Alaska. Some of the veterans will be recently separated from the military and others will be veterans who meet the criteria associated with the most likely to exhaust UI benefits. The latter are veterans who are homeless, disabled, or have other significant barriers to reemployment. In the three RESEA AJCs with on-site Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) staff, a personal introduction and referral to the DVOP will be the norm. In other AJCs, RESEA staff will telephonically introduce the RESEA participant to the DVOPs who serve veterans itinerantly for that region. (Pages 125-126) Title I DVR continues to have an Interagency Agreement in place with the Department of Veterans Affairs Vocational Rehabilitation & Education (VR&E) to cooperate, coordinate, and collaborate for the creation of a powerful force within the rehabilitation community to increase vocational opportunities for veterans of the military service in the United States, regardless of the level of disability, by including DVR as a partner in a comprehensive system of case management. DVR has assigned a VRC to attend monthly meetings with VR&E to strengthen collaboration and coordination of services for this population. (Pages 147-148) Title I Additionally, DVR has developed in-house staff responsible for expanding DVRs presence in local communities for both employment opportunities and to increase referral sources as well. DVR attends all local job fairs whenever possible, the largest being the Veterans job fair every November. DVR staff frequently presents at partnership meetings across the state. (Page 180) Title I
Mental Health

~~DVR continues to work with individuals assigned to the Anchorage Mental Health Court. Mental Health Courts are designed to divert people with mental disabilities, charged with misdemeanor offenses, from incarceration and into community treatment and services including mental health counseling and vocational rehabilitation as appropriate. The hope is to prevent further contacts with the criminal justice system. (Pages 146-147) Title I

The current MOU between DVR and the Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) is in the process of being updated to clarify roles and responsibilities relative to common consumers and assure services are provided in accordance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and WIOA. A preliminary draft of a MOU document is almost complete. DVR provided DHB with the draft MOU on January 31, 2018. Both agencies have identified the Individual Placement and Support model to pilot in at least two regions. DBH is requesting proposals from providers who will provide IPS in Kenai and Anchorage. This model is designed for individuals with significant mental health disabilities to better prepare them for long-term employment. Additionally, DHS is now moving towards providing long-term supports for this population, making pursing supported employment a better option for this population. Each agency has assigned staff to resolve any issues or questions and it is anticipated that the MOU will be executed no later than late 2018. (Page 157) Title IV

• Work with the Center for Human Development, the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority, the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, and other partners to increase provider capacity for employment services and supports. (Page 179) Title IV

Strategies contributing to success:

• Continued efforts coordinated with the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education.

• Continued to work with the Center for Human Development and the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority to increase provider capacity for employment services and supports.

• Continued to increase use of the Provisional Hire process. (Pages 190-191) Title IV

Goals and Priorities for the FFY2017—FFY2020 supported employment (SE) program:

1. DVR will provide SE services to 200 eligible individuals.

2. DVR will set aside 50 percent of the SE award to provide services to youth with the most significant disabilities.

3. DVR will assist 50 SE eligible individuals to obtain competitive employment.

4. DVR will be able to provide all the identified required VR services to all SE eligible individuals.

5. Explore opportunities for CRPs and other entities to become employment networks to provide long—term supports.

6. Work with the community mental health system to increase and establish work—related programs within that system.

7. Emphasize community—based, integrated employment settings with the Governor’s Council on Disability and Special Education, the Alaska Mental Health Board, community behavioral health programs, and the Alaska Mental Health Trust to increase vocational programs within the mental health service delivery system. (Pages 192-193) Title IV

4. DVR has continued to work with the community mental health system to increase and/or to reinstate work related programs within that system of providers. (Page 193) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
The Wagner-Peyser program provides services for job seekers and employers. Services for job seekers, including MSFWs, include an extensive online job bank for researching job openings; referrals to job openings, training or other employment services; job search consulting and workshops; aptitude, interest and proficiency tests; career guidance; area business job fairs; special services to veterans, migrant seasonal farm workers and individuals with disabilities; and re-employment services to claimants identified through the state’s Unemployment Insurance system as high-risk for exhausting benefits prior to re-employment, including recently separated veterans. (Page 131) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 76

