Arkansas

States - Big Screen

The Natural State of Arkansas celebrates that disability is a natural part of life, and should not limit the career opportunities for hard workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Arkansa VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.32%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,013,825
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-6.16%
Change from
2017 to 2018
268,473
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.21%
Change from
2017 to 2018
86,243
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.95%
Change from
2017 to 2018
32.12%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.2%
Change from
2017 to 2018
75.74%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 2,988,248 3,004,279 3,013,825
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 269,725 285,023 268,473
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 85,447 87,290 86,243
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,111,661 1,121,274 1,135,234
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 31.68% 30.85% 32.12%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.72% 75.89% 75.74%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.00% 3.70% 3.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.30% 22.60% 23.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.00% 15.10% 16.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 244,632 257,859 258,641
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 253,631 272,781 264,913
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 394,205 419,543 413,928
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 80,057 81,438 77,710
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 16,865 16,002 17,680
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,045 4,518 4,000
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,382 3,082 3,510
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 384
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 12,373 14,510 16,882
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 5,139 6,563 7,140

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,198 4,265 4,186
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.00% 4.10% 4.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 138,619 137,228 134,780

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,133 7,870 8,431
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 24,988 23,719 23,842
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 40,425 36,414 36,610
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.10% 21.60% 23.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 1.10% 0.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.60% 2.50% 2.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 0.50% 0.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 337 363 309
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 770 814 902
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 195 162 195
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 7 5 0

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,018 2,753 2,821
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.01

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 10 17 15
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 8 9 11
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 80.00% 53.00% 73.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.27 0.30 0.37

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,361
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 7 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 524 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,357 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 820 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 586 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 67 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 41.90% 29.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,382 3,246 3,159
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 202,159 201,408 198,990
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 70 92 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 73 77 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.00 0.00 0.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 52.68% 53.08% 53.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.55% 13.40% 13.15%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.35% 2.30% 2.14%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.41% 98.85% N/A
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 11.80% 17.92% 10.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 24.11% 44.32% 50.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 51.26% 52.02% 54.89%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 12.31% 26.40% 39.66%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 498,055
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,122
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 83,194
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 188,231
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 271,425
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 335
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 375
AbilityOne wages (products). $772,656
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,001,227

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 29 37 29
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3 3 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 32 40 32
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,566 2,456 1,860
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 401 401 384
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,967 2,857 2,244

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~ARS and representatives from CRPs developed and implemented standard procedures for the referral process and outcome indicators resulting in a fee for service schedule for individuals served by CRPs.

ARS’ standard procedures for external Employment First private non-profit and public VR service providers and CRPs are standards of compliance ensuring VR consumers achieve acceptable outcomes related to employment. The procedures for a CRP to be accredited as a vendor and to maintain accreditation are: 

(1) The CRP submits a vendor application documenting required experience in working with consumers with disabilities and employers.

(2) ARS reviews the application to assure ARS requirements are met, and submits a certificate and agreement documents to the ARS Commissioner for signature.

(3) The CRP is required to sign certification agreement documents assuring the ARS requirements as a vendor will be met.

(4) Once accredited, ARS provides a current vendor packet and provides training to the entity, as needed. ARS informs the ARS district manager and the VR counselors of the vendor.

(5) The VR counselor refers the consumer to the CRP and monitors the consumer’s progress.

(6) A VR counselor liaison is assigned to each CRP and provides monthly reports to the appropriate ARS personnel.

(7) ARS case review personnel from Program Planning, Development and Evaluation perform a standardized audit of CRP consumer files to ensure training criteria is met, the CRP demonstrates acceptable consumer progress/plans, appropriate documents are in the file, and the amount billed meets accepted guidelines of cost to value. CRP personnel files are reviewed to assure performance standards are acceptable and staff training requirements are met. (Page186-187) Title II

ARS maintains written cooperative agreements with private non-profit and for profit agencies in the state that provide supported employment (SE) services and extended services to ARS consumers with the most significant disabilities. The service providers commit to funding extended services for as long as the consumers remain employed on the original job.

ARS will continue to work with the Department of Human Services agencies to recruit Developmental Disabilities Centers, Behavioral Health Centers, and other related programs serving individuals with the most significant disabilities to seek certification to provide SE services. ARS will create new agreements based on technical assistance received from RSA; in consultation with the Arkansas State Rehabilitation Council and the Department of Labor, Office of Department of Employment Services experts in Employment First and WIOA. (Page187) Title II

ARS serves on the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, AR Employment First State Leadership team with the Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), University of Arkansas PROMISE Grant, and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU). The team in consultation with both the Arkansas State Rehabilitation Council and the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) State Liaison will be updating the current interagency agreements to fund braided services and apply for combined waiver programs related to opportunities where individuals participated in employment related activities under WIOA. (Page 193) Title II

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, is receiving technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU).

• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will initiate revised MOUs based on the WIOA, including new rates and reimbursement methodology for braiding services.
• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will provide technical assistance to the pilot projects focused on transitioning from facility based services to community based services. (Page 227) Title II

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, the Arkansas SRC and the RSA State Liaison, will establish technical assistance guidelines focused on CRPs transitioning from facility based services to community based services.

• ARS and ACTI administrators will review the current and future role and function of ACTI in the provision of services designed to assist in meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. (Page 231) Title II

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, is receiving technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU). (Page 234- 235) Title I

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, continues to receive technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU).

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, is revising MOUs based on the WIOA, including new rates and a reimbursement methodology.
ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, is providing technical assistance to the pilot projects focused on transitioning from facility based services to community based services. (Page 235) Title II

• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, the Arkansas SRC and the RSA State Liaison, will establish technical assistance guidelines focused on CRPs transitioning from facility based services to community based services.
• ARS and ACTI administrators will review the current and future role and function of ACTI in the provision of services designed to assist in meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. (Page 241) Title II

ARS will train staff on the new services and standards for Community Rehabilitation Programs beginning July 1, 2016.
• ARS will train staff to increase awareness related to Employment First (E1st) Provider Transformation and Integrated Community Based Services as it relates to Community Rehabilitation Programs, Supported Employment Programs, and External Job Placement vendors. (Page 243) Title II

Another purchased service agreement is in place with SE service vendors to implement strategies to expand the SE system including job placement services and extended services. Strategies include increasing the number of vendors offering SE and job placement statewide through enhanced incentives; utilizing a performance based approach with CRPs and SE providers; revised CRP fee schedules; and commitment from partnering state agencies to emphasize employment as a high priority outcome as a result of the Governor’s Executive Order Employment First Initiative for People with Disabilities. (Page 249) Title II

DSB maintains an active presence on numerous councils and committees, including: Arkansas Interagency Transition Partnership, Arkansas Workforce Development Board, Interagency Steering Committee on Integrated Employment, Behavioral Health Planning and Advisory Council, The Arkansas Independent Living Council, Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) The Governor’s Commission on People with Disabilities, Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, Youth Leadership Forum, Accessible Parking Taskforce, Local Workforce Development Boards across the state. (Page 262) Title II

                                                

Customized Employment

~~ARS will maximize the ability of individuals with most significant disabilities to achieve competitive employment through customized employment, supported employment, and other individualized services.

ARS will collaborate with WIOA partners, private funding, and other state agencies to help individuals with most significant disabilities to receive extended services to increase employability in an integrated environment.

Based on the success rate for competitive employment outcomes in the inaugural Project SEARCH initiative, ARS in collaboration with ACCESS Group, Inc., other community partners, and Project SEARCH International will expand the Arkansas Project SEARCH. (Page 221) Title II

Each of the SE services providers: World Services for the Blind, Easter Seals, Job Connections, and Goodwill Industries, will be responsible for extended services.

Supported employment is integrated competitive employment, or an individual working in an integrated employment setting towards integrated competitive employment. This includes customized employment. The standard post-employment extended service support service under supported employment is 24 months.

Focus of Supported Employment on Youth: Half of the money that Arkansas receives under the supported employment state grant will be used to support youth with the most significant blindness and low vision needs (up to age 24), and these youth may receive extended services (i.e., ongoing supports to maintain an individual in supported employment) for up to 4 years. (Page 270) Title II

DSB uses several vendors to provide comprehensive supported employment services to youth and adults identified as blind or visually impaired. The services begin with identifying blindness skills, addressing psychological and social needs, and then moving on to skills training, placement and job coaching.

Supported employment is integrated competitive employment, or an individual working in an integrated employment setting working towards integrated competitive employment. This includes customized employment. The standard post-employment extended support service under supported employment is 24 months. (Page 298) Title II

Supported employment is integrated competitive employment, or an individual working in an integrated employment setting towards integrated competitive employment. This includes customized employment. The standard post-employment extended support service under supported employment is 24 months. Focus of Supported Employment on Youth: Half of the funds that Arkansas receives under the supported employment state grant will be used to support youth with the most significant blindness and low vision needs (up to age 24), and these youth may receive extended services (i.e., ongoing supports to maintain an individual in supported employment) for up to 4 years. DSB is developing an agreement with CRPs and Medicaid through the Division of Medical Services and with the Division of Development Disabilities to share the cost of extended services in supported employment. (Page 299) Title II
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~To best align services and resources, core and optional programs will develop joint policies and initiatives that spur collaboration, braiding of resources, and support the inclusion of key stakeholders in development and implementation. In order to continue to be inclusive of other programs and align with all workforce development resources in Arkansas, it is imperative that the work of the WIOA Roundtable continue and transition from an implementation body to a coordination and continuous improvement body. By doing so, we set ourselves up to more efficiently bring in other federal, state, and private or non-profit resources to the benefit of our citizens. By utilizing this design, the WIOA Roundtable can approach additional partner programs with a united front.  (Page 63) Title I

ARS commits to driving innovation and expansion of activities directly provided or facilitated by the agency that lead to competitive integrated employment while harnessing the unique talents and abilities of the people we serve.

ARS will invest in innovative services and programming tied to industry sectors with projected short and long term growth. ARS leadership will focus its efforts on expanding programing and services that lead to increases in the performance accountability measures. This includes opportunities to better collaborate with other core programs and to forge mutually beneficial partnerships with business and industry partners.

Another high priority for ARS is efficiency. The driving forces are leveraging resources through committed partnerships and maximizing the results of each dollar spent to serve people with disabilities. (Page 233) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~DSB works in conjunction with the Arkansas Education Services for the Visually Impaired (ESVI) and the Department of Education, Special Education Division to identify blind and visually impaired students. Most recently, DSB has expanded its outreach effort to include private schools, alternative schools, and accredited online high school systems. DSB is improving and expanding efforts by offering seminars and in person talks to these educational organizations to inform teachers, parents, and students of the services that are available. DSB offers Parent Summits to provide coordinated efforts to allow students and parents to learn about the options in blindness skills training, education, and employment services. DSB continues to provide a three—week transition learning experience for up to 22 students from across the state, which includes paid work experiences, lessons in self advocacy, peer mentoring, financial literacy, independent living skills, career counseling, and planning for the future; the students are housed at Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired and go home on weekends. DSB intends to expand this program throughout the State to offer students and youth an opportunity to receive services closer to the communities in which they live. DSB is also working to offer work experience training, soft skills training, career counseling, and advocacy skills to pre—employment transition students throughout the State. Page (302) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~Allowable activities, referred to as vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, are those activities necessary to assist individuals with disabilities to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain gainful employment. An individualized plan for employment (IPE) is the foundation for all activities funded by Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS) for eligible individuals. Both the outcome goal and the services outlined on each individual’s IPE must be consistent with their respective strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, informed choice and economic self-sufficiency. VR services, as practicable, should likewise align with the resources of core partners, and other stakeholders to ensure that people with disabilities meet or exceed their IPE goals. In addition to VR counseling, IPE’s may include pre-employment transition and transition services, rehabilitation technology, training for careers that are in demand, post-secondary education, placement with employers, interpreters, accommodations needed for job placement or retaining employment, restorative medical services, positive behavior supports, internships, paid work experiences, and pre-apprenticeship training. (Page 62) Title I

Goal Met: Case reviews showed no students were graduating without current IPE’s.
Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits around the state to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings. (Page 101) Title II

ARS assigns VR counselor liaisons to each high school statewide. VR counselors work collaboratively with combined plan partners.
ARS will set aside 15 percent of federal VR program funding to provide pre-employment transition services such as job exploration counseling, and work-based learning experiences including internships in integrated environments. ARS will provide counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, will provide workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living skills, and will provide instruction in self-advocacy and peer mentoring.  (Page 179) Title II

Pre-ETS services include five core areas: Job exploration counseling: these are services to assist the student in exploring the world or work and learning more about their interests, abilities and future career goals. Work-based learning experiences, (which may include in-school or after school opportunities, experience outside the traditional school setting including internships, that are provided in an integrated environment) Counseling on opportunities in comprehensive transition or enrollment in postsecondary educational programs, Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, Instruction in self-advocacy/peer mentoring. In order to reach these goals DSB is ensuring our Pre-ETS transition counselors have a strong relationship with the local school districts and the local Work Force Development Boards. Summer work experiences, work place readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and other work based learning experiences have been implemented and will continue to expand as the population of high school students we serve increases. (Page 265) Title II

Pre-ETS services include: Job exploration counseling, Work-based learning experiences, (which may include in-school or after school opportunities, experience outside the traditional school setting including internships, that are provided in an integrated environment), Counseling on opportunities in comprehensive transition or enrollment in postsecondary educational programs, Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, Instruction in self-advocacy/peer mentoring.

In order to reach these goals, DSB is ensuring our seven Pre-ETS transition counselors have a strong relationship with the local school districts and the local Work Force Development Boards. Summer work experiences, work place readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and other work based learning experiences have been implemented and will continue to expand as the population of high school students we serve increases. (Page 266) Title II

Transition students/youth may be determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation within 60 days after application and the Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) will be completed within 90 days after eligibility. (Page 179) Title II

7. ARS will work with colleges and universities within the state that train special educators and VR Counselors to include in their curriculum information on pre-employment transition.
8. ARS realizes providing pre-employment services to all Arkansas students with IEPs or 504 plans may require utilization of outside resources. ARS proposes to develop and issue a request for qualifications to determine potential outside providers of pre-employment transition services. It envisions the provider list of eligible programs might include CRPs or even educational cooperatives. (Page 181) Title II

ARS counselors in students IEP meetings with authorization by parents or guardians and student knowledge, will communicate regularly with ARS counselors, and will provide ARS with copies of school records.

ARS will ensure each student with a significant disability enrolled in a vocational education program receives an interest assessment, and identifies capabilities. ARS will provide accommodations as needed to ensure successful completion of the vocational education program for VR eligible youth in accordance with their respective IPEs; unless these accommodations are the responsibility of the LEA pursuant to FAPE regulations. ARS will provide technical assistance to local education agencies to ensure equal educational opportunities including full opportunity to participate in programs, to ensure activities and job opportunities are provided to all youth and students, and to analyze, identify, and change policies and activities that impede the achievement of equal opportunities for all individuals. (Page 183) Title II

2. School districts have the primary planning, programmatic, and financial responsibilities for the provision of education transition services and related services for students as a component of a free appropriate public education (FAPE) and these services are provided to eligible students with disabilities, ages 16 to 21, and younger when determined appropriate through the implementation of the Individualized Education Program (IEP). The parties acknowledge that the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit has general supervisory responsibility over the educational program of any public agency providing FAPE to individuals with disabilities, ages birth to 21, as defined in state and federal statutes. (Page 183) Title II

Outreach efforts include, but are not limited to, attendance at IEP and transition planning meetings, career fairs, back to school nights, group orientations, transition fairs, and presentations coordinated throughout the year. The process includes:
1. Transition counselors to identify and outreach to all students with disabilities to make available the five required pre-employment transition services. (Page 184) Title II

ARS will work with schools to assist the student in identifying and selecting vocational programming that will enhance a student’s ability to pursue appropriate career objectives. ARS counselors will provide information to schools about VR services, meet with special education teachers during the school year, and ensure schools have appropriate forms and information for students to apply for services.

In addition, ARS has a Transition Manager and Vocational Education Coordinator that will assist with managing transition services as an agency, and will also ensure services are appropriate and efficient for the clients, schools, and partnerships. Additionally, the transition manager will work directly with the schools and community partners to provide education on Pre-Employment Transition services and Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act. Furthermore, the agency will be providing detailed information about pre-employment transition services for students with an IEP and 504 plans. (Page 185) Title II

2. Documentation from the appropriate school personnel responsible for the provision of transition services to the VR counselor of the receipt of transition services under IDEA. This documentation must be provided to the VR counselor when a case is opened and may include a copy of the IEP and progress reports on transition services received.
3. Documentation of the application for VR services, with the result that the student was either determined ineligible for VR services or determined eligible and had an approved individualized plan for employment, but was unable to achieve the employment outcome, and the case was closed.
4. Documentation from VR of receipt of career counseling, and information and referral to other federal and/or state programs. This is completed using ARS Transition Section 511 SMW-2 form Career Counseling, Information and Referral, Student/Youth Services. (Page 188) Title II

5. ARS will revise its MOU with Special Education to include pre-employment transition. As part of the MOU, ARS will request Special Education’s assistance in gaining access to all students in the state age 14 an older who have an IEP or 504 plan.
6. ARS will work with Special Education to develop/provide training to special education teachers and special education supervisors on pre-employment transition. (Page 189) Title II

8. ARS realizes providing pre-employment services to all Arkansas students with IEPs or 504 plans may require utilization of outside resources. ARS proposes to develop and issue a request for qualifications to determine potential outside providers of pre-employment transition services. It envisions the provider list of eligible programs might include CRPs or even educational cooperatives. (Page 218) Title II

Secondary schools invite DSB to Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings to be part of the planning team to assist education agencies in preparing students who are blind or severely visually impaired for transition from school to post-school activities, such as employment, training, supported employment, and other VR services. The IEP outlines the roles and responsibilities of DSB, the student, the school, and any other agency/organization involved in providing transition services. (Page 263) Title II

DSB counselors assist participants in developing Individual Plans for Employment (IPE’s) at age 16. The IPE is developed no later than 90 days after eligibility is determined. DSB works to develop IPEs at age 16 and every year until the student transitions out of high school. Secondary schools invite DSB to Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings to be part of the planning team to assist education agencies in preparing students who are blind or severely visually impaired for transition from school to post-school activities, such as employment, training, supported employment, and other VR services. DSB conducts independent living, technology and vocational assessments after the determination of eligibility in order to address planning needs. This information is shared with the education staff in determining career goals and objectives. DSB will provide accommodations according to the IPE that are not the responsibility of the LEA pursuant to FAPE regulations. Peer support and mentoring is arranged for the duration of transition services. The IEP and the IPE outline the roles and responsibilities of DSB, the student, the school, and any other agency/organization involved in providing transition services. Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) DSB is working cooperatively with the Educational Services for the Visually Impaired, Department of Education, Special Education Teachers for the Visually Impaired, and local education areas to coordinate Pre-Employment Transition Services. New federal mandates require that DSB, in collaboration with local educational agencies, offer to transition age high school students with disabilities (ages 16-Graduation) Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) using 15% of our federal allocation on an annual basis. (Page 266) Title II

VR services delivered under WIOA do not remove, reduce, or change the school district’s responsibility to deliver a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) for students served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. VR services supplement, but do not supplant services delivered through the school districts.

Roles and Responsibilities The roles and responsibilities for each partner agency as required by federal and state regulations are as follows:

1. Local education agencies provide a Free and Appropriate Public Education for students with visual impairment and those with low or no vision, including preparation for transition from school to work or other postsecondary activities.

2. DSB and the Department of Education, Special Education, ESVI and Teachers for the Visually Impaired assist with student transition from secondary school to work through postsecondary training, education, or direct placement services necessary to achieve a successful employment outcome. The Division of Services for the Blind and the Department of Education, Special Education share the financial responsibility of ensuring that the provision of pre-employment transition services are planned and implemented within the school system.

3. The Division of Development Disabilities Services in collaboration with the Division of Services for the Blind and the Department of Education, Special Education work to reduce the number of sheltered workshop placements by promoting competitive employment in an integrated setting to all low vision and blind participants. In order to promote independence and self-sufficiency, the agency shall provide support and services, within available resources, to assist customers enrolled in Medicaid waivers who choose to pursue gainful employment.

Financial Responsibilities DSB and the Department of Education, Special Education, ARS, and the Division of Developmental Disabilities Services are committed to meeting financial responsibilities as required by law. Agency/Division heads for the organizations will periodically identify areas for improved programmatic and financial efficiencies and develop strategies to meet financial responsibilities, including joint appropriations requests from the state legislature and negotiations with federal agencies. Each party is financially responsible for the services it provides under its own laws and rules. (Pages 267-268) Title II

DSB has begun work with Arkansas Workforce Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education to plan and develop pre-employment transition services and to coordinate services for individuals being served dually and under the PROMISE grant. The Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education staff provide training and information on transition services to vocational rehabilitation and workforce services staff. In turn, vocational rehabilitation staff, both DSB and ARS train and collaborate with Education and Workforce to provide training on how to establish work based learning experiences, providing job exploration counseling and counseling on opportunities in enrollment in post-secondary counseling, as well as cross training on instructional models in supported employment. Our agencies work together towards utilizing best practices on Section 101, IDEA, ADA and the Individual Education Plan (IEP). DSB’s transition coordinator participates in monthly meetings with ESVI staff and teachers for the visually impaired. (Page 285-286) Title II

Strategy: DSB will update the collaborative database of transition students as needed.

Performance Measure: Counselors/Rehabilitation Assistants will coordinate with Local Education Area (LEA) Supervisors to maintain lists of where transition students are located.

Strategy: VR Counselors will continue to track transition students on their caseloads to insure that the IPE is developed or updated before a student graduates from high school.

Performance Measure: Area Supervisors will monitor this during case reviews to insure that no transition student will graduate without a current IPE.

Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings.

Performance Measure: Annually, DSB will invite ESVI Regional Certified Vision Consultants and transition parents to a Parent Summit with VR Counselors to provide information about assistive technology; rights and responsibilities; available resources and services; benefits counseling; and funding for college and career start—up costs. (Page 292-293) Title II

Strategy: DSB will maintain a database of transition students.
Strategy: VR Counselors will continue to track transition students on their caseloads to insure that the IPE is developed or updated before a student graduates from high school.
Strategy: VR Counselors will make face-to-face visits to LEA Supervisors in their territories.
Strategy: DSB will continue to provide assessments and services to transition students specifically focused on activities of daily living, including but not limited to, mobility, knowledge of available transportation resources, self—advocacy, acquisition of a variety of reading options, awareness of job opportunities, benefits counseling, and rights and responsibilities as an informed participant. (Page 300) Title II

2 Year Update - DSB has 7 Pre-ETS Counselors working with the youth 16 to graduation. Each counselor maintains their own caseload. Reports are generated from the AWARE database to assist the Field Services Administrator, Transition Coordinator and counselors maintain the cases.
Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits around the state to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings. Performance Measure: In FY 2015, DSB will invite ESVI Regional Certified Vision Consultants and transition parents to Parent Summits with VR Counselors and Rehabilitation Teachers, to provide information about students’ rights and accommodations. Goal Met: Parent Summits were held in West Memphis and Harrison for transition students and their families from throughout the state. ESVI was included on the agenda. The information provided included IEP’s, but topics extended beyond high school and into college services. The success of the summit confirmed that additional summits will be held around the state in coming years. (Page 309) Title II
 

Career Pathways

~~On-the-job training (OJT) is training in the public or private sector that is given to a paid employee while he or she is engaged in productive work and that provides knowledge and skills essential to the full and adequate performance of the job. On-the-job training differs from subsidized employment in that the OJT employer receives a subsidy to help with costs associated with training. “Supported work” for individuals with disabilities is considered OJT if onsite training is included. (Page 335) Title IV

Apprenticeship

6. Increase the utilization of Registered Apprenticeship programs as viable talent development opportunities.

7. Increase connections with employers and Vocational Rehabilitation agencies to provide support and employment for youth and adults with disabilities.

8. Partner with K-12 education, higher education, career and technical education, and adult education to provide consistent rules and eliminate barriers to implementing training programs around the State.

9. Explore data sharing opportunities with non-governmental organizations that are committed partners to the state’s workforce center system that will lead to improved intake, referral, and case management for customers served by multiple agencies (both public and private). (Page 46) Title I

Allowable activities, referred to as vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, are those activities necessary to assist individuals with disabilities to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain gainful employment. An individualized plan for employment (IPE) is the foundation for all activities funded by Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS) for eligible individuals. Both the outcome goal and the services outlined on each individual’s IPE must be consistent with their respective strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, informed choice and economic self-sufficiency. VR services, as practicable, should likewise align with the resources of core partners, and other stakeholders to ensure that people with disabilities meet or exceed their IPE goals. In addition to VR counseling, IPE’s may include pre-employment transition and transition services, rehabilitation technology, training for careers that are in demand, post-secondary education, placement with employers, interpreters, accommodations needed for job placement or retaining employment, restorative medical services, positive behavior supports, internships, paid work experiences, and pre-apprenticeship training. (Page 62) Title I

ARS has plans to utilize statewide registered apprenticeship training providers to facilitate placement in registered apprenticeship and one provider has been approved as a vendor for this service. During FFY 2016, there were plans for six 40-hour pre-apprenticeship training classes to train 90 people with disabilities. However, this plan was altered based on availability of the pre-apprenticeship training providers. By the conclusion of FFY 2017, 42 VR consumers successfully completed pre-apprenticeship training. For the first class in FFY 2016, of the 19 successful completers, 14 achieved competitive integrated employment, 12 are employed in high skill, high demand careers, and two are actively searching for employment. There are plans for continued expansion of the use of pre-apprenticeship for VR clients in Arkansas. In the second quarter of FFY 2018, 100 students have registered for pre-apprenticeship training. (Page 72) Title I

In FFY 2017, ACTI partnered with CVS Health to develop a retail training program with externships at CVS Health’s pharmacies. The training is based on CVS’s needs for retail staff and pharmacy technicians.

The pre-apprenticeship training provided to ARS clients was funded by a grant provided through the Arkansas Department of Workforce Services.

Access and Accommodations received 108 referrals for assistive technology assessment with clients looking to participate in educational activities from field counselors this program year. Access and Accommodations also served 95 referrals for assistive technology education and consultation from public and private employers during the program year. These cases typically result in the acquisition and training on the use of specific assistive technology devices and accommodations. Access and Accommodations staff have collaborated with ICAN to provide training in the area of legal provisions of assistive technology, specifically focusing on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) including examples of device implementation to field staff with regards to education, transition, and employment. They have also provided training in these areas to outside community partners as well as public and private employers. (Page 241) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Strategy: DSB will work in conjunction with provider agencies to provide work appropriate skills and training to blind and low vision participants.

  • Performance Measure: DSB will refer participants to World Services for the Blind, Alpha Pointe, the Louisiana Center for the Blind, Sources, Goodwill and other providers as necessary for additional skills training, including, but not limited to soft skills and work readiness training to assist participants in improving their probability of securing competitive employment.

Strategy: DSB will provide detailed benefits counseling information to each participant on SSI and SSDI.

  • Performance Measure: DSB will refer 100% of clients, adults, students and youth on SSI and SSDI to the DSB benefits counselor for a one—on—one benefits analysis.
  • Performance Measure: Area Supervisors will monitor caseloads to ensure that VR Counselors are referring 100% of SSI and SSDI VR participants to the benefits counselor.
  • Performance Measure: Counselors will make participants aware of benefits counseling at the time of application, at the time of IPE’s, and at the time of closure. (Page 291) Title II

Strategy: VR Counselors will schedule and attend face-to-face job exploration meetings to interview human resource professionals regarding the types of jobs they have and the skills needed to do those jobs.
Strategy: VR Counselors will ensure that participants in job- ready status are actively seeking employment.
Strategy: DSB will encourage and support viable self-employment.
Strategy: DSB will work in conjunction with provider agencies to provide work appropriate skills and training to blind and low vision participants.
Strategy: DSB will provide detailed benefits counseling information to each participant on SSI and SSDI.
Strategy: DSB will continue to refer Older Individuals who are Blind and interested in employment to VR and will ensure that its OIB contractor will as well. (Page 299) Title II
 

Employer/ Business

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Data Collection

The most recent Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) for Arkansas was completed in December 2015. ARS contracted with Dan Hopkins & Associates, Inc. who worked collaboratively with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), key stakeholders and ARS to complete a CSNA of rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities in Arkansas. Multiple strategies to gather data and information were used including: (a) A focus group discussion with participants from ARS, SRC, key stakeholders, and vendors; (b) A structured survey of all ARS counselors; (c) A structured survey of a random sample of ARS consumers throughout Arkansas; (d) Focus groups of consumers; (e) An ACTI focus group of administrators and staff; (f) Interviews and surveys of the agency leadership; (g) Questionnaire and an abbreviated focus group with district managers; (h) Review of 2014 RSA 911 data; and (i) Review of data from the American Community Survey and 2014 Current Population Survey. (Page 207) Title II

511

~~ARS in collaboration with the SRC proposes to implement the following to fulfill its RSA requirement of allotting 50% of its supported employment funds to serve youth with disabilities:

ARS will attempt to identify early on youth with disabilities that can benefit from supported employment services. ARS recognizes that a number of individuals with disabilities served through the Promise Grant will be potential candidates for supported employment services and that as it develops an effective pre-employment transition program a number of individuals serviced will also benefit from supported employment services. Developing an effective referral system for individuals served through Promise and pre-employment transition will be a priority. ARS also recognizes that in some areas CRPs have established an arrangement with local school districts to provide services. ARS will make it a priority to work with local CRPs and local school districts to help identify and refer to ARS potential supported employment candidates. This will also be in line with ARS’s efforts to address Section 511 requirements. In addition, as ARS revises its MOU’s with Developmental Disabilities Services and Behavioral Health a priority will be established to include language addressing the provision of supported employment services to youth with disabilities.

With the effective implementation of the activities identified above and with additional guidance provided by the RSA Liaison, ARS and the SRC fully expect to meet the SE requirement.

ARS in collaboration with the SRC and in consultation with its RSA State Liaison proposes to implement the following strategies to address the requirements of Section 511. ARS will:

1. Revise its MOU with Developmental Disabilities to include how both agencies will develop policy/procedure to address clients effected or might potentially be effected by Section 511.
2. Revise its MOU with Behavioral Health to include how both agencies will develop policy/procedure to address clients effected or might potentially be effected by Section 511.
3. Revise its MOU with Special Education to include how both agencies will develop policy/procedure to address students effected or might potentially be effected by Section 511. The MOU will address the issue of referring students to CRPs for services while the student is still enrolled in school or referring the student to a CRP upon graduation as part of transition planning.
4. Work with Special Education to develop/provide training to special education teachers and special education supervisors regarding Section 511.  (Page 217) Title II

• ARS will continue assigning a rehabilitation counselor as a liaison to each CRP in each District.
• ARS district managers will assume a more active role with CRPs to develop more positive working relationships.
• ARS will train CRPs on the WIOA requirements for services to youth and students with disabilities as it relates to Section 511 Limitations on Sub-Minimum Wage. (Page 230) Title IV

Goal 6: Develop and improve Community Rehabilitation Programs.
• ARS will continue assigning a rehabilitation counselor as a liaison to each CRP in each District.
• ARS district managers will assume a more active role with CRPs to develop more positive working relationships.
• ARS will train CRPs on the WIOA requirements for services to youth and students with disabilities as it relates to Section 511 Limitations on Sub-Minimum Wage.
• ARS will initiate purchased service agreements focused on moving CRPs from fee for service to performance based outcomes payments. (Page 241) Title II

Transition in Regards to Section 511 -Section 511 of WIOA intends that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded an opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re-enter competitive integrated employment. The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education are working together to identify students that are blind and visually impaired that have been provided services in a sub-minimum wage setting. We are collaborating on plans to expand services to mutual consumers that includes a systematic approach to better identify consumers who could benefit from supported employment services (in an integrated setting, achieving at least the minimum wage) and are not receiving them at this time. A new Memorandum of Agreement is being developed through the team effort known as Vision Quest, which is an extension of Governor Asa Hutchinson’s Employment First Taskforce. Vision Quest includes the following agencies: The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education. The proposal includes provisions for use of joint agency resources to ensure quality service delivery and long term supports for supported employment. With the cooperation of the partner agencies DSB will contact blind and visually impaired individuals every 6 months who are in sub-minimum wage situations to provide career counseling and information and referral services, designed to promote opportunities for competitive integrated employment. (Page 265) Title II

A new Memorandum of Agreement is being developed through the team effort known as Vision Quest, which is an extension of Governor Asa Hutchinson’s Employment First Taskforce. Vision Quest includes the following agencies: The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education. The proposal includes provisions for use of joint agency resources to ensure quality service delivery and long term supports for supported employment. With the cooperation of the partner agencies DSB will contact blind and visually impaired individuals every 6 months who are in sub-minimum wage situations to provide career counseling and information and referral services, designed to promote opportunities for competitive integrated employment. DSB’s Director joined the other agencies Directors at the official signing of the MOU in the winter of 2018. DSB does not have any consumers employed in a 511 or less than minimum wage situation. (Page 267) Title II

DSB is working cooperatively with the Educational Services for the Visually Impaired, Department of Education, Special Education Teachers for the Visually Impaired, and local education areas to identify the technology needs, independent living needs, and educational training needs of identified students beginning at age 16 in the school system and through IPE meetings and planning meetings for those meeting the 504 regulations. Monthly meetings are held with our VR and Pre-ETS counselors and the school consultants to determine goals and objectives for students. Quarterly visits to schools are conducted to provide labor market information, university application and scholarship information, and technical school opportunities available within the key labor market sectors of the State. An updated agreement with the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education, regarding transition services to students who are blind or severely visually impaired, including Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ASBVI) was developed to address the Section 113 Pre-employment transition activities that are authorized under WIOA and the requirements of Section 511.This MOU was created in conjunction with the Arkansas Rehabilitation Service Agency. The agreement was signed. The interagency agreement outlined the roles and responsibilities, financial responsibility, determination of lead agency, and qualified personnel. DSB has reached out to each Local Education Area Supervisor in the school districts across the State and each high school across the State to give presentations/information on services available under pre-employment transition services. DSB has seven designated pre-employment transition services counselors that provide information to eligible and potentially eligible students with visual impairments both in large print and electronically through the school system. (Page 264) Title II

Transition in Regards to Section 511 -Section 511 of WIOA intends that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded an opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re-enter competitive integrated employment. The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education are working together to identify students that are blind and visually impaired that have been provided services in a sub-minimum wage setting. We are collaborating on plans to expand services to mutual consumers that includes a systematic approach to better identify consumers who could benefit from supported employment services (in an integrated setting, achieving at least the minimum wage) and are not receiving them at this time. A new Memorandum of Agreement is being developed through the team effort known as Vision Quest, which is an extension of Governor Asa Hutchinson’s Employment First Taskforce. Vision Quest includes the following agencies: The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education. The proposal includes provisions for use of joint agency resources to ensure quality service delivery and long term supports for supported employment. With the cooperation of the partner agencies DSB will contact blind and visually impaired individuals every 6 months who are in sub-minimum wage situations to provide career counseling and information and referral services, designed to promote opportunities for competitive integrated employment. (Page 265) Title II

As we move forward with WIOA and the emerging new Technical Assistance Centers, DSB is working with the WINTAC towards Job Driven practices/best practices, best practices in pre-employment transition services, addressing section 511 subminimum wage requirements, and performance accountability. DSB in combination with Arkansas General is working with the Transition Technical Assistance Center of the University of North Carolina to improve and strengthen the transition program. (Page 284) Title II
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The workforce center delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the workforce delivery system partners) will comply with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. The State ensures that Arkansas Workforce Center system complies with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 through the development and implementation of a Methods of Administration Policy that outlines all requirements of the system. Reviews are conducted annually to make sure that workforce centers meet requirements. Furthermore, training is offered at least annually to equal opportunity officers of the local workforce development boards. To demonstrate compliance with this provision, the one-stop center operators and the delivery system partners will collaborate to develop and provide periodic and new-hire staff training and system-wide support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. A rotating certification review team will be established, to provide scheduled evaluation, certification and recertification of the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities and to address any compliance issues that arise. (Pages 117- 118) Title II  

Access and Accommodations in collaboration with Increasing Capabilities Access Network will work with the Division of Services for the Blind to develop a certification review team for compliance of the one stop delivery system with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the ADA. (Page 226) Title IV

Vets

Arkansas’s policy for priority of service to veterans includes up to a 24 hour hold for new job orders placed in the AJL system. Local Veteran Employment Representative (LVER) staff has access to federal contractor job listings through VetCentral, which are fed into the AJL system. This access provides opportunities for priority referrals of target veterans to Federal contractors. After registration in VetCentral, the system provides automatic notifications to the veteran when a job opening occurs in their field. Services to veterans through the Gold Card Initiative are available at the Arkansas Workforce Centers (AWC). The Gold Card Initiative provides unemployed post-9/11 era veterans with the intensive and follow-up services they need to succeed in today’s job market. The Gold Card initiative is a joint effort of the Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration (ETA) and the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS). (Page 117) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. (Page 373) Title IV

Once significant barriers to employment are identified by Wagner-Peyser staff, veterans will be directed to the nearest DVOP for a comprehensive assessment and the development of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP), if necessary. DVOP staff providing intensive case management services will be required to use Arkansas JobLink (AJL) to record services, case notes, referrals, and follow-up services.

