California

States - Big Screen

The Golden State is a place where you can "Find Yourself" through a rewarding career, including those with disabilities who are ready to live the California Dream.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon California's VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.05%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39,557,045
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.43%
Change from
2017 to 2018
1,896,634
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.01%
Change from
2017 to 2018
700,456
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
8.77%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39.93%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.79%
Change from
2017 to 2018
75.61%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 39,250,017 39,536,653 39,557,045
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 2,023,714 1,980,677 1,896,634
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 701,791 721,536 700,456
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 16,632,184 16,961,551 17,104,193
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.68% 36.43% 39.93%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.22% 75.01% 75.61%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.40% 4.80% 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.20% 18.80% 19.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.70% 12.70% 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 2,020,143 1,992,144 1,937,820
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 2,186,775 2,158,900 2,128,351
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,749,171 2,694,884 2,651,000
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 331,848 326,909 312,801
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 1,273,677 1,251,237 1,240,562
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 47,935 51,632 47,303
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 459,722 466,413 457,927
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 15,006 15,676 15,401
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 178,131 183,748 186,022
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 425,105 411,782 395,717

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 41,719 41,243 40,775
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.50% 4.50% 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 682,668 663,886 641,737

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 20,014 17,818 20,381
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 49,907 44,559 47,289
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 221,216 181,992 199,371
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 9.00% 9.80% 10.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 0.10% 0.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50% 0.20% 0.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.90% 2.00% 1.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 11.80% 10.00% 10.10%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 582 494 568
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,552 904 1,172
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,396 7,686 8,301
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 39,862 39,151 44,074

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 36,836 42,724 46,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,153 2,125 2,373
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,127 1,102 1,176
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00% 0.52% 50.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.94 2.82 3.00

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
23,327
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 1,433 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,777 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 3,872 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 8,242 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 5,189 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,807 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 38.90% 35.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 25,118 24,984 24,319
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 1,247,320 1,213,289 1,186,089
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 1,569 1,110 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,257 658 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $92,086,000 $95,089,000 $115,626,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $55,745,000 $53,463,000 $48,783,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $854,301,000 $910,461,000 $1,018,595,250
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 12.00% 12.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 66,040 69,286 72,005
Number of people served in facility based work. 9,629 9,141 7,838
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 26.30 26.60 27.67

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 54.07% 54.92% 56.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 21.54% 20.70% 19.82%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.63% 3.56% 3.40%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.59% 99.79% 99.78%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 52.26% 48.87% 53.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 75.46% 72.65% 77.60%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 83.16% 81.72% 85.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.20% 23.78% 23.63%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 10,193,235
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 12,148
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 123,357
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 4,322,464
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 4,445,821
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 180
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,641
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,821
AbilityOne wages (products). $583,952
AbilityOne wages (services). $61,505,189

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 6 3
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 20 22
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 109 67 65
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 6 5 4
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 119 98 94
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 30 29 22
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 35 1,740 1,826
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 17,727 11,546 10,401
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 488 486 400
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 18,280 13,801 12,649

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~In keeping with California’s Employment First Policy, the DDS Work Services Program addresses the employment needs of consumers by providing work and community integration opportunities through Supported Employment Programs (SEPs). Supported Employment (SE) services through the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) and regional centers are aimed at finding competitive work in a community integrated work setting for persons with severe disabilities who need ongoing support services to learn and perform the work. Support is usually provided by a job coach who meets regularly with the individual on the job to help him or her learn the necessary skills and behaviors to work independently. The DOR is the main vocational rehabilitation program SE service provider for adults with developmental disabilities. However, if the DOR is unable to provide services due to fiscal reasons, the regional center may be able to help individuals served get a job by funding SE through other means if these services are available in their area. (Page 65) Title I

The DPEC works with the State Board, Independent Living Centers, AJCCs, DOR, Department of Developmental Services (DDS), and many other public and private stakeholders to improve employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The DPEC also encourages and assists stakeholders to train staff on disability awareness and effective service delivery. Some of the partnerships and activities supported by the DPEC include: Employment First, Youth Employment Opportunity Program, Youth Leadership Forum, Disability Employment Initiative and Disability Employment Accelerator. (Page 271) Title IV

AB 287 (2009) established the Employment First Policy, which led to a standing Employment First Committee formed by the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. The bill expands employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and identifies best practices and incentives for increasing integrated employment and gainful employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Employment First policy requires Regional Centers to develop Individual Program Plans to ensure individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities beginning at age 14 are provided options, competitive integrated employment, and post—secondary education to enable the consumer to transition from school to work. The CDOR is an active participant in the Employment First Committee to help with transition planning. (Page 432) Title IV

In December 2014, CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to further advance the state’s “Employment First” Policy and other federal and state laws to address employment in integrated settings, at competitive wages, for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In March 2017, the Competitive Integrated Employment: Blueprint for Change was completed, and outlines plans for the following goals:

— Improving collaboration and coordination between the three departments to prepare and support all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment;
— Building capacity to increase opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment to prepare for and participate in the California workforce development system; and,
— Increasing the ability of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to make informed choices, adequately prepare for, transition to, and engage in competitive integrated employment. (Page 432) Title IV

The baseline indicators for performance accountability indicators have not yet been established. Until that time, CDOR is implementing current and new strategies to improve performance including: monthly monitoring of performance indicator data; attending California Model Employer Initiative meetings in order to increase the number of individuals with disabilities in state employment; identifying and implementing improvements in furtherance of the State’s “Employment First” policy to gain integrated competitive wages for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities; increasing jobs—driven employment and consumer self—sufficiency for consumers who are job ready through work incentives planning; establishing new partnerships with employers through the National Employment Team; maximizing the use of the Talent Acquisition Portal, an online system which includes both a national talent pool of VR candidates looking for employment and a job posting system for businesses looking to hire individuals with disabilities, to link job ready consumers with employers; and, enhancing staff training curriculums to include the use of social media strategies and the electronic job application process. (Page 475-476) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~• Efforts are taking place to update the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on CDOR Student Services (Pre—Employment Transition Services) and Customized Employment WIOA services. (Page 430) Title IV

• A need to increase partnerships between CRPs to promote information-sharing regarding job leads, services provided, and opportunities for new services such as customized employment. (Page 455) Title IV

Strategies:

• Conduct focus groups to solicit feedback about what the partners think is needed to enhance services for people with disabilities.
• Develop a CDOR referral form and referral process for the America’s Job Centers of California.
• Provide training to local America’s Job Center of California staff on topics such as: CDOR services; eligibility; job placement; case management; benefits counseling; job readiness and soft skills; disability awareness and etiquette; hiring persons with disabilities; disability disclosures; competitive integrated employment; customized employment; assistive technology; and, reasonable accommodation. (Page 472) Title IV

The CDOR’s Community Resources Development Section continues to update and use the Rehabilitation Resources Directory, an online resource on CDOR’s website that provides users with complete information about CRPs throughout California. CDOR’s Community Resources Development Section is updating the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on Pre—Employment Transition Services and Customized Employment WIOA services. In early 2014, a proof of concept titled “Placement Plus” was administered in select CRPs to test a new employment services fee for service structure. The lessons learned and evaluation of the Placement Plus is informing CDOR’s current efforts to redesign employment services statewide. (Page 475) Title IV

The CDOR Supported Employment Program provides Supported Employment services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities, to enable them to achieve an employment outcome of supported employment in competitive integrated employment. These services support opportunities for competitive integrated employment (including customized employment, as available) that is individualized, and customized, consistent with the unique strengths, abilities, interests, and informed choice of the individual, including with ongoing support services for individuals with the most significant disabilities. (Page 485) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Local Boards are tasked under WIOA Section 121 with developing and entering an MOU with all required One-Stop mandatory partners, certifying One-Stop operators, and conducting oversight of the One-Stop system in the local area. To the extent that Local Boards fulfill these obligations, they will necessarily involve themselves with system alignment efforts and the implementation of state plan program strategies pertaining to service integration, resource braiding, and the provision of supportive services. (Page  134) Title I

Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in-demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post-secondary education. (Page 148) Title I

Clients/Service Population: Adult, dislocated worker, youth, and universal access clients number 1.7 million individuals, including about 60,000 clients who receive certificates through AJCCs. Incumbent workers are an emerging client of the Local Boards. Local Boards serve 65,000 businesses annually and partner in the AJCCs with California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs), community colleges, economic development agencies, DOR, adult education providers, and veteran’s services providers.
Strengths: Local Boards have a lot of experience braiding resources and integrating service delivery through the One-Stop system. Local Boards have deep connections to their local communities, and are gaining greater experience working through state and local led regional initiatives, including sector and career pathway strategies as well as initiatives to provide services to target populations. (Page 517-518) Title IV

Integrating service delivery and braiding resources are ways that workforce and education programs can achieve program alignment and assure access to the broad array of services funded across the state’s workforce and education programs. In California, resources will be braided and services integrated and aligned through the creation of “value-added” partnerships at the state, regional, and local levels.
A value-added partnership is one in which all partners gain from the partnership. Ideally, “gains to exchange” occur and partners transact with one another on the basis of specialization, providing services consistent with each programs’ core competencies. Partners thereby leverage one another’s expertise, building a proverbial “sum that is greater than its parts.” (Page 542) Title I

The State Board will issue regional planning guidance that details best practices and model partnerships between the workforce system and the community college system, recommending that Local Boards meet their WIOA Section 106 requirements pertaining to coordinated service delivery strategies and shared administrative costs in ways that lay the foundation for a strong partnership with community college CTE programs. This can be done in a variety of ways, including the following:
• by building links between AJCCs and campuses, including but not limited to, pooling resources to place AJCC staff directly on campuses
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs. (Page 564) Title I

The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD-WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
• The State Board has partnered with EDD to create and staff the One-Stop Design workgroup, which brought together state plan partners and other stakeholders to develop a blueprint for service delivery in the state’s AJCCs. Work by this group will inform state policy on integrated service delivery and the braiding of resources at AJCCs, including policy on operations, required partnership, and the articulation of AJCC services with Regional Sector Pathway programs. (More detail on this is provided in chapter 4). (Page 568) Title I

• Working with EDD, the State Board has already issued policies pertaining to Eligible Training Providers and the use of alternative training models, including OJT, to encourage the use of “earn and learn” approaches to training by local boards.
• Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One-Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 569) Title I

Additionally, SBE, CDE, CCCCO, and the State Board will work jointly to identify and recommend best practices and model partnerships that encourage program alignment, coordination, integration of services, and braiding of resources beyond the minimum levels required as part of mandatory One-Stop partnership. To this end, the State Board will issue local and regional planning guidance, supported, when appropriate, by policy directives or other appropriate means of communication issued by SBE, CDE, and CCCCO to foster better program alignment between basic education and basic skills programs and other workforce and education programs and services. Recommended relevant best practices may include but are not limited to the following:
• aligning basic skills coursework with career pathways programs and adopting contextualized learning practices that combine basic education and skills coursework with CTE coursework
• braiding resources from WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs with WIOA Title II programs to provide supportive services to those attending basic education and skills programs so as to facilitate both course and program completion; local partnerships may include charter schools focused on serving out of school youth and operating under Education Code Section 47612.1(a) (Page  570) Title I

Vehicle: One-Stop Design and certification requirements, Local Planning Guidance; additionally DOR and CWDB will ensure resources for cross-training of frontline staff in the AJCCs (Planning Guidance Tier: Required) Competitive Integrated Employment: 
DOR district staff will designate a point of contact for the Local Boards to provide linkages to service providers of consumers with ID/DD (Planning Guidance Tier: Required).
Vehicle: DOR district staff will partner with the Local Boards to outreach employers and partners to develop strategies to achieve Competitive Integrated Employment opportunities for consumers with ID/DD (Planning Guidance Tier: Required). DOR will provide disability expertise and CIE technical assistance to the Local Boards, partners, and employers (Planning Guidance Tier: Recommended). (Page 606-607) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Workplace Readiness Training: CDOR VR team members will provide training on workplace readiness skills, including soft skills, financial literacy, independent living skills, and resume development, or arrange for training through Transition Partnership Programs third-party cooperative arrangements as well as other contracts or fee-for-service arrangements through local educational agencies, CRPs, or other providers. As part of the financial literacy component, CDOR Work Incentives Planners will provide limited Work Incentives Planning services to students who are Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability Insurance recipients who need support and information regarding the impact of paid work experience on their benefits. (Page 427) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~The Special Education Division oversees programs operated by approximately 1,600 local educational agencies (LEAs) to provide students up to age 22, who receive services under an Individualized Education Program, with a free and appropriate public education. Students with disabilities age 16-22 must be provided transition services based on their assessed needs, strengths, preferences, and interests to facilitate movement from school to post school activities. These post school activities may include postsecondary education, training, competitive integrated employment, and independent living. In addition to required transition services, WorkAbility I is a state-funded grant program awarded to approximately 270 LEAs to provide comprehensive pre-employment skills training, employment placement and follow-up for participating middle and high school students in special education who are making the transition from school to work, independent living and postsecondary education or training. (Page 522) Title I

After determining eligibility, through a comprehensive assessment and planning process and in collaboration with the SVRC-QRP, the consumer develops an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that identifies the employment goal and required VR services to achieve that goal. VR plan services may include, but are not limited to:

• Counseling and guidance.
• Referrals and assistance to get services from other agencies.
• Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Job search and placement assistance.
• Vocational and other training services, including, but not limited to, pre-employment training and soft skills training.
• Evaluation of physical and mental impairments.
• On-the-job or personal assistance services.
• Interpreter services.
• Rehabilitation and orientation or mobility services for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and/or blind or low vision.
• Occupational licenses, tools, equipment, initial stocks, and supplies.
• Technical assistance for self-employment.
• Rehabilitation assistive technology services and devices.
• Supported employment services.
• Services to the family.
• Transportation as required, such as travel and related expenses, that is necessary to enable the consumer to participate in a VR service.
• Transition services for students.
• Work Incentive Planning, which includes providing information on potential employment earning impacts to Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability Income (SSDI), and Ticket to Work (TTW).
• Expansion of employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including, but are not limited to, professional employment and self-employment.
• Post-employment services. (Page 58) Title I

DOR will work with the State Board and regionally organized Local Boards to identify opportunities to leverage collaborative employer outreach and engagement efforts that develop in the course of regional planning efforts. Where these opportunities exist, DOR will work with State Plan partners to market employer incentives and strategies for the hiring of individuals with disabilities, including better and more coordinated use of Federal procurement “503” hiring requirements. As part of this effort, DOR will partner with ETP to leverage incumbent worker training contracts to open doors for workers with disabilities as 30 percent of the state’s largest 100 federal contractors have utilized ETP contracts to train their incumbent workforce.

Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE). (Page 121) Title IV

• Communicate the statewide availability of pre-employment transition services with Special Education Local Planning Area Directors and the Advisory Commission on Special Education.
• Outreach to schools and closer coordination between VR and Local Educational Agency staff that do not currently have a Transition Partnership Program cooperative arrangement.
• Expand transition services beyond school to work to include school to postsecondary training transitions.
• Provide information about the transition from school to work at an earlier age to eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities.
• Provide work incentives education and planning services to students as well as parents and guardians of students with disabilities. (Page 426) Title IV

The CDOR administers 107 Transition Partnership Programs cooperative programs with Local Educational Agencies, County Offices of Education, or Special Education Local Plan Areas providing VR services to eligible students in hundreds of individual schools. CDOR also administers six case service contracts through associated Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) in conjunction with Transition Partnership Programs cooperative programs. The goal of the Transition Partnership Programs is to serve high school students with disabilities including blind, deaf, intellectual, developmental, and mental health disabilities by facilitating the effective transition from school to meaningful competitive integrated employment. The Local Educational Agency or Special Education Local Plan Area will refer potentially eligible students with disabilities and eligible students with disabilities ages 16 through 21 who can benefit from Pre-Employment Transition Services and VR services to CDOR. The assigned VR Counselor will then open a case and work in partnership with the individual to complete an Individualized Plan for Employment as early as possible, but at the latest before the consumer leaves school. Through the cooperative arrangement or case service contract, the participating Local Educational Agencies, Special Education Local Plan Areas, or CRP provides one or more new or expanded VR services to students. These services conform to the definition of Pre—Employment Transition Services required by WIOA and contain the following key features: job exploration counseling; work-based learning experiences; counseling on post—secondary opportunities; workplace readiness training; and, instruction in self-advocacy. These services, in addition to others provided on an individual basis are intended to ultimately result in competitive integrated employment. (Page 417) Title IV

Collaborative efforts to support community integration of individuals who are eligible for HCBS waiver programs include CDOR district staffs’ participation in person-centered planning meetings, when invited. The CDOR is also supporting discussions with DDS for improved coordination of IEPs and IPP for eligible individuals. The CDOR is also collaborating with DDS to support opportunities for competitive integrated employment through the CIE Blueprint as described in the response to description (f) - Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services. (Page 434)  Title IV

Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).

DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal law, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K-12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners. (Page 563) Title IV

Strengths: CDE, through the Career Pathways Trust, has distributed $500,000,000 over the past two years through a one-time appropriation to establish regional collaborative relationships and partnerships with business entities, community organizations, and local institutions of postsecondary education to develop and integrate standards-based academics with career-relevant, industry-themed pathways and work-based learning opportunities that are aligned to high-need, high-growth, or emerging regional economic sectors. Additionally, CDE is distributing $900,000,000 through the CTE Incentive Grant Program, which is a three-year (2016-2019) statewide grant with the goal of providing pupils in K-12 with the knowledge and skills necessary to transition to employment and postsecondary education. The CDE has also developed a strong community of practice on secondary transitions and has integrated work-based learning approaches for students with disabilities; ensured WIOA Title II grantees have the flexibility to match curriculum with the goals and objectives of other WIOA funded programs; and implemented an evaluation process for the Coordinated Student Support programs that utilizes information provided by program participants to help improve programs. (Page 56) Title II

Career Pathways

~~Additionally, the State Board has entered into an agreement with CDSS, the CWDA, and the Chancellor’s Office of Supportive Services to encourage and promote local partnerships that articulate subsidized employment programs operated by County Welfare Departments with career pathways programs, including “Regional Sector Pathway” programs identified and developed in WIOA regional plans. Where robust partnerships develop, these pathway programs should be designed to service TANF recipients, taking care to meet the particular client needs of those being served.
The State Board has entered into a similar agreement with DOR to promote access to competitive integrated employment at the local level, in coordination with the California Competitive Integrated Employment Blueprint partners, the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) and the California Department of Education (CDE), so as to ensure opportunities for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities to prepare for and obtain quality jobs. (Page 123) Title IV

The State Board has entered into an agreement with SBE/CDE to support and encourage the integration of work-based learning activities in all locally funded WIOA youth programs to involve interactions with industry professionals and include career awareness, career exploration, internships and career pathways training activities. (Page 135) Title IV

The State Board will also review regional plans to ensure compliance with state guidance and WIOA requirements for regional plans, and will share regional plan content with state partners, including information pertaining to prioritized sectors and career pathways identified in the course of the regional planning process. The sharing of this information will facilitate, as appropriate, engagement with regional efforts by other State Plan partners such as DOR ETP, and CalWORKs. (Page) Title IV

Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE). (Page 159) Title IV

Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One-Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 569) Title IV

 DOR will provide access to Vocational Rehabilitation services including training, self-advocacy training, assessments, career counseling/exploration; OJT/work experience; benefits planning; job placement services and assistive technology for eligible individuals with disabilities. (Page 605) Title IV
 

Apprenticeship

Work-Based Learning Experiences: CDOR VR team members will arrange for on-the-job trainings, internships, apprenticeships, work experiences, and other work-based learning experiences for students with disabilities through direct interaction with businesses, Transition Partnership Programs third-party cooperative arrangements, and through vocational services provided through other contracts or fee-for-service arrangements through local educational agencies or CRPs. (Page 427) Title IV

CA Career Innovations: Work-Based Learning Model Demonstration. The CDOR has partnered with San Diego State University, Interwork Institute to evaluate the effects and benefits of work-based learning experiences to prepare students with disabilities to enter post-secondary education and competitive integrated employment. The CDOR anticipates that 800 students with disabilities will participate in the project, including students with the most significant disabilities, who are ages 16 through 21, and have Individualized Education Program or 504 plans. (Page 433) Title IV

Objective 1.2: Beginning July 1, 2018, and annually thereafter, the CDOR will provide no less than 2,000 students with disabilities with work-based learning experiences at an average of 100 hours per student for pre-employment transition services. Strategies: • Continue to contract for approximately $4.0 million dollars annually to local educational agencies for direct funding of work experience placements for students with disabilities. Achieved: Over 2,000 CDOR consumers received work-based learning (work experience) through the WE Can Work contracts and Transition Partnership Program contracts during FFY 2017. Goal 2: Outreach to potentially eligible students with disabilities to enhance awareness of, and the opportunities to receive, CDOR services. (Page 479) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Ticket to Work and Self—Sufficiency Program
The CDOR actively coordinates with the Ticket to Work and Self—Sufficiency Program. Ticket to Work is a voluntary work incentive program for Social Security Disability Insurance or Supplemental Security Income beneficiaries between the ages of 18 and 64 who are interested in going to work. The Ticket to Work Program provides beneficiaries with access to VR, training, and placement services, as well as other services and support. Beneficiaries can use their ticket to obtain employment services and support from CDOR or they can take their ticket to an approved service provider called an Employment Network. A ticket cannot be assigned to an Employment Network and in—use with CDOR at the same time. The CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners and VR Counselors have an active role in the Ticket to Work program. CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners verify ticket status, provide information as needed, and facilitate referrals to Employment Networks at case closure. VR counselors distribute CDOR’s Ticket to Work fact sheet at intake, verify the ticket status prior to approving the Individualized Plan for Employment, and facilitate sequential services.  (Page 422) Title IV

Timing of Transition to Extended Services
Once a consumer has maintained stability on the job for at least 60 days, the funding for and provision of job coaching transitions to an extended services provider. The VR Counselor continues to track the consumer’s progress and job stability during the transition period. If the consumer maintains job stabilization for 60 days after transition to extended services, the case is Closed—Rehabilitated. Transition to extended service providers is essential to maintain consistency and support for consumers receiving supported employment services. CDOR works to identify funding sources for extended services, collaborates with extended service providers, and identifies sources of extended services, including natural supports which are vital for the long-term success of the consumer. Sources of extended services for a consumer eligible for supported employment services include: public resources such as the California Department of Developmental Services and Ticket to Work Programs; private resources such as trust funds, private non—profits, religious or community organizations, and family; and natural supports to ensure the consumer receiving supported employment services has greater success in the work environment. (Page 488) Title IV

After determining eligibility, through a comprehensive assessment and planning process and in collaboration with the SVRC-QRP, the consumer develops an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that identifies the employment goal and required VR services to achieve that goal. VR plan services may include, but are not limited to:

• Counseling and guidance.
• Referrals and assistance to get services from other agencies.
•  Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Job search and placement assistance.
• Vocational and other training services, including, but not limited to, pre-employment training and soft skills training.
• Evaluation of physical and mental impairments.
• On-the-job or personal assistance services.
•  Interpreter services.
•  Rehabilitation and orientation or mobility services for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and/or blind or low vision.
• Occupational licenses, tools, equipment, initial stocks, and supplies.
• Technical assistance for self-employment.
• Rehabilitation assistive technology services and devices.
• Supported employment services.
• Services to the family.
• Transportation as required, such as travel and related expenses, that is necessary to enable the consumer to participate in a VR service.
• Transition services for students.
• Work Incentive Planning, which includes providing information on potential employment earning impacts to Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability Income (SSDI), and Ticket to Work (TTW).
• Expansion of employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including, but are not limited to, professional employment and self-employment.
• Post-employment services. (Pages 524- 545) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Clients/Service Population: WIOA Section 167 grantees serve eligible migrant/seasonal farmworkers and their dependents. Eligible farmworkers are those individuals who primarily depend on employment in agricultural labor that is characterized by chronic unemployment and underemployment.

Strengths: WIOA Section 167 grantees have well-developed relationships with Local Boards and the AJCC system, provide occupational skills training, related supportive services, and housing assistance to the MSFW population. Many Section 167 grantees also qualify as Eligible Training Providers, list programs on the State ETPL, and also receive referrals from AJCCs.

CDOR Response — Coordination with Employers. The WIOA calls for a description of how the designated State unit will work with employers to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities in order to facilitate the provision of: 1) VR services; and, 2) transition services for youth, and Pre—Employment Transition Services for students. In regard to coordination with employers and VR services, CDOR provides this description through the “Business Engagement” goals and objectives in Description (o)(1) — State’s Strategies. (Page 433) Title IV

Data Collection

Data Collection: The degree to which the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance. (Page 251) Title II

Data Collection: The degree to which the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance. (Page 253-254) Title I

The Cross-System Analytics and Assessment for Learning and Skills Attainment (CAAL-SKILLS) data initiative is an interagency and multi-departmental effort to pool participant and program performance data across workforce, education, and human service programs and funding streams. CAAL-SKILLS will use common performance measures to examine participating program outcomes by region, provider, service, demographics, and industry. The project will develop the capacity to evaluate and assess participating programs efficacy, allowing program administrators and policymakers access to actionable data so that programs can be designed to improve program participant outcomes. CAAL-SKILLS is intended to meet the statutory requirements of AB 2148 (K. Mullin, Chapter 385, Statutes of 2014) and AB 1336 (K. Mullin, Chapter 211, Statutes of 2017) and WIOA 116(e) evaluation and assessment requirements. Participating departments include CWDB, DSS, ETP, DIR-DAS, EDD, CCCCO, CDE, SBE and DOR. The following information provides an overview of progress to date: November 2016 - January 2017. (Page 259) Title II

511

~~Objective 8.2: From July 1, 2018, to June 30, 2020, the Achieving Community Employment services team will provide at least 17,000 individuals earning subminimum wage with career counseling and information and referral services in partnership with over 130 14(c) Certificate Holders / Employers (based on Department of Labor Lists of all registered 14c certificate holders and number of workers paid subminimum wage issued in October 2017).

Strategies:

• The CDOR career counseling and information and referral service provision will include individualized person-centered services for individuals expressing a desire to explore and achieve competitive integrated employment.
• Increase outreach efforts with caregivers, partners, and employers to promote the benefits of transitioning individuals from subminimum wage jobs to competitive integrated employment.
• The CDOR’s Achieving Community Employment services team counselors will help individuals receiving career counseling and information and referral to enroll in VR services in collaboration with local CDOR staff; and will track, monitor, and support the individuals as they navigate through the VR services towards successful achievement of competitive integrated employment. (Page 473) Title IV

Goal 7

• Coordinated and collaborated with state partners, the California Department of Education and the California Department of Developmental Services, through an Interagency Leadership Workgroup to implement a statewide cross-departmental partnership.
• Coordinated with local 14 (c) certificate holders to provide information about competitive integrated employment opportunities to individuals employed at subminimum wage.
• Educated partners and employers regarding competitive integrated employment opportunities, outcomes, and supports for adults and youth with disabilities. (Page 483) Title IV

Collaboration with Schools Regarding Required Documentation Specified in Section 511 Regarding Career Exploration Activities for Individuals Considering Sub-Minimum Wage Employment
The CDOR and California Department of Education Interagency Agreement includes specific requirements related to individuals considering sub-minimum wage employment. Actions include, but are not limited to:
• Communication by the California Department of Education with local educational agencies, parents, guardians, teachers, and students about the Section 511 requirements.
• CDOR maintains the documentation and provides a copy to the individual within specified timelines under 34 CFR 397.
• The local educational agency documents any services provided and gives the documentation to the student and CDOR.
• If a youth with a disability or, as applicable, the youth’s parent or guardian, refuses, through informed choice, to participate in the activities required by Section 511 or the implementing regulations in 34 CFR 397, documentation must, at a minimum:
• Contain the information in 34 CFR 397.10(a)(2); and
• Be provided by the CDOR to the youth within 10 calendar days of the youth’s refusal to participate.
• The CDOR School Liaison meets with local educational agency partners at least annually and review Section 511 requirements within the statewide interagency agreement. (Page 465) Title IV

 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The State Board is committed to ensuring individuals with disabilities have physical and programmatic access to the AJCC system and services. The State Board, in consultation with chief elected officials and Local Boards, will establish objective criteria and procedures to evaluate the AJCCs and delivery system for effectiveness. The evaluation will include how well the local job centers ensure equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities to participate in or benefit from AJCC services. The evaluation must also include criteria evaluating how well the centers and local delivery systems take actions to comply with the disability-related regulations implementing WIOA section 188, set forth in 29 CFR part 37. (Page 272) Title II

The CDOR is providing intensive on-site regional training to workforce partners on topics that range from how to write accessible documents to disability awareness and etiquette. The CDOR has scheduled 82 statewide trainings through 2019. The CDOR also provides information on accessible meeting spaces, client flow in America’s Job Center of California, and technical assistance to CDOR District Administrators and Team Managers that sit on boards conducting accessibility reviews. The CDOR collaborates with the California Workforce Association in delivering training to the workforce development systems through the workforce development boards, regional planning units, and America’s Job Center of California staff on disability rights and awareness, employment opportunities, and equal access for individuals with disabilities. Training opportunities will become available through the California Training Institute of the California Workforce Association which will provide flexibility for the California Workforce Development Board, regional planning units, and America Job Center of California to address any disability related training needs. The CDOR provides training, technical assistance, and consultation to state and local government staff, public organizations, employers, and small businesses regarding disability related issues, equal employment opportunities, and physical and digital access for individuals with disabilities. The CDOR also collaborates with state entities to ensure that the communication and information technology infrastructure such as web, web content, information technology procurement, telecommunication, and any public or government communication is accessible for individuals with disabilities and others who use assistive technology. (Page 477) Title IV

DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal law, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K-12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners. (Page 563) Title IV 11.