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“United Way of Anchorage (UWA) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” population that is disproportionately without access to coverage or care and may lack knowledge about affordable options. Including, but not limited to—re-entry population, the unemployed, hourly wage workers, seasonal workers (ie: commercial fishers), variable income workers and low-income families with children, immigrants, young adults, and university students. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.. They will partner with  Alaska Primary Care Association, Community health centers, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Mat-Su Health Services, Aging and Disability Resource Center, Alaska Division of Public Assistance, Anchorage Project Access,  and Alaska 2-1-1.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:Sue BroganPhone: ( 907) 263-3821Email: SBrogan@ak.org

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

1115 Behavioral Health Medicaid Waiver - 06/27/2019

~~“Medicaid Section 1115 Demonstration Waivers provide states with flexibility to test new approaches within Medicaid to aid in redesigning and improving their health systems without increasing costs.Alaska’s 1115 Waiver

In January 2018, Alaska applied to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for approval of an 1115 behavioral health waiver that would create a data-driven, integrated behavioral health system of care for Alaskans experiencing serious mental illness, severe emotional disturbance, substance use disorder (SUD), co-occurring substance use and mental illness, and at-risk families and children.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Student Summer Work Programs - 05/27/2019

~~“We have paid summer work programs in a variety of communities. Most are 4-6 weeks long and provide students with valuable work experience. Program content varies depending on the community. See list of programs below for details.Who Can ApplyA student with a disability is: an individual age 14-21 and enrolled in secondary education (high school) who:• Is on an IEP or 504 plan, or• Is a student who is potentially eligible for DVR services because of a physical, sensory, intellectual, mental health, and communication disabilities and whose disability could be a barrier to postsecondary education or employment.”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Work Incentive Planning & Assistance (WIPA) - 05/06/2019

~~“The Alaska WIPA Project provides assistance to beneficiaries who are working at wage employment, self-employment, or who have a job offer pending. Assistance is offered to help understand the various work incentive programs that might be available, and provide advice about how to manage one’s benefits during the transition to paid employment. We provide both initial and follow along assistance to beneficiaries. Benefits Counseling and a written Benefits Summary Analysis (BSA) is provided free of charge.

If you are currently working, about to begin work, or are self-employed, please contact the Alaska WIPA Project.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development Veterans Employment Services - 04/15/2019

~~“The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development has 21 Job Centers across the state. The Anchorage (Midtown and Muldoon), Fairbanks, and Wasilla Job Centers have on-site Veteran Representatives; however, all Job Centers provide priority services to qualified Veterans and their eligible Spouse.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Alaska Job Centers - 04/01/2019

~~This page iscontains a list of the Job Centers in Alaska with addresses, telephone numbers and links.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Veteran Services - 02/06/2019

~~Alaska Department of Labor offers a priority of service and benefits to veterans, and eligible spouses or caregivers, seeking employment, apprenticeship opportunities, and on-the-job training programs that pay veterans while they prepare for a sustainable career. Eligibility for these services:

Veterans who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released under conditions other than dishonorable,; special disabled veterans who have significant barriers to employment, as well as eligible spouses and caregivers, are eligible for specialized intensive services to obtain or retain employment.Veteran Services

Examples of priority of service for veterans are described by linking to the website.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Senate Bill 174 - 08/25/2018

~~"Alaska Senate Bill 174 reinforced person-centered support services planning and reaffirmed that the policy of the state encourages and enables persons with physical and mental disabilities to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Alaska Transition Plan for HCBS - 08/22/2018

~~“The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Senior and Disabilities Services (SDS) now submits for public review and comment the fourth version of its Transition Plan (“Plan”) in accordance with CFR 42 §441.301(c)(6). This describes what SDS and providers have been working on to ensure that Alaska’s HCBS settings achieve compliance with the elements of the final rule.  The State has described how compliance has been assessed; what the outcomes are; what educational strategies have been used; how providers have achieved compliance through remediation strategies; and what collaborative strategies will be used to ensure ongoing compliance after the deadline of March 22, 2019”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Webinar-On-Demand and Quiz - 07/12/2018

~~A training about the home and community based settings rules, what Program Administrators need to know and do, and how to request and complete the required self - assessment survey. This training is for Administrators or those applying to be administrators for the following services: Supported Employment, Residential Habilitation: Group home, Residential Habilitation: Family Home Habilitation, Residential Habilitation: Supported Living, Congregate Meals, Adult Day Services, Day Habilitation, and Residential Supported Living.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Senate Bill 174 - 08/25/2018