Arkansas LVER staff will advocate, on behalf of veterans, with businesses and industries. LVERs will perform the full range of employer outreach activities outlined in VPL 03-14, which are offered through the workforce system. Staff will report outreach activities, on a quarterly basis, in the Manager’s Quarterly Report. This includes the facilitation of employment, training, and placement services furnished to veterans through the state’s employment service. They are, but are not limited to:

 Planning and participating in job and career fairs;

 Conducting employer outreach;

 Conducting job search workshops, and establishing job search groups;

 Coordinating with unions, apprenticeships programs and business or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans;

 Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans;

 Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and  Coordinating and participating with other business outreach. (Page 375) Title II

Arkansas JobLink (AJL) is the state’s integrated web-based workforce development management information system (MIS) used by the state and local areas to share and manage participant data between the Wagner-Peyser program, the Trade Adjustment Assistance program and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act program. All staff has access to and can view all services provided to the veteran regardless of funding stream. By partnering with other state agencies, ADWS is maximizing its outreach potential. Efforts aimed at providing information about our services to veterans include promoting and attending local Job Fairs, and Hiring our Heroes and Women Veterans Summits events. All hiring events are advertised in the local paper and video streamed on public access media throughout the local AWC. We also seek the assistance of County Veteran Service Officers for those seeking employment. Arkansas is also exploring ways to better connect veterans seeking employment with Apprenticeship opportunities. We have strengthened our partnership with Registered Apprenticeship in recent years through collaboration with the Arkansas Apprenticeship Coalition in implementing the Arkansas Energy Sector Partnership grant. Through this collaboration, the state now has a mobile training center which is operated by the Arkansas Apprenticeship Coalition to provide “green” skills education to apprentices statewide. (Page 376) Title IV

Veterans and eligible persons with significant barriers to employment (SBE), economically or educationally disadvantaged, recently separated, homeless, including domestic violence and other dangerous or life threating conditions, offenders and veterans between the ages 18-24, identified in VPL04-14 as the target groups for services by Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists. The state will focus efforts to increase services and outreach to the target populations as identified in guidance. The State will take steps to ensure that veterans with significant barriers receive intensive services by DVOP specialists. During the initial assessment, if a veteran self-attest to meeting one or more of the SBE criteria, Arkansas Workforce Center (AWC) staff will refer the individual to a DVOP specialist for intensive case management services. (Page 377) Title IV

VPL 01-09 encourages that a DVOP specialist be out-stationed to serve as the Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) for Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment (VR&E) clients referred to AW Cs for job placement assistance. A physical presence at the facilities increases coordination with VR&E staff. The ISC refers VR&E clients to programs authorized under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), Vocational Rehabilitation under United States Code (38 U.S.C.), Chapter 31, and other federal and state programs that provide services and activities to assist the veteran in determining an employment or training plan, to include apprenticeship and on the job training (OJT) to enhance employment potential. (Page 378) Title IV

Mental Health

~~Department of Human Services The Department of Human Services (DHS) is Arkansas’s largest state agency, with more than 7,500 employees working to ensure citizens are healthy, safe and enjoying a high quality of life. The agency’s skilled and passionate staff cares for Arkansans of all ages. People needing support will find at least one local DHS office in each of the state’s 75 counties. Arkansans may apply for a vast array of services at their local county office as well as online. Services include ARKids First health insurance for children, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps), Transitional Employment Assistance (TEA) and Medicaid. Through a blend of federal and state Medicaid funds, DHS pays for 64 percent of the babies born in Arkansas each year and for the care of 69 percent of the state’s nursing home patients. Additionally, DHS protects children and the elderly who have been abused or neglected; finds adoptive homes for foster children; funds congregate and home-delivered meals for the elderly; regulates nursing homes and childcare facilities; supports high-quality early childhood education; treats and serves youth in the juvenile justice system; oversees services for blind Arkansans; runs residential facilities for people with developmental disabilities; manages the Arkansas State Hospital and Arkansas Health Center for those with acute behavioral health issues; and supports nonprofit, community and faith-based organizations that depend on volunteers to continue programs vital to our communities. The agency also works with a system of community mental health care centers to provide mental health services to nearly 74,000 people each year. In all, DHS serves more than 1.2 million Arkansans every year. To manage these services and programs efficiently, DHS has ten divisions and five support offices headquartered in Little Rock in addition to the 85 county offices. (Page 85-86) Title I

 (10) Whether the eligible provider’s activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways;
(11) Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;
(12) Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance; and
(13) Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs. (Page 159) Title II

Goal 9: Increase the efficiency and effectiveness of service delivery for agency consumers.
• ARS will ensure the development and implementation of comprehensive training for district managers and counselors to effectively serve consumers.
• ARS will adequately staff the field program to reduce caseloads and allow counselors to devote additional time to direct consumer contact and provision of services.
• ARS will examine the agency referral sources and ensure counselors are trained to provide effective services to consumers with mental health concerns and intellectual/developmental disabilities.
• ARS will increase the role of the rehab area manager in the areas of outreach and marketing at local levels statewide to cultivate positive working relationships with employers, partners, and stakeholders. In FFY 2017, ARS sent vocational rehabilitation counselors to ARA, AAMRC, and APSE conferences that provided training on mental health services to populations with disabilities.
In FFY 2017, ARS district managers were tasked to visit and provide an agency overview to all WIOA partners statewide. (Pages 245- 246) Title II

The strategy involves an increased focus on SE outcomes resulting in a competitive wage integrated employment that culminates in a career outcome in contrast to the traditional sheltered employment. Based on WIOA, ARS will update the interagency agreements with the state agencies serving individuals with the most significant disabilities including: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU) The agreement places an emphasis on competitive employment as a desirable outcome for individuals with the most significant disabilities including those with developmental disabilities and mental health diagnoses.

ARS is developing additional certification criteria for SE service providers. The criteria include updated requirements for certification and training for job coaches. ARS increased fee schedules and negotiated contracts for services with providers in an attempt to increase service providers, and incentives to service providers, to increase employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities. (Page 248) Title II

As part of DHS, DSB enjoys close working relationships with the DHS Division of Medical Services (DMS), which houses Medicaid; the DHS Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDS); and the DHS Division of Behavioral Health Services (BHS). DSB has cooperative agreements outlining responsibilities and the provision of services with the DDS and DBHS. A similar agreement is being formulated for the provision of services to State Medicaid recipients. DSB coordinates services with DBHS, DMS, and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. (Page 272- 273) Title II

The purpose of the employability assessment will be to determine the applicant’s abilities, talents, proficiencies/deficiencies, etc. The assessment is completed to determine the applicant’s ability to move into employment and may be done by an agency or organization other than DWS.

During the assessment, the DWS Workforce Specialist will present an orientation/overview of the program, gather pertinent information, and identify barriers that may prevent the applicant from becoming self-sufficient through employment. The DWS Workforce Specialist may also identify the following.
o Family situation/circumstances
o Employment history/work experience
o Educational attainment/ literacy level/functional educational level
o Skills
o Interests
o Supportive Service needs, if any.

NOTE: Participants who are identified as victims of domestic violence will be referred for appropriate services. Appropriate services may include but are not limited to:
Counseling, housing relocation assistance, referral to mental health, referral to prosecuting attorney and/or law enforcement and the DHS Division of Children and Family Services. The DWS Workforce Specialist will, where appropriate, use all available resources to help the victim of domestic violence receive timely/needed services. (Page 333) Title IV

Job search and job readiness is assistance in seeking or obtaining employment or the preparation for seeking or obtaining employment. Job search activities include making contact with potential employers, applying for vacancies, and interviewing for jobs. Job readiness activities include classes or workshops where participants can improve their employability skills. Participants learn techniques such as resume writing, workplace etiquette, interviewing, and life skills.

Job readiness activities also include substance abuse treatment, mental health treatment (including mental health treatment needed to address domestic violence), or rehabilitation activities for those who are otherwise employable.

Such treatment or therapy must be determined to be necessary and certified by a qualified medical or mental health professional or treatment provider. (Page 335) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

• ARS will rename its Retaining a Valued Employee (RaVE) program to Stay at Work/Return to Work (SAW/RTW). This language is consistent with programs/practices in private/public sector employment and communicates functional intent. • As part of the Governor’s Employment First Task Force, ARS will assume a lead role in the implementation of a SAW/RTW program within Arkansas state government. • ARS will work with WIOA partners at both the state and local level to support SAW/RTW efforts in both public and private sector employment. • ARS will sufficiently staff its Assistive Technology at Work (AT@Work) program to meet referral demands from the ARS Field Program and SAW/RTW initiative. Staff will have expertise to address accommodation needs in training and employment settings. (Page 232) Title II

In program year 2016, ARS Special Programs was renamed Access and Accommodations to better communicate the resources and services available within the division. The Retaining a Valued Employee (RaVE) program was also renamed to Stay at Work/Return to Work (SAW/RTW) to be consistent with language found within the public/private sector. Access and Accommodations as part of the Employment First Task Force, has worked with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and the Public Employee Claims Division (PECD) to develop an OPM sponsored training for state supervisors and HR staff in the area of SAW/RTW. This included the implementation of assistive technology and how to accommodate an employee with a disability in the workplace. In the third quarter of program year 2016 Access and Accommodations, Assistive Technology at Work (AT@Work) program added a new Occupational Therapist position to meet the increased demands for evaluation services from field staff and to assist employers and employees through evaluations and trainings with the SAW/RTW program. Access and Accommodations is still in the process of adding one more Occupational Therapy position to ensure all referrals are seen in a timely manner. (Page 244-245) Title II

Arkansas’ initial vision of “building on our history as an innovator in the delivery of human services, to develop a robust, statewide, job-driven, employment and training program that will produce a job-ready workforce able to meet the needs of Arkansas’ current employers, attract new industry, and build Arkansas’ economy” is more clear in that the FY18 AR E&T program will serve 37 of our 75 counties, and 75% of all the States work registrants. In previous years Arkansas had a USDA approved waiver from the SNAP Requirement To Work (RTW) provisions. The waiver was based on labor surplus estimates from the Department of Labor, however like many other States, the economy improved and unemployment rates decreased, and the areas available to be covered by the waiver have decreased or disappeared, and this was the case for Arkansas beginning January 1, 2016. This group will now be subject to the PRWORA sponsored participation limits of 3 full months of SNAP benefits in a fixed 36 month period unless they are exempt or complying with the requirements associated with the RTW. (Page 351) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 49

WIOA State Plan: Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities - 06/10/2019

~~"ARS will continue to pursue opportunities currently under development with CRPs around the state to provide pre-employment transition services and other transition services for students living with a disability. ARS will collaborate with employers by fostering integrated systems, coordinating services, and providing career pathways for adults and youth/students with disabilities. ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities.ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities. ACTI works directly with potential employers to provide internship sites for students nearing the completion of their training programs; all of whom have significant disabilities.".

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

State of Arkansas Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan 2016-2019 - 06/10/2019

• Train and equip workforce center staff in an ongoing learning process with the knowledge, skills, and motivation to provide superior service to job seekers, including those with disabilities, and businesses in an integrated, regionally focused framework of service delivery. Center staff are cross-trained, as appropriate, to increase staff capacity, expertise, and efficiency. Cross-training allows staff from differing programs to understand every program and to share their expertise about the needs of specific populations so that all staff can better serve all customers. Center staff are routinely trained and are keenly aware as to how their particular function supports and contributes to the overall vision of the local board

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) “About Us” - 06/07/2019

~~“The Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) was established through a memorandum of agreement between the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) and the UAMS Center for Distance Health (CDH) in cooperation with the Arkansas Spinal Cord Commission (ASCC). Through education and resource development initiatives, ATRP works to increase access to comprehensive, cutting-edge rehabilitation care and facilitate community reintegration for Arkansans who have sustained traumatic injuries.Vision Statement:

To enable every Arkansan who has sustained a disabling traumatic injury access to the comprehensive rehabilitation care he or she needs to seamlessly reintegrate into the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Special Education Process Guide - 04/19/2019

~~ “The Notice of Conference is used by the LEA to take steps to ensure that parent(s) are afforded the opportunity to participate in the special education process.  It is the district’s responsibility to provide parents with appropriate notice of a meeting, and use other methods to ensure parent participation in IEP meetings and other special education conferences.  More information about parameters of these meetings can be found by accessing the web-link."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

AR SB 522: To Create A Comprehensive Statewide Workforce Development System; To Coordinate Various Workforce Programs; To Amend the Duties of the Career Education and Workforce Development Board; and to Declare an Emergency. - 04/18/2019

“The General Assembly finds that:

(1) Occupational, technical, and industrial training provides unique opportunities to improve the lives of Arkansans while advancing the state's economic development;

(2) Businesses seeking to begin operations in Arkansas look to the level of education and skills in the workforce as a key factor in making investment decisions;

(3) Currently, Arkansas workforce education operates within a variety of agencies, without coordination, often with significant inefficiencies arising from overlapping and repeated programming and from important programs being overlooked as presumably covered by another program; and

(4) Bringing coordination of all state and federal career education and workforce development programs will:

(A) Reduce unnecessary duplication of programming;

(B) Ensure that every Arkansan who seeks occupational, 9 technical, and industrial training will find an appropriate education program 10 in the state;

(C) Bring consistency, efficiency, and rigor, as 12 established by applicable industry and accreditation standards to the state's 13 career education and workforce development efforts; and

(D) Alert industry to the commitment of the State of 15 Arkansas to economic development through career workforce education.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

SENATE BILL 101/ Act No. 874 Developmental Disabilities Services Appropriation - 04/11/2019

~~“The Division of Developmental Disabilities Services of the Department of Human Services is hereby authorized to provide employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities residing at the Human Development Centers who work at less than a competitive employment level.

The provisions of this section shall be in effect only from July 1,  2019 through June 30,  2020.”

Systems
  • Other

St. Bernards To Host Unique Training Program for Young Adults with Developmental Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~“In the fall of 2017 St. Bernards Healthcare welcomed 8 interns as part of the St. Bernards Project SEARCH internship program. St. Bernards partners with Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and ACCESS to help participants develop skills for competitive employment. Internships are housed within various departments throughout St. Bernards, including Engineering, Nutritional Services, Fitness Center, just to name a few. Interns take part in three ten-week internships at St. Bernards during the 9-month program. Upon completion of the program, Project SEARCH graduates receive follow-along services to assist them on the job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Arkansas Medicaid Certification Requirements for ARChoices HCBS Waiver Program - 12/01/2018

~All ARChoices Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver providers must meet the Provider Participation and enrollment requirements contained within Section 140.000 of this manual

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Living the Mission - 10/24/2018

~“DHS protects children and the elderly who have been abused or neglected; finds adoptive homes for foster children; funds congregate and home-delivered meals for the elderly; regulates nursing homes and childcare facilities; supports high-quality early childhood education; treats and serves youth in the juvenile justice system; oversees services for blind Arkansans; runs residential facilities for people with developmental disabilities; manages the Arkansas State Hospital and Arkansas Health Center for those with acute behavioral health issues; and supports nonprofit, community and faith-based organizations that depend on volunteers to continue programs vital to our communities.

The agency also works with a system of community mental health care centers to provide mental health services to nearly 74,000 people each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) - 07/26/2018

~“PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) is a new Medicaid program to address the needs of individuals who have intensive behavioral health and intellectual and developmental disabilities service needs.  The PASSE program is designed to help people not only connect to services from their doctors but also services in the community that those members might need. The goal is for the PASSE to help improve people’s health and let them take a more active role in their treatment.A case manager accesses services for you. But your care coordinator makes sure that services are delivered, that the services are monitored, and that any referrals you may need are made to the right providers.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

AR SB 522: To Create A Comprehensive Statewide Workforce Development System; To Coordinate Various Workforce Programs; To Amend the Duties of the Career Education and Workforce Development Board; and to Declare an Emergency. - 04/18/2019

“The General Assembly finds that:

(1) Occupational, technical, and industrial training provides unique opportunities to improve the lives of Arkansans while advancing the state's economic development;

(2) Businesses seeking to begin operations in Arkansas look to the level of education and skills in the workforce as a key factor in making investment decisions;

(3) Currently, Arkansas workforce education operates within a variety of agencies, without coordination, often with significant inefficiencies arising from overlapping and repeated programming and from important programs being overlooked as presumably covered by another program; and

(4) Bringing coordination of all state and federal career education and workforce development programs will:

(A) Reduce unnecessary duplication of programming;

(B) Ensure that every Arkansan who seeks occupational, 9 technical, and industrial training will find an appropriate education program 10 in the state;

(C) Bring consistency, efficiency, and rigor, as 12 established by applicable industry and accreditation standards to the state's 13 career education and workforce development efforts; and

(D) Alert industry to the commitment of the State of 15 Arkansas to economic development through career workforce education.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

SENATE BILL 101/ Act No. 874 Developmental Disabilities Services Appropriation - 04/11/2019

~~“The Division of Developmental Disabilities Services of the Department of Human Services is hereby authorized to provide employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities residing at the Human Development Centers who work at less than a competitive employment level.

The provisions of this section shall be in effect only from July 1,  2019 through June 30,  2020.”

Systems
  • Other

Arkansas HB 1706 - 02/27/2017

~~“20-77-2702. Legislative intent and purpose. 28(a) As the single state agency for administration of the medical 29 assistance programs established under Title XIX of the Social Security Act, 30 42 U.S.C. § 1396 et seq., and Title XXI of the Social Security Act, 42 U.S.C. 31 § 1397aa et seq., the Department of Human Services is authorized by federal 32 law to utilize one (1) or more organizations for providing healthcare 33 services to Medicaid beneficiary populations. (b) The purpose of this subchapter is to establish a Medicaid 35 provider-led organized care system that administers and delivers healthcare  services for a member of an enrollable Medicaid beneficiary population in 1 return for payment.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Citations

Arkansas ABLE HB 1239 - 04/08/2015

An act to create the Achieving a Better Life Experience [ABLE] program; to provide new avenues for financial self-sufficiency for Arkansans with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order (EO 10-17) Establishing the Arkansas Employment First Initiative - 10/21/2010

“State agencies are hereby directed to coordinate efforts to increase employment of Arkansans with disabilities. To that end, the Arkansas Department of Human Services shall convene an Employment First Task Force, which shall include representation of and input from agencies administering disability services, vocational rehabilitation, workforce services and education, as well as from consumer advocates and disability service providers. … State agencies, whose missions include service to individuals with disabilities, shall develop and implement Employment First policies and procedures that prioritize employment as the preferred service option for individuals with disabilities.”

 

 

 

   
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

WIOA State Plan: Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities - 06/10/2019

~~"ARS will continue to pursue opportunities currently under development with CRPs around the state to provide pre-employment transition services and other transition services for students living with a disability. ARS will collaborate with employers by fostering integrated systems, coordinating services, and providing career pathways for adults and youth/students with disabilities. ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities.ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities. ACTI works directly with potential employers to provide internship sites for students nearing the completion of their training programs; all of whom have significant disabilities.".

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

State of Arkansas Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan 2016-2019 - 06/10/2019

• Train and equip workforce center staff in an ongoing learning process with the knowledge, skills, and motivation to provide superior service to job seekers, including those with disabilities, and businesses in an integrated, regionally focused framework of service delivery. Center staff are cross-trained, as appropriate, to increase staff capacity, expertise, and efficiency. Cross-training allows staff from differing programs to understand every program and to share their expertise about the needs of specific populations so that all staff can better serve all customers. Center staff are routinely trained and are keenly aware as to how their particular function supports and contributes to the overall vision of the local board

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) “About Us” - 06/07/2019

~~“The Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) was established through a memorandum of agreement between the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) and the UAMS Center for Distance Health (CDH) in cooperation with the Arkansas Spinal Cord Commission (ASCC). Through education and resource development initiatives, ATRP works to increase access to comprehensive, cutting-edge rehabilitation care and facilitate community reintegration for Arkansans who have sustained traumatic injuries.Vision Statement:

To enable every Arkansan who has sustained a disabling traumatic injury access to the comprehensive rehabilitation care he or she needs to seamlessly reintegrate into the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Special Education Process Guide - 04/19/2019

~~ “The Notice of Conference is used by the LEA to take steps to ensure that parent(s) are afforded the opportunity to participate in the special education process.  It is the district’s responsibility to provide parents with appropriate notice of a meeting, and use other methods to ensure parent participation in IEP meetings and other special education conferences.  More information about parameters of these meetings can be found by accessing the web-link."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Living the Mission - 10/24/2018

~“DHS protects children and the elderly who have been abused or neglected; finds adoptive homes for foster children; funds congregate and home-delivered meals for the elderly; regulates nursing homes and childcare facilities; supports high-quality early childhood education; treats and serves youth in the juvenile justice system; oversees services for blind Arkansans; runs residential facilities for people with developmental disabilities; manages the Arkansas State Hospital and Arkansas Health Center for those with acute behavioral health issues; and supports nonprofit, community and faith-based organizations that depend on volunteers to continue programs vital to our communities.

The agency also works with a system of community mental health care centers to provide mental health services to nearly 74,000 people each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) - 07/26/2018

~“PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) is a new Medicaid program to address the needs of individuals who have intensive behavioral health and intellectual and developmental disabilities service needs.  The PASSE program is designed to help people not only connect to services from their doctors but also services in the community that those members might need. The goal is for the PASSE to help improve people’s health and let them take a more active role in their treatment.A case manager accesses services for you. But your care coordinator makes sure that services are delivered, that the services are monitored, and that any referrals you may need are made to the right providers.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WIOA State Plan for the State of Arkansas FY-2018 - 06/30/2018

~~ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, is receiving technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS),Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU).• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will initiate revised MOUs based on the WIOA, including new rates and reimbursement methodology for braiding services.• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will provide technical assistance to the pilot projects focused on transitioning from facility based services to community based services.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

Arkansas Department of Human Services "Workers with Disabilities" - 12/03/2017

~~“You must be at least 16 and less than 65 years of age. You must also have a significant disability expected to last at least 12 months or to result in death. Eligibility is determined using Social Security Disability guidelines. Unlike receiving Social Security benefits, you may work full-time and earn more than what is allowed under Social Security benefit guidelines (SGA limit). “

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program for Fiscal Year 2015 (submitted FY 2014) - 02/16/2017

~~“6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Arkansas Department of Career Education Transition Services - 12/07/2016

~Arkansas Rehabilitation Services works to provide opportunities for Rehabilitation counselors and schools to develop partnerships in an effort to prepare high school students with disabilities the knowledge, skills, and abilities to achieve successful transition from high school to post-secondary life.The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Transition Counselor works with students, teachers, principals, and other appointed school staff, as well as, families and community resources. Together they coordinate services and develop programs with the intent to improve and provide quality post-school outcomes through student engagement in Vocational Rehabilitation programs."

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

St. Bernards To Host Unique Training Program for Young Adults with Developmental Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~“In the fall of 2017 St. Bernards Healthcare welcomed 8 interns as part of the St. Bernards Project SEARCH internship program. St. Bernards partners with Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and ACCESS to help participants develop skills for competitive employment. Internships are housed within various departments throughout St. Bernards, including Engineering, Nutritional Services, Fitness Center, just to name a few. Interns take part in three ten-week internships at St. Bernards during the 9-month program. Upon completion of the program, Project SEARCH graduates receive follow-along services to assist them on the job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Students Helpful Tools - 06/20/2018

~~If you are a student with a disability, then you will have a transition plan within your Individualized Education Plan (IEP) by the time you turn 16 years old. It is very important that you are educated about what this plan is and that you are involved in creating YOUR transition plan. The transition plan details the goals that you would like to achieve after high school in the areas of work, education and possibly independent living. So when you become involved in transition planning process, you will be thinking about questions like: Where will I work? What will I do to earn money? Will I go to school, like college or a vocational training program? What will I study? Will I live on my own and handle all the tasks that go along with that, like budgeting, finance, cooking, and transportation?

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and University of Arkansas PROMISE Partnership - 01/25/2016

Arkansas Rehabilitation Services will focus heavily on transition services by providing job exploration counseling, work base learning experiences, post-secondary training, job readiness skills and self-advocacy,”... “ARS has built a strong relationship with the University of Arkansas, and the agency is very excited about the MOU with PROMISE and looks forward….to 2016.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas EF Task Force: Collaborations & Final Report

After the Governor signed Executive Order 10-17, the Department of Human Services convened the Employment First Task Force. The Task Force was comprised of representatives from state agencies, provider associations, and advocacy groups. The Task Force developed the following definition of “Employment First:”

Employment First means employment in the workforce at livable wages and benefits is the first and preferred option in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age Arkansans with disabilities, regardless of level of disability.

The Arkansas Employment First Task force endeavors to continue interagency collaboration as a permanent interagency work group is needed to promote collaboration on issues and sharing of information related to disability employment, including outreach and marketing, training, coordination of services, and reporting outcomes. This group will include representatives of State agencies, provider groups, advocacy groups, and the Social Security Administration.

 

The Final Report contained two recommendations related to interagency collaboration:   A permanent interagency work group is needed to promote collaboration on issues and sharing of information related to disability employment, including outreach and marketing, training, coordination of services, and reporting outcomes. This group will include representatives of State agencies, provider groups, advocacy groups, and the Social Security Administration. Explore strategies for sustaining the EmployAbility Project after its federal funding ends in 2012. The Project provides policy analysis, training, and outreach and facilitates interagency collaboration to improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities.      
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Arkansas Balancing Incentives Program - 06/01/2014

Arkansas has been granted $61.2 million in BIP funding. This funding will be used to provide new or enhanced infrastructure and systems that support HCBS to Arkansans; specifically, the state is exploring the development of health homes and the Community First Choice and 1915(i) options. These new systems and options will help the state balance its LTSS system and will provide Arkansans with additional opportunities to receive long-term services and supports in their homes and communities.

In Arkansas, five Divisions within the state’s Department of Human Services play a role in the publicly funded long-term care system: the Division of Medical Services; the Division of Aging and Adult Services; the Division of Developmental Disabilities Services; the Division of Behavioral Health Services; and the Division of County Operations. These divisions are committed to working collaboratively to implement the Balancing Incentive Program. (no mention specifically of employment)

 

 

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas Disability Employment Initiative - 10/14/2010

Project Description: The Arkansas Department of Workforce Services will build upon the success of their Disability Employment Navigator Initiative utilizing multiple models and strategies, including Integrated Resource Teams, customized employment, and Guideposts for Success. Their primary focus will be on integrating youth aged 14 to 24 into education and employment. Arkansas recognizes the coming shortages of a skilled labor force which they feel can be filled through engagement of youth with disabilities during their formative years with a view to long‐term economic self‐sufficiency. Arkansas will be establishing an Employment Network Outreach Specialist, in addition to Disability Resource Coordinators, to reach out‐of school and at‐risk youth as well as linking these youth to in‐depth benefit planning and work incentive information. Arkansas will incorporate individual assessment tools, such as Individual Educational/Employment Plans (IEPs), as part of career exploration and identification of educational and employment pathways. Integrated Resource Team approaches will include guidance counselors, career mentors, vocational rehabilitation specialists, community work incentives coordinators, parents/legal guardians, and others needed to assure individual success. Project design includes “real world” experience opportunities, such as summer youth employment under the Workforce Investment Act and job shadowing and mentoring from prospective employers and networking. Educational opportunities will also be explored and pursued according to the interests and skills of the youth.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Arkansas Promise

Arkansas PROMISE is part of a new program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and the Social Security Administration (SSA) to help youth who are receiving disability benefits and their families improve their educational and employment outcomes. This project is being implemented in 11 states. In Arkansas, the program is being administered by the Department of Education and the University of Arkansas, in partnership with several other state agencies and private organizations.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas Workbridge

The Workbridge program is a partnership between ASN and Arkansas Rehabilitation Services to provide individuals who have disabilities with intense preparation for the work and social skills necessary to succeed in today’s job market. The program consists of a combination of real work experience at Encore Kids, ASN’s children’s resale shop, as well as classroom-style training focused on the social aspects of employment. After the 70-day program, participants are supported by staff while applying for, accepting, and maintaining their jobs in the community. This ensures the success of our program and more importantly, the success of our graduates

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas SSA Ticket to Work Program

~~“Ticket to Work is a Social Security Administration (SSA) program designed to encourage individuals receiving SSI/SSDI recipients to find ways to return to work. ARS Ticket to Work information is facilitated through ARS’ local field offices. A vocational rehabilitation counselor may assign the ticket to the agency if the individual wants ARS services. The vocational rehabilitation counselor will provide support and guidance with the client’s desire to explore return-to-work strategies and may also refer individuals to other agencies for specialized assistance. For more information see the ARS District Map to contact the field office nearest you”

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas Money Follows the Person

The Arkansas Money Follows the Person application has transitioned 773 individuals who have resided in institutions 90 consecutive days and one day on Medicaid into qualified home and community-based programs. The following populations residing in nursing homes and ICF-IDs will be served: Individuals with developmental disabilities; individuals 21 to 64 with physical disabilities; and individuals age 65+

 

 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

The Arkansas Developmental Disabilities Advocate Training Fund (DDATF) - 07/01/2018

~~“The Council staff administers this reimbursement program which provides funding for Arkansans with developmental disabilities, their family members, or their guardians to participate in professional or informational conferences, legislative advocacy skills training events, public forums, focus groups, hearings and other similar activities. This fund is designed to empower individuals with disabilities and their family members with the opportunities, experiences, resources and information they need to participate meaningfully in the decisions that are being made which affect their lives. This fund has a set total maximum amount available for use each fiscal year, and when that amount is expended funding will not be available until after the beginning of the next fiscal year. Other restrictions apply.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Arkansas Transition - 04/01/2018

~~“Arkansas Transition Services serves all 75 counties in Arkansas in an effort to improve transition outcomes for students with disabilities. Our mission is to effectively assist students with disabilities, educators, parents, agency personnel and community members in preparing students to transition from school to adult life and reach positive post-school outcomes. We provide technical assistance, trainings and consultations to special education teachers and other relevant staff, as well as to various agency personnel. Our services are provided at no cost.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arkansas Governor’s Developmental Disabilities Council's "Funded Projects" - 03/01/2017

~~“The Council is supporting a variety of projects in the 2017-2018 grant period to benefit Arkansans with I/DD and their families. These projects are taking place across the state, with programs in every Congressional District..

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arkansas Employment First Task Force Training Recommendations

The Final Report of the Employment First Task Force included a number of recommendations related to training, including:

Recommendation 1: Provide training on disability employment to State agency and provider agency staff.

State agencies should offer three levels of training on disability employment for their staff and provider agencies. Basic orientation should be required for staff of agencies serving people with disabilities, and could be offered online using video. Intermediate level training covering specific work incentives should be required for case managers and employment program staff. In-depth training on work incentives would be useful to persons who will actually provide work incentives counseling or work incentives training. Some State agencies may need in-house training capability on work incentives to meet the needs of their staff and providers.

 

Recommendation 19: Strengthen provider certification for employment services.

Provider certification needs to be strengthened for providers of various employment services. APSE, a national organization with focused on integrated employment and career advancement opportunities for individuals with disabilities, is developing national certification for employment specialists. ARS could use this certification process to upgrade standards for provider staff.

 

Recommendation 29. Train State agency supervisors

Develop mandatory EO 10-17 supervisory training curricula to expand training on the ADA and its amendments, and demonstrate how supervisors may access Clearinghouse information for recruiting, hiring, and maintaining qualified employees with disabilities.