CWDB will draft local and regional guidance and DOR will provide technical assistance, through staff or referrals to local resources, to the Local Boards that will ensure a level of one stop accessibility for individuals with disabilities that is consistent with state and federal requirements pertaining to accessibility. DOR and CWDB will provide a consistent message to both Local Boards and DOR district offices concerning state policy on these matters. DOR and CWDB staff will work jointly to assess the level of partnership in One-Stops and current compliance with known future regulatory requirements regarding access to services for persons with disabilities. These requirements include providing services to job seekers through co-location, cross -training, or direct access through real-time technology. This information gathered from the assessment will be used to ensure that all districts and Local Boards are on a path to compliance with all state and federal laws. DOR will be consulted by Local Boards regarding CAPs for hard to resolve concerns. (Page 604) Title IV

Partners CWDB and DOR agree that a memorandum of understanding (MOU) will be updated between each DOR district and the corresponding Local Board concerning the operation of the One-Stop delivery system in the local area including: services to be provided, funding sources and mechanisms, methods of referral between One-Stop operator and One-Stop partners, methods to ensure needs of individuals with disabilities are addressed, including physical and programmatic accessibility, and duration of the MOU. (Page 608) Title IV

Partners agree to work collaboratively at the state, regional, and local level to build capacity and increase professional development for One-Stop staff for the purpose of ensuring programmatic, physical, and electronic access, and increase employment opportunities for youth. Additionally, partners will support Local Boards to promote best practices in physical and programmatic accessibility, including: facilities, programs, services, technology and materials. Partners will work jointly to identify models of One-Stop partnerships that support youth programs, as well as the purpose of these partnerships, and the manner in which these partnerships elevate service delivery so as to improve client outcomes. To ensure the WIOA youth vision of supporting an integrated service delivery system and framework, partners and local areas will leverage other federal, state, local, and philanthropic resources to support in-school and out-of-school youth. (Page 622) Title IV

Vets

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 48) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist. (Page 270) Title I

The state has implemented a policy to ensure Local Areas have a process in place for referring veterans with significant barriers to employment to career services provided by the JVSG program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist; (Page 676) Title IV

EDD is California’s designated state workforce agency and administers the State’s Jobs for Veterans Program Grant (JVSG). The JVSG supports two principal staff positions: Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist; and Local Veterans’ Employment Representative. The EDD operates and delivers outreach and career services to veterans with significant barriers to employment and employer outreach and workforce services with DOL-VETS funds. To ensure access to services for veterans and veterans with significant barriers to employment, the state has established formal guidance regarding priority of service for veterans that all AJCC staff must follow. EDD Workforce Services Directive WSD08-10 provides this guidance. This guidance is being updated to include the new WIOA references and will be reissued once this is done. (Page 598) Title IV

Mental Health

~~Strengths: DOR employs qualified SVRC-QRPs with master’s degrees who are trained in assessment, career planning, job placement, and assistive technology services to meet the employment needs of eligible individuals with disabilities. DOR utilizes a consumer-centered approach to service delivery through a team that includes SVRC-QRPs, service coordinators, employment coordinators, and other support staff to deliver effective and timely consumer services throughout the state. The employment coordinators provide labor market analysis, employer engagement, disability sensitivity training, and other supportive services to assist clients in achieving an employment outcome. Coupled with the direct services provided by the team, DOR maintains a network of partnerships with community based disability organizations and other public agencies, including high schools, community colleges, universities, and county mental health agencies to provide a greater range of employment services and opportunities to DOR consumers than would otherwise be available through any single agency. Lastly, given its focus and expertise, DOR has positioned itself to provide California’s leadership voice in state government and administers other programs, including the Disability Access Services, to assist in removing barriers to full inclusion of individuals with disabilities in the workforce, in state government, and in community life. (Page 59-60) Title I

The scope of business solutions that may be provided at Rapid Response events is not restricted to the activities described in Section 134 of WIOA. Local Boards are encouraged to leverage other local or state funding sources to provide a broader scope of business solutions. Examples include assisting with Trade Adjustment Assistance, Unemployment Insurance claim filing, economic development, financial assistance counseling, and mental health counseling. (Page 296) Title II

Program Element 10 - Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling
This program element provides individualized counseling to participants and may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling, mental health counseling, and referral to partner programs. Local Areas and youth service providers may directly provide counseling. When a Local Area or youth service provider refers a youth for counseling services that they are unable to provide, the Local Area or service provider must coordinate with the referred counseling organization to ensure continuity of service (TEGL 21-16). (Page 325) Title II

This program element provides individualized counseling to participants and may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling, mental health counseling, and referral to partner programs. Local Areas and youth service providers may directly provide counseling. When a Local Area or youth service provider refers a youth for counseling services that they are unable to provide, the Local Area or service provider must coordinate with the referred counseling organization to ensure continuity of service (TEGL 21-16). (Page 348) Title II

Coordination with the State Agency Responsible for Providing Mental Health Services
In California, the State agency responsible for mental health services is the California Department of Health Care Services. CDOR has developed a Memorandum of Understanding with Department of Health Care Services to establish a framework for collaboration between CDOR and Department of Health Care Services to provide local technical assistance and support in order to strengthen existing CDOR Mental Health Cooperative Programs or to develop new patterns of vocational rehabilitation services available to individuals living with severe mental illness, with the ultimate goal of ensuring that consumers have access to a comprehensive, coordinated, and quality service delivery system. (Page 422) Title IV

Non—educational Agencies Serving Out—of—School Youth The CDOR serves out—of—school youth through multiple venues and methods. CDOR Districts provide unique types of programs and services for youth and adults with disabilities. The majority of programs are with educational agencies (short or long-term training or educational programs). The local CDOR Districts have strong working relationships with the local regional centers that serve youth and adults with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities. Similarly, CDOR Districts also have established working relationships with local county mental health and county welfare programs that also serve youth and adults with psychiatric disabilities. Additionally, some CDOR Districts have also formed connections with foster youth programs. (Page 423) Title IV

To support the provisions of this Interagency Agreement, CDOR established a Cooperative Programs Action Committee comprised of representatives from the California Department of Education, Local Educational Agencies, community colleges, state universities, mental health agencies, and community-based organizations. The Cooperative Programs Action Committee provides feedback to CDOR in the development of policies and procedures to promote the services for individuals with disabilities. (Page 426) Title IV

The CDOR works with over 100 Supported Employment providers statewide with associated locations and satellite offices. The CDOR, the California Department of Developmental Services, and the California Department of Education additionally are establishing Local Partnership Agreements consistent with the Competitive Integrated Employment: Blueprint for Change. The Local Partnership Agreements are anticipated to encourage the sharing of resources to support person centered planning and pre-vocational services that may be provided prior to an individual’s referral to CDOR for Supported Employment. In California, CDOR and the Department of Developmental Services utilize the hourly rates for Supported Employment job coaching, intake, placement, and retention services that are statutorily—defined. The current rates were set in 2008 (Assembly Bill 1781). Sources of extended services vary depending on the individual’s eligibility for other programs or availability of other resources. Funding for extended services for individuals with mental illness may be provided by county mental health agencies, which may allocate Medi—Cal, Mental Health Services Act, or Short—Doyle funds as determined by each county. Social Security Administration Work Incentives, such as Impairment Related Work Expense or an approved Plan for Achieving Self Support, may be used. Supported Employment services provided under Veteran’s Health Administration Compensated Work Therapy Program may also be used to fund extended services. California state regulations do not allow Traumatic Brain Injury state match funds to be used for extended services. Consumers with a Traumatic Brain Injury that require extended services such as ongoing support needed to maintain Supported Employment, such as job coaching, can be served through additional resources at local Independent Living Centers. Whenever possible, building natural supports at the workplace for consumers with Supported Employment needs is encouraged. Natural supports allow the strengthening of the relationship between employer and consumer, supporting long-term successful outcomes and to develop opportunities for competitive integrated employment, to the greatest extent practicable. (Page 431) Title IV

Coordination with the State Agency Responsible for Providing Mental Health Services
In California, the State agency responsible for mental health services is the California Department of Health Care Services. CDOR has developed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Health Care Services to establish a framework for collaboration between CDOR and the Department of Health Care Services to provide local technical assistance and support in order to strengthen existing CDOR Mental Health Cooperative Programs or to develop new patterns of vocational rehabilitation services available to individuals living with severe mental illness, with the ultimate goal of ensuring that consumers have access to a comprehensive, coordinated, and quality service delivery system. The CDOR is also a member of the California Mental Health Planning Council, which evaluates the behavioral health system for accessible and effective care. It advocates for an accountable system of responsive services that are strength-based, recovery-oriented, culturally competent, and cost-effective. (Page 434) Title IV

Possession of a valid license as a Psychologist issued by the California Board of Psychology and possession of an earned Doctorate Degree in Psychology from an educational institution meeting the criteria of Section 2914 of the California Business and Professions Code. Unlicensed individuals who are recruited from outside the State of California and who qualify for licensure may take the examination and may be appointed for a maximum of two years at which time licensure shall have been obtained or the employment shall be terminated.). Experience: Either —
• Two years of experience in the California state service performing clinical psychology duties equivalent to those of a Psychologist (Various Specialties), Psychologist (Health Facility) (Various Specialties), or Psychologist Clinical, Correctional Facility. Or,
• Three years of full—time postdoctoral, post—internship experience in the practice of psychology involving either training, research, consultation, or program planning in mental health services. (Page 442) Title IV

The CDOR will additionally make available services under section 603 to individuals with other disability types that need supported employment services, including those with mental health disabilities, traumatic brain injuries, and other most significant disabilities; and youth who need extended services that are not met under the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (Welf. & Inst. Code, § 4500 et seq.).

The CDOR intends to achieve its supported employment goals and priorities through the following actions:

The CDOR will provide extended services for youth with most significant disabilities for up to four years or until the youth is 25 years of age for those youth who are not eligible for extended services under the Lanterman Act. These may include youth with mental health disabilities, traumatic brain injuries, and other most significant disabilities. (Page 464) Title IV

Client/Service Population: In federal fiscal year 2014, DOR provided services to approximately 98,000 eligible individuals with disabilities, including 6,500 who were blind or visually impaired; 13,300 with cognitive disabilities; 18,200 with learning disabilities; 4,900 with intellectual or developmental disabilities; 6,500 deaf or hard of hearing individuals; 19,100 with physical disabilities; 26,100 with psychiatric disabilities; 1,200 with traumatic brain injury; and 2,200 individuals with other disabilities.

Strengths: DOR employs qualified SVRC-QRPs with master’s degrees who are trained in assessment, career planning, job placement, and assistive technology services to meet the employment needs of eligible individuals with disabilities. DOR utilizes a consumer-centered approach to service delivery through a team that includes SVRC-QRPs, service coordinators, employment coordinators, and other support staff to deliver effective and timely consumer services throughout the state. The employment coordinators provide labor market analysis, employer engagement, disability sensitivity training, and other supportive services to assist clients in achieving an employment outcome. Coupled with the direct services provided by the team, DOR maintains a network of partnerships with community based disability organizations and other public agencies, including high schools, community colleges, universities, and county mental health agencies to provide a greater range of employment services and opportunities to DOR consumers than would otherwise be available through any single agency. Lastly, given its focus and expertise, DOR has positioned itself to provide California’s leadership voice in state government and administers other programs, including the Disability Access Services, to assist in removing barriers to full inclusion of individuals with disabilities in the workforce, in state government, and in community life. (Page 525) TItle IV

Strengths: CalFresh E&T has strong relationships with Local Boards in the counties where it operates and the program is good at ensuring access to mental health and substance abuse services. CalWORKs has a robust subsidized employment program and has a lot of flexibility in the types of services it can provide. CalWORKs has an existing relationship with community colleges to provide support for CalWORKs recipients enrolled in academic and career pathway programs. While maintaining the work-first policies of TANF, recent changes in CalWORKs have increased the emphasis towards a work-focused, skills attainment, and barrier removal agenda to ensure that TANF recipients are positioned to achieve long-term successful outcomes and upward mobility. (Page 526) Title IV

Relevance to Partnership: Many formerly incarcerated and other justice involved individuals are likely to need a whole variety of supportive services as they work to secure employment. The kind of supportive services and the decision whether to provide these services to any given individual depends on that individual’s particular needs and capacity to participate in programming absent the provision of supportive services. Under WIOA, supportive services are defined as “services such as transportation, child care, dependent care, housing, and needs-related payments that are necessary to enable an individual to participate in activities.” In recognizing the lifelong trauma often faced by formerly incarcerated and other justice involved individuals, supportive services can and should include trauma informed healing approaches that foster improved emotional and mental health. The ability to provide supportive services to individuals is contingent on need, the availability of funds, and the roles and responsibilities of the various partners at the Local and Regional level. WIOA Title I funds can be used for the provision of supportive services but every dollar spent on supportive services for a particular individual is a dollar that cannot be spent on broader program costs. The partners may want to consider pursuing specific resources through the budget process to fund supportive services for the formerly incarcerated and other justice involved under the partnership. (Page 631) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

EDD is the largest public workforce development institution in the country and a member of the State Board. Located within LWDA alongside the State Board, EDD administers the WIOA Title I, federal Wagner-Peyser Act (WPA, WIOA Title III), labor market information, Disability Insurance, Paid Family Leave, Unemployment Insurance (UI), Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), and youth, disability, and veterans programs. EDD is also California’s major tax collection agency, administering the audit and collection of payroll taxes and maintaining the employment records for more than 17 million California workers. One of the largest departments in state government, handling over $100 billion annually, EDD has nearly 9,000 employees providing services at more than 200 locations throughout the state. Those services most relevant to the workforce system include all of the following:

• job search and placement services to job seekers including counseling, testing, occupational and labor market information, assessment, and referral to employers • recruiting services and special technical services for employers • program evaluation • developing linkages between services funded under WPA and related federal or state legislation, including the provision of labor exchange services at educational sites • providing services for workers who have received notice of permanent layoff or impending layoff, or workers in occupations which are experiencing limited demand due to technological change, impact of imports, or plant closures • collecting and analyzing California’s labor market information and employment data • developing a management information system and compiling and analyzing reports from the system and • administering the “work test” for the state unemployment compensation system and providing job finding and placement services for Unemployment Insurance claimants

Complementary Roles of EDD and the State Board The primary role of the State Board is policy development, while EDD is responsible for Wagner-Peyser job services, WIOA compliance, local technical assistance, administrative oversight, and the provision of labor market information. The State Board and EDD collaborate closely to implement the Governor’s vision and the policy objectives of the State Plan.

Clients/Service Population: EDD processes over 1.5 million initial unemployment insurance claims per year, over half a million disability insurance claims, and provides job services to 1.5 million people through Wagner-Peyser programs. EDD also operates several programs for targeted populations including job services programs for veterans, the disabled, youth, TAA, and foster youth. Strengths: EDD’s online labor exchange system, The California Job Openings Browse System (CalJOBSSM) is accessible to both employers and job seekers throughout the state. CalJOBSSM contains over half a million job listings and is accessed by more than a million job seekers every year. (Page 51) Title 1 EDD is the largest public workforce development institution in the country and a member of the State Board. Located within LWDA alongside the State Board, EDD administers the WIOA Title I, federal Wagner-Peyser Act (WPA, WIOA Title III), labor market information, Disability Insurance, Paid Family Leave, Unemployment Insurance (UI), Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), and youth, disability, and veterans programs. EDD is also California’s major tax collection agency, administering the audit and collection of payroll taxes and maintaining the employment records for more than 17 million California workers. One of the largest departments in state government, handling over $100 billion annually, EDD has nearly 9,000 employees providing services at more than 200 locations throughout the state. Those services most relevant to the workforce system include all of the following:

• Job search and placement services to job seekers including counseling, testing, occupational and labor market information, assessment, and referral to employers • Recruiting services and special technical services for employers • Program evaluation • Developing linkages between services funded under WPA and related federal or state legislation, including the provision of labor exchange services at educational sites • Providing services for workers who have received notice of permanent layoff or impending layoff, or workers in occupations which are experiencing limited demand due to technological change, impact of imports, or plant closures • Collecting and analyzing California’s labor market information and employment data • Developing a management information system and compiling and analyzing reports from the system and • Administering the “work test” for the state unemployment compensation system and providing job finding and placement services for UI claimants. (Page 518) Title I 

Provided training on core programs, including California Training Benefits, Unemployment Insurance (UI), Trade Adjustment Assistance, Veteran’s programs, and Youth and Dislocated Worker programs. • Developed and provided two hour training on the UI program. The training included UI claim filing eligibility basics, UI claim management, maneuvering UI’s public facing computer system, and understanding notices sent to claimants. The UI programs. The UI training also included seek work requirements and the results of non-compliance. (Page 381) Title II EDD agrees to achieve program coordination and, to the extent possible, integration, of the following programs in the America’s Job Center system of California: Wagner-Peyser Act, Trade Adjustment Assistance Act, Migrant Seasonal Farmworker outreach programs, Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG), Unemployment Insurance, Re-employment Services and Eligibility Assessment Activities (RESEA) and Labor Market Information as negotiated and articulated in the local MOUs. (Page 624) Title IV

Small Business Development Centers of California (SBDC) - The SBDCs provide training and nocost one-on-one counseling to help small businesses and entrepreneurs overcome obstacles to growth. Topics range from: start-up assistance, planning for growth and expansion, technology and innovation and access to capital. Work Sharing Program/Short Term Compensation - Work Sharing is described in Section 1279.5 of the California Unemployment Insurance Code and provides employers with an alternative to layoffs and provides their employees with the payment of reduced Unemployment Insurance benefits. (Page 650) Title IV

Local Workforce Development Areas may conduct group workshops (e.g. job search assistance and/or resume writing workshops) as part of on-site Rapid Response to business closures or significant layoffs and charge the cost to their 25 Percent Rapid Response funds if they have determined, in consultation with the local workforce services manager, that EDD workforce services staff are not available to conduct such workshops. Layoff aversion activities are a required activity in WIOA. It is the state’s policy priority that the full scope of required Rapid Response activities, as described in the WIOA, must be provided in each Local Area. The scope of business solutions that may be provided at Rapid Response events is not restricted to the activities described in Section 134 of WIOA. Local Boards are encouraged to leverage other local or state funding sources to provide a broader scope of business solutions. Examples include assisting with Trade Adjustment Assistance, Unemployment Insurance claim filing, economic development, financial assistance counseling, and mental health counseling. (Page 653) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 105

Senate Bill No. 289 CHAPTER 846 An act to add Section 14132.993 to the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to Medi-Cal. - 10/12/2019

“This bill would require the retention of placement on the waiting list for, or the reenrollment in, specified HCBS waiver programs for an individual who is a dependent child or spouse of an active duty military service member and who transfers out of state with the military service member on official military orders, if the individual subsequently reestablishes residence in this state and meets other specified procedural requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB-81: Developmental services - 06/27/2019

“(1) Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

This bill would require the department to consult, commencing in the summer of 2019, with specified stakeholders, including representatives of the Developmental Services Task Force and the Department of Rehabilitation, to discuss system reforms to better serve consumers with developmental disabilities, to perform various duties, such as evaluating compliance with federal rules relating to specified services, to report on the progress of these efforts, and to post specified material on its internet website, including a summary of public comments.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

California Medicaid State Plan - 06/27/2019

~~“The Medicaid State Plan is based on the requirements set forth in Title XIX of the Social Security Act and is a comprehensive written document created by the State of California that describes the nature and scope of its Medicaid (Medi-Cal) program.  It serves as a contractual agreement between the State of California and the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and must be administered in conformity with specific requirements of Title XIX of the Social Security Act and regulations outlined in Chapter IV of the Code of Federal Regulations. The State Plan contains all information necessary for CMS to determine if the State can receive Federal Financial Participation (FFP) for its Medicaid program. This website includes the current Medicaid State Plan for California as well as State Plan Amendments (SPAs). For all Title XXI- Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) State Plan Amendments please visit the CHIP Homepage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Department of Rehabilitation “Hot Jobs” - 06/12/2019

~~“DOR believes in the talent and potential of individuals with disabilities. We have posted the following jobs in partnership with our business partners who are actively working to diversify their workplace by including opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Anyone can apply for the jobs listed below, but DOR program participants are strongly encouraged to work with their employment team to prepare for the opportunities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

EDD awards $2 million to provide job opportunities and training for people with disabilities - 05/14/2019

~~• “The California Employment Development Department (EDD) today awarded $2 million in Disability Employment Accelerator grants to provide job training and employment opportunities to people with disabilities. The EDD awarded the funding to six workforce development organizations that serve eight counties including Inyo, Kern, Kings, Los Angeles, Mono, Sacramento, San Diego and Tulare. “People with disabilities contribute greatly to the workplace,” said EDD Director Patrick W. Henning. “These grants will fund programs for people with disabilities that can lead to employment, career advancement and economic independence. ”The organizations will work with local businesses in high-growth industries to develop “earn-and-learn” strategies that include paid work experience, transitional jobs and on-the-job training opportunities for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Home and Community-Based Alternatives (HCBA) Waiver - 05/06/2019

~~“The HCBA Waiver (formerly the Nursing Facility/Acute Hospital (NF/AH) Waiver) was approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on May 16, 2017.  Medicaid's Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver programs, including the HCBA Waiver, are authorized under Section1915(c) of the Social Security Act; governed by Title 42, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR); and administered by CMS.

The HCBA Waiver provides care management services to persons at risk for nursing home or institutional placement. The care management services are provided by a multidisciplinary care team comprised of a nurse and social worker. The care management team coordinates Waiver and State Plan services (e.g., medical, behavioral health, In-Home Supportive Services, etc.), and arranges for other available long-term services and supports available in the local community. Care management and Waiver services are provided in the Participant’s community-based residence. This residence can be privately owned, secured through a tenant lease arrangement, or the residence of a Participant’s family member. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California CIE: Blueprint for Change - 05/04/2019

~~“The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), California Department of Education (CDE),  and California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) have entered into a new agreement consistent with the State’s “Employment First” policy and other laws to make employment in an integrated setting, at a competitive wage, for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) its highest priority. .The California Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) Blueprint is the combined effort of the CDE, DOR and DDS, in partnership with a wide range of stakeholders including Disability Rights of California (DRC), with leadership provided by the California Health and Human Services Agency (CHHS). The purpose of the Blueprint is to increase opportunities for Californians with ID/DD to prepare for and participate in CIE.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HCBS Waiver for Californians with Developmental Disabilities: CA.0336.R04.02 - 05/01/2019

~~“The purpose of this amendment is to provide time limited rate increases in specific geographic areas for providers of Community-Based Day Services, In-Home Respite Agencies, and providers of Community Living Arrangement Services under the Alternative Residential Model. This amendment will also include Community Crisis Homes as a new provider type under Behavioral Intervention Services, add Community Based Adult Services as a new waiver service, and add Adult Day HealthCare Center as a provider type under Community Based Adult Services”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Self-Employment - 05/01/2019

~~• “You can use the Ticket to Work program to help you become self-employed or to start your own business. If you are interested in pursuing a self-employment goal, you need to tell potential Employment Networks about your goal, because not all ENs will have experience with helping people who want to become self-employed. It is important to find an EN that has the resources to help you meet your goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Citations

DRAFT 2019–20 California State Transition Plan for Career Technical Education - 04/12/2019

~~ “California is dedicated to the belief that all students can learn and that students with disabilities and English Learners must be guaranteed equal opportunity to access career pathways programs to realize their greatest potential. Through statewide employment first policies combined with efforts to ensure competitive integrated employment, California is ensuring high quality educational programs, and services for students with disabilities are mapped to employment. In addition, through partnerships with other State agencies including the Department of Rehabilitation and the Department of Developmental Services, eligible recipients are better able to plan, implement, and evaluate services to increase opportunities for students to enter into competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

Senate Bill No. 289 CHAPTER 846 An act to add Section 14132.993 to the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to Medi-Cal. - 10/12/2019

“This bill would require the retention of placement on the waiting list for, or the reenrollment in, specified HCBS waiver programs for an individual who is a dependent child or spouse of an active duty military service member and who transfers out of state with the military service member on official military orders, if the individual subsequently reestablishes residence in this state and meets other specified procedural requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB-81: Developmental services - 06/27/2019

“(1) Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

This bill would require the department to consult, commencing in the summer of 2019, with specified stakeholders, including representatives of the Developmental Services Task Force and the Department of Rehabilitation, to discuss system reforms to better serve consumers with developmental disabilities, to perform various duties, such as evaluating compliance with federal rules relating to specified services, to report on the progress of these efforts, and to post specified material on its internet website, including a summary of public comments.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB-1274 Developmental services: data exchange - 09/17/2018

~“An act to amend Section 4514 of, and to add Section 10850.6 to, the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to developmental services.” The State Department of Social Services shall provide the State Department of Developmental Services with CalWORKs and CalFresh eligibility and enrollment data for consumers served by the State Department of Developmental Services for the purposes of monitoring and evaluating employment outcomes to determine the effectiveness of the Employment First Policy.”

Systems
  • Other

AB-1111 Removing Barriers to Employment Act: Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative - 10/15/2017

~~“Existing law, the California Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, establishes the California Workforce Development Board as the body responsible for assisting the Governor in the development, oversight, and continuous improvement of California’s workforce investment system and the alignment of the education and workforce investment systems to the needs of the 21st century economy and workforce. That act requires the establishment of a local workforce development board in each local workforce development area of the state to, among other things, carry out analyses of the economic conditions in the local region.

This bill would enact the Removing Barriers to Employment Act, which would establish the Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative administered by the California Workforce Development Board. The bill would specify that the purpose of the initiative is to create a grant program to provide individuals with barriers to employment the services they need to enter, participate in, and complete broader workforce preparation, training, and education programs aligned with regional labor market needs. The bill would specify that people completing these programs should have the skills and competencies to successfully enter the labor market, retain employment, and earn wages that lead to self-sufficiency and economic security. The bill would require the board to develop criteria for the selection of grant recipients, as specified. The bill also would specify the criteria by which grants are required to be evaluated, the populations that are eligible to be served by grants, and the activities eligible for grant funding.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

AB-1607 An act to amend Sections 4688.21 and 4850.3 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, Rrelating to Developmental Sservices. - 09/19/2017

~~“Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Existing law establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities….

This bill would authorize a consumer in a supported employment program or work activity program who has the stated goal of integrated competitive employment in his or her IPP to request to use tailored day services in conjunction with his or her existing program to achieve that goal, if specified criteria are met, including that the type, amount, and provider of tailored day service allowed under these provisions is determined through the IPP process. The bill would specify the maximum hours of tailored day services that may be authorized in conjunction with existing services under these provisions.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Assembly Bill No. 107 CHAPTER 18 - 06/27/2017

~~“Existing law requires the regional center contracts described above to include, among other things, annual performance objectives, as specified. Existing law also establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities.

This bill would require the annual performance objectives included in regional center contracts to measure progress, and report outcomes, in implementing the Employment First Policy, as specified.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Cal. Welfare and Institutions Code §§4869 - 06/03/2017

~~“In furtherance of the purposes of this division to make services and supports available to enable persons with developmental disabilities to approximate the pattern of everyday living available to people without disabilities of the same age, to support the integration of persons with developmental disabilities into the mainstream life of the community, and to bring about more independent, productive, and normal lives for the persons served, it is the policy of the state that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment shall be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities. This policy shall be known as the Employment First Policy”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California ABLE Legislation (AB 1553) - 06/22/2016

Existing federal law, the Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 (ABLE Act… encourages and assists individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting persons with disabilities to maintain their health, independence, and quality of life by excluding from gross income distributions used for qualified disability expenses by a beneficiary of a Qualified ABLE Program established and maintained by a state, as specified…   This bill would authorize the ABLE Act Board to enter into a multistate contract with an account servicer in order to implement these provisions and to enter into a long-term contract with an account servicer, as provided.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

California Employment of Persons with Disabilities (AB 925) - 02/01/2016

"This bill would require the California Health and Human Services Agency and the Labor and Workforce Development Agency, using existing resources, to create a sustainable, comprehensive strategy to accomplish various goals aimed at bringing persons with disabilities into employment.”