~~"Alaska Senate Bill 174 reinforced person-centered support services planning and reaffirmed that the policy of the state encourages and enables persons with physical and mental disabilities to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Minimum wage exemption for persons with disabilities eliminated - 02/16/2018

~~“JUNEAU, Alaska— Following a regulatory change that goes into effect today, Alaska employers are no longer allowed to pay less than minimum wage to workers who experience disabilities. In repealing 8 AAC 15.120, Alaska joins New Hampshire and Maryland as the first states in the nation to eliminate payment of subminimum wages for persons with disabilities. An exemption from paying minimum wage to persons with disabilities has existed for many years, beginning at the federal level with the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and in Alaska regulations since 1978. Historically, minimum wage exemptions were considered necessary to help people with disabilities gain employment. Experience over the past two decades has shown that workers with disabilities can succeed in jobs earning minimum wage or more. “Workers who experience disabilities are valued members of Alaska’s workforce,” said Department of Labor and Workforce Development Acting Commissioner Greg Cashen. “They deserve minimum wage protections as much as any other Alaskan worker.” The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development received written comments expressing support for repealing the regulation that allowed the minimum wage exemption from the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Alaska Workforce Investment Board. The elimination of the minimum wage exemption brings employment practices into alignment with Alaska Employment First Act of 2014, which requires vocational services help people with disabilities to become gainfully employed at or above the minimum wage.” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Alaska House Bill 188 “ABLE Accounts Bill” - 08/08/2016

Summary An Act establishing a program for financial accounts for individuals with disabilities; exempting the procurement of contracts for the program from the State Procurement Code; exempting certain information on participants in the program from being subject to inspection as a public record; providing that an account under the program for an individual with a disability is not a security; allowing a state to file a claim against an individual's financial account under the program to recover Medicaid payments after the individual's death; and providing for an effective date. The bill was enrolled on July 8, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Alaska ABLE Savings Program Act - 04/11/2015

An Act relating to financial accounts for persons with disabilities; relating to financial institutions; relating to property exemptions; relating to securities; and providing for an effective date.

Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Alaska HB 211 - Making Alaska an “Employment First State" - 09/19/2014

An Act relating to the education and employment of individuals with disabilities."  Signed into law on 9/19/14 by Governor Sean Parnell. Sec. 23.15.095. Gainful employment of individuals with disabilities. (a) When providing vocational training, vocational rehabilitation, or employment placement of an individual with a disability, the agency's primary objective and preferred outcome is to help the individual become gainfully employed in an integrated workplace where individuals with disabilities work with and alongside of individuals without disabilities.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Alaska House Bill 139 - 03/05/2014

“Sec. 2. AS 18.80.200 is amended to read:

(b) Therefore, it is the policy of the state and the purpose of this chapter to eliminate and prevent discrimination in employment, in credit and financing practices, in places of public accommodation, in the sale, lease, or rental of real property because of race, religion, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, physical or mental disability, marital status, changes in marital status, pregnancy or parenthood. It is also the policy of the state to encourage and enable physically and mentally disabled persons to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state and to engage in remunerative employment. It is not the purpose of this chapter to supersede laws pertaining to child labor, the age of majority, or other age restrictions or requirements.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 30

Student Summer Work Programs - 05/27/2019

~~“We have paid summer work programs in a variety of communities. Most are 4-6 weeks long and provide students with valuable work experience. Program content varies depending on the community. See list of programs below for details.Who Can ApplyA student with a disability is: an individual age 14-21 and enrolled in secondary education (high school) who:• Is on an IEP or 504 plan, or• Is a student who is potentially eligible for DVR services because of a physical, sensory, intellectual, mental health, and communication disabilities and whose disability could be a barrier to postsecondary education or employment.”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development Veterans Employment Services - 04/15/2019

~~“The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development has 21 Job Centers across the state. The Anchorage (Midtown and Muldoon), Fairbanks, and Wasilla Job Centers have on-site Veteran Representatives; however, all Job Centers provide priority services to qualified Veterans and their eligible Spouse.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Alaska Job Centers - 04/01/2019