Discussion: State agency supervisors and personnel officials need to have full knowledge of Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its amendments in order to recruit, employ, and accommodate employees with disabilities. This training would include such topics as ADA employment requirements, reasonable accommodation policies, and disability awareness and etiquette. The training will also cover basic work incentives information that enables individuals with disabilities to work and keep their disability benefits, especially health care coverage.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Arkansas Medicaid Certification Requirements for ARChoices HCBS Waiver Program - 12/01/2018

~All ARChoices Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver providers must meet the Provider Participation and enrollment requirements contained within Section 140.000 of this manual

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arkansas Waiver Association - 05/01/2018

~~“Welcome to the home of the Arkansas Waiver Association. We're an association of advocates, persons with developmental disabilities, their families and the professionals who work in the field. Our mission is straight forward:

To Promote Quality, Integrated Supports.

Our membership is built around those who are served by, or work with, Arkansas' Alternative Community Services Home and Community Based Medicaid Waiver. We seek to improve the quality of life of those with a developmental disability, and their families, through active advocacy, open communications, and an exchange of professional ideas. Together, we shall make a difference.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

"Arkansas Works" (Project Number 11-W-00287/6) - 03/05/2018

~~“Approval of this demonstration amendment allows Arkansas, no sooner than June 1, 2018, to require all Arkansas Works beneficiaries ages 19 through 49, with certain exceptions, to participate in and timely document and report 80 hours per month of community engagement activities, such as employment, education, job skills training, or community service, as a condition of continued Medicaid eligibility. Community engagement requirements will not apply to Arkansas Works beneficiaries ages 50 and older so as to ensure alignment and consistency with the state's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) requirements. Thealignment is appropriate and consistent with the ultimate objective of improving health and well-being for Medicaid beneficiaries.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for 1915(C) Home and Community Based Services Waiver - 08/21/2017

~~“Community and Employment Support WaiverWaiver Number: AR.0188Original BSE Waiver Number: AR.0188Amendment Number: AR.0188.R05.02Proposed Effective Date: 8/21/17Approved Effective Date: 08/22/17Approved Effective Date of Waiver being Amended: 09/01/16The purpose of the Community and Employment Support Waiver is to support individuals of all ages who have a developmental disability, meat ICF level of care and require waiver support services to live in the community and prevent institutionalization.The goals of HCBS waiver are to support beneficiaries in all major life activities, promote community inclusion through integrated employment options and community experiences, and provide comprehensive care coordination the 1915(b) Waiver Program” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FFY 2018-2019 Combined Substance Abuse and Mental Health Block Grant Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Application - 07/31/2017

~~“Objective: Partner with the Division of Medical Services (DMS), the State Medicaid Agency in Arkansas and a sister division within the Arkansas Department of Human Services (DHS), to continue working to transform the Medicaid funded behavioral health system through the implementation of support services and care coordination  The transformation involves DBHS staff participation at the front end and will affect the Division’s business practices, contracts and populations in the coming years. DBHS staff will work closely with Medicaid to develop and implement population-based care delivery standards and to implement recovery oriented services in a community setting through a State Plan Amendment to introduce new services and provider led care coordination….Include Recovery Support Services as a Medicaid funded service, which includes Supported Housing, Life Skills Development and Supported Employment. “ 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arkansas Money Follows the Person - 07/28/2017

~~The Arkansas Money Follows the Person application has transitioned 477 individuals who have resided in institutions 90 consecutive days and one day on Medicaid into qualified home and community-based programs. The following populations residing in nursing homes and and (Intermediate Care Facility for the Intellectually Disabled) ICF/IDs will be served: Individuals with developmental or intellectual disabilities, individuals 19 to 64 with physical disabilities; and individuals age 65+.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arkansas Current HCBS Transition Plan - 07/29/2016

You can now see the latest HCBS transition plan that DHS is submitting to CMS. Public Comment opens on 8/15/16 after they receive feedback from CMS. Public comment ends on 9/15/16. Please see the full transition plan, as currently written

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arkansas Medicaid State Plan Amendments - 01/01/2016

AR-15-011 This state plan amendment makes corrections to the citations and page format for PACE pages of the State Plan, per companion letter with SPA #15-0007 that adjusted rates for personal care services

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS 1915c Technical Guide - 01/01/2015

“These instructions provide information to assist states in completing the Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, including changes implemented through November 2014…This guidance is intended to improve understanding of applicable Federal policies and their implications for the design and operation of a HCBS waiver.” The guidance includes service definitions on supported employment, customized employment and other services and resources for people with disabilities seeking employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Medicaid Balancing Incentives - 07/28/2013

Arkansas has been granted $61.2 million in BIP funding. This funding will be used to provide new or enhanced infrastructure and systems that support HCBS to Arkansans; specifically, the state is exploring the development of health homes and the Community First Choice and 1915(i) options. These new systems and options will help the state balance its LTSS system and will provide Arkansans with additional opportunities to receive long-term services and supports in their homes and communities. In Arkansas, five Divisions within the state’s Department of Human Services play an important role in the publicly funded long-term care system: the Division of Medical Services; the Division of Aging & Adult Services; the Division of Developmental Disabilities Services; the Division of Behavioral Health Services; and the Division of County Operations. These divisions are committed to working collaboratively to implement the Balancing Incentive Program. (no mention specifically of employment).

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The Natural State of Arkansas celebrates that disability is a natural part of life, and should not limit the career opportunities for hard workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Arkansa VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.32%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,013,825
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-6.16%
Change from
2017 to 2018
268,473
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.21%
Change from
2017 to 2018
86,243
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.95%
Change from
2017 to 2018
32.12%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.2%
Change from
2017 to 2018
75.74%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 2,988,248 3,004,279 3,013,825
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 269,725 285,023 268,473
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 85,447 87,290 86,243
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,111,661 1,121,274 1,135,234
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 31.68% 30.85% 32.12%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.72% 75.89% 75.74%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.00% 3.70% 3.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.30% 22.60% 23.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.00% 15.10% 16.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 244,632 257,859 258,641
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 253,631 272,781 264,913
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 394,205 419,543 413,928
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 80,057 81,438 77,710
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 16,865 16,002 17,680
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,045 4,518 4,000
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,382 3,082 3,510
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 384
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 12,373 14,510 16,882
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 5,139 6,563 7,140

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,198 4,265 4,186
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.00% 4.10% 4.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 138,619 137,228 134,780

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,133 7,870 8,431
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 24,988 23,719 23,842
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 40,425 36,414 36,610
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.10% 21.60% 23.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 1.10% 0.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.60% 2.50% 2.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 0.50% 0.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 337 363 309
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 770 814 902
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 195 162 195
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 7 5 0

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,018 2,753 2,821
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.01

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 10 17 15
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 8 9 11
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 80.00% 53.00% 73.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.27 0.30 0.37

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,361
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 7 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 524 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,357 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 820 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 586 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 67 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 41.90% 29.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,382 3,246 3,159
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 202,159 201,408 198,990
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 70 92 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 73 77 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.00 0.00 0.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 52.68% 53.08% 53.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.55% 13.40% 13.15%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.35% 2.30% 2.14%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.41% 98.85% N/A
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 11.80% 17.92% 10.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 24.11% 44.32% 50.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 51.26% 52.02% 54.89%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 12.31% 26.40% 39.66%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 498,055
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,122
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 83,194
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 188,231
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 271,425
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 335
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 375
AbilityOne wages (products). $772,656
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,001,227

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 29 37 29
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3 3 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 32 40 32
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,566 2,456 1,860
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 401 401 384
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,967 2,857 2,244

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~ARS and representatives from CRPs developed and implemented standard procedures for the referral process and outcome indicators resulting in a fee for service schedule for individuals served by CRPs.

ARS’ standard procedures for external Employment First private non-profit and public VR service providers and CRPs are standards of compliance ensuring VR consumers achieve acceptable outcomes related to employment. The procedures for a CRP to be accredited as a vendor and to maintain accreditation are: 

(1) The CRP submits a vendor application documenting required experience in working with consumers with disabilities and employers.

(2) ARS reviews the application to assure ARS requirements are met, and submits a certificate and agreement documents to the ARS Commissioner for signature.

(3) The CRP is required to sign certification agreement documents assuring the ARS requirements as a vendor will be met.

(4) Once accredited, ARS provides a current vendor packet and provides training to the entity, as needed. ARS informs the ARS district manager and the VR counselors of the vendor.

(5) The VR counselor refers the consumer to the CRP and monitors the consumer’s progress.

(6) A VR counselor liaison is assigned to each CRP and provides monthly reports to the appropriate ARS personnel.

(7) ARS case review personnel from Program Planning, Development and Evaluation perform a standardized audit of CRP consumer files to ensure training criteria is met, the CRP demonstrates acceptable consumer progress/plans, appropriate documents are in the file, and the amount billed meets accepted guidelines of cost to value. CRP personnel files are reviewed to assure performance standards are acceptable and staff training requirements are met. (Page186-187) Title II

ARS maintains written cooperative agreements with private non-profit and for profit agencies in the state that provide supported employment (SE) services and extended services to ARS consumers with the most significant disabilities. The service providers commit to funding extended services for as long as the consumers remain employed on the original job.

ARS will continue to work with the Department of Human Services agencies to recruit Developmental Disabilities Centers, Behavioral Health Centers, and other related programs serving individuals with the most significant disabilities to seek certification to provide SE services. ARS will create new agreements based on technical assistance received from RSA; in consultation with the Arkansas State Rehabilitation Council and the Department of Labor, Office of Department of Employment Services experts in Employment First and WIOA. (Page187) Title II

ARS serves on the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, AR Employment First State Leadership team with the Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), University of Arkansas PROMISE Grant, and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU). The team in consultation with both the Arkansas State Rehabilitation Council and the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) State Liaison will be updating the current interagency agreements to fund braided services and apply for combined waiver programs related to opportunities where individuals participated in employment related activities under WIOA. (Page 193) Title II

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, is receiving technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU).

• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will initiate revised MOUs based on the WIOA, including new rates and reimbursement methodology for braiding services.
• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will provide technical assistance to the pilot projects focused on transitioning from facility based services to community based services. (Page 227) Title II

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, the Arkansas SRC and the RSA State Liaison, will establish technical assistance guidelines focused on CRPs transitioning from facility based services to community based services.

• ARS and ACTI administrators will review the current and future role and function of ACTI in the provision of services designed to assist in meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. (Page 231) Title II

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, is receiving technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU). (Page 234- 235) Title I

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, continues to receive technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU).

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, is revising MOUs based on the WIOA, including new rates and a reimbursement methodology.
ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, is providing technical assistance to the pilot projects focused on transitioning from facility based services to community based services. (Page 235) Title II

• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, the Arkansas SRC and the RSA State Liaison, will establish technical assistance guidelines focused on CRPs transitioning from facility based services to community based services.
• ARS and ACTI administrators will review the current and future role and function of ACTI in the provision of services designed to assist in meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. (Page 241) Title II

ARS will train staff on the new services and standards for Community Rehabilitation Programs beginning July 1, 2016.
• ARS will train staff to increase awareness related to Employment First (E1st) Provider Transformation and Integrated Community Based Services as it relates to Community Rehabilitation Programs, Supported Employment Programs, and External Job Placement vendors. (Page 243) Title II

Another purchased service agreement is in place with SE service vendors to implement strategies to expand the SE system including job placement services and extended services. Strategies include increasing the number of vendors offering SE and job placement statewide through enhanced incentives; utilizing a performance based approach with CRPs and SE providers; revised CRP fee schedules; and commitment from partnering state agencies to emphasize employment as a high priority outcome as a result of the Governor’s Executive Order Employment First Initiative for People with Disabilities. (Page 249) Title II

DSB maintains an active presence on numerous councils and committees, including: Arkansas Interagency Transition Partnership, Arkansas Workforce Development Board, Interagency Steering Committee on Integrated Employment, Behavioral Health Planning and Advisory Council, The Arkansas Independent Living Council, Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) The Governor’s Commission on People with Disabilities, Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, Youth Leadership Forum, Accessible Parking Taskforce, Local Workforce Development Boards across the state. (Page 262) Title II

                                                

Customized Employment

~~ARS will maximize the ability of individuals with most significant disabilities to achieve competitive employment through customized employment, supported employment, and other individualized services.

ARS will collaborate with WIOA partners, private funding, and other state agencies to help individuals with most significant disabilities to receive extended services to increase employability in an integrated environment.

Based on the success rate for competitive employment outcomes in the inaugural Project SEARCH initiative, ARS in collaboration with ACCESS Group, Inc., other community partners, and Project SEARCH International will expand the Arkansas Project SEARCH. (Page 221) Title II

Each of the SE services providers: World Services for the Blind, Easter Seals, Job Connections, and Goodwill Industries, will be responsible for extended services.

Supported employment is integrated competitive employment, or an individual working in an integrated employment setting towards integrated competitive employment. This includes customized employment. The standard post-employment extended service support service under supported employment is 24 months.

Focus of Supported Employment on Youth: Half of the money that Arkansas receives under the supported employment state grant will be used to support youth with the most significant blindness and low vision needs (up to age 24), and these youth may receive extended services (i.e., ongoing supports to maintain an individual in supported employment) for up to 4 years. (Page 270) Title II

DSB uses several vendors to provide comprehensive supported employment services to youth and adults identified as blind or visually impaired. The services begin with identifying blindness skills, addressing psychological and social needs, and then moving on to skills training, placement and job coaching.

Supported employment is integrated competitive employment, or an individual working in an integrated employment setting working towards integrated competitive employment. This includes customized employment. The standard post-employment extended support service under supported employment is 24 months. (Page 298) Title II

Supported employment is integrated competitive employment, or an individual working in an integrated employment setting towards integrated competitive employment. This includes customized employment. The standard post-employment extended support service under supported employment is 24 months. Focus of Supported Employment on Youth: Half of the funds that Arkansas receives under the supported employment state grant will be used to support youth with the most significant blindness and low vision needs (up to age 24), and these youth may receive extended services (i.e., ongoing supports to maintain an individual in supported employment) for up to 4 years. DSB is developing an agreement with CRPs and Medicaid through the Division of Medical Services and with the Division of Development Disabilities to share the cost of extended services in supported employment. (Page 299) Title II
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~To best align services and resources, core and optional programs will develop joint policies and initiatives that spur collaboration, braiding of resources, and support the inclusion of key stakeholders in development and implementation. In order to continue to be inclusive of other programs and align with all workforce development resources in Arkansas, it is imperative that the work of the WIOA Roundtable continue and transition from an implementation body to a coordination and continuous improvement body. By doing so, we set ourselves up to more efficiently bring in other federal, state, and private or non-profit resources to the benefit of our citizens. By utilizing this design, the WIOA Roundtable can approach additional partner programs with a united front.  (Page 63) Title I

ARS commits to driving innovation and expansion of activities directly provided or facilitated by the agency that lead to competitive integrated employment while harnessing the unique talents and abilities of the people we serve.

ARS will invest in innovative services and programming tied to industry sectors with projected short and long term growth. ARS leadership will focus its efforts on expanding programing and services that lead to increases in the performance accountability measures. This includes opportunities to better collaborate with other core programs and to forge mutually beneficial partnerships with business and industry partners.

Another high priority for ARS is efficiency. The driving forces are leveraging resources through committed partnerships and maximizing the results of each dollar spent to serve people with disabilities. (Page 233) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~DSB works in conjunction with the Arkansas Education Services for the Visually Impaired (ESVI) and the Department of Education, Special Education Division to identify blind and visually impaired students. Most recently, DSB has expanded its outreach effort to include private schools, alternative schools, and accredited online high school systems. DSB is improving and expanding efforts by offering seminars and in person talks to these educational organizations to inform teachers, parents, and students of the services that are available. DSB offers Parent Summits to provide coordinated efforts to allow students and parents to learn about the options in blindness skills training, education, and employment services. DSB continues to provide a three—week transition learning experience for up to 22 students from across the state, which includes paid work experiences, lessons in self advocacy, peer mentoring, financial literacy, independent living skills, career counseling, and planning for the future; the students are housed at Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired and go home on weekends. DSB intends to expand this program throughout the State to offer students and youth an opportunity to receive services closer to the communities in which they live. DSB is also working to offer work experience training, soft skills training, career counseling, and advocacy skills to pre—employment transition students throughout the State. Page (302) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~Allowable activities, referred to as vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, are those activities necessary to assist individuals with disabilities to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain gainful employment. An individualized plan for employment (IPE) is the foundation for all activities funded by Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS) for eligible individuals. Both the outcome goal and the services outlined on each individual’s IPE must be consistent with their respective strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, informed choice and economic self-sufficiency. VR services, as practicable, should likewise align with the resources of core partners, and other stakeholders to ensure that people with disabilities meet or exceed their IPE goals. In addition to VR counseling, IPE’s may include pre-employment transition and transition services, rehabilitation technology, training for careers that are in demand, post-secondary education, placement with employers, interpreters, accommodations needed for job placement or retaining employment, restorative medical services, positive behavior supports, internships, paid work experiences, and pre-apprenticeship training. (Page 62) Title I

Goal Met: Case reviews showed no students were graduating without current IPE’s.
Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits around the state to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings. (Page 101) Title II

ARS assigns VR counselor liaisons to each high school statewide. VR counselors work collaboratively with combined plan partners.
ARS will set aside 15 percent of federal VR program funding to provide pre-employment transition services such as job exploration counseling, and work-based learning experiences including internships in integrated environments. ARS will provide counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, will provide workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living skills, and will provide instruction in self-advocacy and peer mentoring.  (Page 179) Title II

Pre-ETS services include five core areas: Job exploration counseling: these are services to assist the student in exploring the world or work and learning more about their interests, abilities and future career goals. Work-based learning experiences, (which may include in-school or after school opportunities, experience outside the traditional school setting including internships, that are provided in an integrated environment) Counseling on opportunities in comprehensive transition or enrollment in postsecondary educational programs, Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, Instruction in self-advocacy/peer mentoring. In order to reach these goals DSB is ensuring our Pre-ETS transition counselors have a strong relationship with the local school districts and the local Work Force Development Boards. Summer work experiences, work place readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and other work based learning experiences have been implemented and will continue to expand as the population of high school students we serve increases. (Page 265) Title II

Pre-ETS services include: Job exploration counseling, Work-based learning experiences, (which may include in-school or after school opportunities, experience outside the traditional school setting including internships, that are provided in an integrated environment), Counseling on opportunities in comprehensive transition or enrollment in postsecondary educational programs, Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, Instruction in self-advocacy/peer mentoring.

In order to reach these goals, DSB is ensuring our seven Pre-ETS transition counselors have a strong relationship with the local school districts and the local Work Force Development Boards. Summer work experiences, work place readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and other work based learning experiences have been implemented and will continue to expand as the population of high school students we serve increases. (Page 266) Title II

Transition students/youth may be determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation within 60 days after application and the Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) will be completed within 90 days after eligibility. (Page 179) Title II

7. ARS will work with colleges and universities within the state that train special educators and VR Counselors to include in their curriculum information on pre-employment transition.
8. ARS realizes providing pre-employment services to all Arkansas students with IEPs or 504 plans may require utilization of outside resources. ARS proposes to develop and issue a request for qualifications to determine potential outside providers of pre-employment transition services. It envisions the provider list of eligible programs might include CRPs or even educational cooperatives. (Page 181) Title II

ARS counselors in students IEP meetings with authorization by parents or guardians and student knowledge, will communicate regularly with ARS counselors, and will provide ARS with copies of school records.

ARS will ensure each student with a significant disability enrolled in a vocational education program receives an interest assessment, and identifies capabilities. ARS will provide accommodations as needed to ensure successful completion of the vocational education program for VR eligible youth in accordance with their respective IPEs; unless these accommodations are the responsibility of the LEA pursuant to FAPE regulations. ARS will provide technical assistance to local education agencies to ensure equal educational opportunities including full opportunity to participate in programs, to ensure activities and job opportunities are provided to all youth and students, and to analyze, identify, and change policies and activities that impede the achievement of equal opportunities for all individuals. (Page 183) Title II

2. School districts have the primary planning, programmatic, and financial responsibilities for the provision of education transition services and related services for students as a component of a free appropriate public education (FAPE) and these services are provided to eligible students with disabilities, ages 16 to 21, and younger when determined appropriate through the implementation of the Individualized Education Program (IEP). The parties acknowledge that the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit has general supervisory responsibility over the educational program of any public agency providing FAPE to individuals with disabilities, ages birth to 21, as defined in state and federal statutes. (Page 183) Title II

Outreach efforts include, but are not limited to, attendance at IEP and transition planning meetings, career fairs, back to school nights, group orientations, transition fairs, and presentations coordinated throughout the year. The process includes:
1. Transition counselors to identify and outreach to all students with disabilities to make available the five required pre-employment transition services. (Page 184) Title II

ARS will work with schools to assist the student in identifying and selecting vocational programming that will enhance a student’s ability to pursue appropriate career objectives. ARS counselors will provide information to schools about VR services, meet with special education teachers during the school year, and ensure schools have appropriate forms and information for students to apply for services.

In addition, ARS has a Transition Manager and Vocational Education Coordinator that will assist with managing transition services as an agency, and will also ensure services are appropriate and efficient for the clients, schools, and partnerships. Additionally, the transition manager will work directly with the schools and community partners to provide education on Pre-Employment Transition services and Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act. Furthermore, the agency will be providing detailed information about pre-employment transition services for students with an IEP and 504 plans. (Page 185) Title II

2. Documentation from the appropriate school personnel responsible for the provision of transition services to the VR counselor of the receipt of transition services under IDEA. This documentation must be provided to the VR counselor when a case is opened and may include a copy of the IEP and progress reports on transition services received.
3. Documentation of the application for VR services, with the result that the student was either determined ineligible for VR services or determined eligible and had an approved individualized plan for employment, but was unable to achieve the employment outcome, and the case was closed.
4. Documentation from VR of receipt of career counseling, and information and referral to other federal and/or state programs. This is completed using ARS Transition Section 511 SMW-2 form Career Counseling, Information and Referral, Student/Youth Services. (Page 188) Title II

5. ARS will revise its MOU with Special Education to include pre-employment transition. As part of the MOU, ARS will request Special Education’s assistance in gaining access to all students in the state age 14 an older who have an IEP or 504 plan.
6. ARS will work with Special Education to develop/provide training to special education teachers and special education supervisors on pre-employment transition. (Page 189) Title II

8. ARS realizes providing pre-employment services to all Arkansas students with IEPs or 504 plans may require utilization of outside resources. ARS proposes to develop and issue a request for qualifications to determine potential outside providers of pre-employment transition services. It envisions the provider list of eligible programs might include CRPs or even educational cooperatives. (Page 218) Title II

Secondary schools invite DSB to Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings to be part of the planning team to assist education agencies in preparing students who are blind or severely visually impaired for transition from school to post-school activities, such as employment, training, supported employment, and other VR services. The IEP outlines the roles and responsibilities of DSB, the student, the school, and any other agency/organization involved in providing transition services. (Page 263) Title II

DSB counselors assist participants in developing Individual Plans for Employment (IPE’s) at age 16. The IPE is developed no later than 90 days after eligibility is determined. DSB works to develop IPEs at age 16 and every year until the student transitions out of high school. Secondary schools invite DSB to Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings to be part of the planning team to assist education agencies in preparing students who are blind or severely visually impaired for transition from school to post-school activities, such as employment, training, supported employment, and other VR services. DSB conducts independent living, technology and vocational assessments after the determination of eligibility in order to address planning needs. This information is shared with the education staff in determining career goals and objectives. DSB will provide accommodations according to the IPE that are not the responsibility of the LEA pursuant to FAPE regulations. Peer support and mentoring is arranged for the duration of transition services. The IEP and the IPE outline the roles and responsibilities of DSB, the student, the school, and any other agency/organization involved in providing transition services. Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) DSB is working cooperatively with the Educational Services for the Visually Impaired, Department of Education, Special Education Teachers for the Visually Impaired, and local education areas to coordinate Pre-Employment Transition Services. New federal mandates require that DSB, in collaboration with local educational agencies, offer to transition age high school students with disabilities (ages 16-Graduation) Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) using 15% of our federal allocation on an annual basis. (Page 266) Title II

VR services delivered under WIOA do not remove, reduce, or change the school district’s responsibility to deliver a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) for students served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. VR services supplement, but do not supplant services delivered through the school districts.

Roles and Responsibilities The roles and responsibilities for each partner agency as required by federal and state regulations are as follows:

1. Local education agencies provide a Free and Appropriate Public Education for students with visual impairment and those with low or no vision, including preparation for transition from school to work or other postsecondary activities.

2. DSB and the Department of Education, Special Education, ESVI and Teachers for the Visually Impaired assist with student transition from secondary school to work through postsecondary training, education, or direct placement services necessary to achieve a successful employment outcome. The Division of Services for the Blind and the Department of Education, Special Education share the financial responsibility of ensuring that the provision of pre-employment transition services are planned and implemented within the school system.

3. The Division of Development Disabilities Services in collaboration with the Division of Services for the Blind and the Department of Education, Special Education work to reduce the number of sheltered workshop placements by promoting competitive employment in an integrated setting to all low vision and blind participants. In order to promote independence and self-sufficiency, the agency shall provide support and services, within available resources, to assist customers enrolled in Medicaid waivers who choose to pursue gainful employment.

Financial Responsibilities DSB and the Department of Education, Special Education, ARS, and the Division of Developmental Disabilities Services are committed to meeting financial responsibilities as required by law. Agency/Division heads for the organizations will periodically identify areas for improved programmatic and financial efficiencies and develop strategies to meet financial responsibilities, including joint appropriations requests from the state legislature and negotiations with federal agencies. Each party is financially responsible for the services it provides under its own laws and rules. (Pages 267-268) Title II

DSB has begun work with Arkansas Workforce Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education to plan and develop pre-employment transition services and to coordinate services for individuals being served dually and under the PROMISE grant. The Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education staff provide training and information on transition services to vocational rehabilitation and workforce services staff. In turn, vocational rehabilitation staff, both DSB and ARS train and collaborate with Education and Workforce to provide training on how to establish work based learning experiences, providing job exploration counseling and counseling on opportunities in enrollment in post-secondary counseling, as well as cross training on instructional models in supported employment. Our agencies work together towards utilizing best practices on Section 101, IDEA, ADA and the Individual Education Plan (IEP). DSB’s transition coordinator participates in monthly meetings with ESVI staff and teachers for the visually impaired. (Page 285-286) Title II

Strategy: DSB will update the collaborative database of transition students as needed.

Performance Measure: Counselors/Rehabilitation Assistants will coordinate with Local Education Area (LEA) Supervisors to maintain lists of where transition students are located.

Strategy: VR Counselors will continue to track transition students on their caseloads to insure that the IPE is developed or updated before a student graduates from high school.

Performance Measure: Area Supervisors will monitor this during case reviews to insure that no transition student will graduate without a current IPE.

Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings.

Performance Measure: Annually, DSB will invite ESVI Regional Certified Vision Consultants and transition parents to a Parent Summit with VR Counselors to provide information about assistive technology; rights and responsibilities; available resources and services; benefits counseling; and funding for college and career start—up costs. (Page 292-293) Title II

Strategy: DSB will maintain a database of transition students.
Strategy: VR Counselors will continue to track transition students on their caseloads to insure that the IPE is developed or updated before a student graduates from high school.
Strategy: VR Counselors will make face-to-face visits to LEA Supervisors in their territories.
Strategy: DSB will continue to provide assessments and services to transition students specifically focused on activities of daily living, including but not limited to, mobility, knowledge of available transportation resources, self—advocacy, acquisition of a variety of reading options, awareness of job opportunities, benefits counseling, and rights and responsibilities as an informed participant. (Page 300) Title II

2 Year Update - DSB has 7 Pre-ETS Counselors working with the youth 16 to graduation. Each counselor maintains their own caseload. Reports are generated from the AWARE database to assist the Field Services Administrator, Transition Coordinator and counselors maintain the cases.
Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits around the state to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings. Performance Measure: In FY 2015, DSB will invite ESVI Regional Certified Vision Consultants and transition parents to Parent Summits with VR Counselors and Rehabilitation Teachers, to provide information about students’ rights and accommodations. Goal Met: Parent Summits were held in West Memphis and Harrison for transition students and their families from throughout the state. ESVI was included on the agenda. The information provided included IEP’s, but topics extended beyond high school and into college services. The success of the summit confirmed that additional summits will be held around the state in coming years. (Page 309) Title II
 

Career Pathways

~~On-the-job training (OJT) is training in the public or private sector that is given to a paid employee while he or she is engaged in productive work and that provides knowledge and skills essential to the full and adequate performance of the job. On-the-job training differs from subsidized employment in that the OJT employer receives a subsidy to help with costs associated with training. “Supported work” for individuals with disabilities is considered OJT if onsite training is included. (Page 335) Title IV

Apprenticeship

6. Increase the utilization of Registered Apprenticeship programs as viable talent development opportunities.

7. Increase connections with employers and Vocational Rehabilitation agencies to provide support and employment for youth and adults with disabilities.

8. Partner with K-12 education, higher education, career and technical education, and adult education to provide consistent rules and eliminate barriers to implementing training programs around the State.

9. Explore data sharing opportunities with non-governmental organizations that are committed partners to the state’s workforce center system that will lead to improved intake, referral, and case management for customers served by multiple agencies (both public and private). (Page 46) Title I

Allowable activities, referred to as vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, are those activities necessary to assist individuals with disabilities to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain gainful employment. An individualized plan for employment (IPE) is the foundation for all activities funded by Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS) for eligible individuals. Both the outcome goal and the services outlined on each individual’s IPE must be consistent with their respective strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, informed choice and economic self-sufficiency. VR services, as practicable, should likewise align with the resources of core partners, and other stakeholders to ensure that people with disabilities meet or exceed their IPE goals. In addition to VR counseling, IPE’s may include pre-employment transition and transition services, rehabilitation technology, training for careers that are in demand, post-secondary education, placement with employers, interpreters, accommodations needed for job placement or retaining employment, restorative medical services, positive behavior supports, internships, paid work experiences, and pre-apprenticeship training. (Page 62) Title I

ARS has plans to utilize statewide registered apprenticeship training providers to facilitate placement in registered apprenticeship and one provider has been approved as a vendor for this service. During FFY 2016, there were plans for six 40-hour pre-apprenticeship training classes to train 90 people with disabilities. However, this plan was altered based on availability of the pre-apprenticeship training providers. By the conclusion of FFY 2017, 42 VR consumers successfully completed pre-apprenticeship training. For the first class in FFY 2016, of the 19 successful completers, 14 achieved competitive integrated employment, 12 are employed in high skill, high demand careers, and two are actively searching for employment. There are plans for continued expansion of the use of pre-apprenticeship for VR clients in Arkansas. In the second quarter of FFY 2018, 100 students have registered for pre-apprenticeship training. (Page 72) Title I

In FFY 2017, ACTI partnered with CVS Health to develop a retail training program with externships at CVS Health’s pharmacies. The training is based on CVS’s needs for retail staff and pharmacy technicians.

The pre-apprenticeship training provided to ARS clients was funded by a grant provided through the Arkansas Department of Workforce Services.

Access and Accommodations received 108 referrals for assistive technology assessment with clients looking to participate in educational activities from field counselors this program year. Access and Accommodations also served 95 referrals for assistive technology education and consultation from public and private employers during the program year. These cases typically result in the acquisition and training on the use of specific assistive technology devices and accommodations. Access and Accommodations staff have collaborated with ICAN to provide training in the area of legal provisions of assistive technology, specifically focusing on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) including examples of device implementation to field staff with regards to education, transition, and employment. They have also provided training in these areas to outside community partners as well as public and private employers. (Page 241) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Strategy: DSB will work in conjunction with provider agencies to provide work appropriate skills and training to blind and low vision participants.

  • Performance Measure: DSB will refer participants to World Services for the Blind, Alpha Pointe, the Louisiana Center for the Blind, Sources, Goodwill and other providers as necessary for additional skills training, including, but not limited to soft skills and work readiness training to assist participants in improving their probability of securing competitive employment.

Strategy: DSB will provide detailed benefits counseling information to each participant on SSI and SSDI.

  • Performance Measure: DSB will refer 100% of clients, adults, students and youth on SSI and SSDI to the DSB benefits counselor for a one—on—one benefits analysis.
  • Performance Measure: Area Supervisors will monitor caseloads to ensure that VR Counselors are referring 100% of SSI and SSDI VR participants to the benefits counselor.
  • Performance Measure: Counselors will make participants aware of benefits counseling at the time of application, at the time of IPE’s, and at the time of closure. (Page 291) Title II

Strategy: VR Counselors will schedule and attend face-to-face job exploration meetings to interview human resource professionals regarding the types of jobs they have and the skills needed to do those jobs.
Strategy: VR Counselors will ensure that participants in job- ready status are actively seeking employment.
Strategy: DSB will encourage and support viable self-employment.
Strategy: DSB will work in conjunction with provider agencies to provide work appropriate skills and training to blind and low vision participants.
Strategy: DSB will provide detailed benefits counseling information to each participant on SSI and SSDI.
Strategy: DSB will continue to refer Older Individuals who are Blind and interested in employment to VR and will ensure that its OIB contractor will as well. (Page 299) Title II
 

Employer/ Business

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Data Collection

The most recent Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) for Arkansas was completed in December 2015. ARS contracted with Dan Hopkins & Associates, Inc. who worked collaboratively with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), key stakeholders and ARS to complete a CSNA of rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities in Arkansas. Multiple strategies to gather data and information were used including: (a) A focus group discussion with participants from ARS, SRC, key stakeholders, and vendors; (b) A structured survey of all ARS counselors; (c) A structured survey of a random sample of ARS consumers throughout Arkansas; (d) Focus groups of consumers; (e) An ACTI focus group of administrators and staff; (f) Interviews and surveys of the agency leadership; (g) Questionnaire and an abbreviated focus group with district managers; (h) Review of 2014 RSA 911 data; and (i) Review of data from the American Community Survey and 2014 Current Population Survey. (Page 207) Title II

511

~~ARS in collaboration with the SRC proposes to implement the following to fulfill its RSA requirement of allotting 50% of its supported employment funds to serve youth with disabilities:

ARS will attempt to identify early on youth with disabilities that can benefit from supported employment services. ARS recognizes that a number of individuals with disabilities served through the Promise Grant will be potential candidates for supported employment services and that as it develops an effective pre-employment transition program a number of individuals serviced will also benefit from supported employment services. Developing an effective referral system for individuals served through Promise and pre-employment transition will be a priority. ARS also recognizes that in some areas CRPs have established an arrangement with local school districts to provide services. ARS will make it a priority to work with local CRPs and local school districts to help identify and refer to ARS potential supported employment candidates. This will also be in line with ARS’s efforts to address Section 511 requirements. In addition, as ARS revises its MOU’s with Developmental Disabilities Services and Behavioral Health a priority will be established to include language addressing the provision of supported employment services to youth with disabilities.