 

“The bill would also require the committee, to the extent that funds are available, to make grants to counties and local workforce investment boards in order to develop local strategies for enhancing employment opportunities for people with disabilities, and to fund comprehensive local and regional benefits planning and outreach programs to assist persons with disabilities in removing barriers to work.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

California ABLE Legislation (AB 449) - 10/11/2015

Existing federal law, the Stephen Beck Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 (ABLE Act)…encourages and assists individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting persons with disabilities to maintain their health, independence, and quality of life by excluding from gross income distributions used for qualified disability expenses by a beneficiary of a Qualified ABLE Program established and maintained by a state, as specified.   This bill would…conform to these federal income tax law provisions relating to the ABLE Act under the Corporation Tax Law, as provided. The bill would also establish in state government the ABLE program trust for purposes of implementing the federal ABLE Act. The bill would authorize the ABLE Act Board to adopt regulations to implement the program. The bill would create the program fund, a continuously appropriated fund, thereby making an appropriation, and the administrative fund, as specified. The bill would require the board to  Administer the program in compliance with the requirements of the federal ABLE Act.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

California Executive Order S-4-05 - 11/28/2005

“ …WHEREAS, State Government has an opportunity and a responsibility to lead by example, ensuring individuals with disabilities have an open door to the many opportunities in public service;… NOW, THEREFORE, I, ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor of the State of California do hereby issue this order to become effective immediately: 1. All state agencies, departments, boards and commissions shall utilize best efforts with respect to recruitment, hiring, advancement, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment and issue clear, written directives to their managers and supervisors prohibiting discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. 2. Each state agency shall comply with existing law and annually review its hiring practices to identify any barriers to employment of individuals with disabilities, and, in consultation with their disability advisory committee, take appropriate action to eliminate any non job-related barriers to the integration of individuals with disabilities into the workforce. 3. All state agencies, departments, boards, and commissions shall utilize the Limited Examination and Appointment Program (LEAP) lists in filling vacancies. LEAP lists provide a ready pool of qualified candidates, who happen to have a disability, for a variety of jobs. 4. The State Personnel Board shall provide statewide leadership, in partnership with the Department of Rehabilitation, to coordinate and provide technical guidance to fulfill the intent of this executive order…”

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 43

Department of Rehabilitation “Hot Jobs” - 06/12/2019

~~“DOR believes in the talent and potential of individuals with disabilities. We have posted the following jobs in partnership with our business partners who are actively working to diversify their workplace by including opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Anyone can apply for the jobs listed below, but DOR program participants are strongly encouraged to work with their employment team to prepare for the opportunities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

EDD awards $2 million to provide job opportunities and training for people with disabilities - 05/14/2019

~~• “The California Employment Development Department (EDD) today awarded $2 million in Disability Employment Accelerator grants to provide job training and employment opportunities to people with disabilities. The EDD awarded the funding to six workforce development organizations that serve eight counties including Inyo, Kern, Kings, Los Angeles, Mono, Sacramento, San Diego and Tulare. “People with disabilities contribute greatly to the workplace,” said EDD Director Patrick W. Henning. “These grants will fund programs for people with disabilities that can lead to employment, career advancement and economic independence. ”The organizations will work with local businesses in high-growth industries to develop “earn-and-learn” strategies that include paid work experience, transitional jobs and on-the-job training opportunities for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

California CIE: Blueprint for Change - 05/04/2019

~~“The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), California Department of Education (CDE),  and California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) have entered into a new agreement consistent with the State’s “Employment First” policy and other laws to make employment in an integrated setting, at a competitive wage, for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) its highest priority. .The California Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) Blueprint is the combined effort of the CDE, DOR and DDS, in partnership with a wide range of stakeholders including Disability Rights of California (DRC), with leadership provided by the California Health and Human Services Agency (CHHS). The purpose of the Blueprint is to increase opportunities for Californians with ID/DD to prepare for and participate in CIE.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Self-Employment - 05/01/2019

~~• “You can use the Ticket to Work program to help you become self-employed or to start your own business. If you are interested in pursuing a self-employment goal, you need to tell potential Employment Networks about your goal, because not all ENs will have experience with helping people who want to become self-employed. It is important to find an EN that has the resources to help you meet your goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Citations

2019 California Employer’s Guide - 04/01/2019

~~• “Other Services• This guide also contains useful information on the many services that the EDD offers specifically for employers. The EDD supplies information on a wide range of programs, including programs offering tax credits. The EDD also provides a number of employment services, such as job development and job search workshops that are designed to reduce unemployment and, consequently, your taxes. Whether you are a new or established employer, we offer a variety of services to assist you in building a more successful business while complying with California laws.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

CAREER COUNSELING AND INFORMATION AND REFERRAL SERVICES - 01/05/2019

~Providing competitive, integrated employment, career counseling and information and referral (CC&IR) services to all individuals with a significant disability and employed at subminimum wage and known to the California Department of Rehabilitation Services (DOR) is reaffirmed in a recently posted description of DOR services: “The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Section 511 is a federal law that placed new work rules effective July 22, 2016, for entities holding special wage certificates under Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (14(c) employer). WIOA Section 511 requires that individuals with significant disabilities receive specific services and be given an opportunity to explore and obtain community employment. .”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan And Triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) - 01/05/2019

~“The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Portion of the Unified State Plan is developed by DOR to describe the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services provided to Californians with disabilities and identify areas where service delivery can be improved, modified, or enhanced. The State Plan demonstrates DOR’s commitment to changes within the law and empowers individuals to prepare to enter the workforce, maximize employability, and independence.The VR Portion of the Unified State Plan aims to achieve DOR’s mission of working with consumers and other stakeholders to provide services and advocacy resulting in employment, independent living, and equality for individuals with disabilities. You may review the current State Plan below.In addition, every three years the DOR conducts a Comprehensive Statewide Assessment (CSA) of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities in California.  The results of the CSA are then used to shape the goals and objectives in DOR's VR Portion of the State Plan as well as inform other DOR policies and planning efforts. If you have any questions regarding the State Plan or the triennial CSA, please contact the California Department of Rehabilitation's Planning Unit. “ 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Secondary Transition Planning “Compliance” - 12/28/2018

~“Resources and guidelines for educators, parents and agencies that will assist transition age youth develop transition plans that comply with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) are available on the Department of Education’s website.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Self-Determination Program - 12/21/2018

~The website of the California Department of Developmental Services includes a message from former Director Santi J. Rogers, Department of Developmental Disabilities: “All individuals, regardless of ability, have the right to access the basic elements that make-up a good life, beginning with: family, independence, personal responsibility, and freedom of choice. The Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act builds upon these basic fundamentals so that all individuals have the right to live their lives as they choose”. The website also includes links to numerous self-determination resources.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Desert/Mountain Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) Local Partnership Agreement - 11/23/2018

~• “A new collaborative agreement was established between Local Education Agencies (LEAs), the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), the Inland Regional Center (IRC), and the Workforce Development Board, with student participation. Its purpose is to provide employment training and support to individuals in need of additional skills to be ready for competitive, integrated employment (CIE), that includes essential components of Customized Employment. The full scope of the agreement and list of services are available by following the link to the agreement.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

DRAFT 2019–20 California State Transition Plan for Career Technical Education - 04/12/2019

~~ “California is dedicated to the belief that all students can learn and that students with disabilities and English Learners must be guaranteed equal opportunity to access career pathways programs to realize their greatest potential. Through statewide employment first policies combined with efforts to ensure competitive integrated employment, California is ensuring high quality educational programs, and services for students with disabilities are mapped to employment. In addition, through partnerships with other State agencies including the Department of Rehabilitation and the Department of Developmental Services, eligible recipients are better able to plan, implement, and evaluate services to increase opportunities for students to enter into competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Veterans’ Employment-Related Assistance Program (VEAP) Program Year (PY) 2018-19 - 01/11/2019

~“This SFP includes services to veterans with significant barriers to employment, including, but not limited to, special disabled1 or disabled veterans2; homeless veterans; recently separated service members who have been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months; an offender, as identified in WIOA Section 3 (38), who is currently incarcerated or who has been released from incarceration; a veteran lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; a low-income individual [as defined by WIOA Section 3 (36)]; women; and minorities”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

“Local Partnership Agreement Template" - 06/17/2017

~~“The California Department of Education (CDE), the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), and the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) seek to foster an environment of collaboration to increase competitive integrated employment (CIE) opportunities for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

Competitive Integrated Employment is described in plain language by the motto: “Real Work for Real Pay in the Real World.” The term means working for pay (at least minimum wage) in the community alongside people without disabilities. Work can be full-time (up to 40 hours per week) or part-time with the same level of benefits and opportunities for advancement as other employees.

The CIE Blueprint outlines the collaborative efforts between the three departments on a statewide level. A Local Partnership Agreement (LPA) identifies the ways in which partners will work together on a local level. Each agreement is built around the core partners of one or more local educational agencies (LEA), one or more DOR district, and one or more regional centers, and can include any number of additional local community partners.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego-Imperial Counties Developmental Services, Inc. "Employment First" - 05/10/2016

~~California’s Employment First Policy was signed into law in October of 2013, by Governor Brown.dds.ca.govCompetitive employment is finding a job within the community where you are paid about the same as other people doing the same job and at least minimum wage. It could also be working for yourself in your own small business.Information about the Employment First Policy can be found on the website of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities (scdd.ca.gov) as well as the Department of Developmental Services (dds.ca.gov).Employment & Your Individual Program Plan (IPP)When you plan with your service coordinator around employment opportunities, the first option that will be considered is competitive integrated employment. Competitive work is a real choice. Your service coordinator can help you find resources in the community to support your employment goals.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

CA Employment First Memorandum of Understanding - 12/12/2014

This project will use a multi-faceted approach to apply key elements from high performing states in integrated competitive employment and principles of Collaborative Leadership. A unified value, vision, and expectation for competitive integrated employment will be established and will serve as the basis for the strategies used for stimulating policy to practice, training, technical assistance, and a shared method for monitoring progress through available state and local employment data.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Employment First Committee Annual Report (Partnerships) - 01/16/2013

The Council participates in the Alliance for Full Participation California team. The AFP is a collaboration of major national organizations (including the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities) serving or advocating for improved employment outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The California team is facilitated by the Arc of California. The Council has also started coordinating with the California Committee for the Employment of People with Disabilities, established by statute to promote the employment of people with disabilities. Additionally, members of the Employment First Committee continue to actively work with key groups throughout the state to promote Employment First. 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The California Employment Consortium for Youth and Young Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (CECY)

~~“(CECY) is a collaboration of 23 state agencies, centers, and organizations, families, and self-advocates with responsibilities for the education, rehabilitation, employment, and support of youth with disabilities.  CECY is a five-year (2011-2016) Project of National Significance Partnerships in Employment Systems Change grant (#90DN0284) by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD).  The Tarjan Center at UCLA, a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, provides its administrative leadership. “
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

Progressive Employment Concepts (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants) - 04/01/2019

~~“At Progressive Employment Concepts and Community & Employment Services our goal is to provide high quality services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities which enable people to find and maintain employment, to contribute in their communities through volunteerism, to pursue post- secondary education and to start and run small businesses. 

We created this campaign to fund much needed computers, iPads and vehicles. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Breaking Barriers San Diego - 01/07/2016

“A new program funded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Workforce Innovation Fund, Breaking Barriers San Diego (BBSD), assists individuals with disabilities with finding permanent part-time or full-time jobs of their choice.   The network of America’s Job Center of California (AJCC) sites, funded by San Diego Workforce Partnership, will offer customized job placement support based on individuals’ strengths, preferences and skills and an emphasis on starting the job search quickly.   BBSD serves adults with physical and mental disabilities or significant barriers to employment.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

DEI Grantee Abstracts (CA Round 5) - 11/01/2015

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2014, California Employment Development Department, Workforce Services Branch was awarded a Round 2 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DEI Grantee Abstracts (CA Round 2) - 10/01/2014

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2011, California Employment Development Department, Workforce Services Branch was awarded a Round 2 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration.

When this grant ended a Round 5 grant was awarded.  Round 5 began in 2014 and will end in 2017.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

College to Career (C2C) - 01/16/2013

"College to Career (C2C) is a collaborative effort of the California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), California Community College Chancellor’s Office (CCCCO), and the UCLA Tarjan Center UCEDD. This collaboration broke new ground in establishing five, 3-year community college programs that provide youth with intellectual disabilities with education and vocational preparation that will lead to integrated competitive employment".

   
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego State University Interwork Institute’s Creative Support Alternative - Take Charge: Leading the Transition to Adulthood

“The goal of Take Charge is to offer person-driven planning (PDP) to transitioning youth and their families as a strategy to offer skills and experiences resulting in inclusive employment and inclusive lives facilitated by San Diego State University Rehabilitation Counseling (RC) graduate students. In addition, the project will provide educational presentations for students, families, transition teachers, adult service providers, and SDRC staff on the use of PDP to support young adults with developmental disabilities to pursue inclusive employment, including innovative options like micro- enterprise ownership.” Awarded in San Diego County.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Self-Advocacy for Youth (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

“This Self-Advocacy for Youth project goal is to promote self-advocacy and leadership of young adults with developmental disabilities by utilizing person centered planning through trainings and group facilitation of consumers and their advocacy support networks.” Awarded in Fresno County.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kidpower Teenpower Fullpower (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

“This project equips young adults with developmental disabilities and their families with the social emotional tools and skill sets necessary for successful transition to adult life. Outfits adult people with developmental disabilities with the social – emotional tools and skill sets necessary to enter and succeed in gainful work opportunities and increase their self-sufficiency.” Awarded in Multiple Counties.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Transition2Life Project (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

“The Transition2Life Project will provide direct, hands-on training and learning opportunities focusing on effective transitions to inclusive adult lives for young adults with developmental disabilities living in Amador, Calaveras, and Tuolumne counties.” 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

The goal of this project is to implement a “Get a Competitive Edge” Work Safe & Self-Advocacy program for consumers and employees with disabilities as part of The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and Supplement for the Supported Employment Services Program State Plan Program Years 2018 – 2020 - 02/11/2018

~~“Priority 3: Capacity Building

Goal: Establish or enhance partnerships to increase the capacity of CDOR and the WIOA core program partners to improve service delivery for adults and youth with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

“$2 million to assist Californians with disabilities in job searches” - 06/19/2017

~~“People with disabilities in 13 counties will get additional help in landing employment with $2 million in grants announced by the California Employment Development Department today. The Disability Employment Accelerator grants assist people with disabilities obtain skills needed for employment in growing industries such as advanced manufacturing, clean energy, transportation, and healthcare.The disability employment assistance funds will help prepare job seekers with skills and training needed for careers and then connect them with hiring businesses. The organizations receiving the grants will use “earn-and-learn” strategies that empower people with disabilities to earn incomes while they learn new skills that will help them progress into high-growth industries” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD) - 03/12/2017

~~“The California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD)advances employment for people with disabilities by making policy recommendations to the Secretary of the Labor and Workforce Development Agency and the Secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency .

The CCEPD also supports an annual event for youth with disabilities. In November of 2017, the CCEPD voted to adopt the California Youth Leadership Forum for Students with Disabilities (YLF) as the youth event until 2020, unless another model is created by the Youth Event Committee. For more information about the YLF, please visit the DOR YLF website or contact us with any questions.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

CA Employment First: Braiding Day and Employment Services to Build Meaningful Lives - 04/09/2015

This Employment First training presentation focuses on different approaches to promoting Employment First and encouraging integrated, community-based employment opportunities for people with disabilities. Some of the strategies include using Discovery and customized employment with Medicaid waiver day services participants through a braided funding approach including Vocational Rehabilitation. This presentation also provides a number of example case studies.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

The California DEI: Effective Practices in Building an Inclusive Workforce

This presentation summarizes California’s experience with the DEI grant as of 2015. It addresses the history of DEI in the state, the objectives, the strategic service delivery components, the promising practices and the hopes for sustainability after the grant.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

California Customized Employment for Service Members, Veterans & Their Families

This web page discusses Customized Employment as a “Promising Practice for Supporting Employees with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and/or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD),” particularly in the context of US Service Members and Veterans.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

Employment First Committee Annual Report

The Community of Practice (COP) is located within the Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and was formed and funded by the DOE to help improve transition and employment outcomes. This is a voluntary group of educational professionals.   The COP seeks to ensure the seamless transition of services for  youth, ages 16 –22, which will lead to positive post-school outcomes. They carry out their work through a statewide community of practice and a statewide list serve,which disseminates compliance information, resources and evidence-based practices and statewide technical assistance through webinars and conference calls.  Their key goal, with respect to employment ,is integrated ,competitive employment in any area of interest for each individual youth, ages 16-22.  
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California Training Initiatives

“Association of Regional Center Agencies – New day Conference. ARCA sponsored the New Day Conference in Pasadena in September 2012. Over 400 attendees participated in sessions focused on innovations in employment and housing services for individuals with developmental disabilities.” “Four- part employment webinar series aimed to create awareness about employment and to provide a discussion forum for families, individual organizations and professionals.” “Working Conference - Driving Forces Behind Successful Postsecondary Education and Employment for Young Adults with ID and Autism held in Sacramento, CA and sponsored by Think College and California Consortium on Postsecondary Educations and the Center for Disability Studies, University of Hawaii. The conference content addressed significant changes in public policy, insight for promoting inclusive strategies through person-centered protocol and interagency team building to support youth success. … Over 100 families, K-12, rehabilitation, developmental disabilities and higher education professionals, and students with developmental disabilities attended.” “Three-Part webinar series in Triangulating Postsecondary Education Goals for transition specialists and educators. The series aims at identifying postsecondary goals and aligning them with academic and industry standards. This webinar series was hosted by Community of Practice in Secondary Education (CoP).”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Triton Management Services to Pay $110,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Lawsuit - 10/10/2018

~“Triton Management Services, LLC, headquartered in Carlsbad, Calif., agreed to pay $110,000 and provide other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, an employee requiring medical attention and a leave of absence for a disability was denied leave and was instead fired. The EEOC said Triton failed to provide the employee a reasonable accommodation for her disability.

Such alleged conduct violates the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), which makes it unlawful for an employer to fire-or otherwise discriminate against an employee due to a disability.

The EEOC filed suit at the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California (EEOC v. Triton, Inc., Case No.: 3:17-cv-02004-BAS-KSC), after first attempting to reach a voluntary, pre-litigation settlement through its conciliation process.

In addition to monetary relief, the three-year consent decree, which remains under the court's jurisdiction during the term of the decree, includes injunctive relief intended to prevent further workplace discrimination. Triton will review and revise its written policies to achieve compliance with the ADA, provide regular training to all employees regarding the ADA, maintain a log detailing accommodation requests and complaints and conduct regular audits, and oversee recordkeeping and reporting requirements through a designated equal opportunity officer. The EEOC will monitor compliance with the terms of this agreement.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

California Medicaid State Plan - 06/27/2019

~~“The Medicaid State Plan is based on the requirements set forth in Title XIX of the Social Security Act and is a comprehensive written document created by the State of California that describes the nature and scope of its Medicaid (Medi-Cal) program.  It serves as a contractual agreement between the State of California and the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and must be administered in conformity with specific requirements of Title XIX of the Social Security Act and regulations outlined in Chapter IV of the Code of Federal Regulations. The State Plan contains all information necessary for CMS to determine if the State can receive Federal Financial Participation (FFP) for its Medicaid program. This website includes the current Medicaid State Plan for California as well as State Plan Amendments (SPAs). For all Title XXI- Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) State Plan Amendments please visit the CHIP Homepage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Home and Community-Based Alternatives (HCBA) Waiver - 05/06/2019

~~“The HCBA Waiver (formerly the Nursing Facility/Acute Hospital (NF/AH) Waiver) was approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on May 16, 2017.  Medicaid's Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver programs, including the HCBA Waiver, are authorized under Section1915(c) of the Social Security Act; governed by Title 42, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR); and administered by CMS.

The HCBA Waiver provides care management services to persons at risk for nursing home or institutional placement. The care management services are provided by a multidisciplinary care team comprised of a nurse and social worker. The care management team coordinates Waiver and State Plan services (e.g., medical, behavioral health, In-Home Supportive Services, etc.), and arranges for other available long-term services and supports available in the local community. Care management and Waiver services are provided in the Participant’s community-based residence. This residence can be privately owned, secured through a tenant lease arrangement, or the residence of a Participant’s family member. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Waiver for Californians with Developmental Disabilities: CA.0336.R04.02 - 05/01/2019

~~“The purpose of this amendment is to provide time limited rate increases in specific geographic areas for providers of Community-Based Day Services, In-Home Respite Agencies, and providers of Community Living Arrangement Services under the Alternative Residential Model. This amendment will also include Community Crisis Homes as a new provider type under Behavioral Intervention Services, add Community Based Adult Services as a new waiver service, and add Adult Day HealthCare Center as a provider type under Community Based Adult Services”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California HCBS Transition Plan - 02/23/2019

~~“California’s HCBS programs, which are the focus of this Statewide Transition Plan (STP) are either directly administered or overseen by the Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) as the single state agency for Medicaid/Medi-Cal.  However, several of the HCBS waivers and the 1915(i) State Plan program are administered jointly by DHCS and the State or local entity with program responsibility.  Administrative teams comprised of employees from the State department/entity with program responsibility exist at DHCS, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), the Department of Developmental Services (DDS), the California Department of Aging (CDA), and the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH).  The SFDPH administers a HCBS Waiver program in accordance with terms of an Agreement with DHCS.”     

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Amendment to Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for the Developmentally Disabled - 12/14/2018

~“The HCBS waiver is available statewide to provide individuals with developmental disabilities the desired services and supports needed to implement their Individual Program Plan (IPP). The proposed amendment will include the following changes: …Community Based Adult Services

    The addition of Community Based Adult Services as a new service, and establishment of the rate to be the maximum rate based on the Schedule of Maximum Allowances, to align the HCBS Waiver for Persons with Developmental Disabilities with services available in the 1915(i) State Plan”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Fact Sheet: Home and Community Based Setting Rule - 11/28/2018

~“The purpose of the rules is to ensure that individuals receive services in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services to the same degree as individuals who do not receive regional center services. It means that settings need to focus on the nature and quality of individuals' experiences and not just about the buildings where the services are delivered. Individuals have an active role in the development of their plan, the planning process is person-centered, and the plan reflects the individual's service and supports and what is important to them.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California Department of Developmental Services 1915(i) HCBS State Plan Services - 07/01/2018

~~“ServicesHabilitation-Community Living Arrangement Services; Habilitation-Day Services; Habilitation-Behavioral Intervention Services; Respite Care; Enhanced Habilitation- Supported Employment -Individual; Enhanced Habilitation- Prevocational Services; Homemaker Services; Home Health Aide Services; Community Based Adult Services; Personal Emergency Response Systems; Vehicle Modification and Adaptation; Speech, Hearing and Language Services; Dental Services; Optometric/Optician Services; Prescription Lenses and Frames; Psychology Services; Chore Services; Communication Aides; Environmental Accessibility Adaptations; Non-Medical Transportation; Nutritional Consultation; Skilled Nursing; Specialized Medical Equipment and Supplies; Transition/Set-Up Expenses; Community-Based Training Services; Financial Management Services; Family Support Services; Housing Access Services; Occupational Therapy; Physical Therapy; and Family/Consumer Training” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medi‐Cal Health Homes Program Guide - 04/08/2018

~~1915(c) Waiver Programs1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver programs provide services to many Medi‐Cal members who will likely also meet the eligibility criteria for HHP. There are comprehensive care management components within theseprograms that are duplicative of HHP services. Members who are receiving 1915(c) services have a choice of continuing 1915(c) services or receiving HHP services.The 1915(c) HCBS waiver programs include:HIV/AIDS, Assisted Living Waiver (ALW), Developmentally Disabled (DD), In‐HomeOperations (IHO), Multipurpose Senior Services Program (MSSP), Nursing Facility Acute Hospital (NF/AH), and Pediatric Palliative Care (PPC). 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Number: CA.0336.R04.00, California's HCBS DD Waiver - 01/01/2018

~~“California’'s HCBS DD Waiver offers community-based services not otherwise available through a participant’s Medicaid program. The purpose of the HCBS DD Waiver is to serve participants in their own homes and communities as an alternative to placing Medicaid-eligible individuals in intermediate care facilities for persons with developmental disabilities.  The HCBS DD Waiver  program recognizes that many individuals at risk of being placed in these facilities can be cared for in their homes and communities, preserving their independence and ties to family and friends at a cost no higher than that of institutional care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

CA HCBS Waiver for Californians w/DD (0336.R03.00) - 03/29/2012

"This waiver "provides behavioral intervention, community living arrangements, day service, home health aide, homemaker, prevocational services, respite care, supported employment (enhanced habilitation), chore, communication aides, community-based training, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations, FMS, non-medical transportation, nutritional consultation, optometric/optician services, PERS, prescription lenses and frames, psychology services, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, specialized therapeutic services, speech/hearing and language services, transition/set up expenses, vehicle mods and adaptations for individuals w/autism, DD, IID"

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The Golden State is a place where you can "Find Yourself" through a rewarding career, including those with disabilities who are ready to live the California Dream.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon California's VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.05%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39,557,045
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.43%
Change from
2017 to 2018
1,896,634
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.01%
Change from
2017 to 2018
700,456
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
8.77%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39.93%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.79%
Change from
2017 to 2018
75.61%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 39,250,017 39,536,653 39,557,045
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 2,023,714 1,980,677 1,896,634
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 701,791 721,536 700,456
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 16,632,184 16,961,551 17,104,193
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.68% 36.43% 39.93%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.22% 75.01% 75.61%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.40% 4.80% 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.20% 18.80% 19.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.70% 12.70% 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 2,020,143 1,992,144 1,937,820
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 2,186,775 2,158,900 2,128,351
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,749,171 2,694,884 2,651,000
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 331,848 326,909 312,801
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 1,273,677 1,251,237 1,240,562
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 47,935 51,632 47,303
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 459,722 466,413 457,927
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 15,006 15,676 15,401
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 178,131 183,748 186,022
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 425,105 411,782 395,717

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 41,719 41,243 40,775
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.50% 4.50% 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 682,668 663,886 641,737

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 20,014 17,818 20,381
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 49,907 44,559 47,289
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 221,216 181,992 199,371
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 9.00% 9.80% 10.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 0.10% 0.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50% 0.20% 0.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.90% 2.00% 1.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 11.80% 10.00% 10.10%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 582 494 568
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,552 904 1,172
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,396 7,686 8,301
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 39,862 39,151 44,074

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 36,836 42,724 46,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,153 2,125 2,373
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,127 1,102 1,176
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00% 0.52% 50.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.94 2.82 3.00

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
23,327
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 1,433 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,777 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 3,872 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 8,242 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 5,189 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,807 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 38.90% 35.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 25,118 24,984 24,319
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 1,247,320 1,213,289 1,186,089
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 1,569 1,110 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,257 658 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $92,086,000 $95,089,000 $115,626,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $55,745,000 $53,463,000 $48,783,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $854,301,000 $910,461,000 $1,018,595,250
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 12.00% 12.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 66,040 69,286 72,005
Number of people served in facility based work. 9,629 9,141 7,838
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 26.30 26.60 27.67

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 54.07% 54.92% 56.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 21.54% 20.70% 19.82%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.63% 3.56% 3.40%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.59% 99.79% 99.78%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 52.26% 48.87% 53.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 75.46% 72.65% 77.60%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 83.16% 81.72% 85.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.20% 23.78% 23.63%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 10,193,235
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 12,148
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 123,357
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 4,322,464
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 4,445,821
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 180
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,641
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,821
AbilityOne wages (products). $583,952
AbilityOne wages (services). $61,505,189

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 6 3
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 20 22
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 109 67 65
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 6 5 4
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 119 98 94
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 30 29 22
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 35 1,740 1,826
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 17,727 11,546 10,401
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 488 486 400
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 18,280 13,801 12,649