~~This page iscontains a list of the Job Centers in Alaska with addresses, telephone numbers and links.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Veteran Services - 02/06/2019

~~Alaska Department of Labor offers a priority of service and benefits to veterans, and eligible spouses or caregivers, seeking employment, apprenticeship opportunities, and on-the-job training programs that pay veterans while they prepare for a sustainable career. Eligibility for these services:

Veterans who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released under conditions other than dishonorable,; special disabled veterans who have significant barriers to employment, as well as eligible spouses and caregivers, are eligible for specialized intensive services to obtain or retain employment.Veteran Services

Examples of priority of service for veterans are described by linking to the website.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Webinar-On-Demand and Quiz - 07/12/2018

~~A training about the home and community based settings rules, what Program Administrators need to know and do, and how to request and complete the required self - assessment survey. This training is for Administrators or those applying to be administrators for the following services: Supported Employment, Residential Habilitation: Group home, Residential Habilitation: Family Home Habilitation, Residential Habilitation: Supported Living, Congregate Meals, Adult Day Services, Day Habilitation, and Residential Supported Living.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Alaska Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Combined Plan 2018 Update - 04/02/2018

~~Alaska’s “Employment First” legislation calls for “competitive integrated employment” as the preferred outcome for those with disabilities. DOLWD has executed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) withHealth and Social Services; and is obtaining MOU signature with Education and Early Development to ensure progress towards that goal. The MOU includes commitments for active participation on the Interagency Council on Employment First, under the   auspices of the Employment First State Coordinator. 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

Minimum wage exemption for persons with disabilities eliminated - 02/16/2018

~~“JUNEAU, Alaska— Following a regulatory change that goes into effect today, Alaska employers are no longer allowed to pay less than minimum wage to workers who experience disabilities. In repealing 8 AAC 15.120, Alaska joins New Hampshire and Maryland as the first states in the nation to eliminate payment of subminimum wages for persons with disabilities. An exemption from paying minimum wage to persons with disabilities has existed for many years, beginning at the federal level with the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and in Alaska regulations since 1978. Historically, minimum wage exemptions were considered necessary to help people with disabilities gain employment. Experience over the past two decades has shown that workers with disabilities can succeed in jobs earning minimum wage or more. “Workers who experience disabilities are valued members of Alaska’s workforce,” said Department of Labor and Workforce Development Acting Commissioner Greg Cashen. “They deserve minimum wage protections as much as any other Alaskan worker.” The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development received written comments expressing support for repealing the regulation that allowed the minimum wage exemption from the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Alaska Workforce Investment Board. The elimination of the minimum wage exemption brings employment practices into alignment with Alaska Employment First Act of 2014, which requires vocational services help people with disabilities to become gainfully employed at or above the minimum wage.” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Minimum wage exemption for persons with disabilities eliminated - 02/16/2018

JUNEAU, Alaska— Following a regulatory change that goes into effect today, Alaska employers are no longer allowed to pay less than minimum wage to workers who experience disabilities. In repealing 8 AAC 15.120, Alaska joins New Hampshire and Maryland as the first states in the nation to eliminate payment of subminimum wages for persons with disabilities. An exemption from paying minimum wage to persons with disabilities has existed for many years, beginning at the federal level with the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and in Alaska regulations since 1978. Historically, minimum wage exemptions were considered necessary to help people with disabilities gain employment. Experience over the past two decades has shown that workers with disabilities can succeed in jobs earning minimum wage or more.  “Workers who experience disabilities are valued members of Alaska’s workforce,” said Department of Labor and Workforce Development Acting Commissioner Greg Cashen. “They deserve minimum wage protections as much as any other Alaskan worker.” The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development received written comments expressing support for repealing the regulation that allowed the minimum wage exemption from the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Alaska Workforce Investment Board.  The elimination of the minimum wage exemption brings employment practices into alignment with Alaska Employment First Act of 2014, which requires vocational services help people with disabilities to become gainfully employed at or above the minimum wage.  

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit - 11/16/2017

~~“The Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Unit is responsible for monitoring service providers and supports systems serving individuals who experience an intellectual or developmental disability. The IDD Unit oversees the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities waiver (IDD waiver) and, in spring 2018, the new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW).