With the effective implementation of the activities identified above and with additional guidance provided by the RSA Liaison, ARS and the SRC fully expect to meet the SE requirement.

ARS in collaboration with the SRC and in consultation with its RSA State Liaison proposes to implement the following strategies to address the requirements of Section 511. ARS will:

1. Revise its MOU with Developmental Disabilities to include how both agencies will develop policy/procedure to address clients effected or might potentially be effected by Section 511.
2. Revise its MOU with Behavioral Health to include how both agencies will develop policy/procedure to address clients effected or might potentially be effected by Section 511.
3. Revise its MOU with Special Education to include how both agencies will develop policy/procedure to address students effected or might potentially be effected by Section 511. The MOU will address the issue of referring students to CRPs for services while the student is still enrolled in school or referring the student to a CRP upon graduation as part of transition planning.
4. Work with Special Education to develop/provide training to special education teachers and special education supervisors regarding Section 511.  (Page 217) Title II

• ARS will continue assigning a rehabilitation counselor as a liaison to each CRP in each District.
• ARS district managers will assume a more active role with CRPs to develop more positive working relationships.
• ARS will train CRPs on the WIOA requirements for services to youth and students with disabilities as it relates to Section 511 Limitations on Sub-Minimum Wage. (Page 230) Title IV

Goal 6: Develop and improve Community Rehabilitation Programs.
• ARS will continue assigning a rehabilitation counselor as a liaison to each CRP in each District.
• ARS district managers will assume a more active role with CRPs to develop more positive working relationships.
• ARS will train CRPs on the WIOA requirements for services to youth and students with disabilities as it relates to Section 511 Limitations on Sub-Minimum Wage.
• ARS will initiate purchased service agreements focused on moving CRPs from fee for service to performance based outcomes payments. (Page 241) Title II

Transition in Regards to Section 511 -Section 511 of WIOA intends that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded an opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re-enter competitive integrated employment. The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education are working together to identify students that are blind and visually impaired that have been provided services in a sub-minimum wage setting. We are collaborating on plans to expand services to mutual consumers that includes a systematic approach to better identify consumers who could benefit from supported employment services (in an integrated setting, achieving at least the minimum wage) and are not receiving them at this time. A new Memorandum of Agreement is being developed through the team effort known as Vision Quest, which is an extension of Governor Asa Hutchinson’s Employment First Taskforce. Vision Quest includes the following agencies: The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education. The proposal includes provisions for use of joint agency resources to ensure quality service delivery and long term supports for supported employment. With the cooperation of the partner agencies DSB will contact blind and visually impaired individuals every 6 months who are in sub-minimum wage situations to provide career counseling and information and referral services, designed to promote opportunities for competitive integrated employment. (Page 265) Title II

A new Memorandum of Agreement is being developed through the team effort known as Vision Quest, which is an extension of Governor Asa Hutchinson’s Employment First Taskforce. Vision Quest includes the following agencies: The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education. The proposal includes provisions for use of joint agency resources to ensure quality service delivery and long term supports for supported employment. With the cooperation of the partner agencies DSB will contact blind and visually impaired individuals every 6 months who are in sub-minimum wage situations to provide career counseling and information and referral services, designed to promote opportunities for competitive integrated employment. DSB’s Director joined the other agencies Directors at the official signing of the MOU in the winter of 2018. DSB does not have any consumers employed in a 511 or less than minimum wage situation. (Page 267) Title II

DSB is working cooperatively with the Educational Services for the Visually Impaired, Department of Education, Special Education Teachers for the Visually Impaired, and local education areas to identify the technology needs, independent living needs, and educational training needs of identified students beginning at age 16 in the school system and through IPE meetings and planning meetings for those meeting the 504 regulations. Monthly meetings are held with our VR and Pre-ETS counselors and the school consultants to determine goals and objectives for students. Quarterly visits to schools are conducted to provide labor market information, university application and scholarship information, and technical school opportunities available within the key labor market sectors of the State. An updated agreement with the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education, regarding transition services to students who are blind or severely visually impaired, including Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ASBVI) was developed to address the Section 113 Pre-employment transition activities that are authorized under WIOA and the requirements of Section 511.This MOU was created in conjunction with the Arkansas Rehabilitation Service Agency. The agreement was signed. The interagency agreement outlined the roles and responsibilities, financial responsibility, determination of lead agency, and qualified personnel. DSB has reached out to each Local Education Area Supervisor in the school districts across the State and each high school across the State to give presentations/information on services available under pre-employment transition services. DSB has seven designated pre-employment transition services counselors that provide information to eligible and potentially eligible students with visual impairments both in large print and electronically through the school system. (Page 264) Title II

Transition in Regards to Section 511 -Section 511 of WIOA intends that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded an opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re-enter competitive integrated employment. The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education are working together to identify students that are blind and visually impaired that have been provided services in a sub-minimum wage setting. We are collaborating on plans to expand services to mutual consumers that includes a systematic approach to better identify consumers who could benefit from supported employment services (in an integrated setting, achieving at least the minimum wage) and are not receiving them at this time. A new Memorandum of Agreement is being developed through the team effort known as Vision Quest, which is an extension of Governor Asa Hutchinson’s Employment First Taskforce. Vision Quest includes the following agencies: The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education. The proposal includes provisions for use of joint agency resources to ensure quality service delivery and long term supports for supported employment. With the cooperation of the partner agencies DSB will contact blind and visually impaired individuals every 6 months who are in sub-minimum wage situations to provide career counseling and information and referral services, designed to promote opportunities for competitive integrated employment. (Page 265) Title II

As we move forward with WIOA and the emerging new Technical Assistance Centers, DSB is working with the WINTAC towards Job Driven practices/best practices, best practices in pre-employment transition services, addressing section 511 subminimum wage requirements, and performance accountability. DSB in combination with Arkansas General is working with the Transition Technical Assistance Center of the University of North Carolina to improve and strengthen the transition program. (Page 284) Title II
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The workforce center delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the workforce delivery system partners) will comply with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. The State ensures that Arkansas Workforce Center system complies with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 through the development and implementation of a Methods of Administration Policy that outlines all requirements of the system. Reviews are conducted annually to make sure that workforce centers meet requirements. Furthermore, training is offered at least annually to equal opportunity officers of the local workforce development boards. To demonstrate compliance with this provision, the one-stop center operators and the delivery system partners will collaborate to develop and provide periodic and new-hire staff training and system-wide support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. A rotating certification review team will be established, to provide scheduled evaluation, certification and recertification of the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities and to address any compliance issues that arise. (Pages 117- 118) Title II  

Access and Accommodations in collaboration with Increasing Capabilities Access Network will work with the Division of Services for the Blind to develop a certification review team for compliance of the one stop delivery system with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the ADA. (Page 226) Title IV

Vets

Arkansas’s policy for priority of service to veterans includes up to a 24 hour hold for new job orders placed in the AJL system. Local Veteran Employment Representative (LVER) staff has access to federal contractor job listings through VetCentral, which are fed into the AJL system. This access provides opportunities for priority referrals of target veterans to Federal contractors. After registration in VetCentral, the system provides automatic notifications to the veteran when a job opening occurs in their field. Services to veterans through the Gold Card Initiative are available at the Arkansas Workforce Centers (AWC). The Gold Card Initiative provides unemployed post-9/11 era veterans with the intensive and follow-up services they need to succeed in today’s job market. The Gold Card initiative is a joint effort of the Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration (ETA) and the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS). (Page 117) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. (Page 373) Title IV

Once significant barriers to employment are identified by Wagner-Peyser staff, veterans will be directed to the nearest DVOP for a comprehensive assessment and the development of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP), if necessary. DVOP staff providing intensive case management services will be required to use Arkansas JobLink (AJL) to record services, case notes, referrals, and follow-up services.

Arkansas LVER staff will advocate, on behalf of veterans, with businesses and industries. LVERs will perform the full range of employer outreach activities outlined in VPL 03-14, which are offered through the workforce system. Staff will report outreach activities, on a quarterly basis, in the Manager’s Quarterly Report. This includes the facilitation of employment, training, and placement services furnished to veterans through the state’s employment service. They are, but are not limited to:

 Planning and participating in job and career fairs;

 Conducting employer outreach;

 Conducting job search workshops, and establishing job search groups;

 Coordinating with unions, apprenticeships programs and business or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans;

 Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans;

 Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and  Coordinating and participating with other business outreach. (Page 375) Title II

Arkansas JobLink (AJL) is the state’s integrated web-based workforce development management information system (MIS) used by the state and local areas to share and manage participant data between the Wagner-Peyser program, the Trade Adjustment Assistance program and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act program. All staff has access to and can view all services provided to the veteran regardless of funding stream. By partnering with other state agencies, ADWS is maximizing its outreach potential. Efforts aimed at providing information about our services to veterans include promoting and attending local Job Fairs, and Hiring our Heroes and Women Veterans Summits events. All hiring events are advertised in the local paper and video streamed on public access media throughout the local AWC. We also seek the assistance of County Veteran Service Officers for those seeking employment. Arkansas is also exploring ways to better connect veterans seeking employment with Apprenticeship opportunities. We have strengthened our partnership with Registered Apprenticeship in recent years through collaboration with the Arkansas Apprenticeship Coalition in implementing the Arkansas Energy Sector Partnership grant. Through this collaboration, the state now has a mobile training center which is operated by the Arkansas Apprenticeship Coalition to provide “green” skills education to apprentices statewide. (Page 376) Title IV

Veterans and eligible persons with significant barriers to employment (SBE), economically or educationally disadvantaged, recently separated, homeless, including domestic violence and other dangerous or life threating conditions, offenders and veterans between the ages 18-24, identified in VPL04-14 as the target groups for services by Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists. The state will focus efforts to increase services and outreach to the target populations as identified in guidance. The State will take steps to ensure that veterans with significant barriers receive intensive services by DVOP specialists. During the initial assessment, if a veteran self-attest to meeting one or more of the SBE criteria, Arkansas Workforce Center (AWC) staff will refer the individual to a DVOP specialist for intensive case management services. (Page 377) Title IV

VPL 01-09 encourages that a DVOP specialist be out-stationed to serve as the Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) for Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment (VR&E) clients referred to AW Cs for job placement assistance. A physical presence at the facilities increases coordination with VR&E staff. The ISC refers VR&E clients to programs authorized under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), Vocational Rehabilitation under United States Code (38 U.S.C.), Chapter 31, and other federal and state programs that provide services and activities to assist the veteran in determining an employment or training plan, to include apprenticeship and on the job training (OJT) to enhance employment potential. (Page 378) Title IV

Mental Health

~~Department of Human Services The Department of Human Services (DHS) is Arkansas’s largest state agency, with more than 7,500 employees working to ensure citizens are healthy, safe and enjoying a high quality of life. The agency’s skilled and passionate staff cares for Arkansans of all ages. People needing support will find at least one local DHS office in each of the state’s 75 counties. Arkansans may apply for a vast array of services at their local county office as well as online. Services include ARKids First health insurance for children, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps), Transitional Employment Assistance (TEA) and Medicaid. Through a blend of federal and state Medicaid funds, DHS pays for 64 percent of the babies born in Arkansas each year and for the care of 69 percent of the state’s nursing home patients. Additionally, DHS protects children and the elderly who have been abused or neglected; finds adoptive homes for foster children; funds congregate and home-delivered meals for the elderly; regulates nursing homes and childcare facilities; supports high-quality early childhood education; treats and serves youth in the juvenile justice system; oversees services for blind Arkansans; runs residential facilities for people with developmental disabilities; manages the Arkansas State Hospital and Arkansas Health Center for those with acute behavioral health issues; and supports nonprofit, community and faith-based organizations that depend on volunteers to continue programs vital to our communities. The agency also works with a system of community mental health care centers to provide mental health services to nearly 74,000 people each year. In all, DHS serves more than 1.2 million Arkansans every year. To manage these services and programs efficiently, DHS has ten divisions and five support offices headquartered in Little Rock in addition to the 85 county offices. (Page 85-86) Title I

 (10) Whether the eligible provider’s activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways;
(11) Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;
(12) Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance; and
(13) Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs. (Page 159) Title II

Goal 9: Increase the efficiency and effectiveness of service delivery for agency consumers.
• ARS will ensure the development and implementation of comprehensive training for district managers and counselors to effectively serve consumers.
• ARS will adequately staff the field program to reduce caseloads and allow counselors to devote additional time to direct consumer contact and provision of services.
• ARS will examine the agency referral sources and ensure counselors are trained to provide effective services to consumers with mental health concerns and intellectual/developmental disabilities.
• ARS will increase the role of the rehab area manager in the areas of outreach and marketing at local levels statewide to cultivate positive working relationships with employers, partners, and stakeholders. In FFY 2017, ARS sent vocational rehabilitation counselors to ARA, AAMRC, and APSE conferences that provided training on mental health services to populations with disabilities.
In FFY 2017, ARS district managers were tasked to visit and provide an agency overview to all WIOA partners statewide. (Pages 245- 246) Title II

The strategy involves an increased focus on SE outcomes resulting in a competitive wage integrated employment that culminates in a career outcome in contrast to the traditional sheltered employment. Based on WIOA, ARS will update the interagency agreements with the state agencies serving individuals with the most significant disabilities including: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU) The agreement places an emphasis on competitive employment as a desirable outcome for individuals with the most significant disabilities including those with developmental disabilities and mental health diagnoses.

ARS is developing additional certification criteria for SE service providers. The criteria include updated requirements for certification and training for job coaches. ARS increased fee schedules and negotiated contracts for services with providers in an attempt to increase service providers, and incentives to service providers, to increase employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities. (Page 248) Title II

As part of DHS, DSB enjoys close working relationships with the DHS Division of Medical Services (DMS), which houses Medicaid; the DHS Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDS); and the DHS Division of Behavioral Health Services (BHS). DSB has cooperative agreements outlining responsibilities and the provision of services with the DDS and DBHS. A similar agreement is being formulated for the provision of services to State Medicaid recipients. DSB coordinates services with DBHS, DMS, and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. (Page 272- 273) Title II

The purpose of the employability assessment will be to determine the applicant’s abilities, talents, proficiencies/deficiencies, etc. The assessment is completed to determine the applicant’s ability to move into employment and may be done by an agency or organization other than DWS.

During the assessment, the DWS Workforce Specialist will present an orientation/overview of the program, gather pertinent information, and identify barriers that may prevent the applicant from becoming self-sufficient through employment. The DWS Workforce Specialist may also identify the following.
o Family situation/circumstances
o Employment history/work experience
o Educational attainment/ literacy level/functional educational level
o Skills
o Interests
o Supportive Service needs, if any.

NOTE: Participants who are identified as victims of domestic violence will be referred for appropriate services. Appropriate services may include but are not limited to:
Counseling, housing relocation assistance, referral to mental health, referral to prosecuting attorney and/or law enforcement and the DHS Division of Children and Family Services. The DWS Workforce Specialist will, where appropriate, use all available resources to help the victim of domestic violence receive timely/needed services. (Page 333) Title IV

Job search and job readiness is assistance in seeking or obtaining employment or the preparation for seeking or obtaining employment. Job search activities include making contact with potential employers, applying for vacancies, and interviewing for jobs. Job readiness activities include classes or workshops where participants can improve their employability skills. Participants learn techniques such as resume writing, workplace etiquette, interviewing, and life skills.

Job readiness activities also include substance abuse treatment, mental health treatment (including mental health treatment needed to address domestic violence), or rehabilitation activities for those who are otherwise employable.

Such treatment or therapy must be determined to be necessary and certified by a qualified medical or mental health professional or treatment provider. (Page 335) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

• ARS will rename its Retaining a Valued Employee (RaVE) program to Stay at Work/Return to Work (SAW/RTW). This language is consistent with programs/practices in private/public sector employment and communicates functional intent. • As part of the Governor’s Employment First Task Force, ARS will assume a lead role in the implementation of a SAW/RTW program within Arkansas state government. • ARS will work with WIOA partners at both the state and local level to support SAW/RTW efforts in both public and private sector employment. • ARS will sufficiently staff its Assistive Technology at Work (AT@Work) program to meet referral demands from the ARS Field Program and SAW/RTW initiative. Staff will have expertise to address accommodation needs in training and employment settings. (Page 232) Title II

In program year 2016, ARS Special Programs was renamed Access and Accommodations to better communicate the resources and services available within the division. The Retaining a Valued Employee (RaVE) program was also renamed to Stay at Work/Return to Work (SAW/RTW) to be consistent with language found within the public/private sector. Access and Accommodations as part of the Employment First Task Force, has worked with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and the Public Employee Claims Division (PECD) to develop an OPM sponsored training for state supervisors and HR staff in the area of SAW/RTW. This included the implementation of assistive technology and how to accommodate an employee with a disability in the workplace. In the third quarter of program year 2016 Access and Accommodations, Assistive Technology at Work (AT@Work) program added a new Occupational Therapist position to meet the increased demands for evaluation services from field staff and to assist employers and employees through evaluations and trainings with the SAW/RTW program. Access and Accommodations is still in the process of adding one more Occupational Therapy position to ensure all referrals are seen in a timely manner. (Page 244-245) Title II

Arkansas’ initial vision of “building on our history as an innovator in the delivery of human services, to develop a robust, statewide, job-driven, employment and training program that will produce a job-ready workforce able to meet the needs of Arkansas’ current employers, attract new industry, and build Arkansas’ economy” is more clear in that the FY18 AR E&T program will serve 37 of our 75 counties, and 75% of all the States work registrants. In previous years Arkansas had a USDA approved waiver from the SNAP Requirement To Work (RTW) provisions. The waiver was based on labor surplus estimates from the Department of Labor, however like many other States, the economy improved and unemployment rates decreased, and the areas available to be covered by the waiver have decreased or disappeared, and this was the case for Arkansas beginning January 1, 2016. This group will now be subject to the PRWORA sponsored participation limits of 3 full months of SNAP benefits in a fixed 36 month period unless they are exempt or complying with the requirements associated with the RTW. (Page 351) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 49

WIOA State Plan: Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities - 06/10/2019

~~"ARS will continue to pursue opportunities currently under development with CRPs around the state to provide pre-employment transition services and other transition services for students living with a disability. ARS will collaborate with employers by fostering integrated systems, coordinating services, and providing career pathways for adults and youth/students with disabilities. ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities.ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities. ACTI works directly with potential employers to provide internship sites for students nearing the completion of their training programs; all of whom have significant disabilities.".

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

State of Arkansas Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan 2016-2019 - 06/10/2019

• Train and equip workforce center staff in an ongoing learning process with the knowledge, skills, and motivation to provide superior service to job seekers, including those with disabilities, and businesses in an integrated, regionally focused framework of service delivery. Center staff are cross-trained, as appropriate, to increase staff capacity, expertise, and efficiency. Cross-training allows staff from differing programs to understand every program and to share their expertise about the needs of specific populations so that all staff can better serve all customers. Center staff are routinely trained and are keenly aware as to how their particular function supports and contributes to the overall vision of the local board

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) “About Us” - 06/07/2019

~~“The Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) was established through a memorandum of agreement between the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) and the UAMS Center for Distance Health (CDH) in cooperation with the Arkansas Spinal Cord Commission (ASCC). Through education and resource development initiatives, ATRP works to increase access to comprehensive, cutting-edge rehabilitation care and facilitate community reintegration for Arkansans who have sustained traumatic injuries.Vision Statement:

To enable every Arkansan who has sustained a disabling traumatic injury access to the comprehensive rehabilitation care he or she needs to seamlessly reintegrate into the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Special Education Process Guide - 04/19/2019

~~ “The Notice of Conference is used by the LEA to take steps to ensure that parent(s) are afforded the opportunity to participate in the special education process.  It is the district’s responsibility to provide parents with appropriate notice of a meeting, and use other methods to ensure parent participation in IEP meetings and other special education conferences.  More information about parameters of these meetings can be found by accessing the web-link."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

AR SB 522: To Create A Comprehensive Statewide Workforce Development System; To Coordinate Various Workforce Programs; To Amend the Duties of the Career Education and Workforce Development Board; and to Declare an Emergency. - 04/18/2019

“The General Assembly finds that:

(1) Occupational, technical, and industrial training provides unique opportunities to improve the lives of Arkansans while advancing the state's economic development;

(2) Businesses seeking to begin operations in Arkansas look to the level of education and skills in the workforce as a key factor in making investment decisions;

(3) Currently, Arkansas workforce education operates within a variety of agencies, without coordination, often with significant inefficiencies arising from overlapping and repeated programming and from important programs being overlooked as presumably covered by another program; and

(4) Bringing coordination of all state and federal career education and workforce development programs will:

(A) Reduce unnecessary duplication of programming;

(B) Ensure that every Arkansan who seeks occupational, 9 technical, and industrial training will find an appropriate education program 10 in the state;

(C) Bring consistency, efficiency, and rigor, as 12 established by applicable industry and accreditation standards to the state's 13 career education and workforce development efforts; and

(D) Alert industry to the commitment of the State of 15 Arkansas to economic development through career workforce education.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

SENATE BILL 101/ Act No. 874 Developmental Disabilities Services Appropriation - 04/11/2019

~~“The Division of Developmental Disabilities Services of the Department of Human Services is hereby authorized to provide employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities residing at the Human Development Centers who work at less than a competitive employment level.

The provisions of this section shall be in effect only from July 1,  2019 through June 30,  2020.”

Systems
  • Other

St. Bernards To Host Unique Training Program for Young Adults with Developmental Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~“In the fall of 2017 St. Bernards Healthcare welcomed 8 interns as part of the St. Bernards Project SEARCH internship program. St. Bernards partners with Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and ACCESS to help participants develop skills for competitive employment. Internships are housed within various departments throughout St. Bernards, including Engineering, Nutritional Services, Fitness Center, just to name a few. Interns take part in three ten-week internships at St. Bernards during the 9-month program. Upon completion of the program, Project SEARCH graduates receive follow-along services to assist them on the job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Arkansas Medicaid Certification Requirements for ARChoices HCBS Waiver Program - 12/01/2018

~All ARChoices Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver providers must meet the Provider Participation and enrollment requirements contained within Section 140.000 of this manual

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Living the Mission - 10/24/2018

~“DHS protects children and the elderly who have been abused or neglected; finds adoptive homes for foster children; funds congregate and home-delivered meals for the elderly; regulates nursing homes and childcare facilities; supports high-quality early childhood education; treats and serves youth in the juvenile justice system; oversees services for blind Arkansans; runs residential facilities for people with developmental disabilities; manages the Arkansas State Hospital and Arkansas Health Center for those with acute behavioral health issues; and supports nonprofit, community and faith-based organizations that depend on volunteers to continue programs vital to our communities.

The agency also works with a system of community mental health care centers to provide mental health services to nearly 74,000 people each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) - 07/26/2018

~“PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) is a new Medicaid program to address the needs of individuals who have intensive behavioral health and intellectual and developmental disabilities service needs.  The PASSE program is designed to help people not only connect to services from their doctors but also services in the community that those members might need. The goal is for the PASSE to help improve people’s health and let them take a more active role in their treatment.A case manager accesses services for you. But your care coordinator makes sure that services are delivered, that the services are monitored, and that any referrals you may need are made to the right providers.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

AR SB 522: To Create A Comprehensive Statewide Workforce Development System; To Coordinate Various Workforce Programs; To Amend the Duties of the Career Education and Workforce Development Board; and to Declare an Emergency. - 04/18/2019

“The General Assembly finds that:

(1) Occupational, technical, and industrial training provides unique opportunities to improve the lives of Arkansans while advancing the state's economic development;

(2) Businesses seeking to begin operations in Arkansas look to the level of education and skills in the workforce as a key factor in making investment decisions;

(3) Currently, Arkansas workforce education operates within a variety of agencies, without coordination, often with significant inefficiencies arising from overlapping and repeated programming and from important programs being overlooked as presumably covered by another program; and

(4) Bringing coordination of all state and federal career education and workforce development programs will:

(A) Reduce unnecessary duplication of programming;

(B) Ensure that every Arkansan who seeks occupational, 9 technical, and industrial training will find an appropriate education program 10 in the state;

(C) Bring consistency, efficiency, and rigor, as 12 established by applicable industry and accreditation standards to the state's 13 career education and workforce development efforts; and

(D) Alert industry to the commitment of the State of 15 Arkansas to economic development through career workforce education.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

SENATE BILL 101/ Act No. 874 Developmental Disabilities Services Appropriation - 04/11/2019

~~“The Division of Developmental Disabilities Services of the Department of Human Services is hereby authorized to provide employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities residing at the Human Development Centers who work at less than a competitive employment level.

The provisions of this section shall be in effect only from July 1,  2019 through June 30,  2020.”

Systems
  • Other

Arkansas HB 1706 - 02/27/2017

~~“20-77-2702. Legislative intent and purpose. 28(a) As the single state agency for administration of the medical 29 assistance programs established under Title XIX of the Social Security Act, 30 42 U.S.C. § 1396 et seq., and Title XXI of the Social Security Act, 42 U.S.C. 31 § 1397aa et seq., the Department of Human Services is authorized by federal 32 law to utilize one (1) or more organizations for providing healthcare 33 services to Medicaid beneficiary populations. (b) The purpose of this subchapter is to establish a Medicaid 35 provider-led organized care system that administers and delivers healthcare  services for a member of an enrollable Medicaid beneficiary population in 1 return for payment.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Citations

Arkansas ABLE HB 1239 - 04/08/2015

An act to create the Achieving a Better Life Experience [ABLE] program; to provide new avenues for financial self-sufficiency for Arkansans with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order (EO 10-17) Establishing the Arkansas Employment First Initiative - 10/21/2010

“State agencies are hereby directed to coordinate efforts to increase employment of Arkansans with disabilities. To that end, the Arkansas Department of Human Services shall convene an Employment First Task Force, which shall include representation of and input from agencies administering disability services, vocational rehabilitation, workforce services and education, as well as from consumer advocates and disability service providers. … State agencies, whose missions include service to individuals with disabilities, shall develop and implement Employment First policies and procedures that prioritize employment as the preferred service option for individuals with disabilities.”

 

 

 

   
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

WIOA State Plan: Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities - 06/10/2019

~~"ARS will continue to pursue opportunities currently under development with CRPs around the state to provide pre-employment transition services and other transition services for students living with a disability. ARS will collaborate with employers by fostering integrated systems, coordinating services, and providing career pathways for adults and youth/students with disabilities. ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities.ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities. ACTI works directly with potential employers to provide internship sites for students nearing the completion of their training programs; all of whom have significant disabilities.".

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

State of Arkansas Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan 2016-2019 - 06/10/2019

• Train and equip workforce center staff in an ongoing learning process with the knowledge, skills, and motivation to provide superior service to job seekers, including those with disabilities, and businesses in an integrated, regionally focused framework of service delivery. Center staff are cross-trained, as appropriate, to increase staff capacity, expertise, and efficiency. Cross-training allows staff from differing programs to understand every program and to share their expertise about the needs of specific populations so that all staff can better serve all customers. Center staff are routinely trained and are keenly aware as to how their particular function supports and contributes to the overall vision of the local board

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) “About Us” - 06/07/2019

~~“The Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) was established through a memorandum of agreement between the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) and the UAMS Center for Distance Health (CDH) in cooperation with the Arkansas Spinal Cord Commission (ASCC). Through education and resource development initiatives, ATRP works to increase access to comprehensive, cutting-edge rehabilitation care and facilitate community reintegration for Arkansans who have sustained traumatic injuries.Vision Statement:

To enable every Arkansan who has sustained a disabling traumatic injury access to the comprehensive rehabilitation care he or she needs to seamlessly reintegrate into the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Special Education Process Guide - 04/19/2019

~~ “The Notice of Conference is used by the LEA to take steps to ensure that parent(s) are afforded the opportunity to participate in the special education process.  It is the district’s responsibility to provide parents with appropriate notice of a meeting, and use other methods to ensure parent participation in IEP meetings and other special education conferences.  More information about parameters of these meetings can be found by accessing the web-link."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Living the Mission - 10/24/2018

~“DHS protects children and the elderly who have been abused or neglected; finds adoptive homes for foster children; funds congregate and home-delivered meals for the elderly; regulates nursing homes and childcare facilities; supports high-quality early childhood education; treats and serves youth in the juvenile justice system; oversees services for blind Arkansans; runs residential facilities for people with developmental disabilities; manages the Arkansas State Hospital and Arkansas Health Center for those with acute behavioral health issues; and supports nonprofit, community and faith-based organizations that depend on volunteers to continue programs vital to our communities.

The agency also works with a system of community mental health care centers to provide mental health services to nearly 74,000 people each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) - 07/26/2018

~“PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) is a new Medicaid program to address the needs of individuals who have intensive behavioral health and intellectual and developmental disabilities service needs.  The PASSE program is designed to help people not only connect to services from their doctors but also services in the community that those members might need. The goal is for the PASSE to help improve people’s health and let them take a more active role in their treatment.A case manager accesses services for you. But your care coordinator makes sure that services are delivered, that the services are monitored, and that any referrals you may need are made to the right providers.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WIOA State Plan for the State of Arkansas FY-2018 - 06/30/2018

~~ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, is receiving technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS),Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU).• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will initiate revised MOUs based on the WIOA, including new rates and reimbursement methodology for braiding services.• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will provide technical assistance to the pilot projects focused on transitioning from facility based services to community based services.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

Arkansas Department of Human Services "Workers with Disabilities" - 12/03/2017

~~“You must be at least 16 and less than 65 years of age. You must also have a significant disability expected to last at least 12 months or to result in death. Eligibility is determined using Social Security Disability guidelines. Unlike receiving Social Security benefits, you may work full-time and earn more than what is allowed under Social Security benefit guidelines (SGA limit). “

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program for Fiscal Year 2015 (submitted FY 2014) - 02/16/2017

~~“6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Arkansas Department of Career Education Transition Services - 12/07/2016

~Arkansas Rehabilitation Services works to provide opportunities for Rehabilitation counselors and schools to develop partnerships in an effort to prepare high school students with disabilities the knowledge, skills, and abilities to achieve successful transition from high school to post-secondary life.The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Transition Counselor works with students, teachers, principals, and other appointed school staff, as well as, families and community resources. Together they coordinate services and develop programs with the intent to improve and provide quality post-school outcomes through student engagement in Vocational Rehabilitation programs."

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

St. Bernards To Host Unique Training Program for Young Adults with Developmental Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~“In the fall of 2017 St. Bernards Healthcare welcomed 8 interns as part of the St. Bernards Project SEARCH internship program. St. Bernards partners with Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and ACCESS to help participants develop skills for competitive employment. Internships are housed within various departments throughout St. Bernards, including Engineering, Nutritional Services, Fitness Center, just to name a few. Interns take part in three ten-week internships at St. Bernards during the 9-month program. Upon completion of the program, Project SEARCH graduates receive follow-along services to assist them on the job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Students Helpful Tools - 06/20/2018

~~If you are a student with a disability, then you will have a transition plan within your Individualized Education Plan (IEP) by the time you turn 16 years old. It is very important that you are educated about what this plan is and that you are involved in creating YOUR transition plan. The transition plan details the goals that you would like to achieve after high school in the areas of work, education and possibly independent living. So when you become involved in transition planning process, you will be thinking about questions like: Where will I work? What will I do to earn money? Will I go to school, like college or a vocational training program? What will I study? Will I live on my own and handle all the tasks that go along with that, like budgeting, finance, cooking, and transportation?

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and University of Arkansas PROMISE Partnership - 01/25/2016

Arkansas Rehabilitation Services will focus heavily on transition services by providing job exploration counseling, work base learning experiences, post-secondary training, job readiness skills and self-advocacy,”... “ARS has built a strong relationship with the University of Arkansas, and the agency is very excited about the MOU with PROMISE and looks forward….to 2016.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas EF Task Force: Collaborations & Final Report

After the Governor signed Executive Order 10-17, the Department of Human Services convened the Employment First Task Force. The Task Force was comprised of representatives from state agencies, provider associations, and advocacy groups. The Task Force developed the following definition of “Employment First:”

Employment First means employment in the workforce at livable wages and benefits is the first and preferred option in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age Arkansans with disabilities, regardless of level of disability.

The Arkansas Employment First Task force endeavors to continue interagency collaboration as a permanent interagency work group is needed to promote collaboration on issues and sharing of information related to disability employment, including outreach and marketing, training, coordination of services, and reporting outcomes. This group will include representatives of State agencies, provider groups, advocacy groups, and the Social Security Administration.

 

The Final Report contained two recommendations related to interagency collaboration:   A permanent interagency work group is needed to promote collaboration on issues and sharing of information related to disability employment, including outreach and marketing, training, coordination of services, and reporting outcomes. This group will include representatives of State agencies, provider groups, advocacy groups, and the Social Security Administration. Explore strategies for sustaining the EmployAbility Project after its federal funding ends in 2012. The Project provides policy analysis, training, and outreach and facilitates interagency collaboration to improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities.      
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Arkansas Balancing Incentives Program - 06/01/2014

Arkansas has been granted $61.2 million in BIP funding. This funding will be used to provide new or enhanced infrastructure and systems that support HCBS to Arkansans; specifically, the state is exploring the development of health homes and the Community First Choice and 1915(i) options. These new systems and options will help the state balance its LTSS system and will provide Arkansans with additional opportunities to receive long-term services and supports in their homes and communities.