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~In keeping with California’s Employment First Policy, the DDS Work Services Program addresses the employment needs of consumers by providing work and community integration opportunities through Supported Employment Programs (SEPs). Supported Employment (SE) services through the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) and regional centers are aimed at finding competitive work in a community integrated work setting for persons with severe disabilities who need ongoing support services to learn and perform the work. Support is usually provided by a job coach who meets regularly with the individual on the job to help him or her learn the necessary skills and behaviors to work independently. The DOR is the main vocational rehabilitation program SE service provider for adults with developmental disabilities. However, if the DOR is unable to provide services due to fiscal reasons, the regional center may be able to help individuals served get a job by funding SE through other means if these services are available in their area. (Page 65) Title I

The DPEC works with the State Board, Independent Living Centers, AJCCs, DOR, Department of Developmental Services (DDS), and many other public and private stakeholders to improve employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The DPEC also encourages and assists stakeholders to train staff on disability awareness and effective service delivery. Some of the partnerships and activities supported by the DPEC include: Employment First, Youth Employment Opportunity Program, Youth Leadership Forum, Disability Employment Initiative and Disability Employment Accelerator. (Page 271) Title IV

AB 287 (2009) established the Employment First Policy, which led to a standing Employment First Committee formed by the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. The bill expands employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and identifies best practices and incentives for increasing integrated employment and gainful employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Employment First policy requires Regional Centers to develop Individual Program Plans to ensure individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities beginning at age 14 are provided options, competitive integrated employment, and post—secondary education to enable the consumer to transition from school to work. The CDOR is an active participant in the Employment First Committee to help with transition planning. (Page 432) Title IV

In December 2014, CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to further advance the state’s “Employment First” Policy and other federal and state laws to address employment in integrated settings, at competitive wages, for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In March 2017, the Competitive Integrated Employment: Blueprint for Change was completed, and outlines plans for the following goals:

— Improving collaboration and coordination between the three departments to prepare and support all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment;
— Building capacity to increase opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment to prepare for and participate in the California workforce development system; and,
— Increasing the ability of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to make informed choices, adequately prepare for, transition to, and engage in competitive integrated employment. (Page 432) Title IV

The baseline indicators for performance accountability indicators have not yet been established. Until that time, CDOR is implementing current and new strategies to improve performance including: monthly monitoring of performance indicator data; attending California Model Employer Initiative meetings in order to increase the number of individuals with disabilities in state employment; identifying and implementing improvements in furtherance of the State’s “Employment First” policy to gain integrated competitive wages for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities; increasing jobs—driven employment and consumer self—sufficiency for consumers who are job ready through work incentives planning; establishing new partnerships with employers through the National Employment Team; maximizing the use of the Talent Acquisition Portal, an online system which includes both a national talent pool of VR candidates looking for employment and a job posting system for businesses looking to hire individuals with disabilities, to link job ready consumers with employers; and, enhancing staff training curriculums to include the use of social media strategies and the electronic job application process. (Page 475-476) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~• Efforts are taking place to update the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on CDOR Student Services (Pre—Employment Transition Services) and Customized Employment WIOA services. (Page 430) Title IV

• A need to increase partnerships between CRPs to promote information-sharing regarding job leads, services provided, and opportunities for new services such as customized employment. (Page 455) Title IV

Strategies:

• Conduct focus groups to solicit feedback about what the partners think is needed to enhance services for people with disabilities.
• Develop a CDOR referral form and referral process for the America’s Job Centers of California.
• Provide training to local America’s Job Center of California staff on topics such as: CDOR services; eligibility; job placement; case management; benefits counseling; job readiness and soft skills; disability awareness and etiquette; hiring persons with disabilities; disability disclosures; competitive integrated employment; customized employment; assistive technology; and, reasonable accommodation. (Page 472) Title IV

The CDOR’s Community Resources Development Section continues to update and use the Rehabilitation Resources Directory, an online resource on CDOR’s website that provides users with complete information about CRPs throughout California. CDOR’s Community Resources Development Section is updating the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on Pre—Employment Transition Services and Customized Employment WIOA services. In early 2014, a proof of concept titled “Placement Plus” was administered in select CRPs to test a new employment services fee for service structure. The lessons learned and evaluation of the Placement Plus is informing CDOR’s current efforts to redesign employment services statewide. (Page 475) Title IV

The CDOR Supported Employment Program provides Supported Employment services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities, to enable them to achieve an employment outcome of supported employment in competitive integrated employment. These services support opportunities for competitive integrated employment (including customized employment, as available) that is individualized, and customized, consistent with the unique strengths, abilities, interests, and informed choice of the individual, including with ongoing support services for individuals with the most significant disabilities. (Page 485) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Local Boards are tasked under WIOA Section 121 with developing and entering an MOU with all required One-Stop mandatory partners, certifying One-Stop operators, and conducting oversight of the One-Stop system in the local area. To the extent that Local Boards fulfill these obligations, they will necessarily involve themselves with system alignment efforts and the implementation of state plan program strategies pertaining to service integration, resource braiding, and the provision of supportive services. (Page  134) Title I

Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in-demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post-secondary education. (Page 148) Title I

Clients/Service Population: Adult, dislocated worker, youth, and universal access clients number 1.7 million individuals, including about 60,000 clients who receive certificates through AJCCs. Incumbent workers are an emerging client of the Local Boards. Local Boards serve 65,000 businesses annually and partner in the AJCCs with California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs), community colleges, economic development agencies, DOR, adult education providers, and veteran’s services providers.
Strengths: Local Boards have a lot of experience braiding resources and integrating service delivery through the One-Stop system. Local Boards have deep connections to their local communities, and are gaining greater experience working through state and local led regional initiatives, including sector and career pathway strategies as well as initiatives to provide services to target populations. (Page 517-518) Title IV

Integrating service delivery and braiding resources are ways that workforce and education programs can achieve program alignment and assure access to the broad array of services funded across the state’s workforce and education programs. In California, resources will be braided and services integrated and aligned through the creation of “value-added” partnerships at the state, regional, and local levels.
A value-added partnership is one in which all partners gain from the partnership. Ideally, “gains to exchange” occur and partners transact with one another on the basis of specialization, providing services consistent with each programs’ core competencies. Partners thereby leverage one another’s expertise, building a proverbial “sum that is greater than its parts.” (Page 542) Title I

The State Board will issue regional planning guidance that details best practices and model partnerships between the workforce system and the community college system, recommending that Local Boards meet their WIOA Section 106 requirements pertaining to coordinated service delivery strategies and shared administrative costs in ways that lay the foundation for a strong partnership with community college CTE programs. This can be done in a variety of ways, including the following:
• by building links between AJCCs and campuses, including but not limited to, pooling resources to place AJCC staff directly on campuses
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs. (Page 564) Title I

The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD-WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
• The State Board has partnered with EDD to create and staff the One-Stop Design workgroup, which brought together state plan partners and other stakeholders to develop a blueprint for service delivery in the state’s AJCCs. Work by this group will inform state policy on integrated service delivery and the braiding of resources at AJCCs, including policy on operations, required partnership, and the articulation of AJCC services with Regional Sector Pathway programs. (More detail on this is provided in chapter 4). (Page 568) Title I

• Working with EDD, the State Board has already issued policies pertaining to Eligible Training Providers and the use of alternative training models, including OJT, to encourage the use of “earn and learn” approaches to training by local boards.
• Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One-Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 569) Title I

Additionally, SBE, CDE, CCCCO, and the State Board will work jointly to identify and recommend best practices and model partnerships that encourage program alignment, coordination, integration of services, and braiding of resources beyond the minimum levels required as part of mandatory One-Stop partnership. To this end, the State Board will issue local and regional planning guidance, supported, when appropriate, by policy directives or other appropriate means of communication issued by SBE, CDE, and CCCCO to foster better program alignment between basic education and basic skills programs and other workforce and education programs and services. Recommended relevant best practices may include but are not limited to the following:
• aligning basic skills coursework with career pathways programs and adopting contextualized learning practices that combine basic education and skills coursework with CTE coursework
• braiding resources from WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs with WIOA Title II programs to provide supportive services to those attending basic education and skills programs so as to facilitate both course and program completion; local partnerships may include charter schools focused on serving out of school youth and operating under Education Code Section 47612.1(a) (Page  570) Title I

Vehicle: One-Stop Design and certification requirements, Local Planning Guidance; additionally DOR and CWDB will ensure resources for cross-training of frontline staff in the AJCCs (Planning Guidance Tier: Required) Competitive Integrated Employment: 
DOR district staff will designate a point of contact for the Local Boards to provide linkages to service providers of consumers with ID/DD (Planning Guidance Tier: Required).
Vehicle: DOR district staff will partner with the Local Boards to outreach employers and partners to develop strategies to achieve Competitive Integrated Employment opportunities for consumers with ID/DD (Planning Guidance Tier: Required). DOR will provide disability expertise and CIE technical assistance to the Local Boards, partners, and employers (Planning Guidance Tier: Recommended). (Page 606-607) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Workplace Readiness Training: CDOR VR team members will provide training on workplace readiness skills, including soft skills, financial literacy, independent living skills, and resume development, or arrange for training through Transition Partnership Programs third-party cooperative arrangements as well as other contracts or fee-for-service arrangements through local educational agencies, CRPs, or other providers. As part of the financial literacy component, CDOR Work Incentives Planners will provide limited Work Incentives Planning services to students who are Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability Insurance recipients who need support and information regarding the impact of paid work experience on their benefits. (Page 427) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~The Special Education Division oversees programs operated by approximately 1,600 local educational agencies (LEAs) to provide students up to age 22, who receive services under an Individualized Education Program, with a free and appropriate public education. Students with disabilities age 16-22 must be provided transition services based on their assessed needs, strengths, preferences, and interests to facilitate movement from school to post school activities. These post school activities may include postsecondary education, training, competitive integrated employment, and independent living. In addition to required transition services, WorkAbility I is a state-funded grant program awarded to approximately 270 LEAs to provide comprehensive pre-employment skills training, employment placement and follow-up for participating middle and high school students in special education who are making the transition from school to work, independent living and postsecondary education or training. (Page 522) Title I

After determining eligibility, through a comprehensive assessment and planning process and in collaboration with the SVRC-QRP, the consumer develops an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that identifies the employment goal and required VR services to achieve that goal. VR plan services may include, but are not limited to:

• Counseling and guidance.
• Referrals and assistance to get services from other agencies.
• Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Job search and placement assistance.
• Vocational and other training services, including, but not limited to, pre-employment training and soft skills training.
• Evaluation of physical and mental impairments.
• On-the-job or personal assistance services.
• Interpreter services.
• Rehabilitation and orientation or mobility services for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and/or blind or low vision.
• Occupational licenses, tools, equipment, initial stocks, and supplies.
• Technical assistance for self-employment.
• Rehabilitation assistive technology services and devices.
• Supported employment services.
• Services to the family.
• Transportation as required, such as travel and related expenses, that is necessary to enable the consumer to participate in a VR service.
• Transition services for students.
• Work Incentive Planning, which includes providing information on potential employment earning impacts to Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability Income (SSDI), and Ticket to Work (TTW).
• Expansion of employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including, but are not limited to, professional employment and self-employment.
• Post-employment services. (Page 58) Title I

DOR will work with the State Board and regionally organized Local Boards to identify opportunities to leverage collaborative employer outreach and engagement efforts that develop in the course of regional planning efforts. Where these opportunities exist, DOR will work with State Plan partners to market employer incentives and strategies for the hiring of individuals with disabilities, including better and more coordinated use of Federal procurement “503” hiring requirements. As part of this effort, DOR will partner with ETP to leverage incumbent worker training contracts to open doors for workers with disabilities as 30 percent of the state’s largest 100 federal contractors have utilized ETP contracts to train their incumbent workforce.

Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE). (Page 121) Title IV

• Communicate the statewide availability of pre-employment transition services with Special Education Local Planning Area Directors and the Advisory Commission on Special Education.
• Outreach to schools and closer coordination between VR and Local Educational Agency staff that do not currently have a Transition Partnership Program cooperative arrangement.
• Expand transition services beyond school to work to include school to postsecondary training transitions.
• Provide information about the transition from school to work at an earlier age to eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities.
• Provide work incentives education and planning services to students as well as parents and guardians of students with disabilities. (Page 426) Title IV

The CDOR administers 107 Transition Partnership Programs cooperative programs with Local Educational Agencies, County Offices of Education, or Special Education Local Plan Areas providing VR services to eligible students in hundreds of individual schools. CDOR also administers six case service contracts through associated Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) in conjunction with Transition Partnership Programs cooperative programs. The goal of the Transition Partnership Programs is to serve high school students with disabilities including blind, deaf, intellectual, developmental, and mental health disabilities by facilitating the effective transition from school to meaningful competitive integrated employment. The Local Educational Agency or Special Education Local Plan Area will refer potentially eligible students with disabilities and eligible students with disabilities ages 16 through 21 who can benefit from Pre-Employment Transition Services and VR services to CDOR. The assigned VR Counselor will then open a case and work in partnership with the individual to complete an Individualized Plan for Employment as early as possible, but at the latest before the consumer leaves school. Through the cooperative arrangement or case service contract, the participating Local Educational Agencies, Special Education Local Plan Areas, or CRP provides one or more new or expanded VR services to students. These services conform to the definition of Pre—Employment Transition Services required by WIOA and contain the following key features: job exploration counseling; work-based learning experiences; counseling on post—secondary opportunities; workplace readiness training; and, instruction in self-advocacy. These services, in addition to others provided on an individual basis are intended to ultimately result in competitive integrated employment. (Page 417) Title IV

Collaborative efforts to support community integration of individuals who are eligible for HCBS waiver programs include CDOR district staffs’ participation in person-centered planning meetings, when invited. The CDOR is also supporting discussions with DDS for improved coordination of IEPs and IPP for eligible individuals. The CDOR is also collaborating with DDS to support opportunities for competitive integrated employment through the CIE Blueprint as described in the response to description (f) - Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services. (Page 434)  Title IV

Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).

DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal law, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K-12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners. (Page 563) Title IV

Strengths: CDE, through the Career Pathways Trust, has distributed $500,000,000 over the past two years through a one-time appropriation to establish regional collaborative relationships and partnerships with business entities, community organizations, and local institutions of postsecondary education to develop and integrate standards-based academics with career-relevant, industry-themed pathways and work-based learning opportunities that are aligned to high-need, high-growth, or emerging regional economic sectors. Additionally, CDE is distributing $900,000,000 through the CTE Incentive Grant Program, which is a three-year (2016-2019) statewide grant with the goal of providing pupils in K-12 with the knowledge and skills necessary to transition to employment and postsecondary education. The CDE has also developed a strong community of practice on secondary transitions and has integrated work-based learning approaches for students with disabilities; ensured WIOA Title II grantees have the flexibility to match curriculum with the goals and objectives of other WIOA funded programs; and implemented an evaluation process for the Coordinated Student Support programs that utilizes information provided by program participants to help improve programs. (Page 56) Title II

Career Pathways

~~Additionally, the State Board has entered into an agreement with CDSS, the CWDA, and the Chancellor’s Office of Supportive Services to encourage and promote local partnerships that articulate subsidized employment programs operated by County Welfare Departments with career pathways programs, including “Regional Sector Pathway” programs identified and developed in WIOA regional plans. Where robust partnerships develop, these pathway programs should be designed to service TANF recipients, taking care to meet the particular client needs of those being served.
The State Board has entered into a similar agreement with DOR to promote access to competitive integrated employment at the local level, in coordination with the California Competitive Integrated Employment Blueprint partners, the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) and the California Department of Education (CDE), so as to ensure opportunities for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities to prepare for and obtain quality jobs. (Page 123) Title IV

The State Board has entered into an agreement with SBE/CDE to support and encourage the integration of work-based learning activities in all locally funded WIOA youth programs to involve interactions with industry professionals and include career awareness, career exploration, internships and career pathways training activities. (Page 135) Title IV

The State Board will also review regional plans to ensure compliance with state guidance and WIOA requirements for regional plans, and will share regional plan content with state partners, including information pertaining to prioritized sectors and career pathways identified in the course of the regional planning process. The sharing of this information will facilitate, as appropriate, engagement with regional efforts by other State Plan partners such as DOR ETP, and CalWORKs. (Page) Title IV

Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE). (Page 159) Title IV

Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One-Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 569) Title IV

 DOR will provide access to Vocational Rehabilitation services including training, self-advocacy training, assessments, career counseling/exploration; OJT/work experience; benefits planning; job placement services and assistive technology for eligible individuals with disabilities. (Page 605) Title IV
 

Apprenticeship

Work-Based Learning Experiences: CDOR VR team members will arrange for on-the-job trainings, internships, apprenticeships, work experiences, and other work-based learning experiences for students with disabilities through direct interaction with businesses, Transition Partnership Programs third-party cooperative arrangements, and through vocational services provided through other contracts or fee-for-service arrangements through local educational agencies or CRPs. (Page 427) Title IV

CA Career Innovations: Work-Based Learning Model Demonstration. The CDOR has partnered with San Diego State University, Interwork Institute to evaluate the effects and benefits of work-based learning experiences to prepare students with disabilities to enter post-secondary education and competitive integrated employment. The CDOR anticipates that 800 students with disabilities will participate in the project, including students with the most significant disabilities, who are ages 16 through 21, and have Individualized Education Program or 504 plans. (Page 433) Title IV

Objective 1.2: Beginning July 1, 2018, and annually thereafter, the CDOR will provide no less than 2,000 students with disabilities with work-based learning experiences at an average of 100 hours per student for pre-employment transition services. Strategies: • Continue to contract for approximately $4.0 million dollars annually to local educational agencies for direct funding of work experience placements for students with disabilities. Achieved: Over 2,000 CDOR consumers received work-based learning (work experience) through the WE Can Work contracts and Transition Partnership Program contracts during FFY 2017. Goal 2: Outreach to potentially eligible students with disabilities to enhance awareness of, and the opportunities to receive, CDOR services. (Page 479) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Ticket to Work and Self—Sufficiency Program
The CDOR actively coordinates with the Ticket to Work and Self—Sufficiency Program. Ticket to Work is a voluntary work incentive program for Social Security Disability Insurance or Supplemental Security Income beneficiaries between the ages of 18 and 64 who are interested in going to work. The Ticket to Work Program provides beneficiaries with access to VR, training, and placement services, as well as other services and support. Beneficiaries can use their ticket to obtain employment services and support from CDOR or they can take their ticket to an approved service provider called an Employment Network. A ticket cannot be assigned to an Employment Network and in—use with CDOR at the same time. The CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners and VR Counselors have an active role in the Ticket to Work program. CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners verify ticket status, provide information as needed, and facilitate referrals to Employment Networks at case closure. VR counselors distribute CDOR’s Ticket to Work fact sheet at intake, verify the ticket status prior to approving the Individualized Plan for Employment, and facilitate sequential services.  (Page 422) Title IV

Timing of Transition to Extended Services
Once a consumer has maintained stability on the job for at least 60 days, the funding for and provision of job coaching transitions to an extended services provider. The VR Counselor continues to track the consumer’s progress and job stability during the transition period. If the consumer maintains job stabilization for 60 days after transition to extended services, the case is Closed—Rehabilitated. Transition to extended service providers is essential to maintain consistency and support for consumers receiving supported employment services. CDOR works to identify funding sources for extended services, collaborates with extended service providers, and identifies sources of extended services, including natural supports which are vital for the long-term success of the consumer. Sources of extended services for a consumer eligible for supported employment services include: public resources such as the California Department of Developmental Services and Ticket to Work Programs; private resources such as trust funds, private non—profits, religious or community organizations, and family; and natural supports to ensure the consumer receiving supported employment services has greater success in the work environment. (Page 488) Title IV

After determining eligibility, through a comprehensive assessment and planning process and in collaboration with the SVRC-QRP, the consumer develops an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that identifies the employment goal and required VR services to achieve that goal. VR plan services may include, but are not limited to:

• Counseling and guidance.
• Referrals and assistance to get services from other agencies.
•  Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Job search and placement assistance.
• Vocational and other training services, including, but not limited to, pre-employment training and soft skills training.
• Evaluation of physical and mental impairments.
• On-the-job or personal assistance services.
•  Interpreter services.
•  Rehabilitation and orientation or mobility services for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and/or blind or low vision.
• Occupational licenses, tools, equipment, initial stocks, and supplies.
• Technical assistance for self-employment.
• Rehabilitation assistive technology services and devices.
• Supported employment services.
• Services to the family.
• Transportation as required, such as travel and related expenses, that is necessary to enable the consumer to participate in a VR service.
• Transition services for students.
• Work Incentive Planning, which includes providing information on potential employment earning impacts to Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability Income (SSDI), and Ticket to Work (TTW).
• Expansion of employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including, but are not limited to, professional employment and self-employment.
• Post-employment services. (Pages 524- 545) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Clients/Service Population: WIOA Section 167 grantees serve eligible migrant/seasonal farmworkers and their dependents. Eligible farmworkers are those individuals who primarily depend on employment in agricultural labor that is characterized by chronic unemployment and underemployment.

Strengths: WIOA Section 167 grantees have well-developed relationships with Local Boards and the AJCC system, provide occupational skills training, related supportive services, and housing assistance to the MSFW population. Many Section 167 grantees also qualify as Eligible Training Providers, list programs on the State ETPL, and also receive referrals from AJCCs.

CDOR Response — Coordination with Employers. The WIOA calls for a description of how the designated State unit will work with employers to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities in order to facilitate the provision of: 1) VR services; and, 2) transition services for youth, and Pre—Employment Transition Services for students. In regard to coordination with employers and VR services, CDOR provides this description through the “Business Engagement” goals and objectives in Description (o)(1) — State’s Strategies. (Page 433) Title IV

Data Collection

Data Collection: The degree to which the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance. (Page 251) Title II

Data Collection: The degree to which the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance. (Page 253-254) Title I

The Cross-System Analytics and Assessment for Learning and Skills Attainment (CAAL-SKILLS) data initiative is an interagency and multi-departmental effort to pool participant and program performance data across workforce, education, and human service programs and funding streams. CAAL-SKILLS will use common performance measures to examine participating program outcomes by region, provider, service, demographics, and industry. The project will develop the capacity to evaluate and assess participating programs efficacy, allowing program administrators and policymakers access to actionable data so that programs can be designed to improve program participant outcomes. CAAL-SKILLS is intended to meet the statutory requirements of AB 2148 (K. Mullin, Chapter 385, Statutes of 2014) and AB 1336 (K. Mullin, Chapter 211, Statutes of 2017) and WIOA 116(e) evaluation and assessment requirements. Participating departments include CWDB, DSS, ETP, DIR-DAS, EDD, CCCCO, CDE, SBE and DOR. The following information provides an overview of progress to date: November 2016 - January 2017. (Page 259) Title II

511

~~Objective 8.2: From July 1, 2018, to June 30, 2020, the Achieving Community Employment services team will provide at least 17,000 individuals earning subminimum wage with career counseling and information and referral services in partnership with over 130 14(c) Certificate Holders / Employers (based on Department of Labor Lists of all registered 14c certificate holders and number of workers paid subminimum wage issued in October 2017).

Strategies:

• The CDOR career counseling and information and referral service provision will include individualized person-centered services for individuals expressing a desire to explore and achieve competitive integrated employment.
• Increase outreach efforts with caregivers, partners, and employers to promote the benefits of transitioning individuals from subminimum wage jobs to competitive integrated employment.
• The CDOR’s Achieving Community Employment services team counselors will help individuals receiving career counseling and information and referral to enroll in VR services in collaboration with local CDOR staff; and will track, monitor, and support the individuals as they navigate through the VR services towards successful achievement of competitive integrated employment. (Page 473) Title IV

Goal 7

• Coordinated and collaborated with state partners, the California Department of Education and the California Department of Developmental Services, through an Interagency Leadership Workgroup to implement a statewide cross-departmental partnership.
• Coordinated with local 14 (c) certificate holders to provide information about competitive integrated employment opportunities to individuals employed at subminimum wage.
• Educated partners and employers regarding competitive integrated employment opportunities, outcomes, and supports for adults and youth with disabilities. (Page 483) Title IV

Collaboration with Schools Regarding Required Documentation Specified in Section 511 Regarding Career Exploration Activities for Individuals Considering Sub-Minimum Wage Employment
The CDOR and California Department of Education Interagency Agreement includes specific requirements related to individuals considering sub-minimum wage employment. Actions include, but are not limited to:
• Communication by the California Department of Education with local educational agencies, parents, guardians, teachers, and students about the Section 511 requirements.
• CDOR maintains the documentation and provides a copy to the individual within specified timelines under 34 CFR 397.
• The local educational agency documents any services provided and gives the documentation to the student and CDOR.
• If a youth with a disability or, as applicable, the youth’s parent or guardian, refuses, through informed choice, to participate in the activities required by Section 511 or the implementing regulations in 34 CFR 397, documentation must, at a minimum:
• Contain the information in 34 CFR 397.10(a)(2); and
• Be provided by the CDOR to the youth within 10 calendar days of the youth’s refusal to participate.
• The CDOR School Liaison meets with local educational agency partners at least annually and review Section 511 requirements within the statewide interagency agreement. (Page 465) Title IV

 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The State Board is committed to ensuring individuals with disabilities have physical and programmatic access to the AJCC system and services. The State Board, in consultation with chief elected officials and Local Boards, will establish objective criteria and procedures to evaluate the AJCCs and delivery system for effectiveness. The evaluation will include how well the local job centers ensure equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities to participate in or benefit from AJCC services. The evaluation must also include criteria evaluating how well the centers and local delivery systems take actions to comply with the disability-related regulations implementing WIOA section 188, set forth in 29 CFR part 37. (Page 272) Title II

The CDOR is providing intensive on-site regional training to workforce partners on topics that range from how to write accessible documents to disability awareness and etiquette. The CDOR has scheduled 82 statewide trainings through 2019. The CDOR also provides information on accessible meeting spaces, client flow in America’s Job Center of California, and technical assistance to CDOR District Administrators and Team Managers that sit on boards conducting accessibility reviews. The CDOR collaborates with the California Workforce Association in delivering training to the workforce development systems through the workforce development boards, regional planning units, and America’s Job Center of California staff on disability rights and awareness, employment opportunities, and equal access for individuals with disabilities. Training opportunities will become available through the California Training Institute of the California Workforce Association which will provide flexibility for the California Workforce Development Board, regional planning units, and America Job Center of California to address any disability related training needs. The CDOR provides training, technical assistance, and consultation to state and local government staff, public organizations, employers, and small businesses regarding disability related issues, equal employment opportunities, and physical and digital access for individuals with disabilities. The CDOR also collaborates with state entities to ensure that the communication and information technology infrastructure such as web, web content, information technology procurement, telecommunication, and any public or government communication is accessible for individuals with disabilities and others who use assistive technology. (Page 477) Title IV

DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal law, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K-12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners. (Page 563) Title IV 11.