The new Individualized Supports Waiver (ISW) was developed to replace the Community Developmental Disabilities Grant (CDDG) program, which will end June 30, 2018. The ISW will also extend supports to individuals who had not been covered by the grant program.”

The purpose of both waivers is to offer qualified participants a choice between home and community-based services or supports in an institutional setting.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Services Conditions of Participation - 11/05/2017

~~“Supported employment services may be provided to assist recipients to acquire and maintain the work-related skills necessary to become self-employed or for employment in an integrated work setting in the general workforce, at or above minimum wage with the level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals who are not recipients.  These services focus on activities that will meet the recipients’ personal and career goals, lead to an appropriate job match for the recipient and the employer, and may include vocational or job-related discovery or assessment, person-centered employment planning, job placement, job development, negotiation with prospective employers, job analysis, job carving, training and systematic instruction, and career advancement activities. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Information on the Formal Interagency Agreement with the State Educational Agency - 06/30/2018

~~DEED’s Special Education Unit and DVR have an interagency agreement that is designed to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services. The agreement includes: • DVR’s assurance of the development and implementation of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services before the student leaves school; • Designation of a regional DVR contact who is responsible for clarifying questions and concerns relating to the implementation of the agreements with local school districts; and • DVR’s assurance that the core tenets, principles, and career goals stated in each student’s Individual Education Program (IEP) will be incorporated into the development of their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). EED’s Special Education Unit also provides funding for members of the State Vocational Rehabilitation Committee to travel to events related to transition students such as the annual Statewide Special Education Conference.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Project Search - 11/30/2017

~~“This unique program provides real-life work experience to help youth, with significant disabilities, make successful transitions from school to adult life. Meant to serve as a student’s last year in high schoolAnchorage Fairbanks Central Peninsula    Mat-Su

Project SEARCH is an international trademarked and copyrighted program model, which focuses solely on employment for Project SEARCH interns. Successful outcomes for this project include:    Employment in an integrated setting (working alongside people without disabilities)        Year-round work        20 hours/week or more        Minimum wage or higher”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Alaska Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education “State 5-Year Plan FFY 2017-2021 Public Comment Draft”

“GOAL # 2: Employment Alaskans with disabilities and their families will receive the necessary employment services and supports needed to become competitively employed in an integrated setting. Objective 2.1: Provide support for the implementation of Alaska state laws increasing the employment of individuals with disabilities which lead to 3 new or improved policies, procedures, or regulations per year. Activities: Monitor legislation relating to employment for individuals with disabilities and provide support for advocacy and research, as needed. Provide support for the implementation of the Alaska Employment First Act with at least one improved policy, procedure, or regulation per year. Provide support for the implementation of the Alaska Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act as it relates to empowering employment for individuals with disabilities with at least one improved policy, procedure, or regulation per year

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

AK Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education

Alaska' unique geographical area with a relatively small population requires a management system tailored to meet the needs of Alaskans. The Governor's Council on Disabilities & Special Education was created to meet Alaska's diverse needs. The Council uses planning, capacity building, systems change, and advocacy to create change for people with disabilities. Consistent with our State Plan we work towards systems change in areas including:

housing employment early intervention special education lifelong learning independent living inclusion in the community.

 

The council serves as the interdepartmental planning/coordinating agency of the Department of Health and Social Services, the Department of Education and Early Development, and other departments which deliver services to people with disabilities or provide special education.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Announcing Community First Choice Program (CFC) - 07/01/2018

~~Community First Choice Personal Care Service (CFC-PCS) – the number of hours of personal care service per week are determined by an assessment conducted by the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services.Supervision and reminders – Additional CFC-PCS time may be available to recipients shown to have cognitive impairment or behavior issues.Personal Emergency Response system (PERS) – Recipients may be eligible to receive a personal emergency response system or medical alert system that calls for help at the push of a button in the event of an emergency.Skills training – Recipients may be eligible to receive skills training from a personal care assistant (PCA), so that the recipient can learn to do activities more independently.Worker supervision - Recipients can receive training to help manage their PCAs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