In Arkansas, five Divisions within the state’s Department of Human Services play a role in the publicly funded long-term care system: the Division of Medical Services; the Division of Aging and Adult Services; the Division of Developmental Disabilities Services; the Division of Behavioral Health Services; and the Division of County Operations. These divisions are committed to working collaboratively to implement the Balancing Incentive Program. (no mention specifically of employment)

 

 

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas Disability Employment Initiative - 10/14/2010

Project Description: The Arkansas Department of Workforce Services will build upon the success of their Disability Employment Navigator Initiative utilizing multiple models and strategies, including Integrated Resource Teams, customized employment, and Guideposts for Success. Their primary focus will be on integrating youth aged 14 to 24 into education and employment. Arkansas recognizes the coming shortages of a skilled labor force which they feel can be filled through engagement of youth with disabilities during their formative years with a view to long‐term economic self‐sufficiency. Arkansas will be establishing an Employment Network Outreach Specialist, in addition to Disability Resource Coordinators, to reach out‐of school and at‐risk youth as well as linking these youth to in‐depth benefit planning and work incentive information. Arkansas will incorporate individual assessment tools, such as Individual Educational/Employment Plans (IEPs), as part of career exploration and identification of educational and employment pathways. Integrated Resource Team approaches will include guidance counselors, career mentors, vocational rehabilitation specialists, community work incentives coordinators, parents/legal guardians, and others needed to assure individual success. Project design includes “real world” experience opportunities, such as summer youth employment under the Workforce Investment Act and job shadowing and mentoring from prospective employers and networking. Educational opportunities will also be explored and pursued according to the interests and skills of the youth.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Arkansas Promise

Arkansas PROMISE is part of a new program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and the Social Security Administration (SSA) to help youth who are receiving disability benefits and their families improve their educational and employment outcomes. This project is being implemented in 11 states. In Arkansas, the program is being administered by the Department of Education and the University of Arkansas, in partnership with several other state agencies and private organizations.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas Workbridge

The Workbridge program is a partnership between ASN and Arkansas Rehabilitation Services to provide individuals who have disabilities with intense preparation for the work and social skills necessary to succeed in today’s job market. The program consists of a combination of real work experience at Encore Kids, ASN’s children’s resale shop, as well as classroom-style training focused on the social aspects of employment. After the 70-day program, participants are supported by staff while applying for, accepting, and maintaining their jobs in the community. This ensures the success of our program and more importantly, the success of our graduates

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas SSA Ticket to Work Program

~~“Ticket to Work is a Social Security Administration (SSA) program designed to encourage individuals receiving SSI/SSDI recipients to find ways to return to work. ARS Ticket to Work information is facilitated through ARS’ local field offices. A vocational rehabilitation counselor may assign the ticket to the agency if the individual wants ARS services. The vocational rehabilitation counselor will provide support and guidance with the client’s desire to explore return-to-work strategies and may also refer individuals to other agencies for specialized assistance. For more information see the ARS District Map to contact the field office nearest you”

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas Money Follows the Person

The Arkansas Money Follows the Person application has transitioned 773 individuals who have resided in institutions 90 consecutive days and one day on Medicaid into qualified home and community-based programs. The following populations residing in nursing homes and ICF-IDs will be served: Individuals with developmental disabilities; individuals 21 to 64 with physical disabilities; and individuals age 65+

 

 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

The Arkansas Developmental Disabilities Advocate Training Fund (DDATF) - 07/01/2018

~~“The Council staff administers this reimbursement program which provides funding for Arkansans with developmental disabilities, their family members, or their guardians to participate in professional or informational conferences, legislative advocacy skills training events, public forums, focus groups, hearings and other similar activities. This fund is designed to empower individuals with disabilities and their family members with the opportunities, experiences, resources and information they need to participate meaningfully in the decisions that are being made which affect their lives. This fund has a set total maximum amount available for use each fiscal year, and when that amount is expended funding will not be available until after the beginning of the next fiscal year. Other restrictions apply.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Arkansas Transition - 04/01/2018

~~“Arkansas Transition Services serves all 75 counties in Arkansas in an effort to improve transition outcomes for students with disabilities. Our mission is to effectively assist students with disabilities, educators, parents, agency personnel and community members in preparing students to transition from school to adult life and reach positive post-school outcomes. We provide technical assistance, trainings and consultations to special education teachers and other relevant staff, as well as to various agency personnel. Our services are provided at no cost.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arkansas Governor’s Developmental Disabilities Council's "Funded Projects" - 03/01/2017

~~“The Council is supporting a variety of projects in the 2017-2018 grant period to benefit Arkansans with I/DD and their families. These projects are taking place across the state, with programs in every Congressional District..

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arkansas Employment First Task Force Training Recommendations

The Final Report of the Employment First Task Force included a number of recommendations related to training, including:

Recommendation 1: Provide training on disability employment to State agency and provider agency staff.

State agencies should offer three levels of training on disability employment for their staff and provider agencies. Basic orientation should be required for staff of agencies serving people with disabilities, and could be offered online using video. Intermediate level training covering specific work incentives should be required for case managers and employment program staff. In-depth training on work incentives would be useful to persons who will actually provide work incentives counseling or work incentives training. Some State agencies may need in-house training capability on work incentives to meet the needs of their staff and providers.

 

Recommendation 19: Strengthen provider certification for employment services.

Provider certification needs to be strengthened for providers of various employment services. APSE, a national organization with focused on integrated employment and career advancement opportunities for individuals with disabilities, is developing national certification for employment specialists. ARS could use this certification process to upgrade standards for provider staff.

 

Recommendation 29. Train State agency supervisors

Develop mandatory EO 10-17 supervisory training curricula to expand training on the ADA and its amendments, and demonstrate how supervisors may access Clearinghouse information for recruiting, hiring, and maintaining qualified employees with disabilities.

Discussion: State agency supervisors and personnel officials need to have full knowledge of Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its amendments in order to recruit, employ, and accommodate employees with disabilities. This training would include such topics as ADA employment requirements, reasonable accommodation policies, and disability awareness and etiquette. The training will also cover basic work incentives information that enables individuals with disabilities to work and keep their disability benefits, especially health care coverage.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Arkansas Medicaid Certification Requirements for ARChoices HCBS Waiver Program - 12/01/2018

~All ARChoices Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver providers must meet the Provider Participation and enrollment requirements contained within Section 140.000 of this manual

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arkansas Waiver Association - 05/01/2018

~~“Welcome to the home of the Arkansas Waiver Association. We're an association of advocates, persons with developmental disabilities, their families and the professionals who work in the field. Our mission is straight forward:

To Promote Quality, Integrated Supports.

Our membership is built around those who are served by, or work with, Arkansas' Alternative Community Services Home and Community Based Medicaid Waiver. We seek to improve the quality of life of those with a developmental disability, and their families, through active advocacy, open communications, and an exchange of professional ideas. Together, we shall make a difference.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

"Arkansas Works" (Project Number 11-W-00287/6) - 03/05/2018

~~“Approval of this demonstration amendment allows Arkansas, no sooner than June 1, 2018, to require all Arkansas Works beneficiaries ages 19 through 49, with certain exceptions, to participate in and timely document and report 80 hours per month of community engagement activities, such as employment, education, job skills training, or community service, as a condition of continued Medicaid eligibility. Community engagement requirements will not apply to Arkansas Works beneficiaries ages 50 and older so as to ensure alignment and consistency with the state's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) requirements. Thealignment is appropriate and consistent with the ultimate objective of improving health and well-being for Medicaid beneficiaries.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for 1915(C) Home and Community Based Services Waiver - 08/21/2017

~~“Community and Employment Support WaiverWaiver Number: AR.0188Original BSE Waiver Number: AR.0188Amendment Number: AR.0188.R05.02Proposed Effective Date: 8/21/17Approved Effective Date: 08/22/17Approved Effective Date of Waiver being Amended: 09/01/16The purpose of the Community and Employment Support Waiver is to support individuals of all ages who have a developmental disability, meat ICF level of care and require waiver support services to live in the community and prevent institutionalization.The goals of HCBS waiver are to support beneficiaries in all major life activities, promote community inclusion through integrated employment options and community experiences, and provide comprehensive care coordination the 1915(b) Waiver Program” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FFY 2018-2019 Combined Substance Abuse and Mental Health Block Grant Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Application - 07/31/2017

~~“Objective: Partner with the Division of Medical Services (DMS), the State Medicaid Agency in Arkansas and a sister division within the Arkansas Department of Human Services (DHS), to continue working to transform the Medicaid funded behavioral health system through the implementation of support services and care coordination  The transformation involves DBHS staff participation at the front end and will affect the Division’s business practices, contracts and populations in the coming years. DBHS staff will work closely with Medicaid to develop and implement population-based care delivery standards and to implement recovery oriented services in a community setting through a State Plan Amendment to introduce new services and provider led care coordination….Include Recovery Support Services as a Medicaid funded service, which includes Supported Housing, Life Skills Development and Supported Employment. “ 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arkansas Money Follows the Person - 07/28/2017

~~The Arkansas Money Follows the Person application has transitioned 477 individuals who have resided in institutions 90 consecutive days and one day on Medicaid into qualified home and community-based programs. The following populations residing in nursing homes and and (Intermediate Care Facility for the Intellectually Disabled) ICF/IDs will be served: Individuals with developmental or intellectual disabilities, individuals 19 to 64 with physical disabilities; and individuals age 65+.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arkansas Current HCBS Transition Plan - 07/29/2016

You can now see the latest HCBS transition plan that DHS is submitting to CMS. Public Comment opens on 8/15/16 after they receive feedback from CMS. Public comment ends on 9/15/16. Please see the full transition plan, as currently written

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arkansas Medicaid State Plan Amendments - 01/01/2016

AR-15-011 This state plan amendment makes corrections to the citations and page format for PACE pages of the State Plan, per companion letter with SPA #15-0007 that adjusted rates for personal care services

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS 1915c Technical Guide - 01/01/2015

“These instructions provide information to assist states in completing the Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, including changes implemented through November 2014…This guidance is intended to improve understanding of applicable Federal policies and their implications for the design and operation of a HCBS waiver.” The guidance includes service definitions on supported employment, customized employment and other services and resources for people with disabilities seeking employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Medicaid Balancing Incentives - 07/28/2013

Arkansas has been granted $61.2 million in BIP funding. This funding will be used to provide new or enhanced infrastructure and systems that support HCBS to Arkansans; specifically, the state is exploring the development of health homes and the Community First Choice and 1915(i) options. These new systems and options will help the state balance its LTSS system and will provide Arkansans with additional opportunities to receive long-term services and supports in their homes and communities. In Arkansas, five Divisions within the state’s Department of Human Services play an important role in the publicly funded long-term care system: the Division of Medical Services; the Division of Aging & Adult Services; the Division of Developmental Disabilities Services; the Division of Behavioral Health Services; and the Division of County Operations. These divisions are committed to working collaboratively to implement the Balancing Incentive Program. (no mention specifically of employment).

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The Natural State of Arkansas celebrates that disability is a natural part of life, and should not limit the career opportunities for hard workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Arkansa VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.32%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,013,825
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-6.16%
Change from
2017 to 2018
268,473
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.21%
Change from
2017 to 2018
86,243
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.95%
Change from
2017 to 2018
32.12%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.2%
Change from
2017 to 2018
75.74%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 2,988,248 3,004,279 3,013,825
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 269,725 285,023 268,473
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 85,447 87,290 86,243
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,111,661 1,121,274 1,135,234
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 31.68% 30.85% 32.12%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.72% 75.89% 75.74%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.00% 3.70% 3.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.30% 22.60% 23.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.00% 15.10% 16.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 244,632 257,859 258,641
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 253,631 272,781 264,913
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 394,205 419,543 413,928
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 80,057 81,438 77,710
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 16,865 16,002 17,680
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,045 4,518 4,000
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,382 3,082 3,510
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 384
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 12,373 14,510 16,882
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 5,139 6,563 7,140

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,198 4,265 4,186
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.00% 4.10% 4.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 138,619 137,228 134,780

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,133 7,870 8,431
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 24,988 23,719 23,842
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 40,425 36,414 36,610
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.10% 21.60% 23.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 1.10% 0.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.60% 2.50% 2.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 0.50% 0.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 337 363 309
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 770 814 902
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 195 162 195
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 7 5 0

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,018 2,753 2,821
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.01

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 10 17 15
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 8 9 11
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 80.00% 53.00% 73.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.27 0.30 0.37

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,361
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 7 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 524 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,357 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 820 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 586 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 67 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 41.90% 29.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,382 3,246 3,159
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 202,159 201,408 198,990
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 70 92 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 73 77 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.00 0.00 0.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 52.68% 53.08% 53.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.55% 13.40% 13.15%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.35% 2.30% 2.14%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.41% 98.85% N/A
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 11.80% 17.92% 10.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 24.11% 44.32% 50.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 51.26% 52.02% 54.89%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 12.31% 26.40% 39.66%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 498,055
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,122
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 83,194
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 188,231
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 271,425
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 335
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 375
AbilityOne wages (products). $772,656
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,001,227

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 29 37 29
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3 3 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 32 40 32
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,566 2,456 1,860
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 401 401 384
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,967 2,857 2,244

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~ARS and representatives from CRPs developed and implemented standard procedures for the referral process and outcome indicators resulting in a fee for service schedule for individuals served by CRPs.

ARS’ standard procedures for external Employment First private non-profit and public VR service providers and CRPs are standards of compliance ensuring VR consumers achieve acceptable outcomes related to employment. The procedures for a CRP to be accredited as a vendor and to maintain accreditation are: 

(1) The CRP submits a vendor application documenting required experience in working with consumers with disabilities and employers.

(2) ARS reviews the application to assure ARS requirements are met, and submits a certificate and agreement documents to the ARS Commissioner for signature.

(3) The CRP is required to sign certification agreement documents assuring the ARS requirements as a vendor will be met.

(4) Once accredited, ARS provides a current vendor packet and provides training to the entity, as needed. ARS informs the ARS district manager and the VR counselors of the vendor.

(5) The VR counselor refers the consumer to the CRP and monitors the consumer’s progress.

(6) A VR counselor liaison is assigned to each CRP and provides monthly reports to the appropriate ARS personnel.

(7) ARS case review personnel from Program Planning, Development and Evaluation perform a standardized audit of CRP consumer files to ensure training criteria is met, the CRP demonstrates acceptable consumer progress/plans, appropriate documents are in the file, and the amount billed meets accepted guidelines of cost to value. CRP personnel files are reviewed to assure performance standards are acceptable and staff training requirements are met. (Page186-187) Title II

ARS maintains written cooperative agreements with private non-profit and for profit agencies in the state that provide supported employment (SE) services and extended services to ARS consumers with the most significant disabilities. The service providers commit to funding extended services for as long as the consumers remain employed on the original job.

ARS will continue to work with the Department of Human Services agencies to recruit Developmental Disabilities Centers, Behavioral Health Centers, and other related programs serving individuals with the most significant disabilities to seek certification to provide SE services. ARS will create new agreements based on technical assistance received from RSA; in consultation with the Arkansas State Rehabilitation Council and the Department of Labor, Office of Department of Employment Services experts in Employment First and WIOA. (Page187) Title II

ARS serves on the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, AR Employment First State Leadership team with the Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), University of Arkansas PROMISE Grant, and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU). The team in consultation with both the Arkansas State Rehabilitation Council and the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) State Liaison will be updating the current interagency agreements to fund braided services and apply for combined waiver programs related to opportunities where individuals participated in employment related activities under WIOA. (Page 193) Title II

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, is receiving technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU).

• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will initiate revised MOUs based on the WIOA, including new rates and reimbursement methodology for braiding services.
• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will provide technical assistance to the pilot projects focused on transitioning from facility based services to community based services. (Page 227) Title II

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, the Arkansas SRC and the RSA State Liaison, will establish technical assistance guidelines focused on CRPs transitioning from facility based services to community based services.

• ARS and ACTI administrators will review the current and future role and function of ACTI in the provision of services designed to assist in meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. (Page 231) Title II

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, is receiving technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU). (Page 234- 235) Title I

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, continues to receive technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU).

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, is revising MOUs based on the WIOA, including new rates and a reimbursement methodology.
ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, is providing technical assistance to the pilot projects focused on transitioning from facility based services to community based services. (Page 235) Title II

• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, the Arkansas SRC and the RSA State Liaison, will establish technical assistance guidelines focused on CRPs transitioning from facility based services to community based services.
• ARS and ACTI administrators will review the current and future role and function of ACTI in the provision of services designed to assist in meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. (Page 241) Title II

ARS will train staff on the new services and standards for Community Rehabilitation Programs beginning July 1, 2016.
• ARS will train staff to increase awareness related to Employment First (E1st) Provider Transformation and Integrated Community Based Services as it relates to Community Rehabilitation Programs, Supported Employment Programs, and External Job Placement vendors. (Page 243) Title II

Another purchased service agreement is in place with SE service vendors to implement strategies to expand the SE system including job placement services and extended services. Strategies include increasing the number of vendors offering SE and job placement statewide through enhanced incentives; utilizing a performance based approach with CRPs and SE providers; revised CRP fee schedules; and commitment from partnering state agencies to emphasize employment as a high priority outcome as a result of the Governor’s Executive Order Employment First Initiative for People with Disabilities. (Page 249) Title II

DSB maintains an active presence on numerous councils and committees, including: Arkansas Interagency Transition Partnership, Arkansas Workforce Development Board, Interagency Steering Committee on Integrated Employment, Behavioral Health Planning and Advisory Council, The Arkansas Independent Living Council, Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) The Governor’s Commission on People with Disabilities, Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, Youth Leadership Forum, Accessible Parking Taskforce, Local Workforce Development Boards across the state. (Page 262) Title II

                                                

Customized Employment

~~ARS will maximize the ability of individuals with most significant disabilities to achieve competitive employment through customized employment, supported employment, and other individualized services.

ARS will collaborate with WIOA partners, private funding, and other state agencies to help individuals with most significant disabilities to receive extended services to increase employability in an integrated environment.

Based on the success rate for competitive employment outcomes in the inaugural Project SEARCH initiative, ARS in collaboration with ACCESS Group, Inc., other community partners, and Project SEARCH International will expand the Arkansas Project SEARCH. (Page 221) Title II

Each of the SE services providers: World Services for the Blind, Easter Seals, Job Connections, and Goodwill Industries, will be responsible for extended services.

Supported employment is integrated competitive employment, or an individual working in an integrated employment setting towards integrated competitive employment. This includes customized employment. The standard post-employment extended service support service under supported employment is 24 months.

Focus of Supported Employment on Youth: Half of the money that Arkansas receives under the supported employment state grant will be used to support youth with the most significant blindness and low vision needs (up to age 24), and these youth may receive extended services (i.e., ongoing supports to maintain an individual in supported employment) for up to 4 years. (Page 270) Title II

DSB uses several vendors to provide comprehensive supported employment services to youth and adults identified as blind or visually impaired. The services begin with identifying blindness skills, addressing psychological and social needs, and then moving on to skills training, placement and job coaching.

Supported employment is integrated competitive employment, or an individual working in an integrated employment setting working towards integrated competitive employment. This includes customized employment. The standard post-employment extended support service under supported employment is 24 months. (Page 298) Title II

Supported employment is integrated competitive employment, or an individual working in an integrated employment setting towards integrated competitive employment. This includes customized employment. The standard post-employment extended support service under supported employment is 24 months. Focus of Supported Employment on Youth: Half of the funds that Arkansas receives under the supported employment state grant will be used to support youth with the most significant blindness and low vision needs (up to age 24), and these youth may receive extended services (i.e., ongoing supports to maintain an individual in supported employment) for up to 4 years. DSB is developing an agreement with CRPs and Medicaid through the Division of Medical Services and with the Division of Development Disabilities to share the cost of extended services in supported employment. (Page 299) Title II
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~To best align services and resources, core and optional programs will develop joint policies and initiatives that spur collaboration, braiding of resources, and support the inclusion of key stakeholders in development and implementation. In order to continue to be inclusive of other programs and align with all workforce development resources in Arkansas, it is imperative that the work of the WIOA Roundtable continue and transition from an implementation body to a coordination and continuous improvement body. By doing so, we set ourselves up to more efficiently bring in other federal, state, and private or non-profit resources to the benefit of our citizens. By utilizing this design, the WIOA Roundtable can approach additional partner programs with a united front.  (Page 63) Title I

ARS commits to driving innovation and expansion of activities directly provided or facilitated by the agency that lead to competitive integrated employment while harnessing the unique talents and abilities of the people we serve.

ARS will invest in innovative services and programming tied to industry sectors with projected short and long term growth. ARS leadership will focus its efforts on expanding programing and services that lead to increases in the performance accountability measures. This includes opportunities to better collaborate with other core programs and to forge mutually beneficial partnerships with business and industry partners.

Another high priority for ARS is efficiency. The driving forces are leveraging resources through committed partnerships and maximizing the results of each dollar spent to serve people with disabilities. (Page 233) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~DSB works in conjunction with the Arkansas Education Services for the Visually Impaired (ESVI) and the Department of Education, Special Education Division to identify blind and visually impaired students. Most recently, DSB has expanded its outreach effort to include private schools, alternative schools, and accredited online high school systems. DSB is improving and expanding efforts by offering seminars and in person talks to these educational organizations to inform teachers, parents, and students of the services that are available. DSB offers Parent Summits to provide coordinated efforts to allow students and parents to learn about the options in blindness skills training, education, and employment services. DSB continues to provide a three—week transition learning experience for up to 22 students from across the state, which includes paid work experiences, lessons in self advocacy, peer mentoring, financial literacy, independent living skills, career counseling, and planning for the future; the students are housed at Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired and go home on weekends. DSB intends to expand this program throughout the State to offer students and youth an opportunity to receive services closer to the communities in which they live. DSB is also working to offer work experience training, soft skills training, career counseling, and advocacy skills to pre—employment transition students throughout the State. Page (302) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~Allowable activities, referred to as vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, are those activities necessary to assist individuals with disabilities to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain gainful employment. An individualized plan for employment (IPE) is the foundation for all activities funded by Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS) for eligible individuals. Both the outcome goal and the services outlined on each individual’s IPE must be consistent with their respective strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, informed choice and economic self-sufficiency. VR services, as practicable, should likewise align with the resources of core partners, and other stakeholders to ensure that people with disabilities meet or exceed their IPE goals. In addition to VR counseling, IPE’s may include pre-employment transition and transition services, rehabilitation technology, training for careers that are in demand, post-secondary education, placement with employers, interpreters, accommodations needed for job placement or retaining employment, restorative medical services, positive behavior supports, internships, paid work experiences, and pre-apprenticeship training. (Page 62) Title I

Goal Met: Case reviews showed no students were graduating without current IPE’s.
Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits around the state to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings. (Page 101) Title II

ARS assigns VR counselor liaisons to each high school statewide. VR counselors work collaboratively with combined plan partners.
ARS will set aside 15 percent of federal VR program funding to provide pre-employment transition services such as job exploration counseling, and work-based learning experiences including internships in integrated environments. ARS will provide counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, will provide workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living skills, and will provide instruction in self-advocacy and peer mentoring.  (Page 179) Title II

Pre-ETS services include five core areas: Job exploration counseling: these are services to assist the student in exploring the world or work and learning more about their interests, abilities and future career goals. Work-based learning experiences, (which may include in-school or after school opportunities, experience outside the traditional school setting including internships, that are provided in an integrated environment) Counseling on opportunities in comprehensive transition or enrollment in postsecondary educational programs, Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, Instruction in self-advocacy/peer mentoring. In order to reach these goals DSB is ensuring our Pre-ETS transition counselors have a strong relationship with the local school districts and the local Work Force Development Boards. Summer work experiences, work place readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and other work based learning experiences have been implemented and will continue to expand as the population of high school students we serve increases. (Page 265) Title II

Pre-ETS services include: Job exploration counseling, Work-based learning experiences, (which may include in-school or after school opportunities, experience outside the traditional school setting including internships, that are provided in an integrated environment), Counseling on opportunities in comprehensive transition or enrollment in postsecondary educational programs, Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, Instruction in self-advocacy/peer mentoring.

In order to reach these goals, DSB is ensuring our seven Pre-ETS transition counselors have a strong relationship with the local school districts and the local Work Force Development Boards. Summer work experiences, work place readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and other work based learning experiences have been implemented and will continue to expand as the population of high school students we serve increases. (Page 266) Title II

Transition students/youth may be determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation within 60 days after application and the Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) will be completed within 90 days after eligibility. (Page 179) Title II

7. ARS will work with colleges and universities within the state that train special educators and VR Counselors to include in their curriculum information on pre-employment transition.
8. ARS realizes providing pre-employment services to all Arkansas students with IEPs or 504 plans may require utilization of outside resources. ARS proposes to develop and issue a request for qualifications to determine potential outside providers of pre-employment transition services. It envisions the provider list of eligible programs might include CRPs or even educational cooperatives. (Page 181) Title II

ARS counselors in students IEP meetings with authorization by parents or guardians and student knowledge, will communicate regularly with ARS counselors, and will provide ARS with copies of school records.

ARS will ensure each student with a significant disability enrolled in a vocational education program receives an interest assessment, and identifies capabilities. ARS will provide accommodations as needed to ensure successful completion of the vocational education program for VR eligible youth in accordance with their respective IPEs; unless these accommodations are the responsibility of the LEA pursuant to FAPE regulations. ARS will provide technical assistance to local education agencies to ensure equal educational opportunities including full opportunity to participate in programs, to ensure activities and job opportunities are provided to all youth and students, and to analyze, identify, and change policies and activities that impede the achievement of equal opportunities for all individuals. (Page 183) Title II

2. School districts have the primary planning, programmatic, and financial responsibilities for the provision of education transition services and related services for students as a component of a free appropriate public education (FAPE) and these services are provided to eligible students with disabilities, ages 16 to 21, and younger when determined appropriate through the implementation of the Individualized Education Program (IEP). The parties acknowledge that the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit has general supervisory responsibility over the educational program of any public agency providing FAPE to individuals with disabilities, ages birth to 21, as defined in state and federal statutes. (Page 183) Title II

Outreach efforts include, but are not limited to, attendance at IEP and transition planning meetings, career fairs, back to school nights, group orientations, transition fairs, and presentations coordinated throughout the year. The process includes:
1. Transition counselors to identify and outreach to all students with disabilities to make available the five required pre-employment transition services. (Page 184) Title II

ARS will work with schools to assist the student in identifying and selecting vocational programming that will enhance a student’s ability to pursue appropriate career objectives. ARS counselors will provide information to schools about VR services, meet with special education teachers during the school year, and ensure schools have appropriate forms and information for students to apply for services.

In addition, ARS has a Transition Manager and Vocational Education Coordinator that will assist with managing transition services as an agency, and will also ensure services are appropriate and efficient for the clients, schools, and partnerships. Additionally, the transition manager will work directly with the schools and community partners to provide education on Pre-Employment Transition services and Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act. Furthermore, the agency will be providing detailed information about pre-employment transition services for students with an IEP and 504 plans. (Page 185) Title II

2. Documentation from the appropriate school personnel responsible for the provision of transition services to the VR counselor of the receipt of transition services under IDEA. This documentation must be provided to the VR counselor when a case is opened and may include a copy of the IEP and progress reports on transition services received.
3. Documentation of the application for VR services, with the result that the student was either determined ineligible for VR services or determined eligible and had an approved individualized plan for employment, but was unable to achieve the employment outcome, and the case was closed.
4. Documentation from VR of receipt of career counseling, and information and referral to other federal and/or state programs. This is completed using ARS Transition Section 511 SMW-2 form Career Counseling, Information and Referral, Student/Youth Services. (Page 188) Title II

5. ARS will revise its MOU with Special Education to include pre-employment transition. As part of the MOU, ARS will request Special Education’s assistance in gaining access to all students in the state age 14 an older who have an IEP or 504 plan.
6. ARS will work with Special Education to develop/provide training to special education teachers and special education supervisors on pre-employment transition. (Page 189) Title II

8. ARS realizes providing pre-employment services to all Arkansas students with IEPs or 504 plans may require utilization of outside resources. ARS proposes to develop and issue a request for qualifications to determine potential outside providers of pre-employment transition services. It envisions the provider list of eligible programs might include CRPs or even educational cooperatives. (Page 218) Title II

Secondary schools invite DSB to Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings to be part of the planning team to assist education agencies in preparing students who are blind or severely visually impaired for transition from school to post-school activities, such as employment, training, supported employment, and other VR services. The IEP outlines the roles and responsibilities of DSB, the student, the school, and any other agency/organization involved in providing transition services. (Page 263) Title II

DSB counselors assist participants in developing Individual Plans for Employment (IPE’s) at age 16. The IPE is developed no later than 90 days after eligibility is determined. DSB works to develop IPEs at age 16 and every year until the student transitions out of high school. Secondary schools invite DSB to Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings to be part of the planning team to assist education agencies in preparing students who are blind or severely visually impaired for transition from school to post-school activities, such as employment, training, supported employment, and other VR services. DSB conducts independent living, technology and vocational assessments after the determination of eligibility in order to address planning needs. This information is shared with the education staff in determining career goals and objectives. DSB will provide accommodations according to the IPE that are not the responsibility of the LEA pursuant to FAPE regulations. Peer support and mentoring is arranged for the duration of transition services. The IEP and the IPE outline the roles and responsibilities of DSB, the student, the school, and any other agency/organization involved in providing transition services. Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) DSB is working cooperatively with the Educational Services for the Visually Impaired, Department of Education, Special Education Teachers for the Visually Impaired, and local education areas to coordinate Pre-Employment Transition Services. New federal mandates require that DSB, in collaboration with local educational agencies, offer to transition age high school students with disabilities (ages 16-Graduation) Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) using 15% of our federal allocation on an annual basis. (Page 266) Title II

VR services delivered under WIOA do not remove, reduce, or change the school district’s responsibility to deliver a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) for students served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. VR services supplement, but do not supplant services delivered through the school districts.

Roles and Responsibilities The roles and responsibilities for each partner agency as required by federal and state regulations are as follows:

1. Local education agencies provide a Free and Appropriate Public Education for students with visual impairment and those with low or no vision, including preparation for transition from school to work or other postsecondary activities.

2. DSB and the Department of Education, Special Education, ESVI and Teachers for the Visually Impaired assist with student transition from secondary school to work through postsecondary training, education, or direct placement services necessary to achieve a successful employment outcome. The Division of Services for the Blind and the Department of Education, Special Education share the financial responsibility of ensuring that the provision of pre-employment transition services are planned and implemented within the school system.

3. The Division of Development Disabilities Services in collaboration with the Division of Services for the Blind and the Department of Education, Special Education work to reduce the number of sheltered workshop placements by promoting competitive employment in an integrated setting to all low vision and blind participants. In order to promote independence and self-sufficiency, the agency shall provide support and services, within available resources, to assist customers enrolled in Medicaid waivers who choose to pursue gainful employment.

Financial Responsibilities DSB and the Department of Education, Special Education, ARS, and the Division of Developmental Disabilities Services are committed to meeting financial responsibilities as required by law. Agency/Division heads for the organizations will periodically identify areas for improved programmatic and financial efficiencies and develop strategies to meet financial responsibilities, including joint appropriations requests from the state legislature and negotiations with federal agencies. Each party is financially responsible for the services it provides under its own laws and rules. (Pages 267-268) Title II

DSB has begun work with Arkansas Workforce Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education to plan and develop pre-employment transition services and to coordinate services for individuals being served dually and under the PROMISE grant. The Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education staff provide training and information on transition services to vocational rehabilitation and workforce services staff. In turn, vocational rehabilitation staff, both DSB and ARS train and collaborate with Education and Workforce to provide training on how to establish work based learning experiences, providing job exploration counseling and counseling on opportunities in enrollment in post-secondary counseling, as well as cross training on instructional models in supported employment. Our agencies work together towards utilizing best practices on Section 101, IDEA, ADA and the Individual Education Plan (IEP). DSB’s transition coordinator participates in monthly meetings with ESVI staff and teachers for the visually impaired. (Page 285-286) Title II

Strategy: DSB will update the collaborative database of transition students as needed.

Performance Measure: Counselors/Rehabilitation Assistants will coordinate with Local Education Area (LEA) Supervisors to maintain lists of where transition students are located.

Strategy: VR Counselors will continue to track transition students on their caseloads to insure that the IPE is developed or updated before a student graduates from high school.

Performance Measure: Area Supervisors will monitor this during case reviews to insure that no transition student will graduate without a current IPE.

Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings.

Performance Measure: Annually, DSB will invite ESVI Regional Certified Vision Consultants and transition parents to a Parent Summit with VR Counselors to provide information about assistive technology; rights and responsibilities; available resources and services; benefits counseling; and funding for college and career start—up costs. (Page 292-293) Title II

Strategy: DSB will maintain a database of transition students.
Strategy: VR Counselors will continue to track transition students on their caseloads to insure that the IPE is developed or updated before a student graduates from high school.
Strategy: VR Counselors will make face-to-face visits to LEA Supervisors in their territories.
Strategy: DSB will continue to provide assessments and services to transition students specifically focused on activities of daily living, including but not limited to, mobility, knowledge of available transportation resources, self—advocacy, acquisition of a variety of reading options, awareness of job opportunities, benefits counseling, and rights and responsibilities as an informed participant. (Page 300) Title II

2 Year Update - DSB has 7 Pre-ETS Counselors working with the youth 16 to graduation. Each counselor maintains their own caseload. Reports are generated from the AWARE database to assist the Field Services Administrator, Transition Coordinator and counselors maintain the cases.
Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits around the state to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings. Performance Measure: In FY 2015, DSB will invite ESVI Regional Certified Vision Consultants and transition parents to Parent Summits with VR Counselors and Rehabilitation Teachers, to provide information about students’ rights and accommodations. Goal Met: Parent Summits were held in West Memphis and Harrison for transition students and their families from throughout the state. ESVI was included on the agenda. The information provided included IEP’s, but topics extended beyond high school and into college services. The success of the summit confirmed that additional summits will be held around the state in coming years. (Page 309) Title II
 

Career Pathways

~~On-the-job training (OJT) is training in the public or private sector that is given to a paid employee while he or she is engaged in productive work and that provides knowledge and skills essential to the full and adequate performance of the job. On-the-job training differs from subsidized employment in that the OJT employer receives a subsidy to help with costs associated with training. “Supported work” for individuals with disabilities is considered OJT if onsite training is included. (Page 335) Title IV

Apprenticeship

6. Increase the utilization of Registered Apprenticeship programs as viable talent development opportunities.

7. Increase connections with employers and Vocational Rehabilitation agencies to provide support and employment for youth and adults with disabilities.

8. Partner with K-12 education, higher education, career and technical education, and adult education to provide consistent rules and eliminate barriers to implementing training programs around the State.