CWDB will draft local and regional guidance and DOR will provide technical assistance, through staff or referrals to local resources, to the Local Boards that will ensure a level of one stop accessibility for individuals with disabilities that is consistent with state and federal requirements pertaining to accessibility. DOR and CWDB will provide a consistent message to both Local Boards and DOR district offices concerning state policy on these matters. DOR and CWDB staff will work jointly to assess the level of partnership in One-Stops and current compliance with known future regulatory requirements regarding access to services for persons with disabilities. These requirements include providing services to job seekers through co-location, cross -training, or direct access through real-time technology. This information gathered from the assessment will be used to ensure that all districts and Local Boards are on a path to compliance with all state and federal laws. DOR will be consulted by Local Boards regarding CAPs for hard to resolve concerns. (Page 604) Title IV

Partners CWDB and DOR agree that a memorandum of understanding (MOU) will be updated between each DOR district and the corresponding Local Board concerning the operation of the One-Stop delivery system in the local area including: services to be provided, funding sources and mechanisms, methods of referral between One-Stop operator and One-Stop partners, methods to ensure needs of individuals with disabilities are addressed, including physical and programmatic accessibility, and duration of the MOU. (Page 608) Title IV

Partners agree to work collaboratively at the state, regional, and local level to build capacity and increase professional development for One-Stop staff for the purpose of ensuring programmatic, physical, and electronic access, and increase employment opportunities for youth. Additionally, partners will support Local Boards to promote best practices in physical and programmatic accessibility, including: facilities, programs, services, technology and materials. Partners will work jointly to identify models of One-Stop partnerships that support youth programs, as well as the purpose of these partnerships, and the manner in which these partnerships elevate service delivery so as to improve client outcomes. To ensure the WIOA youth vision of supporting an integrated service delivery system and framework, partners and local areas will leverage other federal, state, local, and philanthropic resources to support in-school and out-of-school youth. (Page 622) Title IV

Vets

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 48) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist. (Page 270) Title I

The state has implemented a policy to ensure Local Areas have a process in place for referring veterans with significant barriers to employment to career services provided by the JVSG program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist; (Page 676) Title IV

EDD is California’s designated state workforce agency and administers the State’s Jobs for Veterans Program Grant (JVSG). The JVSG supports two principal staff positions: Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist; and Local Veterans’ Employment Representative. The EDD operates and delivers outreach and career services to veterans with significant barriers to employment and employer outreach and workforce services with DOL-VETS funds. To ensure access to services for veterans and veterans with significant barriers to employment, the state has established formal guidance regarding priority of service for veterans that all AJCC staff must follow. EDD Workforce Services Directive WSD08-10 provides this guidance. This guidance is being updated to include the new WIOA references and will be reissued once this is done. (Page 598) Title IV

Mental Health

~~Strengths: DOR employs qualified SVRC-QRPs with master’s degrees who are trained in assessment, career planning, job placement, and assistive technology services to meet the employment needs of eligible individuals with disabilities. DOR utilizes a consumer-centered approach to service delivery through a team that includes SVRC-QRPs, service coordinators, employment coordinators, and other support staff to deliver effective and timely consumer services throughout the state. The employment coordinators provide labor market analysis, employer engagement, disability sensitivity training, and other supportive services to assist clients in achieving an employment outcome. Coupled with the direct services provided by the team, DOR maintains a network of partnerships with community based disability organizations and other public agencies, including high schools, community colleges, universities, and county mental health agencies to provide a greater range of employment services and opportunities to DOR consumers than would otherwise be available through any single agency. Lastly, given its focus and expertise, DOR has positioned itself to provide California’s leadership voice in state government and administers other programs, including the Disability Access Services, to assist in removing barriers to full inclusion of individuals with disabilities in the workforce, in state government, and in community life. (Page 59-60) Title I

The scope of business solutions that may be provided at Rapid Response events is not restricted to the activities described in Section 134 of WIOA. Local Boards are encouraged to leverage other local or state funding sources to provide a broader scope of business solutions. Examples include assisting with Trade Adjustment Assistance, Unemployment Insurance claim filing, economic development, financial assistance counseling, and mental health counseling. (Page 296) Title II

Program Element 10 - Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling
This program element provides individualized counseling to participants and may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling, mental health counseling, and referral to partner programs. Local Areas and youth service providers may directly provide counseling. When a Local Area or youth service provider refers a youth for counseling services that they are unable to provide, the Local Area or service provider must coordinate with the referred counseling organization to ensure continuity of service (TEGL 21-16). (Page 325) Title II

This program element provides individualized counseling to participants and may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling, mental health counseling, and referral to partner programs. Local Areas and youth service providers may directly provide counseling. When a Local Area or youth service provider refers a youth for counseling services that they are unable to provide, the Local Area or service provider must coordinate with the referred counseling organization to ensure continuity of service (TEGL 21-16). (Page 348) Title II

Coordination with the State Agency Responsible for Providing Mental Health Services
In California, the State agency responsible for mental health services is the California Department of Health Care Services. CDOR has developed a Memorandum of Understanding with Department of Health Care Services to establish a framework for collaboration between CDOR and Department of Health Care Services to provide local technical assistance and support in order to strengthen existing CDOR Mental Health Cooperative Programs or to develop new patterns of vocational rehabilitation services available to individuals living with severe mental illness, with the ultimate goal of ensuring that consumers have access to a comprehensive, coordinated, and quality service delivery system. (Page 422) Title IV

Non—educational Agencies Serving Out—of—School Youth The CDOR serves out—of—school youth through multiple venues and methods. CDOR Districts provide unique types of programs and services for youth and adults with disabilities. The majority of programs are with educational agencies (short or long-term training or educational programs). The local CDOR Districts have strong working relationships with the local regional centers that serve youth and adults with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities. Similarly, CDOR Districts also have established working relationships with local county mental health and county welfare programs that also serve youth and adults with psychiatric disabilities. Additionally, some CDOR Districts have also formed connections with foster youth programs. (Page 423) Title IV

To support the provisions of this Interagency Agreement, CDOR established a Cooperative Programs Action Committee comprised of representatives from the California Department of Education, Local Educational Agencies, community colleges, state universities, mental health agencies, and community-based organizations. The Cooperative Programs Action Committee provides feedback to CDOR in the development of policies and procedures to promote the services for individuals with disabilities. (Page 426) Title IV

The CDOR works with over 100 Supported Employment providers statewide with associated locations and satellite offices. The CDOR, the California Department of Developmental Services, and the California Department of Education additionally are establishing Local Partnership Agreements consistent with the Competitive Integrated Employment: Blueprint for Change. The Local Partnership Agreements are anticipated to encourage the sharing of resources to support person centered planning and pre-vocational services that may be provided prior to an individual’s referral to CDOR for Supported Employment. In California, CDOR and the Department of Developmental Services utilize the hourly rates for Supported Employment job coaching, intake, placement, and retention services that are statutorily—defined. The current rates were set in 2008 (Assembly Bill 1781). Sources of extended services vary depending on the individual’s eligibility for other programs or availability of other resources. Funding for extended services for individuals with mental illness may be provided by county mental health agencies, which may allocate Medi—Cal, Mental Health Services Act, or Short—Doyle funds as determined by each county. Social Security Administration Work Incentives, such as Impairment Related Work Expense or an approved Plan for Achieving Self Support, may be used. Supported Employment services provided under Veteran’s Health Administration Compensated Work Therapy Program may also be used to fund extended services. California state regulations do not allow Traumatic Brain Injury state match funds to be used for extended services. Consumers with a Traumatic Brain Injury that require extended services such as ongoing support needed to maintain Supported Employment, such as job coaching, can be served through additional resources at local Independent Living Centers. Whenever possible, building natural supports at the workplace for consumers with Supported Employment needs is encouraged. Natural supports allow the strengthening of the relationship between employer and consumer, supporting long-term successful outcomes and to develop opportunities for competitive integrated employment, to the greatest extent practicable. (Page 431) Title IV

Coordination with the State Agency Responsible for Providing Mental Health Services
In California, the State agency responsible for mental health services is the California Department of Health Care Services. CDOR has developed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Health Care Services to establish a framework for collaboration between CDOR and the Department of Health Care Services to provide local technical assistance and support in order to strengthen existing CDOR Mental Health Cooperative Programs or to develop new patterns of vocational rehabilitation services available to individuals living with severe mental illness, with the ultimate goal of ensuring that consumers have access to a comprehensive, coordinated, and quality service delivery system. The CDOR is also a member of the California Mental Health Planning Council, which evaluates the behavioral health system for accessible and effective care. It advocates for an accountable system of responsive services that are strength-based, recovery-oriented, culturally competent, and cost-effective. (Page 434) Title IV

Possession of a valid license as a Psychologist issued by the California Board of Psychology and possession of an earned Doctorate Degree in Psychology from an educational institution meeting the criteria of Section 2914 of the California Business and Professions Code. Unlicensed individuals who are recruited from outside the State of California and who qualify for licensure may take the examination and may be appointed for a maximum of two years at which time licensure shall have been obtained or the employment shall be terminated.). Experience: Either —
• Two years of experience in the California state service performing clinical psychology duties equivalent to those of a Psychologist (Various Specialties), Psychologist (Health Facility) (Various Specialties), or Psychologist Clinical, Correctional Facility. Or,
• Three years of full—time postdoctoral, post—internship experience in the practice of psychology involving either training, research, consultation, or program planning in mental health services. (Page 442) Title IV

The CDOR will additionally make available services under section 603 to individuals with other disability types that need supported employment services, including those with mental health disabilities, traumatic brain injuries, and other most significant disabilities; and youth who need extended services that are not met under the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (Welf. & Inst. Code, § 4500 et seq.).

The CDOR intends to achieve its supported employment goals and priorities through the following actions:

The CDOR will provide extended services for youth with most significant disabilities for up to four years or until the youth is 25 years of age for those youth who are not eligible for extended services under the Lanterman Act. These may include youth with mental health disabilities, traumatic brain injuries, and other most significant disabilities. (Page 464) Title IV

Client/Service Population: In federal fiscal year 2014, DOR provided services to approximately 98,000 eligible individuals with disabilities, including 6,500 who were blind or visually impaired; 13,300 with cognitive disabilities; 18,200 with learning disabilities; 4,900 with intellectual or developmental disabilities; 6,500 deaf or hard of hearing individuals; 19,100 with physical disabilities; 26,100 with psychiatric disabilities; 1,200 with traumatic brain injury; and 2,200 individuals with other disabilities.

Strengths: DOR employs qualified SVRC-QRPs with master’s degrees who are trained in assessment, career planning, job placement, and assistive technology services to meet the employment needs of eligible individuals with disabilities. DOR utilizes a consumer-centered approach to service delivery through a team that includes SVRC-QRPs, service coordinators, employment coordinators, and other support staff to deliver effective and timely consumer services throughout the state. The employment coordinators provide labor market analysis, employer engagement, disability sensitivity training, and other supportive services to assist clients in achieving an employment outcome. Coupled with the direct services provided by the team, DOR maintains a network of partnerships with community based disability organizations and other public agencies, including high schools, community colleges, universities, and county mental health agencies to provide a greater range of employment services and opportunities to DOR consumers than would otherwise be available through any single agency. Lastly, given its focus and expertise, DOR has positioned itself to provide California’s leadership voice in state government and administers other programs, including the Disability Access Services, to assist in removing barriers to full inclusion of individuals with disabilities in the workforce, in state government, and in community life. (Page 525) TItle IV

Strengths: CalFresh E&T has strong relationships with Local Boards in the counties where it operates and the program is good at ensuring access to mental health and substance abuse services. CalWORKs has a robust subsidized employment program and has a lot of flexibility in the types of services it can provide. CalWORKs has an existing relationship with community colleges to provide support for CalWORKs recipients enrolled in academic and career pathway programs. While maintaining the work-first policies of TANF, recent changes in CalWORKs have increased the emphasis towards a work-focused, skills attainment, and barrier removal agenda to ensure that TANF recipients are positioned to achieve long-term successful outcomes and upward mobility. (Page 526) Title IV

Relevance to Partnership: Many formerly incarcerated and other justice involved individuals are likely to need a whole variety of supportive services as they work to secure employment. The kind of supportive services and the decision whether to provide these services to any given individual depends on that individual’s particular needs and capacity to participate in programming absent the provision of supportive services. Under WIOA, supportive services are defined as “services such as transportation, child care, dependent care, housing, and needs-related payments that are necessary to enable an individual to participate in activities.” In recognizing the lifelong trauma often faced by formerly incarcerated and other justice involved individuals, supportive services can and should include trauma informed healing approaches that foster improved emotional and mental health. The ability to provide supportive services to individuals is contingent on need, the availability of funds, and the roles and responsibilities of the various partners at the Local and Regional level. WIOA Title I funds can be used for the provision of supportive services but every dollar spent on supportive services for a particular individual is a dollar that cannot be spent on broader program costs. The partners may want to consider pursuing specific resources through the budget process to fund supportive services for the formerly incarcerated and other justice involved under the partnership. (Page 631) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

EDD is the largest public workforce development institution in the country and a member of the State Board. Located within LWDA alongside the State Board, EDD administers the WIOA Title I, federal Wagner-Peyser Act (WPA, WIOA Title III), labor market information, Disability Insurance, Paid Family Leave, Unemployment Insurance (UI), Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), and youth, disability, and veterans programs. EDD is also California’s major tax collection agency, administering the audit and collection of payroll taxes and maintaining the employment records for more than 17 million California workers. One of the largest departments in state government, handling over $100 billion annually, EDD has nearly 9,000 employees providing services at more than 200 locations throughout the state. Those services most relevant to the workforce system include all of the following:

• job search and placement services to job seekers including counseling, testing, occupational and labor market information, assessment, and referral to employers • recruiting services and special technical services for employers • program evaluation • developing linkages between services funded under WPA and related federal or state legislation, including the provision of labor exchange services at educational sites • providing services for workers who have received notice of permanent layoff or impending layoff, or workers in occupations which are experiencing limited demand due to technological change, impact of imports, or plant closures • collecting and analyzing California’s labor market information and employment data • developing a management information system and compiling and analyzing reports from the system and • administering the “work test” for the state unemployment compensation system and providing job finding and placement services for Unemployment Insurance claimants

Complementary Roles of EDD and the State Board The primary role of the State Board is policy development, while EDD is responsible for Wagner-Peyser job services, WIOA compliance, local technical assistance, administrative oversight, and the provision of labor market information. The State Board and EDD collaborate closely to implement the Governor’s vision and the policy objectives of the State Plan.

Clients/Service Population: EDD processes over 1.5 million initial unemployment insurance claims per year, over half a million disability insurance claims, and provides job services to 1.5 million people through Wagner-Peyser programs. EDD also operates several programs for targeted populations including job services programs for veterans, the disabled, youth, TAA, and foster youth. Strengths: EDD’s online labor exchange system, The California Job Openings Browse System (CalJOBSSM) is accessible to both employers and job seekers throughout the state. CalJOBSSM contains over half a million job listings and is accessed by more than a million job seekers every year. (Page 51) Title 1 EDD is the largest public workforce development institution in the country and a member of the State Board. Located within LWDA alongside the State Board, EDD administers the WIOA Title I, federal Wagner-Peyser Act (WPA, WIOA Title III), labor market information, Disability Insurance, Paid Family Leave, Unemployment Insurance (UI), Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), and youth, disability, and veterans programs. EDD is also California’s major tax collection agency, administering the audit and collection of payroll taxes and maintaining the employment records for more than 17 million California workers. One of the largest departments in state government, handling over $100 billion annually, EDD has nearly 9,000 employees providing services at more than 200 locations throughout the state. Those services most relevant to the workforce system include all of the following:

• Job search and placement services to job seekers including counseling, testing, occupational and labor market information, assessment, and referral to employers • Recruiting services and special technical services for employers • Program evaluation • Developing linkages between services funded under WPA and related federal or state legislation, including the provision of labor exchange services at educational sites • Providing services for workers who have received notice of permanent layoff or impending layoff, or workers in occupations which are experiencing limited demand due to technological change, impact of imports, or plant closures • Collecting and analyzing California’s labor market information and employment data • Developing a management information system and compiling and analyzing reports from the system and • Administering the “work test” for the state unemployment compensation system and providing job finding and placement services for UI claimants. (Page 518) Title I 

Provided training on core programs, including California Training Benefits, Unemployment Insurance (UI), Trade Adjustment Assistance, Veteran’s programs, and Youth and Dislocated Worker programs. • Developed and provided two hour training on the UI program. The training included UI claim filing eligibility basics, UI claim management, maneuvering UI’s public facing computer system, and understanding notices sent to claimants. The UI programs. The UI training also included seek work requirements and the results of non-compliance. (Page 381) Title II EDD agrees to achieve program coordination and, to the extent possible, integration, of the following programs in the America’s Job Center system of California: Wagner-Peyser Act, Trade Adjustment Assistance Act, Migrant Seasonal Farmworker outreach programs, Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG), Unemployment Insurance, Re-employment Services and Eligibility Assessment Activities (RESEA) and Labor Market Information as negotiated and articulated in the local MOUs. (Page 624) Title IV

Small Business Development Centers of California (SBDC) - The SBDCs provide training and nocost one-on-one counseling to help small businesses and entrepreneurs overcome obstacles to growth. Topics range from: start-up assistance, planning for growth and expansion, technology and innovation and access to capital. Work Sharing Program/Short Term Compensation - Work Sharing is described in Section 1279.5 of the California Unemployment Insurance Code and provides employers with an alternative to layoffs and provides their employees with the payment of reduced Unemployment Insurance benefits. (Page 650) Title IV

Local Workforce Development Areas may conduct group workshops (e.g. job search assistance and/or resume writing workshops) as part of on-site Rapid Response to business closures or significant layoffs and charge the cost to their 25 Percent Rapid Response funds if they have determined, in consultation with the local workforce services manager, that EDD workforce services staff are not available to conduct such workshops. Layoff aversion activities are a required activity in WIOA. It is the state’s policy priority that the full scope of required Rapid Response activities, as described in the WIOA, must be provided in each Local Area. The scope of business solutions that may be provided at Rapid Response events is not restricted to the activities described in Section 134 of WIOA. Local Boards are encouraged to leverage other local or state funding sources to provide a broader scope of business solutions. Examples include assisting with Trade Adjustment Assistance, Unemployment Insurance claim filing, economic development, financial assistance counseling, and mental health counseling. (Page 653) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 105

Senate Bill No. 289 CHAPTER 846 An act to add Section 14132.993 to the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to Medi-Cal. - 10/12/2019

“This bill would require the retention of placement on the waiting list for, or the reenrollment in, specified HCBS waiver programs for an individual who is a dependent child or spouse of an active duty military service member and who transfers out of state with the military service member on official military orders, if the individual subsequently reestablishes residence in this state and meets other specified procedural requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB-81: Developmental services - 06/27/2019

“(1) Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

This bill would require the department to consult, commencing in the summer of 2019, with specified stakeholders, including representatives of the Developmental Services Task Force and the Department of Rehabilitation, to discuss system reforms to better serve consumers with developmental disabilities, to perform various duties, such as evaluating compliance with federal rules relating to specified services, to report on the progress of these efforts, and to post specified material on its internet website, including a summary of public comments.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

California Medicaid State Plan - 06/27/2019

~~“The Medicaid State Plan is based on the requirements set forth in Title XIX of the Social Security Act and is a comprehensive written document created by the State of California that describes the nature and scope of its Medicaid (Medi-Cal) program.  It serves as a contractual agreement between the State of California and the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and must be administered in conformity with specific requirements of Title XIX of the Social Security Act and regulations outlined in Chapter IV of the Code of Federal Regulations. The State Plan contains all information necessary for CMS to determine if the State can receive Federal Financial Participation (FFP) for its Medicaid program. This website includes the current Medicaid State Plan for California as well as State Plan Amendments (SPAs). For all Title XXI- Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) State Plan Amendments please visit the CHIP Homepage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Department of Rehabilitation “Hot Jobs” - 06/12/2019

~~“DOR believes in the talent and potential of individuals with disabilities. We have posted the following jobs in partnership with our business partners who are actively working to diversify their workplace by including opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Anyone can apply for the jobs listed below, but DOR program participants are strongly encouraged to work with their employment team to prepare for the opportunities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

EDD awards $2 million to provide job opportunities and training for people with disabilities - 05/14/2019

~~• “The California Employment Development Department (EDD) today awarded $2 million in Disability Employment Accelerator grants to provide job training and employment opportunities to people with disabilities. The EDD awarded the funding to six workforce development organizations that serve eight counties including Inyo, Kern, Kings, Los Angeles, Mono, Sacramento, San Diego and Tulare. “People with disabilities contribute greatly to the workplace,” said EDD Director Patrick W. Henning. “These grants will fund programs for people with disabilities that can lead to employment, career advancement and economic independence. ”The organizations will work with local businesses in high-growth industries to develop “earn-and-learn” strategies that include paid work experience, transitional jobs and on-the-job training opportunities for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Home and Community-Based Alternatives (HCBA) Waiver - 05/06/2019

~~“The HCBA Waiver (formerly the Nursing Facility/Acute Hospital (NF/AH) Waiver) was approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on May 16, 2017.  Medicaid's Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver programs, including the HCBA Waiver, are authorized under Section1915(c) of the Social Security Act; governed by Title 42, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR); and administered by CMS.

The HCBA Waiver provides care management services to persons at risk for nursing home or institutional placement. The care management services are provided by a multidisciplinary care team comprised of a nurse and social worker. The care management team coordinates Waiver and State Plan services (e.g., medical, behavioral health, In-Home Supportive Services, etc.), and arranges for other available long-term services and supports available in the local community. Care management and Waiver services are provided in the Participant’s community-based residence. This residence can be privately owned, secured through a tenant lease arrangement, or the residence of a Participant’s family member. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California CIE: Blueprint for Change - 05/04/2019

~~“The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), California Department of Education (CDE),  and California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) have entered into a new agreement consistent with the State’s “Employment First” policy and other laws to make employment in an integrated setting, at a competitive wage, for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) its highest priority. .The California Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) Blueprint is the combined effort of the CDE, DOR and DDS, in partnership with a wide range of stakeholders including Disability Rights of California (DRC), with leadership provided by the California Health and Human Services Agency (CHHS). The purpose of the Blueprint is to increase opportunities for Californians with ID/DD to prepare for and participate in CIE.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HCBS Waiver for Californians with Developmental Disabilities: CA.0336.R04.02 - 05/01/2019

~~“The purpose of this amendment is to provide time limited rate increases in specific geographic areas for providers of Community-Based Day Services, In-Home Respite Agencies, and providers of Community Living Arrangement Services under the Alternative Residential Model. This amendment will also include Community Crisis Homes as a new provider type under Behavioral Intervention Services, add Community Based Adult Services as a new waiver service, and add Adult Day HealthCare Center as a provider type under Community Based Adult Services”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Self-Employment - 05/01/2019

~~• “You can use the Ticket to Work program to help you become self-employed or to start your own business. If you are interested in pursuing a self-employment goal, you need to tell potential Employment Networks about your goal, because not all ENs will have experience with helping people who want to become self-employed. It is important to find an EN that has the resources to help you meet your goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Citations

DRAFT 2019–20 California State Transition Plan for Career Technical Education - 04/12/2019

~~ “California is dedicated to the belief that all students can learn and that students with disabilities and English Learners must be guaranteed equal opportunity to access career pathways programs to realize their greatest potential. Through statewide employment first policies combined with efforts to ensure competitive integrated employment, California is ensuring high quality educational programs, and services for students with disabilities are mapped to employment. In addition, through partnerships with other State agencies including the Department of Rehabilitation and the Department of Developmental Services, eligible recipients are better able to plan, implement, and evaluate services to increase opportunities for students to enter into competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

Senate Bill No. 289 CHAPTER 846 An act to add Section 14132.993 to the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to Medi-Cal. - 10/12/2019

“This bill would require the retention of placement on the waiting list for, or the reenrollment in, specified HCBS waiver programs for an individual who is a dependent child or spouse of an active duty military service member and who transfers out of state with the military service member on official military orders, if the individual subsequently reestablishes residence in this state and meets other specified procedural requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB-81: Developmental services - 06/27/2019

“(1) Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

This bill would require the department to consult, commencing in the summer of 2019, with specified stakeholders, including representatives of the Developmental Services Task Force and the Department of Rehabilitation, to discuss system reforms to better serve consumers with developmental disabilities, to perform various duties, such as evaluating compliance with federal rules relating to specified services, to report on the progress of these efforts, and to post specified material on its internet website, including a summary of public comments.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB-1274 Developmental services: data exchange - 09/17/2018

~“An act to amend Section 4514 of, and to add Section 10850.6 to, the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to developmental services.” The State Department of Social Services shall provide the State Department of Developmental Services with CalWORKs and CalFresh eligibility and enrollment data for consumers served by the State Department of Developmental Services for the purposes of monitoring and evaluating employment outcomes to determine the effectiveness of the Employment First Policy.”

Systems
  • Other

AB-1111 Removing Barriers to Employment Act: Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative - 10/15/2017

~~“Existing law, the California Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, establishes the California Workforce Development Board as the body responsible for assisting the Governor in the development, oversight, and continuous improvement of California’s workforce investment system and the alignment of the education and workforce investment systems to the needs of the 21st century economy and workforce. That act requires the establishment of a local workforce development board in each local workforce development area of the state to, among other things, carry out analyses of the economic conditions in the local region.

This bill would enact the Removing Barriers to Employment Act, which would establish the Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative administered by the California Workforce Development Board. The bill would specify that the purpose of the initiative is to create a grant program to provide individuals with barriers to employment the services they need to enter, participate in, and complete broader workforce preparation, training, and education programs aligned with regional labor market needs. The bill would specify that people completing these programs should have the skills and competencies to successfully enter the labor market, retain employment, and earn wages that lead to self-sufficiency and economic security. The bill would require the board to develop criteria for the selection of grant recipients, as specified. The bill also would specify the criteria by which grants are required to be evaluated, the populations that are eligible to be served by grants, and the activities eligible for grant funding.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

AB-1607 An act to amend Sections 4688.21 and 4850.3 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, Rrelating to Developmental Sservices. - 09/19/2017

~~“Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Existing law establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities….

This bill would authorize a consumer in a supported employment program or work activity program who has the stated goal of integrated competitive employment in his or her IPP to request to use tailored day services in conjunction with his or her existing program to achieve that goal, if specified criteria are met, including that the type, amount, and provider of tailored day service allowed under these provisions is determined through the IPP process. The bill would specify the maximum hours of tailored day services that may be authorized in conjunction with existing services under these provisions.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Assembly Bill No. 107 CHAPTER 18 - 06/27/2017

~~“Existing law requires the regional center contracts described above to include, among other things, annual performance objectives, as specified. Existing law also establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities.

This bill would require the annual performance objectives included in regional center contracts to measure progress, and report outcomes, in implementing the Employment First Policy, as specified.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Cal. Welfare and Institutions Code §§4869 - 06/03/2017

~~“In furtherance of the purposes of this division to make services and supports available to enable persons with developmental disabilities to approximate the pattern of everyday living available to people without disabilities of the same age, to support the integration of persons with developmental disabilities into the mainstream life of the community, and to bring about more independent, productive, and normal lives for the persons served, it is the policy of the state that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment shall be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities. This policy shall be known as the Employment First Policy”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California ABLE Legislation (AB 1553) - 06/22/2016

Existing federal law, the Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 (ABLE Act… encourages and assists individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting persons with disabilities to maintain their health, independence, and quality of life by excluding from gross income distributions used for qualified disability expenses by a beneficiary of a Qualified ABLE Program established and maintained by a state, as specified…   This bill would authorize the ABLE Act Board to enter into a multistate contract with an account servicer in order to implement these provisions and to enter into a long-term contract with an account servicer, as provided.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

California Employment of Persons with Disabilities (AB 925) - 02/01/2016

"This bill would require the California Health and Human Services Agency and the Labor and Workforce Development Agency, using existing resources, to create a sustainable, comprehensive strategy to accomplish various goals aimed at bringing persons with disabilities into employment.”