AK Integrated Employment Initiative (AIEI) 2015 Reported Outcomes - 02/01/2015

The Partnerships in Employment (PIE) Systems Change Grant is intended to increase integrated, competitive employment (ICE) opportunities for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). As one of the eight states participating in PIE, Alaska’s Integrated Employment Initiative (AIEI) presented outcomes including the unanimous passage of Employment First Legislation, data systems enhancement to improve system efficacy, policy and regulation leveraging, close collaboration and partnership with other agencies, and the promotion of the State as a Model Employer (SAME) Task Force.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Alaska Disability Employment Initiative - 10/23/2013

AKDEI will hire five regional Disability Resource Coordinator/EN Counselors and build on the successes of AKDEI 1 and 4 projects to improve employment opportunities and outcomes for youth by expanding access to employment and career pathways that will prepare youth for in-demand careers.  This will be accomplished through a multi-faceted approach.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Alaska AIDD Integrated Employment Initiative - 09/30/2012

"The Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative prioritizes employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities across Alaska. Partnerships with the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Education and Early Development, Disability Law Center of Alaska, and the Center for Human Development will address barriers and develop replicable, sustainable strategies using a three-pronged approach: (1) policy development; (2) capacity building; and (3) resource leveraging."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Alaska Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

BrainWorks for Self-Employment, University of AK - Anchorage Center for Human Development

BrainWorks is an innovative new project to assist individuals with brain injury in starting a business. This is part of a two-year research project funded by the Kessler Foundation. The BrainWorks program was developed by individuals with brain injury who are self-employed, self-employment facilitators who are knowledgeable about self employment and have experience working with people with disabilities, and research staff at the Center for Human Development.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Alaska Integrated Employment Initiative (AIDD PIE)

A consortium of partners consisting of the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education (lead entity), the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services (State I/DD agency), the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Education and Early Development, Disability Law Center of Alaska, and the Center for Human Development will develop sustainable strategies to increase the employment of youth and young adults with I/DD. The project intends to increase the percent of youth and young adults served by DVR from 20% to 25%; 2) increase hours worked by DVR participants with I/DD from 13 to 20 hours per week (comparable to other youth with disabilities); and 3) double the number of youth and young adults with I/DD served by SDS who are employed or self-employed from 139-278.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“United Way of Anchorage (UWA) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” population that is disproportionately without access to coverage or care and may lack knowledge about affordable options. Including, but not limited to—re-entry population, the unemployed, hourly wage workers, seasonal workers (ie: commercial fishers), variable income workers and low-income families with children, immigrants, young adults, and university students. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.. They will partner with  Alaska Primary Care Association, Community health centers, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Mat-Su Health Services, Aging and Disability Resource Center, Alaska Division of Public Assistance, Anchorage Project Access,  and Alaska 2-1-1.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:Sue BroganPhone: ( 907) 263-3821Email: SBrogan@ak.org

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Work Incentive Planning & Assistance (WIPA) - 05/06/2019

~~“The Alaska WIPA Project provides assistance to beneficiaries who are working at wage employment, self-employment, or who have a job offer pending. Assistance is offered to help understand the various work incentive programs that might be available, and provide advice about how to manage one’s benefits during the transition to paid employment. We provide both initial and follow along assistance to beneficiaries. Benefits Counseling and a written Benefits Summary Analysis (BSA) is provided free of charge.

If you are currently working, about to begin work, or are self-employed, please contact the Alaska WIPA Project.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

SDS Training - Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Self - Assessment Survey - 07/01/2017

~~“Join SDS staff for a training about the Settings rules, the self - assessment survey, and what Program Administrators need to know and do. This training is for Administrators or those applying to administrate: Supported Employment, Residential Habilitation: Group home, Residential Habilitation: Family Home Habilitation, Residential Habilitation: Supported Living, Congregate Meals, Adult Day Services, Day Habilitation, and Residential Supported Living. SDS has been working with CMS and providers on a Transition Plan to bring Alaska into settings compliance since 2014. CMS requires all states to comply with new settings rules per 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4)-(5) . The purpose of these changes is to make sure that states use Home and Community Based funding for programs that truly work to integrate Alaskans with disabilities and/or who are frail elders into the community at every opportunity.