9. Explore data sharing opportunities with non-governmental organizations that are committed partners to the state’s workforce center system that will lead to improved intake, referral, and case management for customers served by multiple agencies (both public and private). (Page 46) Title I

Allowable activities, referred to as vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, are those activities necessary to assist individuals with disabilities to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain gainful employment. An individualized plan for employment (IPE) is the foundation for all activities funded by Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS) for eligible individuals. Both the outcome goal and the services outlined on each individual’s IPE must be consistent with their respective strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, informed choice and economic self-sufficiency. VR services, as practicable, should likewise align with the resources of core partners, and other stakeholders to ensure that people with disabilities meet or exceed their IPE goals. In addition to VR counseling, IPE’s may include pre-employment transition and transition services, rehabilitation technology, training for careers that are in demand, post-secondary education, placement with employers, interpreters, accommodations needed for job placement or retaining employment, restorative medical services, positive behavior supports, internships, paid work experiences, and pre-apprenticeship training. (Page 62) Title I

ARS has plans to utilize statewide registered apprenticeship training providers to facilitate placement in registered apprenticeship and one provider has been approved as a vendor for this service. During FFY 2016, there were plans for six 40-hour pre-apprenticeship training classes to train 90 people with disabilities. However, this plan was altered based on availability of the pre-apprenticeship training providers. By the conclusion of FFY 2017, 42 VR consumers successfully completed pre-apprenticeship training. For the first class in FFY 2016, of the 19 successful completers, 14 achieved competitive integrated employment, 12 are employed in high skill, high demand careers, and two are actively searching for employment. There are plans for continued expansion of the use of pre-apprenticeship for VR clients in Arkansas. In the second quarter of FFY 2018, 100 students have registered for pre-apprenticeship training. (Page 72) Title I

In FFY 2017, ACTI partnered with CVS Health to develop a retail training program with externships at CVS Health’s pharmacies. The training is based on CVS’s needs for retail staff and pharmacy technicians.

The pre-apprenticeship training provided to ARS clients was funded by a grant provided through the Arkansas Department of Workforce Services.

Access and Accommodations received 108 referrals for assistive technology assessment with clients looking to participate in educational activities from field counselors this program year. Access and Accommodations also served 95 referrals for assistive technology education and consultation from public and private employers during the program year. These cases typically result in the acquisition and training on the use of specific assistive technology devices and accommodations. Access and Accommodations staff have collaborated with ICAN to provide training in the area of legal provisions of assistive technology, specifically focusing on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) including examples of device implementation to field staff with regards to education, transition, and employment. They have also provided training in these areas to outside community partners as well as public and private employers. (Page 241) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Strategy: DSB will work in conjunction with provider agencies to provide work appropriate skills and training to blind and low vision participants.

  • Performance Measure: DSB will refer participants to World Services for the Blind, Alpha Pointe, the Louisiana Center for the Blind, Sources, Goodwill and other providers as necessary for additional skills training, including, but not limited to soft skills and work readiness training to assist participants in improving their probability of securing competitive employment.

Strategy: DSB will provide detailed benefits counseling information to each participant on SSI and SSDI.

  • Performance Measure: DSB will refer 100% of clients, adults, students and youth on SSI and SSDI to the DSB benefits counselor for a one—on—one benefits analysis.
  • Performance Measure: Area Supervisors will monitor caseloads to ensure that VR Counselors are referring 100% of SSI and SSDI VR participants to the benefits counselor.
  • Performance Measure: Counselors will make participants aware of benefits counseling at the time of application, at the time of IPE’s, and at the time of closure. (Page 291) Title II

Strategy: VR Counselors will schedule and attend face-to-face job exploration meetings to interview human resource professionals regarding the types of jobs they have and the skills needed to do those jobs.
Strategy: VR Counselors will ensure that participants in job- ready status are actively seeking employment.
Strategy: DSB will encourage and support viable self-employment.
Strategy: DSB will work in conjunction with provider agencies to provide work appropriate skills and training to blind and low vision participants.
Strategy: DSB will provide detailed benefits counseling information to each participant on SSI and SSDI.
Strategy: DSB will continue to refer Older Individuals who are Blind and interested in employment to VR and will ensure that its OIB contractor will as well. (Page 299) Title II
 

Employer/ Business

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Data Collection

The most recent Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) for Arkansas was completed in December 2015. ARS contracted with Dan Hopkins & Associates, Inc. who worked collaboratively with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), key stakeholders and ARS to complete a CSNA of rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities in Arkansas. Multiple strategies to gather data and information were used including: (a) A focus group discussion with participants from ARS, SRC, key stakeholders, and vendors; (b) A structured survey of all ARS counselors; (c) A structured survey of a random sample of ARS consumers throughout Arkansas; (d) Focus groups of consumers; (e) An ACTI focus group of administrators and staff; (f) Interviews and surveys of the agency leadership; (g) Questionnaire and an abbreviated focus group with district managers; (h) Review of 2014 RSA 911 data; and (i) Review of data from the American Community Survey and 2014 Current Population Survey. (Page 207) Title II

511

~~ARS in collaboration with the SRC proposes to implement the following to fulfill its RSA requirement of allotting 50% of its supported employment funds to serve youth with disabilities:

ARS will attempt to identify early on youth with disabilities that can benefit from supported employment services. ARS recognizes that a number of individuals with disabilities served through the Promise Grant will be potential candidates for supported employment services and that as it develops an effective pre-employment transition program a number of individuals serviced will also benefit from supported employment services. Developing an effective referral system for individuals served through Promise and pre-employment transition will be a priority. ARS also recognizes that in some areas CRPs have established an arrangement with local school districts to provide services. ARS will make it a priority to work with local CRPs and local school districts to help identify and refer to ARS potential supported employment candidates. This will also be in line with ARS’s efforts to address Section 511 requirements. In addition, as ARS revises its MOU’s with Developmental Disabilities Services and Behavioral Health a priority will be established to include language addressing the provision of supported employment services to youth with disabilities.

With the effective implementation of the activities identified above and with additional guidance provided by the RSA Liaison, ARS and the SRC fully expect to meet the SE requirement.

ARS in collaboration with the SRC and in consultation with its RSA State Liaison proposes to implement the following strategies to address the requirements of Section 511. ARS will:

1. Revise its MOU with Developmental Disabilities to include how both agencies will develop policy/procedure to address clients effected or might potentially be effected by Section 511.
2. Revise its MOU with Behavioral Health to include how both agencies will develop policy/procedure to address clients effected or might potentially be effected by Section 511.
3. Revise its MOU with Special Education to include how both agencies will develop policy/procedure to address students effected or might potentially be effected by Section 511. The MOU will address the issue of referring students to CRPs for services while the student is still enrolled in school or referring the student to a CRP upon graduation as part of transition planning.
4. Work with Special Education to develop/provide training to special education teachers and special education supervisors regarding Section 511.  (Page 217) Title II

• ARS will continue assigning a rehabilitation counselor as a liaison to each CRP in each District.
• ARS district managers will assume a more active role with CRPs to develop more positive working relationships.
• ARS will train CRPs on the WIOA requirements for services to youth and students with disabilities as it relates to Section 511 Limitations on Sub-Minimum Wage. (Page 230) Title IV

Goal 6: Develop and improve Community Rehabilitation Programs.
• ARS will continue assigning a rehabilitation counselor as a liaison to each CRP in each District.
• ARS district managers will assume a more active role with CRPs to develop more positive working relationships.
• ARS will train CRPs on the WIOA requirements for services to youth and students with disabilities as it relates to Section 511 Limitations on Sub-Minimum Wage.
• ARS will initiate purchased service agreements focused on moving CRPs from fee for service to performance based outcomes payments. (Page 241) Title II

Transition in Regards to Section 511 -Section 511 of WIOA intends that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded an opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re-enter competitive integrated employment. The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education are working together to identify students that are blind and visually impaired that have been provided services in a sub-minimum wage setting. We are collaborating on plans to expand services to mutual consumers that includes a systematic approach to better identify consumers who could benefit from supported employment services (in an integrated setting, achieving at least the minimum wage) and are not receiving them at this time. A new Memorandum of Agreement is being developed through the team effort known as Vision Quest, which is an extension of Governor Asa Hutchinson’s Employment First Taskforce. Vision Quest includes the following agencies: The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education. The proposal includes provisions for use of joint agency resources to ensure quality service delivery and long term supports for supported employment. With the cooperation of the partner agencies DSB will contact blind and visually impaired individuals every 6 months who are in sub-minimum wage situations to provide career counseling and information and referral services, designed to promote opportunities for competitive integrated employment. (Page 265) Title II

A new Memorandum of Agreement is being developed through the team effort known as Vision Quest, which is an extension of Governor Asa Hutchinson’s Employment First Taskforce. Vision Quest includes the following agencies: The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education. The proposal includes provisions for use of joint agency resources to ensure quality service delivery and long term supports for supported employment. With the cooperation of the partner agencies DSB will contact blind and visually impaired individuals every 6 months who are in sub-minimum wage situations to provide career counseling and information and referral services, designed to promote opportunities for competitive integrated employment. DSB’s Director joined the other agencies Directors at the official signing of the MOU in the winter of 2018. DSB does not have any consumers employed in a 511 or less than minimum wage situation. (Page 267) Title II

DSB is working cooperatively with the Educational Services for the Visually Impaired, Department of Education, Special Education Teachers for the Visually Impaired, and local education areas to identify the technology needs, independent living needs, and educational training needs of identified students beginning at age 16 in the school system and through IPE meetings and planning meetings for those meeting the 504 regulations. Monthly meetings are held with our VR and Pre-ETS counselors and the school consultants to determine goals and objectives for students. Quarterly visits to schools are conducted to provide labor market information, university application and scholarship information, and technical school opportunities available within the key labor market sectors of the State. An updated agreement with the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education, regarding transition services to students who are blind or severely visually impaired, including Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ASBVI) was developed to address the Section 113 Pre-employment transition activities that are authorized under WIOA and the requirements of Section 511.This MOU was created in conjunction with the Arkansas Rehabilitation Service Agency. The agreement was signed. The interagency agreement outlined the roles and responsibilities, financial responsibility, determination of lead agency, and qualified personnel. DSB has reached out to each Local Education Area Supervisor in the school districts across the State and each high school across the State to give presentations/information on services available under pre-employment transition services. DSB has seven designated pre-employment transition services counselors that provide information to eligible and potentially eligible students with visual impairments both in large print and electronically through the school system. (Page 264) Title II

Transition in Regards to Section 511 -Section 511 of WIOA intends that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded an opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re-enter competitive integrated employment. The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education are working together to identify students that are blind and visually impaired that have been provided services in a sub-minimum wage setting. We are collaborating on plans to expand services to mutual consumers that includes a systematic approach to better identify consumers who could benefit from supported employment services (in an integrated setting, achieving at least the minimum wage) and are not receiving them at this time. A new Memorandum of Agreement is being developed through the team effort known as Vision Quest, which is an extension of Governor Asa Hutchinson’s Employment First Taskforce. Vision Quest includes the following agencies: The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education. The proposal includes provisions for use of joint agency resources to ensure quality service delivery and long term supports for supported employment. With the cooperation of the partner agencies DSB will contact blind and visually impaired individuals every 6 months who are in sub-minimum wage situations to provide career counseling and information and referral services, designed to promote opportunities for competitive integrated employment. (Page 265) Title II

As we move forward with WIOA and the emerging new Technical Assistance Centers, DSB is working with the WINTAC towards Job Driven practices/best practices, best practices in pre-employment transition services, addressing section 511 subminimum wage requirements, and performance accountability. DSB in combination with Arkansas General is working with the Transition Technical Assistance Center of the University of North Carolina to improve and strengthen the transition program. (Page 284) Title II
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The workforce center delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the workforce delivery system partners) will comply with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. The State ensures that Arkansas Workforce Center system complies with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 through the development and implementation of a Methods of Administration Policy that outlines all requirements of the system. Reviews are conducted annually to make sure that workforce centers meet requirements. Furthermore, training is offered at least annually to equal opportunity officers of the local workforce development boards. To demonstrate compliance with this provision, the one-stop center operators and the delivery system partners will collaborate to develop and provide periodic and new-hire staff training and system-wide support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. A rotating certification review team will be established, to provide scheduled evaluation, certification and recertification of the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities and to address any compliance issues that arise. (Pages 117- 118) Title II  

Access and Accommodations in collaboration with Increasing Capabilities Access Network will work with the Division of Services for the Blind to develop a certification review team for compliance of the one stop delivery system with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the ADA. (Page 226) Title IV

Vets

Arkansas’s policy for priority of service to veterans includes up to a 24 hour hold for new job orders placed in the AJL system. Local Veteran Employment Representative (LVER) staff has access to federal contractor job listings through VetCentral, which are fed into the AJL system. This access provides opportunities for priority referrals of target veterans to Federal contractors. After registration in VetCentral, the system provides automatic notifications to the veteran when a job opening occurs in their field. Services to veterans through the Gold Card Initiative are available at the Arkansas Workforce Centers (AWC). The Gold Card Initiative provides unemployed post-9/11 era veterans with the intensive and follow-up services they need to succeed in today’s job market. The Gold Card initiative is a joint effort of the Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration (ETA) and the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS). (Page 117) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. (Page 373) Title IV

Once significant barriers to employment are identified by Wagner-Peyser staff, veterans will be directed to the nearest DVOP for a comprehensive assessment and the development of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP), if necessary. DVOP staff providing intensive case management services will be required to use Arkansas JobLink (AJL) to record services, case notes, referrals, and follow-up services.

Arkansas LVER staff will advocate, on behalf of veterans, with businesses and industries. LVERs will perform the full range of employer outreach activities outlined in VPL 03-14, which are offered through the workforce system. Staff will report outreach activities, on a quarterly basis, in the Manager’s Quarterly Report. This includes the facilitation of employment, training, and placement services furnished to veterans through the state’s employment service. They are, but are not limited to:

 Planning and participating in job and career fairs;

 Conducting employer outreach;

 Conducting job search workshops, and establishing job search groups;

 Coordinating with unions, apprenticeships programs and business or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans;

 Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans;

 Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and  Coordinating and participating with other business outreach. (Page 375) Title II

Arkansas JobLink (AJL) is the state’s integrated web-based workforce development management information system (MIS) used by the state and local areas to share and manage participant data between the Wagner-Peyser program, the Trade Adjustment Assistance program and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act program. All staff has access to and can view all services provided to the veteran regardless of funding stream. By partnering with other state agencies, ADWS is maximizing its outreach potential. Efforts aimed at providing information about our services to veterans include promoting and attending local Job Fairs, and Hiring our Heroes and Women Veterans Summits events. All hiring events are advertised in the local paper and video streamed on public access media throughout the local AWC. We also seek the assistance of County Veteran Service Officers for those seeking employment. Arkansas is also exploring ways to better connect veterans seeking employment with Apprenticeship opportunities. We have strengthened our partnership with Registered Apprenticeship in recent years through collaboration with the Arkansas Apprenticeship Coalition in implementing the Arkansas Energy Sector Partnership grant. Through this collaboration, the state now has a mobile training center which is operated by the Arkansas Apprenticeship Coalition to provide “green” skills education to apprentices statewide. (Page 376) Title IV

Veterans and eligible persons with significant barriers to employment (SBE), economically or educationally disadvantaged, recently separated, homeless, including domestic violence and other dangerous or life threating conditions, offenders and veterans between the ages 18-24, identified in VPL04-14 as the target groups for services by Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists. The state will focus efforts to increase services and outreach to the target populations as identified in guidance. The State will take steps to ensure that veterans with significant barriers receive intensive services by DVOP specialists. During the initial assessment, if a veteran self-attest to meeting one or more of the SBE criteria, Arkansas Workforce Center (AWC) staff will refer the individual to a DVOP specialist for intensive case management services. (Page 377) Title IV

VPL 01-09 encourages that a DVOP specialist be out-stationed to serve as the Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) for Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment (VR&E) clients referred to AW Cs for job placement assistance. A physical presence at the facilities increases coordination with VR&E staff. The ISC refers VR&E clients to programs authorized under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), Vocational Rehabilitation under United States Code (38 U.S.C.), Chapter 31, and other federal and state programs that provide services and activities to assist the veteran in determining an employment or training plan, to include apprenticeship and on the job training (OJT) to enhance employment potential. (Page 378) Title IV

Mental Health

~~Department of Human Services The Department of Human Services (DHS) is Arkansas’s largest state agency, with more than 7,500 employees working to ensure citizens are healthy, safe and enjoying a high quality of life. The agency’s skilled and passionate staff cares for Arkansans of all ages. People needing support will find at least one local DHS office in each of the state’s 75 counties. Arkansans may apply for a vast array of services at their local county office as well as online. Services include ARKids First health insurance for children, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps), Transitional Employment Assistance (TEA) and Medicaid. Through a blend of federal and state Medicaid funds, DHS pays for 64 percent of the babies born in Arkansas each year and for the care of 69 percent of the state’s nursing home patients. Additionally, DHS protects children and the elderly who have been abused or neglected; finds adoptive homes for foster children; funds congregate and home-delivered meals for the elderly; regulates nursing homes and childcare facilities; supports high-quality early childhood education; treats and serves youth in the juvenile justice system; oversees services for blind Arkansans; runs residential facilities for people with developmental disabilities; manages the Arkansas State Hospital and Arkansas Health Center for those with acute behavioral health issues; and supports nonprofit, community and faith-based organizations that depend on volunteers to continue programs vital to our communities. The agency also works with a system of community mental health care centers to provide mental health services to nearly 74,000 people each year. In all, DHS serves more than 1.2 million Arkansans every year. To manage these services and programs efficiently, DHS has ten divisions and five support offices headquartered in Little Rock in addition to the 85 county offices. (Page 85-86) Title I

 (10) Whether the eligible provider’s activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways;
(11) Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;
(12) Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance; and
(13) Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs. (Page 159) Title II

Goal 9: Increase the efficiency and effectiveness of service delivery for agency consumers.
• ARS will ensure the development and implementation of comprehensive training for district managers and counselors to effectively serve consumers.
• ARS will adequately staff the field program to reduce caseloads and allow counselors to devote additional time to direct consumer contact and provision of services.
• ARS will examine the agency referral sources and ensure counselors are trained to provide effective services to consumers with mental health concerns and intellectual/developmental disabilities.
• ARS will increase the role of the rehab area manager in the areas of outreach and marketing at local levels statewide to cultivate positive working relationships with employers, partners, and stakeholders. In FFY 2017, ARS sent vocational rehabilitation counselors to ARA, AAMRC, and APSE conferences that provided training on mental health services to populations with disabilities.
In FFY 2017, ARS district managers were tasked to visit and provide an agency overview to all WIOA partners statewide. (Pages 245- 246) Title II

The strategy involves an increased focus on SE outcomes resulting in a competitive wage integrated employment that culminates in a career outcome in contrast to the traditional sheltered employment. Based on WIOA, ARS will update the interagency agreements with the state agencies serving individuals with the most significant disabilities including: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU) The agreement places an emphasis on competitive employment as a desirable outcome for individuals with the most significant disabilities including those with developmental disabilities and mental health diagnoses.

ARS is developing additional certification criteria for SE service providers. The criteria include updated requirements for certification and training for job coaches. ARS increased fee schedules and negotiated contracts for services with providers in an attempt to increase service providers, and incentives to service providers, to increase employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities. (Page 248) Title II

As part of DHS, DSB enjoys close working relationships with the DHS Division of Medical Services (DMS), which houses Medicaid; the DHS Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDS); and the DHS Division of Behavioral Health Services (BHS). DSB has cooperative agreements outlining responsibilities and the provision of services with the DDS and DBHS. A similar agreement is being formulated for the provision of services to State Medicaid recipients. DSB coordinates services with DBHS, DMS, and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. (Page 272- 273) Title II

The purpose of the employability assessment will be to determine the applicant’s abilities, talents, proficiencies/deficiencies, etc. The assessment is completed to determine the applicant’s ability to move into employment and may be done by an agency or organization other than DWS.

During the assessment, the DWS Workforce Specialist will present an orientation/overview of the program, gather pertinent information, and identify barriers that may prevent the applicant from becoming self-sufficient through employment. The DWS Workforce Specialist may also identify the following.
o Family situation/circumstances
o Employment history/work experience
o Educational attainment/ literacy level/functional educational level
o Skills
o Interests
o Supportive Service needs, if any.

NOTE: Participants who are identified as victims of domestic violence will be referred for appropriate services. Appropriate services may include but are not limited to:
Counseling, housing relocation assistance, referral to mental health, referral to prosecuting attorney and/or law enforcement and the DHS Division of Children and Family Services. The DWS Workforce Specialist will, where appropriate, use all available resources to help the victim of domestic violence receive timely/needed services. (Page 333) Title IV

Job search and job readiness is assistance in seeking or obtaining employment or the preparation for seeking or obtaining employment. Job search activities include making contact with potential employers, applying for vacancies, and interviewing for jobs. Job readiness activities include classes or workshops where participants can improve their employability skills. Participants learn techniques such as resume writing, workplace etiquette, interviewing, and life skills.

Job readiness activities also include substance abuse treatment, mental health treatment (including mental health treatment needed to address domestic violence), or rehabilitation activities for those who are otherwise employable.

Such treatment or therapy must be determined to be necessary and certified by a qualified medical or mental health professional or treatment provider. (Page 335) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

• ARS will rename its Retaining a Valued Employee (RaVE) program to Stay at Work/Return to Work (SAW/RTW). This language is consistent with programs/practices in private/public sector employment and communicates functional intent. • As part of the Governor’s Employment First Task Force, ARS will assume a lead role in the implementation of a SAW/RTW program within Arkansas state government. • ARS will work with WIOA partners at both the state and local level to support SAW/RTW efforts in both public and private sector employment. • ARS will sufficiently staff its Assistive Technology at Work (AT@Work) program to meet referral demands from the ARS Field Program and SAW/RTW initiative. Staff will have expertise to address accommodation needs in training and employment settings. (Page 232) Title II

In program year 2016, ARS Special Programs was renamed Access and Accommodations to better communicate the resources and services available within the division. The Retaining a Valued Employee (RaVE) program was also renamed to Stay at Work/Return to Work (SAW/RTW) to be consistent with language found within the public/private sector. Access and Accommodations as part of the Employment First Task Force, has worked with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and the Public Employee Claims Division (PECD) to develop an OPM sponsored training for state supervisors and HR staff in the area of SAW/RTW. This included the implementation of assistive technology and how to accommodate an employee with a disability in the workplace. In the third quarter of program year 2016 Access and Accommodations, Assistive Technology at Work (AT@Work) program added a new Occupational Therapist position to meet the increased demands for evaluation services from field staff and to assist employers and employees through evaluations and trainings with the SAW/RTW program. Access and Accommodations is still in the process of adding one more Occupational Therapy position to ensure all referrals are seen in a timely manner. (Page 244-245) Title II

Arkansas’ initial vision of “building on our history as an innovator in the delivery of human services, to develop a robust, statewide, job-driven, employment and training program that will produce a job-ready workforce able to meet the needs of Arkansas’ current employers, attract new industry, and build Arkansas’ economy” is more clear in that the FY18 AR E&T program will serve 37 of our 75 counties, and 75% of all the States work registrants. In previous years Arkansas had a USDA approved waiver from the SNAP Requirement To Work (RTW) provisions. The waiver was based on labor surplus estimates from the Department of Labor, however like many other States, the economy improved and unemployment rates decreased, and the areas available to be covered by the waiver have decreased or disappeared, and this was the case for Arkansas beginning January 1, 2016. This group will now be subject to the PRWORA sponsored participation limits of 3 full months of SNAP benefits in a fixed 36 month period unless they are exempt or complying with the requirements associated with the RTW. (Page 351) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 49

WIOA State Plan: Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities - 06/10/2019

~~"ARS will continue to pursue opportunities currently under development with CRPs around the state to provide pre-employment transition services and other transition services for students living with a disability. ARS will collaborate with employers by fostering integrated systems, coordinating services, and providing career pathways for adults and youth/students with disabilities. ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities.ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities. ACTI works directly with potential employers to provide internship sites for students nearing the completion of their training programs; all of whom have significant disabilities.".

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

State of Arkansas Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan 2016-2019 - 06/10/2019

• Train and equip workforce center staff in an ongoing learning process with the knowledge, skills, and motivation to provide superior service to job seekers, including those with disabilities, and businesses in an integrated, regionally focused framework of service delivery. Center staff are cross-trained, as appropriate, to increase staff capacity, expertise, and efficiency. Cross-training allows staff from differing programs to understand every program and to share their expertise about the needs of specific populations so that all staff can better serve all customers. Center staff are routinely trained and are keenly aware as to how their particular function supports and contributes to the overall vision of the local board

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) “About Us” - 06/07/2019

~~“The Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) was established through a memorandum of agreement between the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) and the UAMS Center for Distance Health (CDH) in cooperation with the Arkansas Spinal Cord Commission (ASCC). Through education and resource development initiatives, ATRP works to increase access to comprehensive, cutting-edge rehabilitation care and facilitate community reintegration for Arkansans who have sustained traumatic injuries.Vision Statement:

To enable every Arkansan who has sustained a disabling traumatic injury access to the comprehensive rehabilitation care he or she needs to seamlessly reintegrate into the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Special Education Process Guide - 04/19/2019

~~ “The Notice of Conference is used by the LEA to take steps to ensure that parent(s) are afforded the opportunity to participate in the special education process.  It is the district’s responsibility to provide parents with appropriate notice of a meeting, and use other methods to ensure parent participation in IEP meetings and other special education conferences.  More information about parameters of these meetings can be found by accessing the web-link."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

AR SB 522: To Create A Comprehensive Statewide Workforce Development System; To Coordinate Various Workforce Programs; To Amend the Duties of the Career Education and Workforce Development Board; and to Declare an Emergency. - 04/18/2019

“The General Assembly finds that:

(1) Occupational, technical, and industrial training provides unique opportunities to improve the lives of Arkansans while advancing the state's economic development;

(2) Businesses seeking to begin operations in Arkansas look to the level of education and skills in the workforce as a key factor in making investment decisions;

(3) Currently, Arkansas workforce education operates within a variety of agencies, without coordination, often with significant inefficiencies arising from overlapping and repeated programming and from important programs being overlooked as presumably covered by another program; and

(4) Bringing coordination of all state and federal career education and workforce development programs will:

(A) Reduce unnecessary duplication of programming;

(B) Ensure that every Arkansan who seeks occupational, 9 technical, and industrial training will find an appropriate education program 10 in the state;

(C) Bring consistency, efficiency, and rigor, as 12 established by applicable industry and accreditation standards to the state's 13 career education and workforce development efforts; and

(D) Alert industry to the commitment of the State of 15 Arkansas to economic development through career workforce education.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

SENATE BILL 101/ Act No. 874 Developmental Disabilities Services Appropriation - 04/11/2019

~~“The Division of Developmental Disabilities Services of the Department of Human Services is hereby authorized to provide employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities residing at the Human Development Centers who work at less than a competitive employment level.

The provisions of this section shall be in effect only from July 1,  2019 through June 30,  2020.”

Systems
  • Other

St. Bernards To Host Unique Training Program for Young Adults with Developmental Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~“In the fall of 2017 St. Bernards Healthcare welcomed 8 interns as part of the St. Bernards Project SEARCH internship program. St. Bernards partners with Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and ACCESS to help participants develop skills for competitive employment. Internships are housed within various departments throughout St. Bernards, including Engineering, Nutritional Services, Fitness Center, just to name a few. Interns take part in three ten-week internships at St. Bernards during the 9-month program. Upon completion of the program, Project SEARCH graduates receive follow-along services to assist them on the job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Arkansas Medicaid Certification Requirements for ARChoices HCBS Waiver Program - 12/01/2018

~All ARChoices Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver providers must meet the Provider Participation and enrollment requirements contained within Section 140.000 of this manual

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Living the Mission - 10/24/2018

~“DHS protects children and the elderly who have been abused or neglected; finds adoptive homes for foster children; funds congregate and home-delivered meals for the elderly; regulates nursing homes and childcare facilities; supports high-quality early childhood education; treats and serves youth in the juvenile justice system; oversees services for blind Arkansans; runs residential facilities for people with developmental disabilities; manages the Arkansas State Hospital and Arkansas Health Center for those with acute behavioral health issues; and supports nonprofit, community and faith-based organizations that depend on volunteers to continue programs vital to our communities.

The agency also works with a system of community mental health care centers to provide mental health services to nearly 74,000 people each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) - 07/26/2018

~“PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) is a new Medicaid program to address the needs of individuals who have intensive behavioral health and intellectual and developmental disabilities service needs.  The PASSE program is designed to help people not only connect to services from their doctors but also services in the community that those members might need. The goal is for the PASSE to help improve people’s health and let them take a more active role in their treatment.A case manager accesses services for you. But your care coordinator makes sure that services are delivered, that the services are monitored, and that any referrals you may need are made to the right providers.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

AR SB 522: To Create A Comprehensive Statewide Workforce Development System; To Coordinate Various Workforce Programs; To Amend the Duties of the Career Education and Workforce Development Board; and to Declare an Emergency. - 04/18/2019

“The General Assembly finds that:

(1) Occupational, technical, and industrial training provides unique opportunities to improve the lives of Arkansans while advancing the state's economic development;

(2) Businesses seeking to begin operations in Arkansas look to the level of education and skills in the workforce as a key factor in making investment decisions;

(3) Currently, Arkansas workforce education operates within a variety of agencies, without coordination, often with significant inefficiencies arising from overlapping and repeated programming and from important programs being overlooked as presumably covered by another program; and

(4) Bringing coordination of all state and federal career education and workforce development programs will:

(A) Reduce unnecessary duplication of programming;

(B) Ensure that every Arkansan who seeks occupational, 9 technical, and industrial training will find an appropriate education program 10 in the state;

(C) Bring consistency, efficiency, and rigor, as 12 established by applicable industry and accreditation standards to the state's 13 career education and workforce development efforts; and

(D) Alert industry to the commitment of the State of 15 Arkansas to economic development through career workforce education.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

SENATE BILL 101/ Act No. 874 Developmental Disabilities Services Appropriation - 04/11/2019

~~“The Division of Developmental Disabilities Services of the Department of Human Services is hereby authorized to provide employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities residing at the Human Development Centers who work at less than a competitive employment level.

The provisions of this section shall be in effect only from July 1,  2019 through June 30,  2020.”

Systems
  • Other

Arkansas HB 1706 - 02/27/2017

~~“20-77-2702. Legislative intent and purpose. 28(a) As the single state agency for administration of the medical 29 assistance programs established under Title XIX of the Social Security Act, 30 42 U.S.C. § 1396 et seq., and Title XXI of the Social Security Act, 42 U.S.C. 31 § 1397aa et seq., the Department of Human Services is authorized by federal 32 law to utilize one (1) or more organizations for providing healthcare 33 services to Medicaid beneficiary populations. (b) The purpose of this subchapter is to establish a Medicaid 35 provider-led organized care system that administers and delivers healthcare  services for a member of an enrollable Medicaid beneficiary population in 1 return for payment.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Citations

Arkansas ABLE HB 1239 - 04/08/2015

An act to create the Achieving a Better Life Experience [ABLE] program; to provide new avenues for financial self-sufficiency for Arkansans with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order (EO 10-17) Establishing the Arkansas Employment First Initiative - 10/21/2010

“State agencies are hereby directed to coordinate efforts to increase employment of Arkansans with disabilities. To that end, the Arkansas Department of Human Services shall convene an Employment First Task Force, which shall include representation of and input from agencies administering disability services, vocational rehabilitation, workforce services and education, as well as from consumer advocates and disability service providers. … State agencies, whose missions include service to individuals with disabilities, shall develop and implement Employment First policies and procedures that prioritize employment as the preferred service option for individuals with disabilities.”

 

 

 

   
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

WIOA State Plan: Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities - 06/10/2019

~~"ARS will continue to pursue opportunities currently under development with CRPs around the state to provide pre-employment transition services and other transition services for students living with a disability. ARS will collaborate with employers by fostering integrated systems, coordinating services, and providing career pathways for adults and youth/students with disabilities. ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities.ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities. ACTI works directly with potential employers to provide internship sites for students nearing the completion of their training programs; all of whom have significant disabilities.".

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

State of Arkansas Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan 2016-2019 - 06/10/2019

• Train and equip workforce center staff in an ongoing learning process with the knowledge, skills, and motivation to provide superior service to job seekers, including those with disabilities, and businesses in an integrated, regionally focused framework of service delivery. Center staff are cross-trained, as appropriate, to increase staff capacity, expertise, and efficiency. Cross-training allows staff from differing programs to understand every program and to share their expertise about the needs of specific populations so that all staff can better serve all customers. Center staff are routinely trained and are keenly aware as to how their particular function supports and contributes to the overall vision of the local board

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) “About Us” - 06/07/2019

~~“The Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) was established through a memorandum of agreement between the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) and the UAMS Center for Distance Health (CDH) in cooperation with the Arkansas Spinal Cord Commission (ASCC). Through education and resource development initiatives, ATRP works to increase access to comprehensive, cutting-edge rehabilitation care and facilitate community reintegration for Arkansans who have sustained traumatic injuries.Vision Statement:

To enable every Arkansan who has sustained a disabling traumatic injury access to the comprehensive rehabilitation care he or she needs to seamlessly reintegrate into the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Special Education Process Guide - 04/19/2019

~~ “The Notice of Conference is used by the LEA to take steps to ensure that parent(s) are afforded the opportunity to participate in the special education process.  It is the district’s responsibility to provide parents with appropriate notice of a meeting, and use other methods to ensure parent participation in IEP meetings and other special education conferences.  More information about parameters of these meetings can be found by accessing the web-link."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Living the Mission - 10/24/2018

~“DHS protects children and the elderly who have been abused or neglected; finds adoptive homes for foster children; funds congregate and home-delivered meals for the elderly; regulates nursing homes and childcare facilities; supports high-quality early childhood education; treats and serves youth in the juvenile justice system; oversees services for blind Arkansans; runs residential facilities for people with developmental disabilities; manages the Arkansas State Hospital and Arkansas Health Center for those with acute behavioral health issues; and supports nonprofit, community and faith-based organizations that depend on volunteers to continue programs vital to our communities.