 

“The bill would also require the committee, to the extent that funds are available, to make grants to counties and local workforce investment boards in order to develop local strategies for enhancing employment opportunities for people with disabilities, and to fund comprehensive local and regional benefits planning and outreach programs to assist persons with disabilities in removing barriers to work.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

California ABLE Legislation (AB 449) - 10/11/2015

Existing federal law, the Stephen Beck Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 (ABLE Act)…encourages and assists individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting persons with disabilities to maintain their health, independence, and quality of life by excluding from gross income distributions used for qualified disability expenses by a beneficiary of a Qualified ABLE Program established and maintained by a state, as specified.   This bill would…conform to these federal income tax law provisions relating to the ABLE Act under the Corporation Tax Law, as provided. The bill would also establish in state government the ABLE program trust for purposes of implementing the federal ABLE Act. The bill would authorize the ABLE Act Board to adopt regulations to implement the program. The bill would create the program fund, a continuously appropriated fund, thereby making an appropriation, and the administrative fund, as specified. The bill would require the board to  Administer the program in compliance with the requirements of the federal ABLE Act.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

California Executive Order S-4-05 - 11/28/2005

“ …WHEREAS, State Government has an opportunity and a responsibility to lead by example, ensuring individuals with disabilities have an open door to the many opportunities in public service;… NOW, THEREFORE, I, ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor of the State of California do hereby issue this order to become effective immediately: 1. All state agencies, departments, boards and commissions shall utilize best efforts with respect to recruitment, hiring, advancement, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment and issue clear, written directives to their managers and supervisors prohibiting discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. 2. Each state agency shall comply with existing law and annually review its hiring practices to identify any barriers to employment of individuals with disabilities, and, in consultation with their disability advisory committee, take appropriate action to eliminate any non job-related barriers to the integration of individuals with disabilities into the workforce. 3. All state agencies, departments, boards, and commissions shall utilize the Limited Examination and Appointment Program (LEAP) lists in filling vacancies. LEAP lists provide a ready pool of qualified candidates, who happen to have a disability, for a variety of jobs. 4. The State Personnel Board shall provide statewide leadership, in partnership with the Department of Rehabilitation, to coordinate and provide technical guidance to fulfill the intent of this executive order…”

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 43

Department of Rehabilitation “Hot Jobs” - 06/12/2019

~~“DOR believes in the talent and potential of individuals with disabilities. We have posted the following jobs in partnership with our business partners who are actively working to diversify their workplace by including opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Anyone can apply for the jobs listed below, but DOR program participants are strongly encouraged to work with their employment team to prepare for the opportunities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

EDD awards $2 million to provide job opportunities and training for people with disabilities - 05/14/2019

~~• “The California Employment Development Department (EDD) today awarded $2 million in Disability Employment Accelerator grants to provide job training and employment opportunities to people with disabilities. The EDD awarded the funding to six workforce development organizations that serve eight counties including Inyo, Kern, Kings, Los Angeles, Mono, Sacramento, San Diego and Tulare. “People with disabilities contribute greatly to the workplace,” said EDD Director Patrick W. Henning. “These grants will fund programs for people with disabilities that can lead to employment, career advancement and economic independence. ”The organizations will work with local businesses in high-growth industries to develop “earn-and-learn” strategies that include paid work experience, transitional jobs and on-the-job training opportunities for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

California CIE: Blueprint for Change - 05/04/2019

~~“The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), California Department of Education (CDE),  and California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) have entered into a new agreement consistent with the State’s “Employment First” policy and other laws to make employment in an integrated setting, at a competitive wage, for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) its highest priority. .The California Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) Blueprint is the combined effort of the CDE, DOR and DDS, in partnership with a wide range of stakeholders including Disability Rights of California (DRC), with leadership provided by the California Health and Human Services Agency (CHHS). The purpose of the Blueprint is to increase opportunities for Californians with ID/DD to prepare for and participate in CIE.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Self-Employment - 05/01/2019

~~• “You can use the Ticket to Work program to help you become self-employed or to start your own business. If you are interested in pursuing a self-employment goal, you need to tell potential Employment Networks about your goal, because not all ENs will have experience with helping people who want to become self-employed. It is important to find an EN that has the resources to help you meet your goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Citations

2019 California Employer’s Guide - 04/01/2019

~~• “Other Services• This guide also contains useful information on the many services that the EDD offers specifically for employers. The EDD supplies information on a wide range of programs, including programs offering tax credits. The EDD also provides a number of employment services, such as job development and job search workshops that are designed to reduce unemployment and, consequently, your taxes. Whether you are a new or established employer, we offer a variety of services to assist you in building a more successful business while complying with California laws.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

CAREER COUNSELING AND INFORMATION AND REFERRAL SERVICES - 01/05/2019

~Providing competitive, integrated employment, career counseling and information and referral (CC&IR) services to all individuals with a significant disability and employed at subminimum wage and known to the California Department of Rehabilitation Services (DOR) is reaffirmed in a recently posted description of DOR services: “The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Section 511 is a federal law that placed new work rules effective July 22, 2016, for entities holding special wage certificates under Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (14(c) employer). WIOA Section 511 requires that individuals with significant disabilities receive specific services and be given an opportunity to explore and obtain community employment. .”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan And Triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) - 01/05/2019

~“The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Portion of the Unified State Plan is developed by DOR to describe the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services provided to Californians with disabilities and identify areas where service delivery can be improved, modified, or enhanced. The State Plan demonstrates DOR’s commitment to changes within the law and empowers individuals to prepare to enter the workforce, maximize employability, and independence.The VR Portion of the Unified State Plan aims to achieve DOR’s mission of working with consumers and other stakeholders to provide services and advocacy resulting in employment, independent living, and equality for individuals with disabilities. You may review the current State Plan below.In addition, every three years the DOR conducts a Comprehensive Statewide Assessment (CSA) of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities in California.  The results of the CSA are then used to shape the goals and objectives in DOR's VR Portion of the State Plan as well as inform other DOR policies and planning efforts. If you have any questions regarding the State Plan or the triennial CSA, please contact the California Department of Rehabilitation's Planning Unit. “ 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Secondary Transition Planning “Compliance” - 12/28/2018

~“Resources and guidelines for educators, parents and agencies that will assist transition age youth develop transition plans that comply with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) are available on the Department of Education’s website.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Self-Determination Program - 12/21/2018

~The website of the California Department of Developmental Services includes a message from former Director Santi J. Rogers, Department of Developmental Disabilities: “All individuals, regardless of ability, have the right to access the basic elements that make-up a good life, beginning with: family, independence, personal responsibility, and freedom of choice. The Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act builds upon these basic fundamentals so that all individuals have the right to live their lives as they choose”. The website also includes links to numerous self-determination resources.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Desert/Mountain Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) Local Partnership Agreement - 11/23/2018

~• “A new collaborative agreement was established between Local Education Agencies (LEAs), the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), the Inland Regional Center (IRC), and the Workforce Development Board, with student participation. Its purpose is to provide employment training and support to individuals in need of additional skills to be ready for competitive, integrated employment (CIE), that includes essential components of Customized Employment. The full scope of the agreement and list of services are available by following the link to the agreement.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

DRAFT 2019–20 California State Transition Plan for Career Technical Education - 04/12/2019

~~ “California is dedicated to the belief that all students can learn and that students with disabilities and English Learners must be guaranteed equal opportunity to access career pathways programs to realize their greatest potential. Through statewide employment first policies combined with efforts to ensure competitive integrated employment, California is ensuring high quality educational programs, and services for students with disabilities are mapped to employment. In addition, through partnerships with other State agencies including the Department of Rehabilitation and the Department of Developmental Services, eligible recipients are better able to plan, implement, and evaluate services to increase opportunities for students to enter into competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Veterans’ Employment-Related Assistance Program (VEAP) Program Year (PY) 2018-19 - 01/11/2019

~“This SFP includes services to veterans with significant barriers to employment, including, but not limited to, special disabled1 or disabled veterans2; homeless veterans; recently separated service members who have been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months; an offender, as identified in WIOA Section 3 (38), who is currently incarcerated or who has been released from incarceration; a veteran lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; a low-income individual [as defined by WIOA Section 3 (36)]; women; and minorities”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

“Local Partnership Agreement Template" - 06/17/2017

~~“The California Department of Education (CDE), the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), and the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) seek to foster an environment of collaboration to increase competitive integrated employment (CIE) opportunities for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

Competitive Integrated Employment is described in plain language by the motto: “Real Work for Real Pay in the Real World.” The term means working for pay (at least minimum wage) in the community alongside people without disabilities. Work can be full-time (up to 40 hours per week) or part-time with the same level of benefits and opportunities for advancement as other employees.

The CIE Blueprint outlines the collaborative efforts between the three departments on a statewide level. A Local Partnership Agreement (LPA) identifies the ways in which partners will work together on a local level. Each agreement is built around the core partners of one or more local educational agencies (LEA), one or more DOR district, and one or more regional centers, and can include any number of additional local community partners.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego-Imperial Counties Developmental Services, Inc. "Employment First" - 05/10/2016

~~California’s Employment First Policy was signed into law in October of 2013, by Governor Brown.dds.ca.govCompetitive employment is finding a job within the community where you are paid about the same as other people doing the same job and at least minimum wage. It could also be working for yourself in your own small business.Information about the Employment First Policy can be found on the website of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities (scdd.ca.gov) as well as the Department of Developmental Services (dds.ca.gov).Employment & Your Individual Program Plan (IPP)When you plan with your service coordinator around employment opportunities, the first option that will be considered is competitive integrated employment. Competitive work is a real choice. Your service coordinator can help you find resources in the community to support your employment goals.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

CA Employment First Memorandum of Understanding - 12/12/2014

This project will use a multi-faceted approach to apply key elements from high performing states in integrated competitive employment and principles of Collaborative Leadership. A unified value, vision, and expectation for competitive integrated employment will be established and will serve as the basis for the strategies used for stimulating policy to practice, training, technical assistance, and a shared method for monitoring progress through available state and local employment data.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Employment First Committee Annual Report (Partnerships) - 01/16/2013

The Council participates in the Alliance for Full Participation California team. The AFP is a collaboration of major national organizations (including the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities) serving or advocating for improved employment outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The California team is facilitated by the Arc of California. The Council has also started coordinating with the California Committee for the Employment of People with Disabilities, established by statute to promote the employment of people with disabilities. Additionally, members of the Employment First Committee continue to actively work with key groups throughout the state to promote Employment First. 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The California Employment Consortium for Youth and Young Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (CECY)

~~“(CECY) is a collaboration of 23 state agencies, centers, and organizations, families, and self-advocates with responsibilities for the education, rehabilitation, employment, and support of youth with disabilities.  CECY is a five-year (2011-2016) Project of National Significance Partnerships in Employment Systems Change grant (#90DN0284) by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD).  The Tarjan Center at UCLA, a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, provides its administrative leadership. “
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

Progressive Employment Concepts (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants) - 04/01/2019

~~“At Progressive Employment Concepts and Community & Employment Services our goal is to provide high quality services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities which enable people to find and maintain employment, to contribute in their communities through volunteerism, to pursue post- secondary education and to start and run small businesses. 

We created this campaign to fund much needed computers, iPads and vehicles. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Breaking Barriers San Diego - 01/07/2016

“A new program funded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Workforce Innovation Fund, Breaking Barriers San Diego (BBSD), assists individuals with disabilities with finding permanent part-time or full-time jobs of their choice.   The network of America’s Job Center of California (AJCC) sites, funded by San Diego Workforce Partnership, will offer customized job placement support based on individuals’ strengths, preferences and skills and an emphasis on starting the job search quickly.   BBSD serves adults with physical and mental disabilities or significant barriers to employment.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

DEI Grantee Abstracts (CA Round 5) - 11/01/2015

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2014, California Employment Development Department, Workforce Services Branch was awarded a Round 2 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DEI Grantee Abstracts (CA Round 2) - 10/01/2014

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2011, California Employment Development Department, Workforce Services Branch was awarded a Round 2 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration.

When this grant ended a Round 5 grant was awarded.  Round 5 began in 2014 and will end in 2017.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

College to Career (C2C) - 01/16/2013

"College to Career (C2C) is a collaborative effort of the California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), California Community College Chancellor’s Office (CCCCO), and the UCLA Tarjan Center UCEDD. This collaboration broke new ground in establishing five, 3-year community college programs that provide youth with intellectual disabilities with education and vocational preparation that will lead to integrated competitive employment".

   
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego State University Interwork Institute’s Creative Support Alternative - Take Charge: Leading the Transition to Adulthood

“The goal of Take Charge is to offer person-driven planning (PDP) to transitioning youth and their families as a strategy to offer skills and experiences resulting in inclusive employment and inclusive lives facilitated by San Diego State University Rehabilitation Counseling (RC) graduate students. In addition, the project will provide educational presentations for students, families, transition teachers, adult service providers, and SDRC staff on the use of PDP to support young adults with developmental disabilities to pursue inclusive employment, including innovative options like micro- enterprise ownership.” Awarded in San Diego County.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Self-Advocacy for Youth (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

“This Self-Advocacy for Youth project goal is to promote self-advocacy and leadership of young adults with developmental disabilities by utilizing person centered planning through trainings and group facilitation of consumers and their advocacy support networks.” Awarded in Fresno County.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kidpower Teenpower Fullpower (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

“This project equips young adults with developmental disabilities and their families with the social emotional tools and skill sets necessary for successful transition to adult life. Outfits adult people with developmental disabilities with the social – emotional tools and skill sets necessary to enter and succeed in gainful work opportunities and increase their self-sufficiency.” Awarded in Multiple Counties.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Transition2Life Project (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

“The Transition2Life Project will provide direct, hands-on training and learning opportunities focusing on effective transitions to inclusive adult lives for young adults with developmental disabilities living in Amador, Calaveras, and Tuolumne counties.” 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

The goal of this project is to implement a “Get a Competitive Edge” Work Safe & Self-Advocacy program for consumers and employees with disabilities as part of The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and Supplement for the Supported Employment Services Program State Plan Program Years 2018 – 2020 - 02/11/2018

~~“Priority 3: Capacity Building

Goal: Establish or enhance partnerships to increase the capacity of CDOR and the WIOA core program partners to improve service delivery for adults and youth with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

“$2 million to assist Californians with disabilities in job searches” - 06/19/2017

~~“People with disabilities in 13 counties will get additional help in landing employment with $2 million in grants announced by the California Employment Development Department today. The Disability Employment Accelerator grants assist people with disabilities obtain skills needed for employment in growing industries such as advanced manufacturing, clean energy, transportation, and healthcare.The disability employment assistance funds will help prepare job seekers with skills and training needed for careers and then connect them with hiring businesses. The organizations receiving the grants will use “earn-and-learn” strategies that empower people with disabilities to earn incomes while they learn new skills that will help them progress into high-growth industries” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD) - 03/12/2017

~~“The California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD)advances employment for people with disabilities by making policy recommendations to the Secretary of the Labor and Workforce Development Agency and the Secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency .

The CCEPD also supports an annual event for youth with disabilities. In November of 2017, the CCEPD voted to adopt the California Youth Leadership Forum for Students with Disabilities (YLF) as the youth event until 2020, unless another model is created by the Youth Event Committee. For more information about the YLF, please visit the DOR YLF website or contact us with any questions.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

CA Employment First: Braiding Day and Employment Services to Build Meaningful Lives - 04/09/2015

This Employment First training presentation focuses on different approaches to promoting Employment First and encouraging integrated, community-based employment opportunities for people with disabilities. Some of the strategies include using Discovery and customized employment with Medicaid waiver day services participants through a braided funding approach including Vocational Rehabilitation. This presentation also provides a number of example case studies.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

The California DEI: Effective Practices in Building an Inclusive Workforce

This presentation summarizes California’s experience with the DEI grant as of 2015. It addresses the history of DEI in the state, the objectives, the strategic service delivery components, the promising practices and the hopes for sustainability after the grant.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

California Customized Employment for Service Members, Veterans & Their Families

This web page discusses Customized Employment as a “Promising Practice for Supporting Employees with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and/or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD),” particularly in the context of US Service Members and Veterans.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

Employment First Committee Annual Report

The Community of Practice (COP) is located within the Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and was formed and funded by the DOE to help improve transition and employment outcomes. This is a voluntary group of educational professionals.   The COP seeks to ensure the seamless transition of services for  youth, ages 16 –22, which will lead to positive post-school outcomes. They carry out their work through a statewide community of practice and a statewide list serve,which disseminates compliance information, resources and evidence-based practices and statewide technical assistance through webinars and conference calls.  Their key goal, with respect to employment ,is integrated ,competitive employment in any area of interest for each individual youth, ages 16-22.  
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California Training Initiatives

“Association of Regional Center Agencies – New day Conference. ARCA sponsored the New Day Conference in Pasadena in September 2012. Over 400 attendees participated in sessions focused on innovations in employment and housing services for individuals with developmental disabilities.” “Four- part employment webinar series aimed to create awareness about employment and to provide a discussion forum for families, individual organizations and professionals.” “Working Conference - Driving Forces Behind Successful Postsecondary Education and Employment for Young Adults with ID and Autism held in Sacramento, CA and sponsored by Think College and California Consortium on Postsecondary Educations and the Center for Disability Studies, University of Hawaii. The conference content addressed significant changes in public policy, insight for promoting inclusive strategies through person-centered protocol and interagency team building to support youth success. … Over 100 families, K-12, rehabilitation, developmental disabilities and higher education professionals, and students with developmental disabilities attended.” “Three-Part webinar series in Triangulating Postsecondary Education Goals for transition specialists and educators. The series aims at identifying postsecondary goals and aligning them with academic and industry standards. This webinar series was hosted by Community of Practice in Secondary Education (CoP).”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Triton Management Services to Pay $110,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Lawsuit - 10/10/2018

~“Triton Management Services, LLC, headquartered in Carlsbad, Calif., agreed to pay $110,000 and provide other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, an employee requiring medical attention and a leave of absence for a disability was denied leave and was instead fired. The EEOC said Triton failed to provide the employee a reasonable accommodation for her disability.

Such alleged conduct violates the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), which makes it unlawful for an employer to fire-or otherwise discriminate against an employee due to a disability.

The EEOC filed suit at the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California (EEOC v. Triton, Inc., Case No.: 3:17-cv-02004-BAS-KSC), after first attempting to reach a voluntary, pre-litigation settlement through its conciliation process.

In addition to monetary relief, the three-year consent decree, which remains under the court's jurisdiction during the term of the decree, includes injunctive relief intended to prevent further workplace discrimination. Triton will review and revise its written policies to achieve compliance with the ADA, provide regular training to all employees regarding the ADA, maintain a log detailing accommodation requests and complaints and conduct regular audits, and oversee recordkeeping and reporting requirements through a designated equal opportunity officer. The EEOC will monitor compliance with the terms of this agreement.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

California Medicaid State Plan - 06/27/2019

~~“The Medicaid State Plan is based on the requirements set forth in Title XIX of the Social Security Act and is a comprehensive written document created by the State of California that describes the nature and scope of its Medicaid (Medi-Cal) program.  It serves as a contractual agreement between the State of California and the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and must be administered in conformity with specific requirements of Title XIX of the Social Security Act and regulations outlined in Chapter IV of the Code of Federal Regulations. The State Plan contains all information necessary for CMS to determine if the State can receive Federal Financial Participation (FFP) for its Medicaid program. This website includes the current Medicaid State Plan for California as well as State Plan Amendments (SPAs). For all Title XXI- Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) State Plan Amendments please visit the CHIP Homepage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Home and Community-Based Alternatives (HCBA) Waiver - 05/06/2019

~~“The HCBA Waiver (formerly the Nursing Facility/Acute Hospital (NF/AH) Waiver) was approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on May 16, 2017.  Medicaid's Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver programs, including the HCBA Waiver, are authorized under Section1915(c) of the Social Security Act; governed by Title 42, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR); and administered by CMS.

The HCBA Waiver provides care management services to persons at risk for nursing home or institutional placement. The care management services are provided by a multidisciplinary care team comprised of a nurse and social worker. The care management team coordinates Waiver and State Plan services (e.g., medical, behavioral health, In-Home Supportive Services, etc.), and arranges for other available long-term services and supports available in the local community. Care management and Waiver services are provided in the Participant’s community-based residence. This residence can be privately owned, secured through a tenant lease arrangement, or the residence of a Participant’s family member. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Waiver for Californians with Developmental Disabilities: CA.0336.R04.02 - 05/01/2019

~~“The purpose of this amendment is to provide time limited rate increases in specific geographic areas for providers of Community-Based Day Services, In-Home Respite Agencies, and providers of Community Living Arrangement Services under the Alternative Residential Model. This amendment will also include Community Crisis Homes as a new provider type under Behavioral Intervention Services, add Community Based Adult Services as a new waiver service, and add Adult Day HealthCare Center as a provider type under Community Based Adult Services”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California HCBS Transition Plan - 02/23/2019

~~“California’s HCBS programs, which are the focus of this Statewide Transition Plan (STP) are either directly administered or overseen by the Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) as the single state agency for Medicaid/Medi-Cal.  However, several of the HCBS waivers and the 1915(i) State Plan program are administered jointly by DHCS and the State or local entity with program responsibility.  Administrative teams comprised of employees from the State department/entity with program responsibility exist at DHCS, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), the Department of Developmental Services (DDS), the California Department of Aging (CDA), and the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH).  The SFDPH administers a HCBS Waiver program in accordance with terms of an Agreement with DHCS.”     

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Amendment to Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for the Developmentally Disabled - 12/14/2018

~“The HCBS waiver is available statewide to provide individuals with developmental disabilities the desired services and supports needed to implement their Individual Program Plan (IPP). The proposed amendment will include the following changes: …Community Based Adult Services

    The addition of Community Based Adult Services as a new service, and establishment of the rate to be the maximum rate based on the Schedule of Maximum Allowances, to align the HCBS Waiver for Persons with Developmental Disabilities with services available in the 1915(i) State Plan”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Fact Sheet: Home and Community Based Setting Rule - 11/28/2018

~“The purpose of the rules is to ensure that individuals receive services in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services to the same degree as individuals who do not receive regional center services. It means that settings need to focus on the nature and quality of individuals' experiences and not just about the buildings where the services are delivered. Individuals have an active role in the development of their plan, the planning process is person-centered, and the plan reflects the individual's service and supports and what is important to them.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California Department of Developmental Services 1915(i) HCBS State Plan Services - 07/01/2018

~~“ServicesHabilitation-Community Living Arrangement Services; Habilitation-Day Services; Habilitation-Behavioral Intervention Services; Respite Care; Enhanced Habilitation- Supported Employment -Individual; Enhanced Habilitation- Prevocational Services; Homemaker Services; Home Health Aide Services; Community Based Adult Services; Personal Emergency Response Systems; Vehicle Modification and Adaptation; Speech, Hearing and Language Services; Dental Services; Optometric/Optician Services; Prescription Lenses and Frames; Psychology Services; Chore Services; Communication Aides; Environmental Accessibility Adaptations; Non-Medical Transportation; Nutritional Consultation; Skilled Nursing; Specialized Medical Equipment and Supplies; Transition/Set-Up Expenses; Community-Based Training Services; Financial Management Services; Family Support Services; Housing Access Services; Occupational Therapy; Physical Therapy; and Family/Consumer Training” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medi‐Cal Health Homes Program Guide - 04/08/2018

~~1915(c) Waiver Programs1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver programs provide services to many Medi‐Cal members who will likely also meet the eligibility criteria for HHP. There are comprehensive care management components within theseprograms that are duplicative of HHP services. Members who are receiving 1915(c) services have a choice of continuing 1915(c) services or receiving HHP services.The 1915(c) HCBS waiver programs include:HIV/AIDS, Assisted Living Waiver (ALW), Developmentally Disabled (DD), In‐HomeOperations (IHO), Multipurpose Senior Services Program (MSSP), Nursing Facility Acute Hospital (NF/AH), and Pediatric Palliative Care (PPC). 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Number: CA.0336.R04.00, California's HCBS DD Waiver - 01/01/2018

~~“California’'s HCBS DD Waiver offers community-based services not otherwise available through a participant’s Medicaid program. The purpose of the HCBS DD Waiver is to serve participants in their own homes and communities as an alternative to placing Medicaid-eligible individuals in intermediate care facilities for persons with developmental disabilities.  The HCBS DD Waiver  program recognizes that many individuals at risk of being placed in these facilities can be cared for in their homes and communities, preserving their independence and ties to family and friends at a cost no higher than that of institutional care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

CA HCBS Waiver for Californians w/DD (0336.R03.00) - 03/29/2012

"This waiver "provides behavioral intervention, community living arrangements, day service, home health aide, homemaker, prevocational services, respite care, supported employment (enhanced habilitation), chore, communication aides, community-based training, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations, FMS, non-medical transportation, nutritional consultation, optometric/optician services, PERS, prescription lenses and frames, psychology services, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, specialized therapeutic services, speech/hearing and language services, transition/set up expenses, vehicle mods and adaptations for individuals w/autism, DD, IID"

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The Golden State is a place where you can "Find Yourself" through a rewarding career, including those with disabilities who are ready to live the California Dream.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon California's VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.05%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39,557,045
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.43%
Change from
2017 to 2018
1,896,634
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.01%
Change from
2017 to 2018
700,456
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
8.77%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39.93%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.79%
Change from
2017 to 2018
75.61%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 39,250,017 39,536,653 39,557,045
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 2,023,714 1,980,677 1,896,634
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 701,791 721,536 700,456
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 16,632,184 16,961,551 17,104,193
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.68% 36.43% 39.93%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.22% 75.01% 75.61%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.40% 4.80% 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.20% 18.80% 19.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.70% 12.70% 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 2,020,143 1,992,144 1,937,820
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 2,186,775 2,158,900 2,128,351
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,749,171 2,694,884 2,651,000
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 331,848 326,909 312,801
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 1,273,677 1,251,237 1,240,562
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 47,935 51,632 47,303
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 459,722 466,413 457,927
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 15,006 15,676 15,401
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 178,131 183,748 186,022
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 425,105 411,782 395,717

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 41,719 41,243 40,775
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.50% 4.50% 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 682,668 663,886 641,737

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 20,014 17,818 20,381
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 49,907 44,559 47,289
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 221,216 181,992 199,371
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 9.00% 9.80% 10.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 0.10% 0.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50% 0.20% 0.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.90% 2.00% 1.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 11.80% 10.00% 10.10%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 582 494 568
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,552 904 1,172
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,396 7,686 8,301
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 39,862 39,151 44,074

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 36,836 42,724 46,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,153 2,125 2,373
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,127 1,102 1,176
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00% 0.52% 50.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.94 2.82 3.00

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
23,327
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 1,433 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,777 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 3,872 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 8,242 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 5,189 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,807 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 38.90% 35.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 25,118 24,984 24,319
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 1,247,320 1,213,289 1,186,089
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 1,569 1,110 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,257 658 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $92,086,000 $95,089,000 $115,626,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $55,745,000 $53,463,000 $48,783,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $854,301,000 $910,461,000 $1,018,595,250
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 12.00% 12.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 66,040 69,286 72,005
Number of people served in facility based work. 9,629 9,141 7,838
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 26.30 26.60 27.67

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 54.07% 54.92% 56.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 21.54% 20.70% 19.82%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.63% 3.56% 3.40%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.59% 99.79% 99.78%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 52.26% 48.87% 53.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 75.46% 72.65% 77.60%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 83.16% 81.72% 85.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.20% 23.78% 23.63%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 10,193,235
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 12,148
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 123,357
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 4,322,464
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 4,445,821
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 180
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,641
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,821
AbilityOne wages (products). $583,952
AbilityOne wages (services). $61,505,189

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 6 3
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 20 22
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 109 67 65
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 6 5 4
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 119 98 94
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 30 29 22
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 35 1,740 1,826
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 17,727 11,546 10,401
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 488 486 400
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 18,280 13,801 12,649

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~In keeping with California’s Employment First Policy, the DDS Work Services Program addresses the employment needs of consumers by providing work and community integration opportunities through Supported Employment Programs (SEPs). Supported Employment (SE) services through the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) and regional centers are aimed at finding competitive work in a community integrated work setting for persons with severe disabilities who need ongoing support services to learn and perform the work. Support is usually provided by a job coach who meets regularly with the individual on the job to help him or her learn the necessary skills and behaviors to work independently. The DOR is the main vocational rehabilitation program SE service provider for adults with developmental disabilities. However, if the DOR is unable to provide services due to fiscal reasons, the regional center may be able to help individuals served get a job by funding SE through other means if these services are available in their area. (Page 65) Title I

The DPEC works with the State Board, Independent Living Centers, AJCCs, DOR, Department of Developmental Services (DDS), and many other public and private stakeholders to improve employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The DPEC also encourages and assists stakeholders to train staff on disability awareness and effective service delivery. Some of the partnerships and activities supported by the DPEC include: Employment First, Youth Employment Opportunity Program, Youth Leadership Forum, Disability Employment Initiative and Disability Employment Accelerator. (Page 271) Title IV

AB 287 (2009) established the Employment First Policy, which led to a standing Employment First Committee formed by the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. The bill expands employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and identifies best practices and incentives for increasing integrated employment and gainful employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Employment First policy requires Regional Centers to develop Individual Program Plans to ensure individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities beginning at age 14 are provided options, competitive integrated employment, and post—secondary education to enable the consumer to transition from school to work. The CDOR is an active participant in the Employment First Committee to help with transition planning. (Page 432) Title IV

In December 2014, CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to further advance the state’s “Employment First” Policy and other federal and state laws to address employment in integrated settings, at competitive wages, for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In March 2017, the Competitive Integrated Employment: Blueprint for Change was completed, and outlines plans for the following goals:

— Improving collaboration and coordination between the three departments to prepare and support all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment;
— Building capacity to increase opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment to prepare for and participate in the California workforce development system; and,
— Increasing the ability of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to make informed choices, adequately prepare for, transition to, and engage in competitive integrated employment. (Page 432) Title IV

The baseline indicators for performance accountability indicators have not yet been established. Until that time, CDOR is implementing current and new strategies to improve performance including: monthly monitoring of performance indicator data; attending California Model Employer Initiative meetings in order to increase the number of individuals with disabilities in state employment; identifying and implementing improvements in furtherance of the State’s “Employment First” policy to gain integrated competitive wages for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities; increasing jobs—driven employment and consumer self—sufficiency for consumers who are job ready through work incentives planning; establishing new partnerships with employers through the National Employment Team; maximizing the use of the Talent Acquisition Portal, an online system which includes both a national talent pool of VR candidates looking for employment and a job posting system for businesses looking to hire individuals with disabilities, to link job ready consumers with employers; and, enhancing staff training curriculums to include the use of social media strategies and the electronic job application process. (Page 475-476) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~• Efforts are taking place to update the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on CDOR Student Services (Pre—Employment Transition Services) and Customized Employment WIOA services. (Page 430) Title IV

• A need to increase partnerships between CRPs to promote information-sharing regarding job leads, services provided, and opportunities for new services such as customized employment. (Page 455) Title IV

Strategies:

• Conduct focus groups to solicit feedback about what the partners think is needed to enhance services for people with disabilities.
• Develop a CDOR referral form and referral process for the America’s Job Centers of California.
• Provide training to local America’s Job Center of California staff on topics such as: CDOR services; eligibility; job placement; case management; benefits counseling; job readiness and soft skills; disability awareness and etiquette; hiring persons with disabilities; disability disclosures; competitive integrated employment; customized employment; assistive technology; and, reasonable accommodation. (Page 472) Title IV

The CDOR’s Community Resources Development Section continues to update and use the Rehabilitation Resources Directory, an online resource on CDOR’s website that provides users with complete information about CRPs throughout California. CDOR’s Community Resources Development Section is updating the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on Pre—Employment Transition Services and Customized Employment WIOA services. In early 2014, a proof of concept titled “Placement Plus” was administered in select CRPs to test a new employment services fee for service structure. The lessons learned and evaluation of the Placement Plus is informing CDOR’s current efforts to redesign employment services statewide. (Page 475) Title IV

The CDOR Supported Employment Program provides Supported Employment services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities, to enable them to achieve an employment outcome of supported employment in competitive integrated employment. These services support opportunities for competitive integrated employment (including customized employment, as available) that is individualized, and customized, consistent with the unique strengths, abilities, interests, and informed choice of the individual, including with ongoing support services for individuals with the most significant disabilities. (Page 485) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Local Boards are tasked under WIOA Section 121 with developing and entering an MOU with all required One-Stop mandatory partners, certifying One-Stop operators, and conducting oversight of the One-Stop system in the local area. To the extent that Local Boards fulfill these obligations, they will necessarily involve themselves with system alignment efforts and the implementation of state plan program strategies pertaining to service integration, resource braiding, and the provision of supportive services. (Page  134) Title I

Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in-demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post-secondary education. (Page 148) Title I

Clients/Service Population: Adult, dislocated worker, youth, and universal access clients number 1.7 million individuals, including about 60,000 clients who receive certificates through AJCCs. Incumbent workers are an emerging client of the Local Boards. Local Boards serve 65,000 businesses annually and partner in the AJCCs with California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs), community colleges, economic development agencies, DOR, adult education providers, and veteran’s services providers.
Strengths: Local Boards have a lot of experience braiding resources and integrating service delivery through the One-Stop system. Local Boards have deep connections to their local communities, and are gaining greater experience working through state and local led regional initiatives, including sector and career pathway strategies as well as initiatives to provide services to target populations. (Page 517-518) Title IV

Integrating service delivery and braiding resources are ways that workforce and education programs can achieve program alignment and assure access to the broad array of services funded across the state’s workforce and education programs. In California, resources will be braided and services integrated and aligned through the creation of “value-added” partnerships at the state, regional, and local levels.
A value-added partnership is one in which all partners gain from the partnership. Ideally, “gains to exchange” occur and partners transact with one another on the basis of specialization, providing services consistent with each programs’ core competencies. Partners thereby leverage one another’s expertise, building a proverbial “sum that is greater than its parts.” (Page 542) Title I

The State Board will issue regional planning guidance that details best practices and model partnerships between the workforce system and the community college system, recommending that Local Boards meet their WIOA Section 106 requirements pertaining to coordinated service delivery strategies and shared administrative costs in ways that lay the foundation for a strong partnership with community college CTE programs. This can be done in a variety of ways, including the following:
• by building links between AJCCs and campuses, including but not limited to, pooling resources to place AJCC staff directly on campuses
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs. (Page 564) Title I

The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD-WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
• The State Board has partnered with EDD to create and staff the One-Stop Design workgroup, which brought together state plan partners and other stakeholders to develop a blueprint for service delivery in the state’s AJCCs. Work by this group will inform state policy on integrated service delivery and the braiding of resources at AJCCs, including policy on operations, required partnership, and the articulation of AJCC services with Regional Sector Pathway programs. (More detail on this is provided in chapter 4). (Page 568) Title I

• Working with EDD, the State Board has already issued policies pertaining to Eligible Training Providers and the use of alternative training models, including OJT, to encourage the use of “earn and learn” approaches to training by local boards.
• Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One-Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 569) Title I

Additionally, SBE, CDE, CCCCO, and the State Board will work jointly to identify and recommend best practices and model partnerships that encourage program alignment, coordination, integration of services, and braiding of resources beyond the minimum levels required as part of mandatory One-Stop partnership. To this end, the State Board will issue local and regional planning guidance, supported, when appropriate, by policy directives or other appropriate means of communication issued by SBE, CDE, and CCCCO to foster better program alignment between basic education and basic skills programs and other workforce and education programs and services. Recommended relevant best practices may include but are not limited to the following:
• aligning basic skills coursework with career pathways programs and adopting contextualized learning practices that combine basic education and skills coursework with CTE coursework
• braiding resources from WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs with WIOA Title II programs to provide supportive services to those attending basic education and skills programs so as to facilitate both course and program completion; local partnerships may include charter schools focused on serving out of school youth and operating under Education Code Section 47612.1(a) (Page  570) Title I

Vehicle: One-Stop Design and certification requirements, Local Planning Guidance; additionally DOR and CWDB will ensure resources for cross-training of frontline staff in the AJCCs (Planning Guidance Tier: Required) Competitive Integrated Employment: 
DOR district staff will designate a point of contact for the Local Boards to provide linkages to service providers of consumers with ID/DD (Planning Guidance Tier: Required).
Vehicle: DOR district staff will partner with the Local Boards to outreach employers and partners to develop strategies to achieve Competitive Integrated Employment opportunities for consumers with ID/DD (Planning Guidance Tier: Required). DOR will provide disability expertise and CIE technical assistance to the Local Boards, partners, and employers (Planning Guidance Tier: Recommended). (Page 606-607) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Workplace Readiness Training: CDOR VR team members will provide training on workplace readiness skills, including soft skills, financial literacy, independent living skills, and resume development, or arrange for training through Transition Partnership Programs third-party cooperative arrangements as well as other contracts or fee-for-service arrangements through local educational agencies, CRPs, or other providers. As part of the financial literacy component, CDOR Work Incentives Planners will provide limited Work Incentives Planning services to students who are Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability Insurance recipients who need support and information regarding the impact of paid work experience on their benefits. (Page 427) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~The Special Education Division oversees programs operated by approximately 1,600 local educational agencies (LEAs) to provide students up to age 22, who receive services under an Individualized Education Program, with a free and appropriate public education. Students with disabilities age 16-22 must be provided transition services based on their assessed needs, strengths, preferences, and interests to facilitate movement from school to post school activities. These post school activities may include postsecondary education, training, competitive integrated employment, and independent living. In addition to required transition services, WorkAbility I is a state-funded grant program awarded to approximately 270 LEAs to provide comprehensive pre-employment skills training, employment placement and follow-up for participating middle and high school students in special education who are making the transition from school to work, independent living and postsecondary education or training. (Page 522) Title I

After determining eligibility, through a comprehensive assessment and planning process and in collaboration with the SVRC-QRP, the consumer develops an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that identifies the employment goal and required VR services to achieve that goal. VR plan services may include, but are not limited to:

• Counseling and guidance.
• Referrals and assistance to get services from other agencies.
• Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Job search and placement assistance.
• Vocational and other training services, including, but not limited to, pre-employment training and soft skills training.
• Evaluation of physical and mental impairments.
• On-the-job or personal assistance services.
• Interpreter services.
• Rehabilitation and orientation or mobility services for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and/or blind or low vision.
• Occupational licenses, tools, equipment, initial stocks, and supplies.
• Technical assistance for self-employment.
• Rehabilitation assistive technology services and devices.
• Supported employment services.
• Services to the family.
• Transportation as required, such as travel and related expenses, that is necessary to enable the consumer to participate in a VR service.
• Transition services for students.
• Work Incentive Planning, which includes providing information on potential employment earning impacts to Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability Income (SSDI), and Ticket to Work (TTW).
• Expansion of employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including, but are not limited to, professional employment and self-employment.
• Post-employment services. (Page 58) Title I

DOR will work with the State Board and regionally organized Local Boards to identify opportunities to leverage collaborative employer outreach and engagement efforts that develop in the course of regional planning efforts. Where these opportunities exist, DOR will work with State Plan partners to market employer incentives and strategies for the hiring of individuals with disabilities, including better and more coordinated use of Federal procurement “503” hiring requirements. As part of this effort, DOR will partner with ETP to leverage incumbent worker training contracts to open doors for workers with disabilities as 30 percent of the state’s largest 100 federal contractors have utilized ETP contracts to train their incumbent workforce.

Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE). (Page 121) Title IV

• Communicate the statewide availability of pre-employment transition services with Special Education Local Planning Area Directors and the Advisory Commission on Special Education.
• Outreach to schools and closer coordination between VR and Local Educational Agency staff that do not currently have a Transition Partnership Program cooperative arrangement.
• Expand transition services beyond school to work to include school to postsecondary training transitions.
• Provide information about the transition from school to work at an earlier age to eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities.
• Provide work incentives education and planning services to students as well as parents and guardians of students with disabilities. (Page 426) Title IV

The CDOR administers 107 Transition Partnership Programs cooperative programs with Local Educational Agencies, County Offices of Education, or Special Education Local Plan Areas providing VR services to eligible students in hundreds of individual schools. CDOR also administers six case service contracts through associated Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) in conjunction with Transition Partnership Programs cooperative programs. The goal of the Transition Partnership Programs is to serve high school students with disabilities including blind, deaf, intellectual, developmental, and mental health disabilities by facilitating the effective transition from school to meaningful competitive integrated employment. The Local Educational Agency or Special Education Local Plan Area will refer potentially eligible students with disabilities and eligible students with disabilities ages 16 through 21 who can benefit from Pre-Employment Transition Services and VR services to CDOR. The assigned VR Counselor will then open a case and work in partnership with the individual to complete an Individualized Plan for Employment as early as possible, but at the latest before the consumer leaves school. Through the cooperative arrangement or case service contract, the participating Local Educational Agencies, Special Education Local Plan Areas, or CRP provides one or more new or expanded VR services to students. These services conform to the definition of Pre—Employment Transition Services required by WIOA and contain the following key features: job exploration counseling; work-based learning experiences; counseling on post—secondary opportunities; workplace readiness training; and, instruction in self-advocacy. These services, in addition to others provided on an individual basis are intended to ultimately result in competitive integrated employment. (Page 417) Title IV

Collaborative efforts to support community integration of individuals who are eligible for HCBS waiver programs include CDOR district staffs’ participation in person-centered planning meetings, when invited. The CDOR is also supporting discussions with DDS for improved coordination of IEPs and IPP for eligible individuals. The CDOR is also collaborating with DDS to support opportunities for competitive integrated employment through the CIE Blueprint as described in the response to description (f) - Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services. (Page 434)  Title IV

Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).

DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal law, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K-12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners. (Page 563) Title IV

Strengths: CDE, through the Career Pathways Trust, has distributed $500,000,000 over the past two years through a one-time appropriation to establish regional collaborative relationships and partnerships with business entities, community organizations, and local institutions of postsecondary education to develop and integrate standards-based academics with career-relevant, industry-themed pathways and work-based learning opportunities that are aligned to high-need, high-growth, or emerging regional economic sectors. Additionally, CDE is distributing $900,000,000 through the CTE Incentive Grant Program, which is a three-year (2016-2019) statewide grant with the goal of providing pupils in K-12 with the knowledge and skills necessary to transition to employment and postsecondary education. The CDE has also developed a strong community of practice on secondary transitions and has integrated work-based learning approaches for students with disabilities; ensured WIOA Title II grantees have the flexibility to match curriculum with the goals and objectives of other WIOA funded programs; and implemented an evaluation process for the Coordinated Student Support programs that utilizes information provided by program participants to help improve programs. (Page 56) Title II

Career Pathways

~~Additionally, the State Board has entered into an agreement with CDSS, the CWDA, and the Chancellor’s Office of Supportive Services to encourage and promote local partnerships that articulate subsidized employment programs operated by County Welfare Departments with career pathways programs, including “Regional Sector Pathway” programs identified and developed in WIOA regional plans. Where robust partnerships develop, these pathway programs should be designed to service TANF recipients, taking care to meet the particular client needs of those being served.
The State Board has entered into a similar agreement with DOR to promote access to competitive integrated employment at the local level, in coordination with the California Competitive Integrated Employment Blueprint partners, the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) and the California Department of Education (CDE), so as to ensure opportunities for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities to prepare for and obtain quality jobs. (Page 123) Title IV

The State Board has entered into an agreement with SBE/CDE to support and encourage the integration of work-based learning activities in all locally funded WIOA youth programs to involve interactions with industry professionals and include career awareness, career exploration, internships and career pathways training activities. (Page 135) Title IV

The State Board will also review regional plans to ensure compliance with state guidance and WIOA requirements for regional plans, and will share regional plan content with state partners, including information pertaining to prioritized sectors and career pathways identified in the course of the regional planning process. The sharing of this information will facilitate, as appropriate, engagement with regional efforts by other State Plan partners such as DOR ETP, and CalWORKs. (Page) Title IV

Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE). (Page 159) Title IV

Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One-Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 569) Title IV

 DOR will provide access to Vocational Rehabilitation services including training, self-advocacy training, assessments, career counseling/exploration; OJT/work experience; benefits planning; job placement services and assistive technology for eligible individuals with disabilities. (Page 605) Title IV
 

Apprenticeship

Work-Based Learning Experiences: CDOR VR team members will arrange for on-the-job trainings, internships, apprenticeships, work experiences, and other work-based learning experiences for students with disabilities through direct interaction with businesses, Transition Partnership Programs third-party cooperative arrangements, and through vocational services provided through other contracts or fee-for-service arrangements through local educational agencies or CRPs. (Page 427) Title IV

CA Career Innovations: Work-Based Learning Model Demonstration. The CDOR has partnered with San Diego State University, Interwork Institute to evaluate the effects and benefits of work-based learning experiences to prepare students with disabilities to enter post-secondary education and competitive integrated employment. The CDOR anticipates that 800 students with disabilities will participate in the project, including students with the most significant disabilities, who are ages 16 through 21, and have Individualized Education Program or 504 plans. (Page 433) Title IV

Objective 1.2: Beginning July 1, 2018, and annually thereafter, the CDOR will provide no less than 2,000 students with disabilities with work-based learning experiences at an average of 100 hours per student for pre-employment transition services. Strategies: • Continue to contract for approximately $4.0 million dollars annually to local educational agencies for direct funding of work experience placements for students with disabilities. Achieved: Over 2,000 CDOR consumers received work-based learning (work experience) through the WE Can Work contracts and Transition Partnership Program contracts during FFY 2017. Goal 2: Outreach to potentially eligible students with disabilities to enhance awareness of, and the opportunities to receive, CDOR services. (Page 479) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Ticket to Work and Self—Sufficiency Program
The CDOR actively coordinates with the Ticket to Work and Self—Sufficiency Program. Ticket to Work is a voluntary work incentive program for Social Security Disability Insurance or Supplemental Security Income beneficiaries between the ages of 18 and 64 who are interested in going to work. The Ticket to Work Program provides beneficiaries with access to VR, training, and placement services, as well as other services and support. Beneficiaries can use their ticket to obtain employment services and support from CDOR or they can take their ticket to an approved service provider called an Employment Network. A ticket cannot be assigned to an Employment Network and in—use with CDOR at the same time. The CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners and VR Counselors have an active role in the Ticket to Work program. CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners verify ticket status, provide information as needed, and facilitate referrals to Employment Networks at case closure. VR counselors distribute CDOR’s Ticket to Work fact sheet at intake, verify the ticket status prior to approving the Individualized Plan for Employment, and facilitate sequential services.  (Page 422) Title IV

Timing of Transition to Extended Services
Once a consumer has maintained stability on the job for at least 60 days, the funding for and provision of job coaching transitions to an extended services provider. The VR Counselor continues to track the consumer’s progress and job stability during the transition period. If the consumer maintains job stabilization for 60 days after transition to extended services, the case is Closed—Rehabilitated. Transition to extended service providers is essential to maintain consistency and support for consumers receiving supported employment services. CDOR works to identify funding sources for extended services, collaborates with extended service providers, and identifies sources of extended services, including natural supports which are vital for the long-term success of the consumer. Sources of extended services for a consumer eligible for supported employment services include: public resources such as the California Department of Developmental Services and Ticket to Work Programs; private resources such as trust funds, private non—profits, religious or community organizations, and family; and natural supports to ensure the consumer receiving supported employment services has greater success in the work environment. (Page 488) Title IV

After determining eligibility, through a comprehensive assessment and planning process and in collaboration with the SVRC-QRP, the consumer develops an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that identifies the employment goal and required VR services to achieve that goal. VR plan services may include, but are not limited to:

• Counseling and guidance.
• Referrals and assistance to get services from other agencies.
•  Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Job search and placement assistance.
• Vocational and other training services, including, but not limited to, pre-employment training and soft skills training.
• Evaluation of physical and mental impairments.
• On-the-job or personal assistance services.
•  Interpreter services.
•  Rehabilitation and orientation or mobility services for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and/or blind or low vision.
• Occupational licenses, tools, equipment, initial stocks, and supplies.
• Technical assistance for self-employment.
• Rehabilitation assistive technology services and devices.
• Supported employment services.
• Services to the family.
• Transportation as required, such as travel and related expenses, that is necessary to enable the consumer to participate in a VR service.
• Transition services for students.
• Work Incentive Planning, which includes providing information on potential employment earning impacts to Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability Income (SSDI), and Ticket to Work (TTW).
• Expansion of employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including, but are not limited to, professional employment and self-employment.
• Post-employment services. (Pages 524- 545) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Clients/Service Population: WIOA Section 167 grantees serve eligible migrant/seasonal farmworkers and their dependents. Eligible farmworkers are those individuals who primarily depend on employment in agricultural labor that is characterized by chronic unemployment and underemployment.

Strengths: WIOA Section 167 grantees have well-developed relationships with Local Boards and the AJCC system, provide occupational skills training, related supportive services, and housing assistance to the MSFW population. Many Section 167 grantees also qualify as Eligible Training Providers, list programs on the State ETPL, and also receive referrals from AJCCs.

CDOR Response — Coordination with Employers. The WIOA calls for a description of how the designated State unit will work with employers to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities in order to facilitate the provision of: 1) VR services; and, 2) transition services for youth, and Pre—Employment Transition Services for students. In regard to coordination with employers and VR services, CDOR provides this description through the “Business Engagement” goals and objectives in Description (o)(1) — State’s Strategies. (Page 433) Title IV

Data Collection

Data Collection: The degree to which the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance. (Page 251) Title II

Data Collection: The degree to which the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance. (Page 253-254) Title I

The Cross-System Analytics and Assessment for Learning and Skills Attainment (CAAL-SKILLS) data initiative is an interagency and multi-departmental effort to pool participant and program performance data across workforce, education, and human service programs and funding streams. CAAL-SKILLS will use common performance measures to examine participating program outcomes by region, provider, service, demographics, and industry. The project will develop the capacity to evaluate and assess participating programs efficacy, allowing program administrators and policymakers access to actionable data so that programs can be designed to improve program participant outcomes. CAAL-SKILLS is intended to meet the statutory requirements of AB 2148 (K. Mullin, Chapter 385, Statutes of 2014) and AB 1336 (K. Mullin, Chapter 211, Statutes of 2017) and WIOA 116(e) evaluation and assessment requirements. Participating departments include CWDB, DSS, ETP, DIR-DAS, EDD, CCCCO, CDE, SBE and DOR. The following information provides an overview of progress to date: November 2016 - January 2017. (Page 259) Title II

511

~~Objective 8.2: From July 1, 2018, to June 30, 2020, the Achieving Community Employment services team will provide at least 17,000 individuals earning subminimum wage with career counseling and information and referral services in partnership with over 130 14(c) Certificate Holders / Employers (based on Department of Labor Lists of all registered 14c certificate holders and number of workers paid subminimum wage issued in October 2017).

Strategies:

• The CDOR career counseling and information and referral service provision will include individualized person-centered services for individuals expressing a desire to explore and achieve competitive integrated employment.
• Increase outreach efforts with caregivers, partners, and employers to promote the benefits of transitioning individuals from subminimum wage jobs to competitive integrated employment.
• The CDOR’s Achieving Community Employment services team counselors will help individuals receiving career counseling and information and referral to enroll in VR services in collaboration with local CDOR staff; and will track, monitor, and support the individuals as they navigate through the VR services towards successful achievement of competitive integrated employment. (Page 473) Title IV

Goal 7

• Coordinated and collaborated with state partners, the California Department of Education and the California Department of Developmental Services, through an Interagency Leadership Workgroup to implement a statewide cross-departmental partnership.
• Coordinated with local 14 (c) certificate holders to provide information about competitive integrated employment opportunities to individuals employed at subminimum wage.
• Educated partners and employers regarding competitive integrated employment opportunities, outcomes, and supports for adults and youth with disabilities. (Page 483) Title IV

Collaboration with Schools Regarding Required Documentation Specified in Section 511 Regarding Career Exploration Activities for Individuals Considering Sub-Minimum Wage Employment
The CDOR and California Department of Education Interagency Agreement includes specific requirements related to individuals considering sub-minimum wage employment. Actions include, but are not limited to:
• Communication by the California Department of Education with local educational agencies, parents, guardians, teachers, and students about the Section 511 requirements.
• CDOR maintains the documentation and provides a copy to the individual within specified timelines under 34 CFR 397.
• The local educational agency documents any services provided and gives the documentation to the student and CDOR.
• If a youth with a disability or, as applicable, the youth’s parent or guardian, refuses, through informed choice, to participate in the activities required by Section 511 or the implementing regulations in 34 CFR 397, documentation must, at a minimum:
• Contain the information in 34 CFR 397.10(a)(2); and
• Be provided by the CDOR to the youth within 10 calendar days of the youth’s refusal to participate.
• The CDOR School Liaison meets with local educational agency partners at least annually and review Section 511 requirements within the statewide interagency agreement. (Page 465) Title IV

 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The State Board is committed to ensuring individuals with disabilities have physical and programmatic access to the AJCC system and services. The State Board, in consultation with chief elected officials and Local Boards, will establish objective criteria and procedures to evaluate the AJCCs and delivery system for effectiveness. The evaluation will include how well the local job centers ensure equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities to participate in or benefit from AJCC services. The evaluation must also include criteria evaluating how well the centers and local delivery systems take actions to comply with the disability-related regulations implementing WIOA section 188, set forth in 29 CFR part 37. (Page 272) Title II

The CDOR is providing intensive on-site regional training to workforce partners on topics that range from how to write accessible documents to disability awareness and etiquette. The CDOR has scheduled 82 statewide trainings through 2019. The CDOR also provides information on accessible meeting spaces, client flow in America’s Job Center of California, and technical assistance to CDOR District Administrators and Team Managers that sit on boards conducting accessibility reviews. The CDOR collaborates with the California Workforce Association in delivering training to the workforce development systems through the workforce development boards, regional planning units, and America’s Job Center of California staff on disability rights and awareness, employment opportunities, and equal access for individuals with disabilities. Training opportunities will become available through the California Training Institute of the California Workforce Association which will provide flexibility for the California Workforce Development Board, regional planning units, and America Job Center of California to address any disability related training needs. The CDOR provides training, technical assistance, and consultation to state and local government staff, public organizations, employers, and small businesses regarding disability related issues, equal employment opportunities, and physical and digital access for individuals with disabilities. The CDOR also collaborates with state entities to ensure that the communication and information technology infrastructure such as web, web content, information technology procurement, telecommunication, and any public or government communication is accessible for individuals with disabilities and others who use assistive technology. (Page 477) Title IV

DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal law, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K-12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners. (Page 563) Title IV 11.

CWDB will draft local and regional guidance and DOR will provide technical assistance, through staff or referrals to local resources, to the Local Boards that will ensure a level of one stop accessibility for individuals with disabilities that is consistent with state and federal requirements pertaining to accessibility. DOR and CWDB will provide a consistent message to both Local Boards and DOR district offices concerning state policy on these matters. DOR and CWDB staff will work jointly to assess the level of partnership in One-Stops and current compliance with known future regulatory requirements regarding access to services for persons with disabilities. These requirements include providing services to job seekers through co-location, cross -training, or direct access through real-time technology. This information gathered from the assessment will be used to ensure that all districts and Local Boards are on a path to compliance with all state and federal laws. DOR will be consulted by Local Boards regarding CAPs for hard to resolve concerns. (Page 604) Title IV

Partners CWDB and DOR agree that a memorandum of understanding (MOU) will be updated between each DOR district and the corresponding Local Board concerning the operation of the One-Stop delivery system in the local area including: services to be provided, funding sources and mechanisms, methods of referral between One-Stop operator and One-Stop partners, methods to ensure needs of individuals with disabilities are addressed, including physical and programmatic accessibility, and duration of the MOU. (Page 608) Title IV

Partners agree to work collaboratively at the state, regional, and local level to build capacity and increase professional development for One-Stop staff for the purpose of ensuring programmatic, physical, and electronic access, and increase employment opportunities for youth. Additionally, partners will support Local Boards to promote best practices in physical and programmatic accessibility, including: facilities, programs, services, technology and materials. Partners will work jointly to identify models of One-Stop partnerships that support youth programs, as well as the purpose of these partnerships, and the manner in which these partnerships elevate service delivery so as to improve client outcomes. To ensure the WIOA youth vision of supporting an integrated service delivery system and framework, partners and local areas will leverage other federal, state, local, and philanthropic resources to support in-school and out-of-school youth. (Page 622) Title IV

Vets

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 48) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist. (Page 270) Title I

The state has implemented a policy to ensure Local Areas have a process in place for referring veterans with significant barriers to employment to career services provided by the JVSG program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist; (Page 676) Title IV

EDD is California’s designated state workforce agency and administers the State’s Jobs for Veterans Program Grant (JVSG). The JVSG supports two principal staff positions: Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist; and Local Veterans’ Employment Representative. The EDD operates and delivers outreach and career services to veterans with significant barriers to employment and employer outreach and workforce services with DOL-VETS funds. To ensure access to services for veterans and veterans with significant barriers to employment, the state has established formal guidance regarding priority of service for veterans that all AJCC staff must follow. EDD Workforce Services Directive WSD08-10 provides this guidance. This guidance is being updated to include the new WIOA references and will be reissued once this is done. (Page 598) Title IV

Mental Health

~~Strengths: DOR employs qualified SVRC-QRPs with master’s degrees who are trained in assessment, career planning, job placement, and assistive technology services to meet the employment needs of eligible individuals with disabilities. DOR utilizes a consumer-centered approach to service delivery through a team that includes SVRC-QRPs, service coordinators, employment coordinators, and other support staff to deliver effective and timely consumer services throughout the state. The employment coordinators provide labor market analysis, employer engagement, disability sensitivity training, and other supportive services to assist clients in achieving an employment outcome. Coupled with the direct services provided by the team, DOR maintains a network of partnerships with community based disability organizations and other public agencies, including high schools, community colleges, universities, and county mental health agencies to provide a greater range of employment services and opportunities to DOR consumers than would otherwise be available through any single agency. Lastly, given its focus and expertise, DOR has positioned itself to provide California’s leadership voice in state government and administers other programs, including the Disability Access Services, to assist in removing barriers to full inclusion of individuals with disabilities in the workforce, in state government, and in community life. (Page 59-60) Title I

The scope of business solutions that may be provided at Rapid Response events is not restricted to the activities described in Section 134 of WIOA. Local Boards are encouraged to leverage other local or state funding sources to provide a broader scope of business solutions. Examples include assisting with Trade Adjustment Assistance, Unemployment Insurance claim filing, economic development, financial assistance counseling, and mental health counseling. (Page 296) Title II

Program Element 10 - Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling
This program element provides individualized counseling to participants and may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling, mental health counseling, and referral to partner programs. Local Areas and youth service providers may directly provide counseling. When a Local Area or youth service provider refers a youth for counseling services that they are unable to provide, the Local Area or service provider must coordinate with the referred counseling organization to ensure continuity of service (TEGL 21-16). (Page 325) Title II

This program element provides individualized counseling to participants and may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling, mental health counseling, and referral to partner programs. Local Areas and youth service providers may directly provide counseling. When a Local Area or youth service provider refers a youth for counseling services that they are unable to provide, the Local Area or service provider must coordinate with the referred counseling organization to ensure continuity of service (TEGL 21-16). (Page 348) Title II