Training is offered as a video:HCBS Program Administrator Training: HCBS Settings Self – Assessment Survey.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Care Coordination Training Guide - 06/02/2017

~~“We’re glad you’ve chosen to study Senior and Disabilities Service Care Coordination. This guide is designed to provide you with basic information and procedures. It is not intended to solely qualify you as a Care Coordinator. The qualifications needed to become a Care Coordinator are set forth in the guide. Even with the basic qualifications, for a new Care Coordinator, best practice is to spend a lot of time with a mentor. You may consider contacting a local Care Coordinator to see about mentorship possibilities. You may also choose to join your local Care Coordination Network association.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

AK Customized Employment - PowerPoint - 01/01/2008

This is a PowerPoint presentation addressing Customized Employment in Alaska with an emphasis on maintaining a client-centered team.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

AK Customized Employment Service Provider Manual - 05/01/2007

Our mission is to support the rights of those living with life complexities and disabilities to participate in all aspects of vocational services, while striving to eliminate barriers to employment. Together we form partnerships with individuals, families, employers, service providers, and the community at large to support the creation of expanded work options and meaningful employment, promote economic opportunities and independence, encourage self‐determination, and support the inclusion of people with complex lives into the community.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Industry-Driven Support Model

The Industry-Driven Support Model is being developed and tested as a resource for low income entrepreneurs with disabilities. The model is focused on bringing entrepreneurs from all parts of Alaska with various disabilities together through one common theme, owning a small business within a similar industry. The training sessions focus on a specific topic (e.g., Finances or Marketing) for a specific industry (e.g., arts and crafts or service businesses). The networking sessions focus on discussions around the training topics and how to network within and outside of one’s own community

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Alaska Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Policy Manual

The purpose of this manual is to provide clear guidance to ADVR staff for the consistent and legal implementation of the vocational rehabilitation program in Alaska.  ADVR staff is expected to provide services pursuant to the policies and procedures outlined in this manual. 

The manual provides comprehensive information pertaining to the subject, including not only the division’s policy, but also basic procedures, legal citations, resources and answers to frequently asked questions about the subject.  The procedures are not prescriptive, as VR services are determined by an individual’s needs, although they are reflective of ADVR’s business practices.   

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Alaska DVR -– “Service Definitions, Requirements and Hourly Rat Range” for Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP)

Alaska DVR has authorized the CRPs listed to provide the identified services. These services should only be purchased from authorized CRPs. Some of the authorized services include situational assessments, benefits analysis/ counseling, job search assistance, job readiness training, on-the-job evaluations, job supports, and business development services, among others.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Proposed Model of Employment Services for Individuals with Behavioral Health Disabilities

This is the proposed model of employment services of individuals with behavioral disabilities for providers as well as select government agencies within the state of Alaska. It focuses on training, technical assistance and required resources.

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

1115 Behavioral Health Medicaid Waiver - 06/27/2019

~~“Medicaid Section 1115 Demonstration Waivers provide states with flexibility to test new approaches within Medicaid to aid in redesigning and improving their health systems without increasing costs.Alaska’s 1115 Waiver

In January 2018, Alaska applied to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for approval of an 1115 behavioral health waiver that would create a data-driven, integrated behavioral health system of care for Alaskans experiencing serious mental illness, severe emotional disturbance, substance use disorder (SUD), co-occurring substance use and mental illness, and at-risk families and children.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Alaska Transition Plan for HCBS - 08/22/2018

~~“The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Senior and Disabilities Services (SDS) now submits for public review and comment the fourth version of its Transition Plan (“Plan”) in accordance with CFR 42 §441.301(c)(6). This describes what SDS and providers have been working on to ensure that Alaska’s HCBS settings achieve compliance with the elements of the final rule.  The State has described how compliance has been assessed; what the outcomes are; what educational strategies have been used; how providers have achieved compliance through remediation strategies; and what collaborative strategies will be used to ensure ongoing compliance after the deadline of March 22, 2019”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Announcing Community First Choice Program (CFC) - 07/01/2018

~~This is a “new program that is part of the Medicaid reform initiative also known as 1915(k).Provides Personal Care Services and other supports in the recipient’s home as an alternative to institutional care.All recipients who currently meet an institutional level of care and receive both Home and Community Based Waiver Services and Personal Care Services have predetermined eligibility; these recipients have received a letter of notification* (see link to letter below).

What Services are Available from the CFC Program?....Skills training – Recipients may be eligible to receive skills training from a personal care assistant (PCA), so that the recipient can learn to do activities more independently.Worker supervision - Recipients can receive training to help manage their PCAs.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)