The agency also works with a system of community mental health care centers to provide mental health services to nearly 74,000 people each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) - 07/26/2018

~“PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) is a new Medicaid program to address the needs of individuals who have intensive behavioral health and intellectual and developmental disabilities service needs.  The PASSE program is designed to help people not only connect to services from their doctors but also services in the community that those members might need. The goal is for the PASSE to help improve people’s health and let them take a more active role in their treatment.A case manager accesses services for you. But your care coordinator makes sure that services are delivered, that the services are monitored, and that any referrals you may need are made to the right providers.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WIOA State Plan for the State of Arkansas FY-2018 - 06/30/2018

~~ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, is receiving technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS),Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU).• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will initiate revised MOUs based on the WIOA, including new rates and reimbursement methodology for braiding services.• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will provide technical assistance to the pilot projects focused on transitioning from facility based services to community based services.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

Arkansas Department of Human Services "Workers with Disabilities" - 12/03/2017

~~“You must be at least 16 and less than 65 years of age. You must also have a significant disability expected to last at least 12 months or to result in death. Eligibility is determined using Social Security Disability guidelines. Unlike receiving Social Security benefits, you may work full-time and earn more than what is allowed under Social Security benefit guidelines (SGA limit). “

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program for Fiscal Year 2015 (submitted FY 2014) - 02/16/2017

~~“6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Arkansas Department of Career Education Transition Services - 12/07/2016

~Arkansas Rehabilitation Services works to provide opportunities for Rehabilitation counselors and schools to develop partnerships in an effort to prepare high school students with disabilities the knowledge, skills, and abilities to achieve successful transition from high school to post-secondary life.The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Transition Counselor works with students, teachers, principals, and other appointed school staff, as well as, families and community resources. Together they coordinate services and develop programs with the intent to improve and provide quality post-school outcomes through student engagement in Vocational Rehabilitation programs."

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

St. Bernards To Host Unique Training Program for Young Adults with Developmental Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~“In the fall of 2017 St. Bernards Healthcare welcomed 8 interns as part of the St. Bernards Project SEARCH internship program. St. Bernards partners with Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and ACCESS to help participants develop skills for competitive employment. Internships are housed within various departments throughout St. Bernards, including Engineering, Nutritional Services, Fitness Center, just to name a few. Interns take part in three ten-week internships at St. Bernards during the 9-month program. Upon completion of the program, Project SEARCH graduates receive follow-along services to assist them on the job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Students Helpful Tools - 06/20/2018

~~If you are a student with a disability, then you will have a transition plan within your Individualized Education Plan (IEP) by the time you turn 16 years old. It is very important that you are educated about what this plan is and that you are involved in creating YOUR transition plan. The transition plan details the goals that you would like to achieve after high school in the areas of work, education and possibly independent living. So when you become involved in transition planning process, you will be thinking about questions like: Where will I work? What will I do to earn money? Will I go to school, like college or a vocational training program? What will I study? Will I live on my own and handle all the tasks that go along with that, like budgeting, finance, cooking, and transportation?

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and University of Arkansas PROMISE Partnership - 01/25/2016

Arkansas Rehabilitation Services will focus heavily on transition services by providing job exploration counseling, work base learning experiences, post-secondary training, job readiness skills and self-advocacy,”... “ARS has built a strong relationship with the University of Arkansas, and the agency is very excited about the MOU with PROMISE and looks forward….to 2016.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas EF Task Force: Collaborations & Final Report

After the Governor signed Executive Order 10-17, the Department of Human Services convened the Employment First Task Force. The Task Force was comprised of representatives from state agencies, provider associations, and advocacy groups. The Task Force developed the following definition of “Employment First:”

Employment First means employment in the workforce at livable wages and benefits is the first and preferred option in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age Arkansans with disabilities, regardless of level of disability.

The Arkansas Employment First Task force endeavors to continue interagency collaboration as a permanent interagency work group is needed to promote collaboration on issues and sharing of information related to disability employment, including outreach and marketing, training, coordination of services, and reporting outcomes. This group will include representatives of State agencies, provider groups, advocacy groups, and the Social Security Administration.

 

The Final Report contained two recommendations related to interagency collaboration:   A permanent interagency work group is needed to promote collaboration on issues and sharing of information related to disability employment, including outreach and marketing, training, coordination of services, and reporting outcomes. This group will include representatives of State agencies, provider groups, advocacy groups, and the Social Security Administration. Explore strategies for sustaining the EmployAbility Project after its federal funding ends in 2012. The Project provides policy analysis, training, and outreach and facilitates interagency collaboration to improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities.      
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Arkansas Balancing Incentives Program - 06/01/2014

Arkansas has been granted $61.2 million in BIP funding. This funding will be used to provide new or enhanced infrastructure and systems that support HCBS to Arkansans; specifically, the state is exploring the development of health homes and the Community First Choice and 1915(i) options. These new systems and options will help the state balance its LTSS system and will provide Arkansans with additional opportunities to receive long-term services and supports in their homes and communities.

In Arkansas, five Divisions within the state’s Department of Human Services play a role in the publicly funded long-term care system: the Division of Medical Services; the Division of Aging and Adult Services; the Division of Developmental Disabilities Services; the Division of Behavioral Health Services; and the Division of County Operations. These divisions are committed to working collaboratively to implement the Balancing Incentive Program. (no mention specifically of employment)

 

 

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas Disability Employment Initiative - 10/14/2010

Project Description: The Arkansas Department of Workforce Services will build upon the success of their Disability Employment Navigator Initiative utilizing multiple models and strategies, including Integrated Resource Teams, customized employment, and Guideposts for Success. Their primary focus will be on integrating youth aged 14 to 24 into education and employment. Arkansas recognizes the coming shortages of a skilled labor force which they feel can be filled through engagement of youth with disabilities during their formative years with a view to long‐term economic self‐sufficiency. Arkansas will be establishing an Employment Network Outreach Specialist, in addition to Disability Resource Coordinators, to reach out‐of school and at‐risk youth as well as linking these youth to in‐depth benefit planning and work incentive information. Arkansas will incorporate individual assessment tools, such as Individual Educational/Employment Plans (IEPs), as part of career exploration and identification of educational and employment pathways. Integrated Resource Team approaches will include guidance counselors, career mentors, vocational rehabilitation specialists, community work incentives coordinators, parents/legal guardians, and others needed to assure individual success. Project design includes “real world” experience opportunities, such as summer youth employment under the Workforce Investment Act and job shadowing and mentoring from prospective employers and networking. Educational opportunities will also be explored and pursued according to the interests and skills of the youth.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Arkansas Promise

Arkansas PROMISE is part of a new program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and the Social Security Administration (SSA) to help youth who are receiving disability benefits and their families improve their educational and employment outcomes. This project is being implemented in 11 states. In Arkansas, the program is being administered by the Department of Education and the University of Arkansas, in partnership with several other state agencies and private organizations.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas Workbridge

The Workbridge program is a partnership between ASN and Arkansas Rehabilitation Services to provide individuals who have disabilities with intense preparation for the work and social skills necessary to succeed in today’s job market. The program consists of a combination of real work experience at Encore Kids, ASN’s children’s resale shop, as well as classroom-style training focused on the social aspects of employment. After the 70-day program, participants are supported by staff while applying for, accepting, and maintaining their jobs in the community. This ensures the success of our program and more importantly, the success of our graduates

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas SSA Ticket to Work Program

~~“Ticket to Work is a Social Security Administration (SSA) program designed to encourage individuals receiving SSI/SSDI recipients to find ways to return to work. ARS Ticket to Work information is facilitated through ARS’ local field offices. A vocational rehabilitation counselor may assign the ticket to the agency if the individual wants ARS services. The vocational rehabilitation counselor will provide support and guidance with the client’s desire to explore return-to-work strategies and may also refer individuals to other agencies for specialized assistance. For more information see the ARS District Map to contact the field office nearest you”

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arkansas Money Follows the Person

The Arkansas Money Follows the Person application has transitioned 773 individuals who have resided in institutions 90 consecutive days and one day on Medicaid into qualified home and community-based programs. The following populations residing in nursing homes and ICF-IDs will be served: Individuals with developmental disabilities; individuals 21 to 64 with physical disabilities; and individuals age 65+

 

 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

The Arkansas Developmental Disabilities Advocate Training Fund (DDATF) - 07/01/2018

~~“The Council staff administers this reimbursement program which provides funding for Arkansans with developmental disabilities, their family members, or their guardians to participate in professional or informational conferences, legislative advocacy skills training events, public forums, focus groups, hearings and other similar activities. This fund is designed to empower individuals with disabilities and their family members with the opportunities, experiences, resources and information they need to participate meaningfully in the decisions that are being made which affect their lives. This fund has a set total maximum amount available for use each fiscal year, and when that amount is expended funding will not be available until after the beginning of the next fiscal year. Other restrictions apply.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Arkansas Transition - 04/01/2018

~~“Arkansas Transition Services serves all 75 counties in Arkansas in an effort to improve transition outcomes for students with disabilities. Our mission is to effectively assist students with disabilities, educators, parents, agency personnel and community members in preparing students to transition from school to adult life and reach positive post-school outcomes. We provide technical assistance, trainings and consultations to special education teachers and other relevant staff, as well as to various agency personnel. Our services are provided at no cost.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arkansas Governor’s Developmental Disabilities Council's "Funded Projects" - 03/01/2017

~~“The Council is supporting a variety of projects in the 2017-2018 grant period to benefit Arkansans with I/DD and their families. These projects are taking place across the state, with programs in every Congressional District..

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arkansas Employment First Task Force Training Recommendations

The Final Report of the Employment First Task Force included a number of recommendations related to training, including:

Recommendation 1: Provide training on disability employment to State agency and provider agency staff.

State agencies should offer three levels of training on disability employment for their staff and provider agencies. Basic orientation should be required for staff of agencies serving people with disabilities, and could be offered online using video. Intermediate level training covering specific work incentives should be required for case managers and employment program staff. In-depth training on work incentives would be useful to persons who will actually provide work incentives counseling or work incentives training. Some State agencies may need in-house training capability on work incentives to meet the needs of their staff and providers.

 

Recommendation 19: Strengthen provider certification for employment services.

Provider certification needs to be strengthened for providers of various employment services. APSE, a national organization with focused on integrated employment and career advancement opportunities for individuals with disabilities, is developing national certification for employment specialists. ARS could use this certification process to upgrade standards for provider staff.

 

Recommendation 29. Train State agency supervisors

Develop mandatory EO 10-17 supervisory training curricula to expand training on the ADA and its amendments, and demonstrate how supervisors may access Clearinghouse information for recruiting, hiring, and maintaining qualified employees with disabilities.

Discussion: State agency supervisors and personnel officials need to have full knowledge of Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its amendments in order to recruit, employ, and accommodate employees with disabilities. This training would include such topics as ADA employment requirements, reasonable accommodation policies, and disability awareness and etiquette. The training will also cover basic work incentives information that enables individuals with disabilities to work and keep their disability benefits, especially health care coverage.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Arkansas Medicaid Certification Requirements for ARChoices HCBS Waiver Program - 12/01/2018

~All ARChoices Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver providers must meet the Provider Participation and enrollment requirements contained within Section 140.000 of this manual

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arkansas Waiver Association - 05/01/2018

~~“Welcome to the home of the Arkansas Waiver Association. We're an association of advocates, persons with developmental disabilities, their families and the professionals who work in the field. Our mission is straight forward:

To Promote Quality, Integrated Supports.

Our membership is built around those who are served by, or work with, Arkansas' Alternative Community Services Home and Community Based Medicaid Waiver. We seek to improve the quality of life of those with a developmental disability, and their families, through active advocacy, open communications, and an exchange of professional ideas. Together, we shall make a difference.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

"Arkansas Works" (Project Number 11-W-00287/6) - 03/05/2018

~~“Approval of this demonstration amendment allows Arkansas, no sooner than June 1, 2018, to require all Arkansas Works beneficiaries ages 19 through 49, with certain exceptions, to participate in and timely document and report 80 hours per month of community engagement activities, such as employment, education, job skills training, or community service, as a condition of continued Medicaid eligibility. Community engagement requirements will not apply to Arkansas Works beneficiaries ages 50 and older so as to ensure alignment and consistency with the state's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) requirements. Thealignment is appropriate and consistent with the ultimate objective of improving health and well-being for Medicaid beneficiaries.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for 1915(C) Home and Community Based Services Waiver - 08/21/2017

~~“Community and Employment Support WaiverWaiver Number: AR.0188Original BSE Waiver Number: AR.0188Amendment Number: AR.0188.R05.02Proposed Effective Date: 8/21/17Approved Effective Date: 08/22/17Approved Effective Date of Waiver being Amended: 09/01/16The purpose of the Community and Employment Support Waiver is to support individuals of all ages who have a developmental disability, meat ICF level of care and require waiver support services to live in the community and prevent institutionalization.The goals of HCBS waiver are to support beneficiaries in all major life activities, promote community inclusion through integrated employment options and community experiences, and provide comprehensive care coordination the 1915(b) Waiver Program” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FFY 2018-2019 Combined Substance Abuse and Mental Health Block Grant Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Application - 07/31/2017

~~“Objective: Partner with the Division of Medical Services (DMS), the State Medicaid Agency in Arkansas and a sister division within the Arkansas Department of Human Services (DHS), to continue working to transform the Medicaid funded behavioral health system through the implementation of support services and care coordination  The transformation involves DBHS staff participation at the front end and will affect the Division’s business practices, contracts and populations in the coming years. DBHS staff will work closely with Medicaid to develop and implement population-based care delivery standards and to implement recovery oriented services in a community setting through a State Plan Amendment to introduce new services and provider led care coordination….Include Recovery Support Services as a Medicaid funded service, which includes Supported Housing, Life Skills Development and Supported Employment. “ 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arkansas Money Follows the Person - 07/28/2017

~~The Arkansas Money Follows the Person application has transitioned 477 individuals who have resided in institutions 90 consecutive days and one day on Medicaid into qualified home and community-based programs. The following populations residing in nursing homes and and (Intermediate Care Facility for the Intellectually Disabled) ICF/IDs will be served: Individuals with developmental or intellectual disabilities, individuals 19 to 64 with physical disabilities; and individuals age 65+.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arkansas Current HCBS Transition Plan - 07/29/2016

You can now see the latest HCBS transition plan that DHS is submitting to CMS. Public Comment opens on 8/15/16 after they receive feedback from CMS. Public comment ends on 9/15/16. Please see the full transition plan, as currently written

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arkansas Medicaid State Plan Amendments - 01/01/2016

AR-15-011 This state plan amendment makes corrections to the citations and page format for PACE pages of the State Plan, per companion letter with SPA #15-0007 that adjusted rates for personal care services

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS 1915c Technical Guide - 01/01/2015

“These instructions provide information to assist states in completing the Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, including changes implemented through November 2014…This guidance is intended to improve understanding of applicable Federal policies and their implications for the design and operation of a HCBS waiver.” The guidance includes service definitions on supported employment, customized employment and other services and resources for people with disabilities seeking employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Medicaid Balancing Incentives - 07/28/2013

Arkansas has been granted $61.2 million in BIP funding. This funding will be used to provide new or enhanced infrastructure and systems that support HCBS to Arkansans; specifically, the state is exploring the development of health homes and the Community First Choice and 1915(i) options. These new systems and options will help the state balance its LTSS system and will provide Arkansans with additional opportunities to receive long-term services and supports in their homes and communities. In Arkansas, five Divisions within the state’s Department of Human Services play an important role in the publicly funded long-term care system: the Division of Medical Services; the Division of Aging & Adult Services; the Division of Developmental Disabilities Services; the Division of Behavioral Health Services; and the Division of County Operations. These divisions are committed to working collaboratively to implement the Balancing Incentive Program. (no mention specifically of employment).

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The Natural State of Arkansas celebrates that disability is a natural part of life, and should not limit the career opportunities for hard workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Arkansa VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.32%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,013,825
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-6.16%
Change from
2017 to 2018
268,473
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.21%
Change from
2017 to 2018
86,243
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.95%
Change from
2017 to 2018
32.12%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.2%
Change from
2017 to 2018
75.74%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 3,013,825
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 268,473
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 86,243
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,135,234
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 32.12%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.74%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 258,641
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 264,913
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 413,928
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 77,710
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 17,680
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,000
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 3,510
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 384
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 16,882
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,140

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,186
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 134,780

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,431
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 23,842
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 36,610
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 23.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 309
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 902
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 195
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 0

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,821
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 15
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 11
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 73.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.37

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,159
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 198,990
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 0.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 53.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.15%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.14%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). N/A
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 10.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 50.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 54.89%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 39.66%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 498,055
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,122
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 83,194
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 188,231
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 271,425
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 335
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 375
AbilityOne wages (products). $772,656
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,001,227

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 29
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 32
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,860
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 384
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,244

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~ARS and representatives from CRPs developed and implemented standard procedures for the referral process and outcome indicators resulting in a fee for service schedule for individuals served by CRPs.

ARS’ standard procedures for external Employment First private non-profit and public VR service providers and CRPs are standards of compliance ensuring VR consumers achieve acceptable outcomes related to employment. The procedures for a CRP to be accredited as a vendor and to maintain accreditation are: 

(1) The CRP submits a vendor application documenting required experience in working with consumers with disabilities and employers.

(2) ARS reviews the application to assure ARS requirements are met, and submits a certificate and agreement documents to the ARS Commissioner for signature.

(3) The CRP is required to sign certification agreement documents assuring the ARS requirements as a vendor will be met.

(4) Once accredited, ARS provides a current vendor packet and provides training to the entity, as needed. ARS informs the ARS district manager and the VR counselors of the vendor.

(5) The VR counselor refers the consumer to the CRP and monitors the consumer’s progress.

(6) A VR counselor liaison is assigned to each CRP and provides monthly reports to the appropriate ARS personnel.

(7) ARS case review personnel from Program Planning, Development and Evaluation perform a standardized audit of CRP consumer files to ensure training criteria is met, the CRP demonstrates acceptable consumer progress/plans, appropriate documents are in the file, and the amount billed meets accepted guidelines of cost to value. CRP personnel files are reviewed to assure performance standards are acceptable and staff training requirements are met. (Page186-187) Title II

ARS maintains written cooperative agreements with private non-profit and for profit agencies in the state that provide supported employment (SE) services and extended services to ARS consumers with the most significant disabilities. The service providers commit to funding extended services for as long as the consumers remain employed on the original job.

ARS will continue to work with the Department of Human Services agencies to recruit Developmental Disabilities Centers, Behavioral Health Centers, and other related programs serving individuals with the most significant disabilities to seek certification to provide SE services. ARS will create new agreements based on technical assistance received from RSA; in consultation with the Arkansas State Rehabilitation Council and the Department of Labor, Office of Department of Employment Services experts in Employment First and WIOA. (Page187) Title II

ARS serves on the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, AR Employment First State Leadership team with the Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), University of Arkansas PROMISE Grant, and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU). The team in consultation with both the Arkansas State Rehabilitation Council and the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) State Liaison will be updating the current interagency agreements to fund braided services and apply for combined waiver programs related to opportunities where individuals participated in employment related activities under WIOA. (Page 193) Title II

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, is receiving technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU).

• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will initiate revised MOUs based on the WIOA, including new rates and reimbursement methodology for braiding services.
• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, will provide technical assistance to the pilot projects focused on transitioning from facility based services to community based services. (Page 227) Title II

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, the Arkansas SRC and the RSA State Liaison, will establish technical assistance guidelines focused on CRPs transitioning from facility based services to community based services.

• ARS and ACTI administrators will review the current and future role and function of ACTI in the provision of services designed to assist in meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. (Page 231) Title II

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, is receiving technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU). (Page 234- 235) Title I

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program team, continues to receive technical assistance from the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy subject matter experts on methods to use Medicaid Waivers and other partners’ funds in restructuring to expand and improve SE services. The team includes: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU).

ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, is revising MOUs based on the WIOA, including new rates and a reimbursement methodology.
ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, is providing technical assistance to the pilot projects focused on transitioning from facility based services to community based services. (Page 235) Title II

• ARS, in partnership with the AR Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, the Arkansas SRC and the RSA State Liaison, will establish technical assistance guidelines focused on CRPs transitioning from facility based services to community based services.
• ARS and ACTI administrators will review the current and future role and function of ACTI in the provision of services designed to assist in meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. (Page 241) Title II

ARS will train staff on the new services and standards for Community Rehabilitation Programs beginning July 1, 2016.
• ARS will train staff to increase awareness related to Employment First (E1st) Provider Transformation and Integrated Community Based Services as it relates to Community Rehabilitation Programs, Supported Employment Programs, and External Job Placement vendors. (Page 243) Title II

Another purchased service agreement is in place with SE service vendors to implement strategies to expand the SE system including job placement services and extended services. Strategies include increasing the number of vendors offering SE and job placement statewide through enhanced incentives; utilizing a performance based approach with CRPs and SE providers; revised CRP fee schedules; and commitment from partnering state agencies to emphasize employment as a high priority outcome as a result of the Governor’s Executive Order Employment First Initiative for People with Disabilities. (Page 249) Title II

DSB maintains an active presence on numerous councils and committees, including: Arkansas Interagency Transition Partnership, Arkansas Workforce Development Board, Interagency Steering Committee on Integrated Employment, Behavioral Health Planning and Advisory Council, The Arkansas Independent Living Council, Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) The Governor’s Commission on People with Disabilities, Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, Youth Leadership Forum, Accessible Parking Taskforce, Local Workforce Development Boards across the state. (Page 262) Title II

                                                

Customized Employment

~~ARS will maximize the ability of individuals with most significant disabilities to achieve competitive employment through customized employment, supported employment, and other individualized services.

ARS will collaborate with WIOA partners, private funding, and other state agencies to help individuals with most significant disabilities to receive extended services to increase employability in an integrated environment.

Based on the success rate for competitive employment outcomes in the inaugural Project SEARCH initiative, ARS in collaboration with ACCESS Group, Inc., other community partners, and Project SEARCH International will expand the Arkansas Project SEARCH. (Page 221) Title II

Each of the SE services providers: World Services for the Blind, Easter Seals, Job Connections, and Goodwill Industries, will be responsible for extended services.

Supported employment is integrated competitive employment, or an individual working in an integrated employment setting towards integrated competitive employment. This includes customized employment. The standard post-employment extended service support service under supported employment is 24 months.

Focus of Supported Employment on Youth: Half of the money that Arkansas receives under the supported employment state grant will be used to support youth with the most significant blindness and low vision needs (up to age 24), and these youth may receive extended services (i.e., ongoing supports to maintain an individual in supported employment) for up to 4 years. (Page 270) Title II

DSB uses several vendors to provide comprehensive supported employment services to youth and adults identified as blind or visually impaired. The services begin with identifying blindness skills, addressing psychological and social needs, and then moving on to skills training, placement and job coaching.

Supported employment is integrated competitive employment, or an individual working in an integrated employment setting working towards integrated competitive employment. This includes customized employment. The standard post-employment extended support service under supported employment is 24 months. (Page 298) Title II

Supported employment is integrated competitive employment, or an individual working in an integrated employment setting towards integrated competitive employment. This includes customized employment. The standard post-employment extended support service under supported employment is 24 months. Focus of Supported Employment on Youth: Half of the funds that Arkansas receives under the supported employment state grant will be used to support youth with the most significant blindness and low vision needs (up to age 24), and these youth may receive extended services (i.e., ongoing supports to maintain an individual in supported employment) for up to 4 years. DSB is developing an agreement with CRPs and Medicaid through the Division of Medical Services and with the Division of Development Disabilities to share the cost of extended services in supported employment. (Page 299) Title II
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~To best align services and resources, core and optional programs will develop joint policies and initiatives that spur collaboration, braiding of resources, and support the inclusion of key stakeholders in development and implementation. In order to continue to be inclusive of other programs and align with all workforce development resources in Arkansas, it is imperative that the work of the WIOA Roundtable continue and transition from an implementation body to a coordination and continuous improvement body. By doing so, we set ourselves up to more efficiently bring in other federal, state, and private or non-profit resources to the benefit of our citizens. By utilizing this design, the WIOA Roundtable can approach additional partner programs with a united front.  (Page 63) Title I

ARS commits to driving innovation and expansion of activities directly provided or facilitated by the agency that lead to competitive integrated employment while harnessing the unique talents and abilities of the people we serve.

ARS will invest in innovative services and programming tied to industry sectors with projected short and long term growth. ARS leadership will focus its efforts on expanding programing and services that lead to increases in the performance accountability measures. This includes opportunities to better collaborate with other core programs and to forge mutually beneficial partnerships with business and industry partners.

Another high priority for ARS is efficiency. The driving forces are leveraging resources through committed partnerships and maximizing the results of each dollar spent to serve people with disabilities. (Page 233) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~DSB works in conjunction with the Arkansas Education Services for the Visually Impaired (ESVI) and the Department of Education, Special Education Division to identify blind and visually impaired students. Most recently, DSB has expanded its outreach effort to include private schools, alternative schools, and accredited online high school systems. DSB is improving and expanding efforts by offering seminars and in person talks to these educational organizations to inform teachers, parents, and students of the services that are available. DSB offers Parent Summits to provide coordinated efforts to allow students and parents to learn about the options in blindness skills training, education, and employment services. DSB continues to provide a three—week transition learning experience for up to 22 students from across the state, which includes paid work experiences, lessons in self advocacy, peer mentoring, financial literacy, independent living skills, career counseling, and planning for the future; the students are housed at Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired and go home on weekends. DSB intends to expand this program throughout the State to offer students and youth an opportunity to receive services closer to the communities in which they live. DSB is also working to offer work experience training, soft skills training, career counseling, and advocacy skills to pre—employment transition students throughout the State. Page (302) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~Allowable activities, referred to as vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, are those activities necessary to assist individuals with disabilities to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain gainful employment. An individualized plan for employment (IPE) is the foundation for all activities funded by Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS) for eligible individuals. Both the outcome goal and the services outlined on each individual’s IPE must be consistent with their respective strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, informed choice and economic self-sufficiency. VR services, as practicable, should likewise align with the resources of core partners, and other stakeholders to ensure that people with disabilities meet or exceed their IPE goals. In addition to VR counseling, IPE’s may include pre-employment transition and transition services, rehabilitation technology, training for careers that are in demand, post-secondary education, placement with employers, interpreters, accommodations needed for job placement or retaining employment, restorative medical services, positive behavior supports, internships, paid work experiences, and pre-apprenticeship training. (Page 62) Title I

Goal Met: Case reviews showed no students were graduating without current IPE’s.
Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits around the state to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings. (Page 101) Title II

ARS assigns VR counselor liaisons to each high school statewide. VR counselors work collaboratively with combined plan partners.
ARS will set aside 15 percent of federal VR program funding to provide pre-employment transition services such as job exploration counseling, and work-based learning experiences including internships in integrated environments. ARS will provide counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, will provide workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living skills, and will provide instruction in self-advocacy and peer mentoring.  (Page 179) Title II

Pre-ETS services include five core areas: Job exploration counseling: these are services to assist the student in exploring the world or work and learning more about their interests, abilities and future career goals. Work-based learning experiences, (which may include in-school or after school opportunities, experience outside the traditional school setting including internships, that are provided in an integrated environment) Counseling on opportunities in comprehensive transition or enrollment in postsecondary educational programs, Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, Instruction in self-advocacy/peer mentoring. In order to reach these goals DSB is ensuring our Pre-ETS transition counselors have a strong relationship with the local school districts and the local Work Force Development Boards. Summer work experiences, work place readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and other work based learning experiences have been implemented and will continue to expand as the population of high school students we serve increases. (Page 265) Title II

Pre-ETS services include: Job exploration counseling, Work-based learning experiences, (which may include in-school or after school opportunities, experience outside the traditional school setting including internships, that are provided in an integrated environment), Counseling on opportunities in comprehensive transition or enrollment in postsecondary educational programs, Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, Instruction in self-advocacy/peer mentoring.

In order to reach these goals, DSB is ensuring our seven Pre-ETS transition counselors have a strong relationship with the local school districts and the local Work Force Development Boards. Summer work experiences, work place readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and other work based learning experiences have been implemented and will continue to expand as the population of high school students we serve increases. (Page 266) Title II

Transition students/youth may be determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation within 60 days after application and the Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) will be completed within 90 days after eligibility. (Page 179) Title II

7. ARS will work with colleges and universities within the state that train special educators and VR Counselors to include in their curriculum information on pre-employment transition.
8. ARS realizes providing pre-employment services to all Arkansas students with IEPs or 504 plans may require utilization of outside resources. ARS proposes to develop and issue a request for qualifications to determine potential outside providers of pre-employment transition services. It envisions the provider list of eligible programs might include CRPs or even educational cooperatives. (Page 181) Title II

ARS counselors in students IEP meetings with authorization by parents or guardians and student knowledge, will communicate regularly with ARS counselors, and will provide ARS with copies of school records.

ARS will ensure each student with a significant disability enrolled in a vocational education program receives an interest assessment, and identifies capabilities. ARS will provide accommodations as needed to ensure successful completion of the vocational education program for VR eligible youth in accordance with their respective IPEs; unless these accommodations are the responsibility of the LEA pursuant to FAPE regulations. ARS will provide technical assistance to local education agencies to ensure equal educational opportunities including full opportunity to participate in programs, to ensure activities and job opportunities are provided to all youth and students, and to analyze, identify, and change policies and activities that impede the achievement of equal opportunities for all individuals. (Page 183) Title II

2. School districts have the primary planning, programmatic, and financial responsibilities for the provision of education transition services and related services for students as a component of a free appropriate public education (FAPE) and these services are provided to eligible students with disabilities, ages 16 to 21, and younger when determined appropriate through the implementation of the Individualized Education Program (IEP). The parties acknowledge that the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit has general supervisory responsibility over the educational program of any public agency providing FAPE to individuals with disabilities, ages birth to 21, as defined in state and federal statutes. (Page 183) Title II

Outreach efforts include, but are not limited to, attendance at IEP and transition planning meetings, career fairs, back to school nights, group orientations, transition fairs, and presentations coordinated throughout the year. The process includes:
1. Transition counselors to identify and outreach to all students with disabilities to make available the five required pre-employment transition services. (Page 184) Title II

ARS will work with schools to assist the student in identifying and selecting vocational programming that will enhance a student’s ability to pursue appropriate career objectives. ARS counselors will provide information to schools about VR services, meet with special education teachers during the school year, and ensure schools have appropriate forms and information for students to apply for services.

In addition, ARS has a Transition Manager and Vocational Education Coordinator that will assist with managing transition services as an agency, and will also ensure services are appropriate and efficient for the clients, schools, and partnerships. Additionally, the transition manager will work directly with the schools and community partners to provide education on Pre-Employment Transition services and Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act. Furthermore, the agency will be providing detailed information about pre-employment transition services for students with an IEP and 504 plans. (Page 185) Title II

2. Documentation from the appropriate school personnel responsible for the provision of transition services to the VR counselor of the receipt of transition services under IDEA. This documentation must be provided to the VR counselor when a case is opened and may include a copy of the IEP and progress reports on transition services received.
3. Documentation of the application for VR services, with the result that the student was either determined ineligible for VR services or determined eligible and had an approved individualized plan for employment, but was unable to achieve the employment outcome, and the case was closed.
4. Documentation from VR of receipt of career counseling, and information and referral to other federal and/or state programs. This is completed using ARS Transition Section 511 SMW-2 form Career Counseling, Information and Referral, Student/Youth Services. (Page 188) Title II

5. ARS will revise its MOU with Special Education to include pre-employment transition. As part of the MOU, ARS will request Special Education’s assistance in gaining access to all students in the state age 14 an older who have an IEP or 504 plan.
6. ARS will work with Special Education to develop/provide training to special education teachers and special education supervisors on pre-employment transition. (Page 189) Title II

8. ARS realizes providing pre-employment services to all Arkansas students with IEPs or 504 plans may require utilization of outside resources. ARS proposes to develop and issue a request for qualifications to determine potential outside providers of pre-employment transition services. It envisions the provider list of eligible programs might include CRPs or even educational cooperatives. (Page 218) Title II

Secondary schools invite DSB to Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings to be part of the planning team to assist education agencies in preparing students who are blind or severely visually impaired for transition from school to post-school activities, such as employment, training, supported employment, and other VR services. The IEP outlines the roles and responsibilities of DSB, the student, the school, and any other agency/organization involved in providing transition services. (Page 263) Title II

DSB counselors assist participants in developing Individual Plans for Employment (IPE’s) at age 16. The IPE is developed no later than 90 days after eligibility is determined. DSB works to develop IPEs at age 16 and every year until the student transitions out of high school. Secondary schools invite DSB to Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings to be part of the planning team to assist education agencies in preparing students who are blind or severely visually impaired for transition from school to post-school activities, such as employment, training, supported employment, and other VR services. DSB conducts independent living, technology and vocational assessments after the determination of eligibility in order to address planning needs. This information is shared with the education staff in determining career goals and objectives. DSB will provide accommodations according to the IPE that are not the responsibility of the LEA pursuant to FAPE regulations. Peer support and mentoring is arranged for the duration of transition services. The IEP and the IPE outline the roles and responsibilities of DSB, the student, the school, and any other agency/organization involved in providing transition services. Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) DSB is working cooperatively with the Educational Services for the Visually Impaired, Department of Education, Special Education Teachers for the Visually Impaired, and local education areas to coordinate Pre-Employment Transition Services. New federal mandates require that DSB, in collaboration with local educational agencies, offer to transition age high school students with disabilities (ages 16-Graduation) Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) using 15% of our federal allocation on an annual basis. (Page 266) Title II

VR services delivered under WIOA do not remove, reduce, or change the school district’s responsibility to deliver a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) for students served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. VR services supplement, but do not supplant services delivered through the school districts.

Roles and Responsibilities The roles and responsibilities for each partner agency as required by federal and state regulations are as follows:

1. Local education agencies provide a Free and Appropriate Public Education for students with visual impairment and those with low or no vision, including preparation for transition from school to work or other postsecondary activities.

2. DSB and the Department of Education, Special Education, ESVI and Teachers for the Visually Impaired assist with student transition from secondary school to work through postsecondary training, education, or direct placement services necessary to achieve a successful employment outcome. The Division of Services for the Blind and the Department of Education, Special Education share the financial responsibility of ensuring that the provision of pre-employment transition services are planned and implemented within the school system.

3. The Division of Development Disabilities Services in collaboration with the Division of Services for the Blind and the Department of Education, Special Education work to reduce the number of sheltered workshop placements by promoting competitive employment in an integrated setting to all low vision and blind participants. In order to promote independence and self-sufficiency, the agency shall provide support and services, within available resources, to assist customers enrolled in Medicaid waivers who choose to pursue gainful employment.

Financial Responsibilities DSB and the Department of Education, Special Education, ARS, and the Division of Developmental Disabilities Services are committed to meeting financial responsibilities as required by law. Agency/Division heads for the organizations will periodically identify areas for improved programmatic and financial efficiencies and develop strategies to meet financial responsibilities, including joint appropriations requests from the state legislature and negotiations with federal agencies. Each party is financially responsible for the services it provides under its own laws and rules. (Pages 267-268) Title II

DSB has begun work with Arkansas Workforce Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education to plan and develop pre-employment transition services and to coordinate services for individuals being served dually and under the PROMISE grant. The Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education staff provide training and information on transition services to vocational rehabilitation and workforce services staff. In turn, vocational rehabilitation staff, both DSB and ARS train and collaborate with Education and Workforce to provide training on how to establish work based learning experiences, providing job exploration counseling and counseling on opportunities in enrollment in post-secondary counseling, as well as cross training on instructional models in supported employment. Our agencies work together towards utilizing best practices on Section 101, IDEA, ADA and the Individual Education Plan (IEP). DSB’s transition coordinator participates in monthly meetings with ESVI staff and teachers for the visually impaired. (Page 285-286) Title II

Strategy: DSB will update the collaborative database of transition students as needed.

Performance Measure: Counselors/Rehabilitation Assistants will coordinate with Local Education Area (LEA) Supervisors to maintain lists of where transition students are located.

Strategy: VR Counselors will continue to track transition students on their caseloads to insure that the IPE is developed or updated before a student graduates from high school.

Performance Measure: Area Supervisors will monitor this during case reviews to insure that no transition student will graduate without a current IPE.

Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings.

Performance Measure: Annually, DSB will invite ESVI Regional Certified Vision Consultants and transition parents to a Parent Summit with VR Counselors to provide information about assistive technology; rights and responsibilities; available resources and services; benefits counseling; and funding for college and career start—up costs. (Page 292-293) Title II

Strategy: DSB will maintain a database of transition students.
Strategy: VR Counselors will continue to track transition students on their caseloads to insure that the IPE is developed or updated before a student graduates from high school.
Strategy: VR Counselors will make face-to-face visits to LEA Supervisors in their territories.
Strategy: DSB will continue to provide assessments and services to transition students specifically focused on activities of daily living, including but not limited to, mobility, knowledge of available transportation resources, self—advocacy, acquisition of a variety of reading options, awareness of job opportunities, benefits counseling, and rights and responsibilities as an informed participant. (Page 300) Title II

2 Year Update - DSB has 7 Pre-ETS Counselors working with the youth 16 to graduation. Each counselor maintains their own caseload. Reports are generated from the AWARE database to assist the Field Services Administrator, Transition Coordinator and counselors maintain the cases.
Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits around the state to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings. Performance Measure: In FY 2015, DSB will invite ESVI Regional Certified Vision Consultants and transition parents to Parent Summits with VR Counselors and Rehabilitation Teachers, to provide information about students’ rights and accommodations. Goal Met: Parent Summits were held in West Memphis and Harrison for transition students and their families from throughout the state. ESVI was included on the agenda. The information provided included IEP’s, but topics extended beyond high school and into college services. The success of the summit confirmed that additional summits will be held around the state in coming years. (Page 309) Title II
 

Career Pathways

~~On-the-job training (OJT) is training in the public or private sector that is given to a paid employee while he or she is engaged in productive work and that provides knowledge and skills essential to the full and adequate performance of the job. On-the-job training differs from subsidized employment in that the OJT employer receives a subsidy to help with costs associated with training. “Supported work” for individuals with disabilities is considered OJT if onsite training is included. (Page 335) Title IV

Apprenticeship

6. Increase the utilization of Registered Apprenticeship programs as viable talent development opportunities.

7. Increase connections with employers and Vocational Rehabilitation agencies to provide support and employment for youth and adults with disabilities.

8. Partner with K-12 education, higher education, career and technical education, and adult education to provide consistent rules and eliminate barriers to implementing training programs around the State.

9. Explore data sharing opportunities with non-governmental organizations that are committed partners to the state’s workforce center system that will lead to improved intake, referral, and case management for customers served by multiple agencies (both public and private). (Page 46) Title I

Allowable activities, referred to as vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, are those activities necessary to assist individuals with disabilities to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain gainful employment. An individualized plan for employment (IPE) is the foundation for all activities funded by Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS) for eligible individuals. Both the outcome goal and the services outlined on each individual’s IPE must be consistent with their respective strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, informed choice and economic self-sufficiency. VR services, as practicable, should likewise align with the resources of core partners, and other stakeholders to ensure that people with disabilities meet or exceed their IPE goals. In addition to VR counseling, IPE’s may include pre-employment transition and transition services, rehabilitation technology, training for careers that are in demand, post-secondary education, placement with employers, interpreters, accommodations needed for job placement or retaining employment, restorative medical services, positive behavior supports, internships, paid work experiences, and pre-apprenticeship training. (Page 62) Title I

ARS has plans to utilize statewide registered apprenticeship training providers to facilitate placement in registered apprenticeship and one provider has been approved as a vendor for this service. During FFY 2016, there were plans for six 40-hour pre-apprenticeship training classes to train 90 people with disabilities. However, this plan was altered based on availability of the pre-apprenticeship training providers. By the conclusion of FFY 2017, 42 VR consumers successfully completed pre-apprenticeship training. For the first class in FFY 2016, of the 19 successful completers, 14 achieved competitive integrated employment, 12 are employed in high skill, high demand careers, and two are actively searching for employment. There are plans for continued expansion of the use of pre-apprenticeship for VR clients in Arkansas. In the second quarter of FFY 2018, 100 students have registered for pre-apprenticeship training. (Page 72) Title I

In FFY 2017, ACTI partnered with CVS Health to develop a retail training program with externships at CVS Health’s pharmacies. The training is based on CVS’s needs for retail staff and pharmacy technicians.

The pre-apprenticeship training provided to ARS clients was funded by a grant provided through the Arkansas Department of Workforce Services.

Access and Accommodations received 108 referrals for assistive technology assessment with clients looking to participate in educational activities from field counselors this program year. Access and Accommodations also served 95 referrals for assistive technology education and consultation from public and private employers during the program year. These cases typically result in the acquisition and training on the use of specific assistive technology devices and accommodations. Access and Accommodations staff have collaborated with ICAN to provide training in the area of legal provisions of assistive technology, specifically focusing on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) including examples of device implementation to field staff with regards to education, transition, and employment. They have also provided training in these areas to outside community partners as well as public and private employers. (Page 241) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Strategy: DSB will work in conjunction with provider agencies to provide work appropriate skills and training to blind and low vision participants.

  • Performance Measure: DSB will refer participants to World Services for the Blind, Alpha Pointe, the Louisiana Center for the Blind, Sources, Goodwill and other providers as necessary for additional skills training, including, but not limited to soft skills and work readiness training to assist participants in improving their probability of securing competitive employment.

Strategy: DSB will provide detailed benefits counseling information to each participant on SSI and SSDI.

  • Performance Measure: DSB will refer 100% of clients, adults, students and youth on SSI and SSDI to the DSB benefits counselor for a one—on—one benefits analysis.
  • Performance Measure: Area Supervisors will monitor caseloads to ensure that VR Counselors are referring 100% of SSI and SSDI VR participants to the benefits counselor.
  • Performance Measure: Counselors will make participants aware of benefits counseling at the time of application, at the time of IPE’s, and at the time of closure. (Page 291) Title II

Strategy: VR Counselors will schedule and attend face-to-face job exploration meetings to interview human resource professionals regarding the types of jobs they have and the skills needed to do those jobs.
Strategy: VR Counselors will ensure that participants in job- ready status are actively seeking employment.
Strategy: DSB will encourage and support viable self-employment.
Strategy: DSB will work in conjunction with provider agencies to provide work appropriate skills and training to blind and low vision participants.
Strategy: DSB will provide detailed benefits counseling information to each participant on SSI and SSDI.
Strategy: DSB will continue to refer Older Individuals who are Blind and interested in employment to VR and will ensure that its OIB contractor will as well. (Page 299) Title II
 

Employer/ Business

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Data Collection

The most recent Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) for Arkansas was completed in December 2015. ARS contracted with Dan Hopkins & Associates, Inc. who worked collaboratively with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), key stakeholders and ARS to complete a CSNA of rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities in Arkansas. Multiple strategies to gather data and information were used including: (a) A focus group discussion with participants from ARS, SRC, key stakeholders, and vendors; (b) A structured survey of all ARS counselors; (c) A structured survey of a random sample of ARS consumers throughout Arkansas; (d) Focus groups of consumers; (e) An ACTI focus group of administrators and staff; (f) Interviews and surveys of the agency leadership; (g) Questionnaire and an abbreviated focus group with district managers; (h) Review of 2014 RSA 911 data; and (i) Review of data from the American Community Survey and 2014 Current Population Survey. (Page 207) Title II

511

~~ARS in collaboration with the SRC proposes to implement the following to fulfill its RSA requirement of allotting 50% of its supported employment funds to serve youth with disabilities:

ARS will attempt to identify early on youth with disabilities that can benefit from supported employment services. ARS recognizes that a number of individuals with disabilities served through the Promise Grant will be potential candidates for supported employment services and that as it develops an effective pre-employment transition program a number of individuals serviced will also benefit from supported employment services. Developing an effective referral system for individuals served through Promise and pre-employment transition will be a priority. ARS also recognizes that in some areas CRPs have established an arrangement with local school districts to provide services. ARS will make it a priority to work with local CRPs and local school districts to help identify and refer to ARS potential supported employment candidates. This will also be in line with ARS’s efforts to address Section 511 requirements. In addition, as ARS revises its MOU’s with Developmental Disabilities Services and Behavioral Health a priority will be established to include language addressing the provision of supported employment services to youth with disabilities.

With the effective implementation of the activities identified above and with additional guidance provided by the RSA Liaison, ARS and the SRC fully expect to meet the SE requirement.

ARS in collaboration with the SRC and in consultation with its RSA State Liaison proposes to implement the following strategies to address the requirements of Section 511. ARS will:

1. Revise its MOU with Developmental Disabilities to include how both agencies will develop policy/procedure to address clients effected or might potentially be effected by Section 511.
2. Revise its MOU with Behavioral Health to include how both agencies will develop policy/procedure to address clients effected or might potentially be effected by Section 511.
3. Revise its MOU with Special Education to include how both agencies will develop policy/procedure to address students effected or might potentially be effected by Section 511. The MOU will address the issue of referring students to CRPs for services while the student is still enrolled in school or referring the student to a CRP upon graduation as part of transition planning.
4. Work with Special Education to develop/provide training to special education teachers and special education supervisors regarding Section 511.  (Page 217) Title II

• ARS will continue assigning a rehabilitation counselor as a liaison to each CRP in each District.
• ARS district managers will assume a more active role with CRPs to develop more positive working relationships.
• ARS will train CRPs on the WIOA requirements for services to youth and students with disabilities as it relates to Section 511 Limitations on Sub-Minimum Wage. (Page 230) Title IV

Goal 6: Develop and improve Community Rehabilitation Programs.
• ARS will continue assigning a rehabilitation counselor as a liaison to each CRP in each District.
• ARS district managers will assume a more active role with CRPs to develop more positive working relationships.
• ARS will train CRPs on the WIOA requirements for services to youth and students with disabilities as it relates to Section 511 Limitations on Sub-Minimum Wage.
• ARS will initiate purchased service agreements focused on moving CRPs from fee for service to performance based outcomes payments. (Page 241) Title II

Transition in Regards to Section 511 -Section 511 of WIOA intends that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded an opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re-enter competitive integrated employment. The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education are working together to identify students that are blind and visually impaired that have been provided services in a sub-minimum wage setting. We are collaborating on plans to expand services to mutual consumers that includes a systematic approach to better identify consumers who could benefit from supported employment services (in an integrated setting, achieving at least the minimum wage) and are not receiving them at this time. A new Memorandum of Agreement is being developed through the team effort known as Vision Quest, which is an extension of Governor Asa Hutchinson’s Employment First Taskforce. Vision Quest includes the following agencies: The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education. The proposal includes provisions for use of joint agency resources to ensure quality service delivery and long term supports for supported employment. With the cooperation of the partner agencies DSB will contact blind and visually impaired individuals every 6 months who are in sub-minimum wage situations to provide career counseling and information and referral services, designed to promote opportunities for competitive integrated employment. (Page 265) Title II

A new Memorandum of Agreement is being developed through the team effort known as Vision Quest, which is an extension of Governor Asa Hutchinson’s Employment First Taskforce. Vision Quest includes the following agencies: The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education. The proposal includes provisions for use of joint agency resources to ensure quality service delivery and long term supports for supported employment. With the cooperation of the partner agencies DSB will contact blind and visually impaired individuals every 6 months who are in sub-minimum wage situations to provide career counseling and information and referral services, designed to promote opportunities for competitive integrated employment. DSB’s Director joined the other agencies Directors at the official signing of the MOU in the winter of 2018. DSB does not have any consumers employed in a 511 or less than minimum wage situation. (Page 267) Title II

DSB is working cooperatively with the Educational Services for the Visually Impaired, Department of Education, Special Education Teachers for the Visually Impaired, and local education areas to identify the technology needs, independent living needs, and educational training needs of identified students beginning at age 16 in the school system and through IPE meetings and planning meetings for those meeting the 504 regulations. Monthly meetings are held with our VR and Pre-ETS counselors and the school consultants to determine goals and objectives for students. Quarterly visits to schools are conducted to provide labor market information, university application and scholarship information, and technical school opportunities available within the key labor market sectors of the State. An updated agreement with the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education, regarding transition services to students who are blind or severely visually impaired, including Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ASBVI) was developed to address the Section 113 Pre-employment transition activities that are authorized under WIOA and the requirements of Section 511.This MOU was created in conjunction with the Arkansas Rehabilitation Service Agency. The agreement was signed. The interagency agreement outlined the roles and responsibilities, financial responsibility, determination of lead agency, and qualified personnel. DSB has reached out to each Local Education Area Supervisor in the school districts across the State and each high school across the State to give presentations/information on services available under pre-employment transition services. DSB has seven designated pre-employment transition services counselors that provide information to eligible and potentially eligible students with visual impairments both in large print and electronically through the school system. (Page 264) Title II

Transition in Regards to Section 511 -Section 511 of WIOA intends that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded an opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re-enter competitive integrated employment. The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education are working together to identify students that are blind and visually impaired that have been provided services in a sub-minimum wage setting. We are collaborating on plans to expand services to mutual consumers that includes a systematic approach to better identify consumers who could benefit from supported employment services (in an integrated setting, achieving at least the minimum wage) and are not receiving them at this time. A new Memorandum of Agreement is being developed through the team effort known as Vision Quest, which is an extension of Governor Asa Hutchinson’s Employment First Taskforce. Vision Quest includes the following agencies: The Division of Services for the Blind, Division of Developmental Disabilities, the Division of Medical Services, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services and the Arkansas Department of Education. The proposal includes provisions for use of joint agency resources to ensure quality service delivery and long term supports for supported employment. With the cooperation of the partner agencies DSB will contact blind and visually impaired individuals every 6 months who are in sub-minimum wage situations to provide career counseling and information and referral services, designed to promote opportunities for competitive integrated employment. (Page 265) Title II

As we move forward with WIOA and the emerging new Technical Assistance Centers, DSB is working with the WINTAC towards Job Driven practices/best practices, best practices in pre-employment transition services, addressing section 511 subminimum wage requirements, and performance accountability. DSB in combination with Arkansas General is working with the Transition Technical Assistance Center of the University of North Carolina to improve and strengthen the transition program. (Page 284) Title II
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The workforce center delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the workforce delivery system partners) will comply with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. The State ensures that Arkansas Workforce Center system complies with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 through the development and implementation of a Methods of Administration Policy that outlines all requirements of the system. Reviews are conducted annually to make sure that workforce centers meet requirements. Furthermore, training is offered at least annually to equal opportunity officers of the local workforce development boards. To demonstrate compliance with this provision, the one-stop center operators and the delivery system partners will collaborate to develop and provide periodic and new-hire staff training and system-wide support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. A rotating certification review team will be established, to provide scheduled evaluation, certification and recertification of the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities and to address any compliance issues that arise. (Pages 117- 118) Title II  

Access and Accommodations in collaboration with Increasing Capabilities Access Network will work with the Division of Services for the Blind to develop a certification review team for compliance of the one stop delivery system with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the ADA. (Page 226) Title IV

Vets

Arkansas’s policy for priority of service to veterans includes up to a 24 hour hold for new job orders placed in the AJL system. Local Veteran Employment Representative (LVER) staff has access to federal contractor job listings through VetCentral, which are fed into the AJL system. This access provides opportunities for priority referrals of target veterans to Federal contractors. After registration in VetCentral, the system provides automatic notifications to the veteran when a job opening occurs in their field. Services to veterans through the Gold Card Initiative are available at the Arkansas Workforce Centers (AWC). The Gold Card Initiative provides unemployed post-9/11 era veterans with the intensive and follow-up services they need to succeed in today’s job market. The Gold Card initiative is a joint effort of the Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration (ETA) and the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS). (Page 117) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. (Page 373) Title IV

Once significant barriers to employment are identified by Wagner-Peyser staff, veterans will be directed to the nearest DVOP for a comprehensive assessment and the development of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP), if necessary. DVOP staff providing intensive case management services will be required to use Arkansas JobLink (AJL) to record services, case notes, referrals, and follow-up services.

Arkansas LVER staff will advocate, on behalf of veterans, with businesses and industries. LVERs will perform the full range of employer outreach activities outlined in VPL 03-14, which are offered through the workforce system. Staff will report outreach activities, on a quarterly basis, in the Manager’s Quarterly Report. This includes the facilitation of employment, training, and placement services furnished to veterans through the state’s employment service. They are, but are not limited to:

 Planning and participating in job and career fairs;

 Conducting employer outreach;

 Conducting job search workshops, and establishing job search groups;

 Coordinating with unions, apprenticeships programs and business or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans;

 Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans;

 Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and  Coordinating and participating with other business outreach. (Page 375) Title II

Arkansas JobLink (AJL) is the state’s integrated web-based workforce development management information system (MIS) used by the state and local areas to share and manage participant data between the Wagner-Peyser program, the Trade Adjustment Assistance program and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act program. All staff has access to and can view all services provided to the veteran regardless of funding stream. By partnering with other state agencies, ADWS is maximizing its outreach potential. Efforts aimed at providing information about our services to veterans include promoting and attending local Job Fairs, and Hiring our Heroes and Women Veterans Summits events. All hiring events are advertised in the local paper and video streamed on public access media throughout the local AWC. We also seek the assistance of County Veteran Service Officers for those seeking employment. Arkansas is also exploring ways to better connect veterans seeking employment with Apprenticeship opportunities. We have strengthened our partnership with Registered Apprenticeship in recent years through collaboration with the Arkansas Apprenticeship Coalition in implementing the Arkansas Energy Sector Partnership grant. Through this collaboration, the state now has a mobile training center which is operated by the Arkansas Apprenticeship Coalition to provide “green” skills education to apprentices statewide. (Page 376) Title IV

Veterans and eligible persons with significant barriers to employment (SBE), economically or educationally disadvantaged, recently separated, homeless, including domestic violence and other dangerous or life threating conditions, offenders and veterans between the ages 18-24, identified in VPL04-14 as the target groups for services by Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists. The state will focus efforts to increase services and outreach to the target populations as identified in guidance. The State will take steps to ensure that veterans with significant barriers receive intensive services by DVOP specialists. During the initial assessment, if a veteran self-attest to meeting one or more of the SBE criteria, Arkansas Workforce Center (AWC) staff will refer the individual to a DVOP specialist for intensive case management services. (Page 377) Title IV

VPL 01-09 encourages that a DVOP specialist be out-stationed to serve as the Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) for Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment (VR&E) clients referred to AW Cs for job placement assistance. A physical presence at the facilities increases coordination with VR&E staff. The ISC refers VR&E clients to programs authorized under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), Vocational Rehabilitation under United States Code (38 U.S.C.), Chapter 31, and other federal and state programs that provide services and activities to assist the veteran in determining an employment or training plan, to include apprenticeship and on the job training (OJT) to enhance employment potential. (Page 378) Title IV

Mental Health

~~Department of Human Services The Department of Human Services (DHS) is Arkansas’s largest state agency, with more than 7,500 employees working to ensure citizens are healthy, safe and enjoying a high quality of life. The agency’s skilled and passionate staff cares for Arkansans of all ages. People needing support will find at least one local DHS office in each of the state’s 75 counties. Arkansans may apply for a vast array of services at their local county office as well as online. Services include ARKids First health insurance for children, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps), Transitional Employment Assistance (TEA) and Medicaid. Through a blend of federal and state Medicaid funds, DHS pays for 64 percent of the babies born in Arkansas each year and for the care of 69 percent of the state’s nursing home patients. Additionally, DHS protects children and the elderly who have been abused or neglected; finds adoptive homes for foster children; funds congregate and home-delivered meals for the elderly; regulates nursing homes and childcare facilities; supports high-quality early childhood education; treats and serves youth in the juvenile justice system; oversees services for blind Arkansans; runs residential facilities for people with developmental disabilities; manages the Arkansas State Hospital and Arkansas Health Center for those with acute behavioral health issues; and supports nonprofit, community and faith-based organizations that depend on volunteers to continue programs vital to our communities. The agency also works with a system of community mental health care centers to provide mental health services to nearly 74,000 people each year. In all, DHS serves more than 1.2 million Arkansans every year. To manage these services and programs efficiently, DHS has ten divisions and five support offices headquartered in Little Rock in addition to the 85 county offices. (Page 85-86) Title I

 (10) Whether the eligible provider’s activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways;
(11) Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;
(12) Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance; and
(13) Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs. (Page 159) Title II

Goal 9: Increase the efficiency and effectiveness of service delivery for agency consumers.
• ARS will ensure the development and implementation of comprehensive training for district managers and counselors to effectively serve consumers.
• ARS will adequately staff the field program to reduce caseloads and allow counselors to devote additional time to direct consumer contact and provision of services.
• ARS will examine the agency referral sources and ensure counselors are trained to provide effective services to consumers with mental health concerns and intellectual/developmental disabilities.
• ARS will increase the role of the rehab area manager in the areas of outreach and marketing at local levels statewide to cultivate positive working relationships with employers, partners, and stakeholders. In FFY 2017, ARS sent vocational rehabilitation counselors to ARA, AAMRC, and APSE conferences that provided training on mental health services to populations with disabilities.
In FFY 2017, ARS district managers were tasked to visit and provide an agency overview to all WIOA partners statewide. (Pages 245- 246) Title II

The strategy involves an increased focus on SE outcomes resulting in a competitive wage integrated employment that culminates in a career outcome in contrast to the traditional sheltered employment. Based on WIOA, ARS will update the interagency agreements with the state agencies serving individuals with the most significant disabilities including: The Department of Human Services Divisions of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), Behavioral Health Services (DBHS), Services for the Blind (DSB), Medical Services (DMS), Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), Department of Workforce Services (DWS), and the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit (ADE SEU) The agreement places an emphasis on competitive employment as a desirable outcome for individuals with the most significant disabilities including those with developmental disabilities and mental health diagnoses.

ARS is developing additional certification criteria for SE service providers. The criteria include updated requirements for certification and training for job coaches. ARS increased fee schedules and negotiated contracts for services with providers in an attempt to increase service providers, and incentives to service providers, to increase employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities. (Page 248) Title II

As part of DHS, DSB enjoys close working relationships with the DHS Division of Medical Services (DMS), which houses Medicaid; the DHS Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDS); and the DHS Division of Behavioral Health Services (BHS). DSB has cooperative agreements outlining responsibilities and the provision of services with the DDS and DBHS. A similar agreement is being formulated for the provision of services to State Medicaid recipients. DSB coordinates services with DBHS, DMS, and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. (Page 272- 273) Title II

The purpose of the employability assessment will be to determine the applicant’s abilities, talents, proficiencies/deficiencies, etc. The assessment is completed to determine the applicant’s ability to move into employment and may be done by an agency or organization other than DWS.

During the assessment, the DWS Workforce Specialist will present an orientation/overview of the program, gather pertinent information, and identify barriers that may prevent the applicant from becoming self-sufficient through employment. The DWS Workforce Specialist may also identify the following.
o Family situation/circumstances
o Employment history/work experience
o Educational attainment/ literacy level/functional educational level
o Skills
o Interests
o Supportive Service needs, if any.

NOTE: Participants who are identified as victims of domestic violence will be referred for appropriate services. Appropriate services may include but are not limited to:
Counseling, housing relocation assistance, referral to mental health, referral to prosecuting attorney and/or law enforcement and the DHS Division of Children and Family Services. The DWS Workforce Specialist will, where appropriate, use all available resources to help the victim of domestic violence receive timely/needed services. (Page 333) Title IV

Job search and job readiness is assistance in seeking or obtaining employment or the preparation for seeking or obtaining employment. Job search activities include making contact with potential employers, applying for vacancies, and interviewing for jobs. Job readiness activities include classes or workshops where participants can improve their employability skills. Participants learn techniques such as resume writing, workplace etiquette, interviewing, and life skills.

Job readiness activities also include substance abuse treatment, mental health treatment (including mental health treatment needed to address domestic violence), or rehabilitation activities for those who are otherwise employable.

Such treatment or therapy must be determined to be necessary and certified by a qualified medical or mental health professional or treatment provider. (Page 335) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

• ARS will rename its Retaining a Valued Employee (RaVE) program to Stay at Work/Return to Work (SAW/RTW). This language is consistent with programs/practices in private/public sector employment and communicates functional intent. • As part of the Governor’s Employment First Task Force, ARS will assume a lead role in the implementation of a SAW/RTW program within Arkansas state government. • ARS will work with WIOA partners at both the state and local level to support SAW/RTW efforts in both public and private sector employment. • ARS will sufficiently staff its Assistive Technology at Work (AT@Work) program to meet referral demands from the ARS Field Program and SAW/RTW initiative. Staff will have expertise to address accommodation needs in training and employment settings. (Page 232) Title II

In program year 2016, ARS Special Programs was renamed Access and Accommodations to better communicate the resources and services available within the division. The Retaining a Valued Employee (RaVE) program was also renamed to Stay at Work/Return to Work (SAW/RTW) to be consistent with language found within the public/private sector. Access and Accommodations as part of the Employment First Task Force, has worked with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and the Public Employee Claims Division (PECD) to develop an OPM sponsored training for state supervisors and HR staff in the area of SAW/RTW. This included the implementation of assistive technology and how to accommodate an employee with a disability in the workplace. In the third quarter of program year 2016 Access and Accommodations, Assistive Technology at Work (AT@Work) program added a new Occupational Therapist position to meet the increased demands for evaluation services from field staff and to assist employers and employees through evaluations and trainings with the SAW/RTW program. Access and Accommodations is still in the process of adding one more Occupational Therapy position to ensure all referrals are seen in a timely manner. (Page 244-245) Title II

Arkansas’ initial vision of “building on our history as an innovator in the delivery of human services, to develop a robust, statewide, job-driven, employment and training program that will produce a job-ready workforce able to meet the needs of Arkansas’ current employers, attract new industry, and build Arkansas’ economy” is more clear in that the FY18 AR E&T program will serve 37 of our 75 counties, and 75% of all the States work registrants. In previous years Arkansas had a USDA approved waiver from the SNAP Requirement To Work (RTW) provisions. The waiver was based on labor surplus estimates from the Department of Labor, however like many other States, the economy improved and unemployment rates decreased, and the areas available to be covered by the waiver have decreased or disappeared, and this was the case for Arkansas beginning January 1, 2016. This group will now be subject to the PRWORA sponsored participation limits of 3 full months of SNAP benefits in a fixed 36 month period unless they are exempt or complying with the requirements associated with the RTW. (Page 351) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 49

WIOA State Plan: Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities - 06/10/2019

~~"ARS will continue to pursue opportunities currently under development with CRPs around the state to provide pre-employment transition services and other transition services for students living with a disability. ARS will collaborate with employers by fostering integrated systems, coordinating services, and providing career pathways for adults and youth/students with disabilities. ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities.ARS will collaborate with secondary education institutions to coordinate partnerships with employers to provide summer and non-seasonal employment, apprenticeship programs, and internships for students with significant disabilities. ACTI works directly with potential employers to provide internship sites for students nearing the completion of their training programs; all of whom have significant disabilities.".

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

State of Arkansas Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan 2016-2019 - 06/10/2019

• Train and equip workforce center staff in an ongoing learning process with the knowledge, skills, and motivation to provide superior service to job seekers, including those with disabilities, and businesses in an integrated, regionally focused framework of service delivery. Center staff are cross-trained, as appropriate, to increase staff capacity, expertise, and efficiency. Cross-training allows staff from differing programs to understand every program and to share their expertise about the needs of specific populations so that all staff can better serve all customers. Center staff are routinely trained and are keenly aware as to how their particular function supports and contributes to the overall vision of the local board

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) “About Us” - 06/07/2019

~~“The Arkansas Trauma Rehabilitation Program (ATRP) was established through a memorandum of agreement between the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) and the UAMS Center for Distance Health (CDH) in cooperation with the Arkansas Spinal Cord Commission (ASCC). Through education and resource development initiatives, ATRP works to increase access to comprehensive, cutting-edge rehabilitation care and facilitate community reintegration for Arkansans who have sustained traumatic injuries.Vision Statement:

To enable every Arkansan who has sustained a disabling traumatic injury access to the comprehensive rehabilitation care he or she needs to seamlessly reintegrate into the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Special Education Process Guide - 04/19/2019

~~ “The Notice of Conference is used by the LEA to take steps to ensure that parent(s) are afforded the opportunity to participate in the special education process.  It is the district’s responsibility to provide parents with appropriate notice of a meeting, and use other methods to ensure parent participation in IEP meetings and other special education conferences.  More information about parameters of these meetings can be found by accessing the web-link."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

AR SB 522: To Create A Comprehensive Statewide Workforce Development System; To Coordinate Various Workforce Programs; To Amend the Duties of the Career Education and Workforce Development Board; and to Declare an Emergency. - 04/18/2019

“The General Assembly finds that:

(1) Occupational, technical, and industrial training provides unique opportunities to improve the lives of Arkansans while advancing the state's economic development;

(2) Businesses seeking to begin operations in Arkansas look to the level of education and skills in the workforce as a key factor in making investment decisions;

(3) Currently, Arkansas workforce education operates within a variety of agencies, without coordination, often with significant inefficiencies arising from overlapping and repeated programming and from important programs being overlooked as presumably covered by another program; and

(4) Bringing coordination of all state and federal career education and workforce development programs will:

(A) Reduce unnecessary duplication of programming;

(B) Ensure that every Arkansan who seeks occupational, 9 technical, and industrial training will find an appropriate education program 10 in the state;

(C) Bring consistency, efficiency, and rigor, as 12 established by applicable industry and accreditation standards to the state's 13 career education and workforce development efforts; and

(D) Alert industry to the commitment of the State of 15 Arkansas to economic development through career workforce education.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

SENATE BILL 101/ Act No. 874 Developmental Disabilities Services Appropriation - 04/11/2019

~~“The Division of Developmental Disabilities Services of the Department of Human Services is hereby authorized to provide employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities residing at the Human Development Centers who work at less than a competitive employment level.

The provisions of this section shall be in effect only from July 1,  2019 through June 30,  2020.”

Systems
  • Other

St. Bernards To Host Unique Training Program for Young Adults with Developmental Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~“In the fall of 2017 St. Bernards Healthcare welcomed 8 interns as part of the St. Bernards Project SEARCH internship program. St. Bernards partners with Arkansas Rehabilitation Services and ACCESS to help participants develop skills for competitive employment. Internships are housed within various departments throughout St. Bernards, including Engineering, Nutritional Services, Fitness Center, just to name a few. Interns take part in three ten-week internships at St. Bernards during the 9-month program. Upon completion of the program, Project SEARCH graduates receive follow-along services to assist them on the job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Arkansas Medicaid Certification Requirements for ARChoices HCBS Waiver Program - 12/01/2018

~All ARChoices Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver providers must meet the Provider Participation and enrollment requirements contained within Section 140.000 of this manual

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Living the Mission - 10/24/2018

~“DHS protects children and the elderly who have been abused or neglected; finds adoptive homes for foster children; funds congregate and home-delivered meals for the elderly; regulates nursing homes and childcare facilities; supports high-quality early childhood education; treats and serves youth in the juvenile justice system; oversees services for blind Arkansans; runs residential facilities for people with developmental disabilities; manages the Arkansas State Hospital and Arkansas Health Center for those with acute behavioral health issues; and supports nonprofit, community and faith-based organizations that depend on volunteers to continue programs vital to our communities.

The agency also works with a system of community mental health care centers to provide mental health services to nearly 74,000 people each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) - 07/26/2018

~“PASSE (Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity) is a new Medicaid program to address the needs of individuals who have intensive behavioral health and intellectual and developmental disabilities service needs.  The PASSE program is designed to help people not only connect to services from their doctors but also services in the community that those members might need. The goal is for the PASSE to help improve people’s health and let them take a more active role in their treatment.A case manager accesses services for you. But your care coordinator makes sure that services are delivered, that the services are monitored, and that any referrals you may need are made to the right providers.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
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AR SB 522: To Create A Comprehensive Statewide Workforce Development System; To Coordinate Various Workforce Programs; To Amend the Duties of the Career Education and Workforce Development Board; and to Declare an Emergency. - 04/18/2019

“The General Assembly finds that:

(1) Occupational, technical, and industrial training provides unique opportunities to improve the lives of Arkansans while advancing the state's economic development;

(2) Businesses seeking to begin operations in Arkansas look to the level of education and skills in the workforce as a key factor in making investment decisions;

(3) Currently, Arkansas workforce education operates within a variety of agencies, without coordination, often with significant inefficiencies arising from overlapping and repeated programming and from important programs being overlooked as presumably covered by another program; and

(4) Bringing coordination of all state and federal career education and workforce development programs will:

(A) Reduce unnecessary duplication of programming;

(B) Ensure that every Arkansan who seeks occupational, 9 technical, and industrial training will find an appropri