Coordination with the State Agency Responsible for Providing Mental Health Services
In California, the State agency responsible for mental health services is the California Department of Health Care Services. CDOR has developed a Memorandum of Understanding with Department of Health Care Services to establish a framework for collaboration between CDOR and Department of Health Care Services to provide local technical assistance and support in order to strengthen existing CDOR Mental Health Cooperative Programs or to develop new patterns of vocational rehabilitation services available to individuals living with severe mental illness, with the ultimate goal of ensuring that consumers have access to a comprehensive, coordinated, and quality service delivery system. (Page 422) Title IV

Non—educational Agencies Serving Out—of—School Youth The CDOR serves out—of—school youth through multiple venues and methods. CDOR Districts provide unique types of programs and services for youth and adults with disabilities. The majority of programs are with educational agencies (short or long-term training or educational programs). The local CDOR Districts have strong working relationships with the local regional centers that serve youth and adults with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities. Similarly, CDOR Districts also have established working relationships with local county mental health and county welfare programs that also serve youth and adults with psychiatric disabilities. Additionally, some CDOR Districts have also formed connections with foster youth programs. (Page 423) Title IV

To support the provisions of this Interagency Agreement, CDOR established a Cooperative Programs Action Committee comprised of representatives from the California Department of Education, Local Educational Agencies, community colleges, state universities, mental health agencies, and community-based organizations. The Cooperative Programs Action Committee provides feedback to CDOR in the development of policies and procedures to promote the services for individuals with disabilities. (Page 426) Title IV

The CDOR works with over 100 Supported Employment providers statewide with associated locations and satellite offices. The CDOR, the California Department of Developmental Services, and the California Department of Education additionally are establishing Local Partnership Agreements consistent with the Competitive Integrated Employment: Blueprint for Change. The Local Partnership Agreements are anticipated to encourage the sharing of resources to support person centered planning and pre-vocational services that may be provided prior to an individual’s referral to CDOR for Supported Employment. In California, CDOR and the Department of Developmental Services utilize the hourly rates for Supported Employment job coaching, intake, placement, and retention services that are statutorily—defined. The current rates were set in 2008 (Assembly Bill 1781). Sources of extended services vary depending on the individual’s eligibility for other programs or availability of other resources. Funding for extended services for individuals with mental illness may be provided by county mental health agencies, which may allocate Medi—Cal, Mental Health Services Act, or Short—Doyle funds as determined by each county. Social Security Administration Work Incentives, such as Impairment Related Work Expense or an approved Plan for Achieving Self Support, may be used. Supported Employment services provided under Veteran’s Health Administration Compensated Work Therapy Program may also be used to fund extended services. California state regulations do not allow Traumatic Brain Injury state match funds to be used for extended services. Consumers with a Traumatic Brain Injury that require extended services such as ongoing support needed to maintain Supported Employment, such as job coaching, can be served through additional resources at local Independent Living Centers. Whenever possible, building natural supports at the workplace for consumers with Supported Employment needs is encouraged. Natural supports allow the strengthening of the relationship between employer and consumer, supporting long-term successful outcomes and to develop opportunities for competitive integrated employment, to the greatest extent practicable. (Page 431) Title IV

Coordination with the State Agency Responsible for Providing Mental Health Services
In California, the State agency responsible for mental health services is the California Department of Health Care Services. CDOR has developed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Health Care Services to establish a framework for collaboration between CDOR and the Department of Health Care Services to provide local technical assistance and support in order to strengthen existing CDOR Mental Health Cooperative Programs or to develop new patterns of vocational rehabilitation services available to individuals living with severe mental illness, with the ultimate goal of ensuring that consumers have access to a comprehensive, coordinated, and quality service delivery system. The CDOR is also a member of the California Mental Health Planning Council, which evaluates the behavioral health system for accessible and effective care. It advocates for an accountable system of responsive services that are strength-based, recovery-oriented, culturally competent, and cost-effective. (Page 434) Title IV

Possession of a valid license as a Psychologist issued by the California Board of Psychology and possession of an earned Doctorate Degree in Psychology from an educational institution meeting the criteria of Section 2914 of the California Business and Professions Code. Unlicensed individuals who are recruited from outside the State of California and who qualify for licensure may take the examination and may be appointed for a maximum of two years at which time licensure shall have been obtained or the employment shall be terminated.). Experience: Either —
• Two years of experience in the California state service performing clinical psychology duties equivalent to those of a Psychologist (Various Specialties), Psychologist (Health Facility) (Various Specialties), or Psychologist Clinical, Correctional Facility. Or,
• Three years of full—time postdoctoral, post—internship experience in the practice of psychology involving either training, research, consultation, or program planning in mental health services. (Page 442) Title IV

The CDOR will additionally make available services under section 603 to individuals with other disability types that need supported employment services, including those with mental health disabilities, traumatic brain injuries, and other most significant disabilities; and youth who need extended services that are not met under the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (Welf. & Inst. Code, § 4500 et seq.).

The CDOR intends to achieve its supported employment goals and priorities through the following actions:

The CDOR will provide extended services for youth with most significant disabilities for up to four years or until the youth is 25 years of age for those youth who are not eligible for extended services under the Lanterman Act. These may include youth with mental health disabilities, traumatic brain injuries, and other most significant disabilities. (Page 464) Title IV

Client/Service Population: In federal fiscal year 2014, DOR provided services to approximately 98,000 eligible individuals with disabilities, including 6,500 who were blind or visually impaired; 13,300 with cognitive disabilities; 18,200 with learning disabilities; 4,900 with intellectual or developmental disabilities; 6,500 deaf or hard of hearing individuals; 19,100 with physical disabilities; 26,100 with psychiatric disabilities; 1,200 with traumatic brain injury; and 2,200 individuals with other disabilities.

Strengths: DOR employs qualified SVRC-QRPs with master’s degrees who are trained in assessment, career planning, job placement, and assistive technology services to meet the employment needs of eligible individuals with disabilities. DOR utilizes a consumer-centered approach to service delivery through a team that includes SVRC-QRPs, service coordinators, employment coordinators, and other support staff to deliver effective and timely consumer services throughout the state. The employment coordinators provide labor market analysis, employer engagement, disability sensitivity training, and other supportive services to assist clients in achieving an employment outcome. Coupled with the direct services provided by the team, DOR maintains a network of partnerships with community based disability organizations and other public agencies, including high schools, community colleges, universities, and county mental health agencies to provide a greater range of employment services and opportunities to DOR consumers than would otherwise be available through any single agency. Lastly, given its focus and expertise, DOR has positioned itself to provide California’s leadership voice in state government and administers other programs, including the Disability Access Services, to assist in removing barriers to full inclusion of individuals with disabilities in the workforce, in state government, and in community life. (Page 525) TItle IV

Strengths: CalFresh E&T has strong relationships with Local Boards in the counties where it operates and the program is good at ensuring access to mental health and substance abuse services. CalWORKs has a robust subsidized employment program and has a lot of flexibility in the types of services it can provide. CalWORKs has an existing relationship with community colleges to provide support for CalWORKs recipients enrolled in academic and career pathway programs. While maintaining the work-first policies of TANF, recent changes in CalWORKs have increased the emphasis towards a work-focused, skills attainment, and barrier removal agenda to ensure that TANF recipients are positioned to achieve long-term successful outcomes and upward mobility. (Page 526) Title IV

Relevance to Partnership: Many formerly incarcerated and other justice involved individuals are likely to need a whole variety of supportive services as they work to secure employment. The kind of supportive services and the decision whether to provide these services to any given individual depends on that individual’s particular needs and capacity to participate in programming absent the provision of supportive services. Under WIOA, supportive services are defined as “services such as transportation, child care, dependent care, housing, and needs-related payments that are necessary to enable an individual to participate in activities.” In recognizing the lifelong trauma often faced by formerly incarcerated and other justice involved individuals, supportive services can and should include trauma informed healing approaches that foster improved emotional and mental health. The ability to provide supportive services to individuals is contingent on need, the availability of funds, and the roles and responsibilities of the various partners at the Local and Regional level. WIOA Title I funds can be used for the provision of supportive services but every dollar spent on supportive services for a particular individual is a dollar that cannot be spent on broader program costs. The partners may want to consider pursuing specific resources through the budget process to fund supportive services for the formerly incarcerated and other justice involved under the partnership. (Page 631) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

EDD is the largest public workforce development institution in the country and a member of the State Board. Located within LWDA alongside the State Board, EDD administers the WIOA Title I, federal Wagner-Peyser Act (WPA, WIOA Title III), labor market information, Disability Insurance, Paid Family Leave, Unemployment Insurance (UI), Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), and youth, disability, and veterans programs. EDD is also California’s major tax collection agency, administering the audit and collection of payroll taxes and maintaining the employment records for more than 17 million California workers. One of the largest departments in state government, handling over $100 billion annually, EDD has nearly 9,000 employees providing services at more than 200 locations throughout the state. Those services most relevant to the workforce system include all of the following:

• job search and placement services to job seekers including counseling, testing, occupational and labor market information, assessment, and referral to employers • recruiting services and special technical services for employers • program evaluation • developing linkages between services funded under WPA and related federal or state legislation, including the provision of labor exchange services at educational sites • providing services for workers who have received notice of permanent layoff or impending layoff, or workers in occupations which are experiencing limited demand due to technological change, impact of imports, or plant closures • collecting and analyzing California’s labor market information and employment data • developing a management information system and compiling and analyzing reports from the system and • administering the “work test” for the state unemployment compensation system and providing job finding and placement services for Unemployment Insurance claimants

Complementary Roles of EDD and the State Board The primary role of the State Board is policy development, while EDD is responsible for Wagner-Peyser job services, WIOA compliance, local technical assistance, administrative oversight, and the provision of labor market information. The State Board and EDD collaborate closely to implement the Governor’s vision and the policy objectives of the State Plan.

Clients/Service Population: EDD processes over 1.5 million initial unemployment insurance claims per year, over half a million disability insurance claims, and provides job services to 1.5 million people through Wagner-Peyser programs. EDD also operates several programs for targeted populations including job services programs for veterans, the disabled, youth, TAA, and foster youth. Strengths: EDD’s online labor exchange system, The California Job Openings Browse System (CalJOBSSM) is accessible to both employers and job seekers throughout the state. CalJOBSSM contains over half a million job listings and is accessed by more than a million job seekers every year. (Page 51) Title 1 EDD is the largest public workforce development institution in the country and a member of the State Board. Located within LWDA alongside the State Board, EDD administers the WIOA Title I, federal Wagner-Peyser Act (WPA, WIOA Title III), labor market information, Disability Insurance, Paid Family Leave, Unemployment Insurance (UI), Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), and youth, disability, and veterans programs. EDD is also California’s major tax collection agency, administering the audit and collection of payroll taxes and maintaining the employment records for more than 17 million California workers. One of the largest departments in state government, handling over $100 billion annually, EDD has nearly 9,000 employees providing services at more than 200 locations throughout the state. Those services most relevant to the workforce system include all of the following:

• Job search and placement services to job seekers including counseling, testing, occupational and labor market information, assessment, and referral to employers • Recruiting services and special technical services for employers • Program evaluation • Developing linkages between services funded under WPA and related federal or state legislation, including the provision of labor exchange services at educational sites • Providing services for workers who have received notice of permanent layoff or impending layoff, or workers in occupations which are experiencing limited demand due to technological change, impact of imports, or plant closures • Collecting and analyzing California’s labor market information and employment data • Developing a management information system and compiling and analyzing reports from the system and • Administering the “work test” for the state unemployment compensation system and providing job finding and placement services for UI claimants. (Page 518) Title I 

Provided training on core programs, including California Training Benefits, Unemployment Insurance (UI), Trade Adjustment Assistance, Veteran’s programs, and Youth and Dislocated Worker programs. • Developed and provided two hour training on the UI program. The training included UI claim filing eligibility basics, UI claim management, maneuvering UI’s public facing computer system, and understanding notices sent to claimants. The UI programs. The UI training also included seek work requirements and the results of non-compliance. (Page 381) Title II EDD agrees to achieve program coordination and, to the extent possible, integration, of the following programs in the America’s Job Center system of California: Wagner-Peyser Act, Trade Adjustment Assistance Act, Migrant Seasonal Farmworker outreach programs, Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG), Unemployment Insurance, Re-employment Services and Eligibility Assessment Activities (RESEA) and Labor Market Information as negotiated and articulated in the local MOUs. (Page 624) Title IV

Small Business Development Centers of California (SBDC) - The SBDCs provide training and nocost one-on-one counseling to help small businesses and entrepreneurs overcome obstacles to growth. Topics range from: start-up assistance, planning for growth and expansion, technology and innovation and access to capital. Work Sharing Program/Short Term Compensation - Work Sharing is described in Section 1279.5 of the California Unemployment Insurance Code and provides employers with an alternative to layoffs and provides their employees with the payment of reduced Unemployment Insurance benefits. (Page 650) Title IV

Local Workforce Development Areas may conduct group workshops (e.g. job search assistance and/or resume writing workshops) as part of on-site Rapid Response to business closures or significant layoffs and charge the cost to their 25 Percent Rapid Response funds if they have determined, in consultation with the local workforce services manager, that EDD workforce services staff are not available to conduct such workshops. Layoff aversion activities are a required activity in WIOA. It is the state’s policy priority that the full scope of required Rapid Response activities, as described in the WIOA, must be provided in each Local Area. The scope of business solutions that may be provided at Rapid Response events is not restricted to the activities described in Section 134 of WIOA. Local Boards are encouraged to leverage other local or state funding sources to provide a broader scope of business solutions. Examples include assisting with Trade Adjustment Assistance, Unemployment Insurance claim filing, economic development, financial assistance counseling, and mental health counseling. (Page 653) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 105

Senate Bill No. 289 CHAPTER 846 An act to add Section 14132.993 to the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to Medi-Cal. - 10/12/2019

“This bill would require the retention of placement on the waiting list for, or the reenrollment in, specified HCBS waiver programs for an individual who is a dependent child or spouse of an active duty military service member and who transfers out of state with the military service member on official military orders, if the individual subsequently reestablishes residence in this state and meets other specified procedural requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB-81: Developmental services - 06/27/2019

“(1) Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

This bill would require the department to consult, commencing in the summer of 2019, with specified stakeholders, including representatives of the Developmental Services Task Force and the Department of Rehabilitation, to discuss system reforms to better serve consumers with developmental disabilities, to perform various duties, such as evaluating compliance with federal rules relating to specified services, to report on the progress of these efforts, and to post specified material on its internet website, including a summary of public comments.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

California Medicaid State Plan - 06/27/2019

~~“The Medicaid State Plan is based on the requirements set forth in Title XIX of the Social Security Act and is a comprehensive written document created by the State of California that describes the nature and scope of its Medicaid (Medi-Cal) program.  It serves as a contractual agreement between the State of California and the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and must be administered in conformity with specific requirements of Title XIX of the Social Security Act and regulations outlined in Chapter IV of the Code of Federal Regulations. The State Plan contains all information necessary for CMS to determine if the State can receive Federal Financial Participation (FFP) for its Medicaid program. This website includes the current Medicaid State Plan for California as well as State Plan Amendments (SPAs). For all Title XXI- Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) State Plan Amendments please visit the CHIP Homepage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Department of Rehabilitation “Hot Jobs” - 06/12/2019

~~“DOR believes in the talent and potential of individuals with disabilities. We have posted the following jobs in partnership with our business partners who are actively working to diversify their workplace by including opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Anyone can apply for the jobs listed below, but DOR program participants are strongly encouraged to work with their employment team to prepare for the opportunities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

EDD awards $2 million to provide job opportunities and training for people with disabilities - 05/14/2019

~~• “The California Employment Development Department (EDD) today awarded $2 million in Disability Employment Accelerator grants to provide job training and employment opportunities to people with disabilities. The EDD awarded the funding to six workforce development organizations that serve eight counties including Inyo, Kern, Kings, Los Angeles, Mono, Sacramento, San Diego and Tulare. “People with disabilities contribute greatly to the workplace,” said EDD Director Patrick W. Henning. “These grants will fund programs for people with disabilities that can lead to employment, career advancement and economic independence. ”The organizations will work with local businesses in high-growth industries to develop “earn-and-learn” strategies that include paid work experience, transitional jobs and on-the-job training opportunities for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Home and Community-Based Alternatives (HCBA) Waiver - 05/06/2019

~~“The HCBA Waiver (formerly the Nursing Facility/Acute Hospital (NF/AH) Waiver) was approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on May 16, 2017.  Medicaid's Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver programs, including the HCBA Waiver, are authorized under Section1915(c) of the Social Security Act; governed by Title 42, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR); and administered by CMS.

The HCBA Waiver provides care management services to persons at risk for nursing home or institutional placement. The care management services are provided by a multidisciplinary care team comprised of a nurse and social worker. The care management team coordinates Waiver and State Plan services (e.g., medical, behavioral health, In-Home Supportive Services, etc.), and arranges for other available long-term services and supports available in the local community. Care management and Waiver services are provided in the Participant’s community-based residence. This residence can be privately owned, secured through a tenant lease arrangement, or the residence of a Participant’s family member. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California CIE: Blueprint for Change - 05/04/2019

~~“The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), California Department of Education (CDE),  and California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) have entered into a new agreement consistent with the State’s “Employment First” policy and other laws to make employment in an integrated setting, at a competitive wage, for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) its highest priority. .The California Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) Blueprint is the combined effort of the CDE, DOR and DDS, in partnership with a wide range of stakeholders including Disability Rights of California (DRC), with leadership provided by the California Health and Human Services Agency (CHHS). The purpose of the Blueprint is to increase opportunities for Californians with ID/DD to prepare for and participate in CIE.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HCBS Waiver for Californians with Developmental Disabilities: CA.0336.R04.02 - 05/01/2019

~~“The purpose of this amendment is to provide time limited rate increases in specific geographic areas for providers of Community-Based Day Services, In-Home Respite Agencies, and providers of Community Living Arrangement Services under the Alternative Residential Model. This amendment will also include Community Crisis Homes as a new provider type under Behavioral Intervention Services, add Community Based Adult Services as a new waiver service, and add Adult Day HealthCare Center as a provider type under Community Based Adult Services”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Self-Employment - 05/01/2019

~~• “You can use the Ticket to Work program to help you become self-employed or to start your own business. If you are interested in pursuing a self-employment goal, you need to tell potential Employment Networks about your goal, because not all ENs will have experience with helping people who want to become self-employed. It is important to find an EN that has the resources to help you meet your goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Citations

DRAFT 2019–20 California State Transition Plan for Career Technical Education - 04/12/2019

~~ “California is dedicated to the belief that all students can learn and that students with disabilities and English Learners must be guaranteed equal opportunity to access career pathways programs to realize their greatest potential. Through statewide employment first policies combined with efforts to ensure competitive integrated employment, California is ensuring high quality educational programs, and services for students with disabilities are mapped to employment. In addition, through partnerships with other State agencies including the Department of Rehabilitation and the Department of Developmental Services, eligible recipients are better able to plan, implement, and evaluate services to increase opportunities for students to enter into competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

Senate Bill No. 289 CHAPTER 846 An act to add Section 14132.993 to the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to Medi-Cal. - 10/12/2019

“This bill would require the retention of placement on the waiting list for, or the reenrollment in, specified HCBS waiver programs for an individual who is a dependent child or spouse of an active duty military service member and who transfers out of state with the military service member on official military orders, if the individual subsequently reestablishes residence in this state and meets other specified procedural requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB-81: Developmental services - 06/27/2019

“(1) Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

This bill would require the department to consult, commencing in the summer of 2019, with specified stakeholders, including representatives of the Developmental Services Task Force and the Department of Rehabilitation, to discuss system reforms to better serve consumers with developmental disabilities, to perform various duties, such as evaluating compliance with federal rules relating to specified services, to report on the progress of these efforts, and to post specified material on its internet website, including a summary of public comments.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB-1274 Developmental services: data exchange - 09/17/2018

~“An act to amend Section 4514 of, and to add Section 10850.6 to, the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to developmental services.” The State Department of Social Services shall provide the State Department of Developmental Services with CalWORKs and CalFresh eligibility and enrollment data for consumers served by the State Department of Developmental Services for the purposes of monitoring and evaluating employment outcomes to determine the effectiveness of the Employment First Policy.”

Systems
  • Other

AB-1111 Removing Barriers to Employment Act: Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative - 10/15/2017

~~“Existing law, the California Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, establishes the California Workforce Development Board as the body responsible for assisting the Governor in the development, oversight, and continuous improvement of California’s workforce investment system and the alignment of the education and workforce investment systems to the needs of the 21st century economy and workforce. That act requires the establishment of a local workforce development board in each local workforce development area of the state to, among other things, carry out analyses of the economic conditions in the local region.

This bill would enact the Removing Barriers to Employment Act, which would establish the Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative administered by the California Workforce Development Board. The bill would specify that the purpose of the initiative is to create a grant program to provide individuals with barriers to employment the services they need to enter, participate in, and complete broader workforce preparation, training, and education programs aligned with regional labor market needs. The bill would specify that people completing these programs should have the skills and competencies to successfully enter the labor market, retain employment, and earn wages that lead to self-sufficiency and economic security. The bill would require the board to develop criteria for the selection of grant recipients, as specified. The bill also would specify the criteria by which grants are required to be evaluated, the populations that are eligible to be served by grants, and the activities eligible for grant funding.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

AB-1607 An act to amend Sections 4688.21 and 4850.3 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, Rrelating to Developmental Sservices. - 09/19/2017

~~“Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Existing law establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities….

This bill would authorize a consumer in a supported employment program or work activity program who has the stated goal of integrated competitive employment in his or her IPP to request to use tailored day services in conjunction with his or her existing program to achieve that goal, if specified criteria are met, including that the type, amount, and provider of tailored day service allowed under these provisions is determined through the IPP process. The bill would specify the maximum hours of tailored day services that may be authorized in conjunction with existing services under these provisions.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Assembly Bill No. 107 CHAPTER 18 - 06/27/2017

~~“Existing law requires the regional center contracts described above to include, among other things, annual performance objectives, as specified. Existing law also establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities.

This bill would require the annual performance objectives included in regional center contracts to measure progress, and report outcomes, in implementing the Employment First Policy, as specified.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Cal. Welfare and Institutions Code §§4869 - 06/03/2017

~~“In furtherance of the purposes of this division to make services and supports available to enable persons with developmental disabilities to approximate the pattern of everyday living available to people without disabilities of the same age, to support the integration of persons with developmental disabilities into the mainstream life of the community, and to bring about more independent, productive, and normal lives for the persons served, it is the policy of the state that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment shall be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities. This policy shall be known as the Employment First Policy”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California ABLE Legislation (AB 1553) - 06/22/2016

Existing federal law, the Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 (ABLE Act… encourages and assists individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting persons with disabilities to maintain their health, independence, and quality of life by excluding from gross income distributions used for qualified disability expenses by a beneficiary of a Qualified ABLE Program established and maintained by a state, as specified…   This bill would authorize the ABLE Act Board to enter into a multistate contract with an account servicer in order to implement these provisions and to enter into a long-term contract with an account servicer, as provided.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

California Employment of Persons with Disabilities (AB 925) - 02/01/2016

"This bill would require the California Health and Human Services Agency and the Labor and Workforce Development Agency, using existing resources, to create a sustainable, comprehensive strategy to accomplish various goals aimed at bringing persons with disabilities into employment.”

 

“The bill would also require the committee, to the extent that funds are available, to make grants to counties and local workforce investment boards in order to develop local strategies for enhancing employment opportunities for people with disabilities, and to fund comprehensive local and regional benefits planning and outreach programs to assist persons with disabilities in removing barriers to work.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

California ABLE Legislation (AB 449) - 10/11/2015

Existing federal law, the Stephen Beck Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 (ABLE Act)…encourages and assists individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting persons with disabilities to maintain their health, independence, and quality of life by excluding from gross income distributions used for qualified disability expenses by a beneficiary of a Qualified ABLE Program established and maintained by a state, as specified.   This bill would…conform to these federal income tax law provisions relating to the ABLE Act under the Corporation Tax Law, as provided. The bill would also establish in state government the ABLE program trust for purposes of implementing the federal ABLE Act. The bill would authorize the ABLE Act Board to adopt regulations to implement the program. The bill would create the program fund, a continuously appropriated fund, thereby making an appropriation, and the administrative fund, as specified. The bill would require the board to  Administer the program in compliance with the requirements of the federal ABLE Act.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

California Executive Order S-4-05 - 11/28/2005

“ …WHEREAS, State Government has an opportunity and a responsibility to lead by example, ensuring individuals with disabilities have an open door to the many opportunities in public service;… NOW, THEREFORE, I, ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor of the State of California do hereby issue this order to become effective immediately: 1. All state agencies, departments, boards and commissions shall utilize best efforts with respect to recruitment, hiring, advancement, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment and issue clear, written directives to their managers and supervisors prohibiting discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. 2. Each state agency shall comply with existing law and annually review its hiring practices to identify any barriers to employment of individuals with disabilities, and, in consultation with their disability advisory committee, take appropriate action to eliminate any non job-related barriers to the integration of individuals with disabilities into the workforce. 3. All state agencies, departments, boards, and commissions shall utilize the Limited Examination and Appointment Program (LEAP) lists in filling vacancies. LEAP lists provide a ready pool of qualified candidates, who happen to have a disability, for a variety of jobs. 4. The State Personnel Board shall provide statewide leadership, in partnership with the Department of Rehabilitation, to coordinate and provide technical guidance to fulfill the intent of this executive order…”

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 43

Department of Rehabilitation “Hot Jobs” - 06/12/2019

~~“DOR believes in the talent and potential of individuals with disabilities. We have posted the following jobs in partnership with our business partners who are actively working to diversify their workplace by including opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Anyone can apply for the jobs listed below, but DOR program participants are strongly encouraged to work with their employment team to prepare for the opportunities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

EDD awards $2 million to provide job opportunities and training for people with disabilities - 05/14/2019

~~• “The California Employment Development Department (EDD) today awarded $2 million in Disability Employment Accelerator grants to provide job training and employment opportunities to people with disabilities. The EDD awarded the funding to six workforce development organizations that serve eight counties including Inyo, Kern, Kings, Los Angeles, Mono, Sacramento, San Diego and Tulare. “People with disabilities contribute greatly to the workplace,” said EDD Director Patrick W. Henning. “These grants will fund programs for people with disabilities that can lead to employment, career advancement and economic independence. ”The organizations will work with local businesses in high-growth industries to develop “earn-and-learn” strategies that include paid work experience, transitional jobs and on-the-job training opportunities for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

California CIE: Blueprint for Change - 05/04/2019

~~“The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), California Department of Education (CDE),  and California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) have entered into a new agreement consistent with the State’s “Employment First” policy and other laws to make employment in an integrated setting, at a competitive wage, for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) its highest priority. .The California Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) Blueprint is the combined effort of the CDE, DOR and DDS, in partnership with a wide range of stakeholders including Disability Rights of California (DRC), with leadership provided by the California Health and Human Services Agency (CHHS). The purpose of the Blueprint is to increase opportunities for Californians with ID/DD to prepare for and participate in CIE.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Self-Employment - 05/01/2019

~~• “You can use the Ticket to Work program to help you become self-employed or to start your own business. If you are interested in pursuing a self-employment goal, you need to tell potential Employment Networks about your goal, because not all ENs will have experience with helping people who want to become self-employed. It is important to find an EN that has the resources to help you meet your goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Citations

2019 California Employer’s Guide - 04/01/2019

~~• “Other Services• This guide also contains useful information on the many services that the EDD offers specifically for employers. The EDD supplies information on a wide range of programs, including programs offering tax credits. The EDD also provides a number of employment services, such as job development and job search workshops that are designed to reduce unemployment and, consequently, your taxes. Whether you are a new or established employer, we offer a variety of services to assist you in building a more successful business while complying with California laws.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

CAREER COUNSELING AND INFORMATION AND REFERRAL SERVICES - 01/05/2019

~Providing competitive, integrated employment, career counseling and information and referral (CC&IR) services to all individuals with a significant disability and employed at subminimum wage and known to the California Department of Rehabilitation Services (DOR) is reaffirmed in a recently posted description of DOR services: “The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Section 511 is a federal law that placed new work rules effective July 22, 2016, for entities holding special wage certificates under Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (14(c) employer). WIOA Section 511 requires that individuals with significant disabilities receive specific services and be given an opportunity to explore and obtain community employment. .”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan And Triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) - 01/05/2019

~“The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Portion of the Unified State Plan is developed by DOR to describe the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services provided to Californians with disabilities and identify areas where service delivery can be improved, modified, or enhanced. The State Plan demonstrates DOR’s commitment to changes within the law and empowers individuals to prepare to enter the workforce, maximize employability, and independence.The VR Portion of the Unified State Plan aims to achieve DOR’s mission of working with consumers and other stakeholders to provide services and advocacy resulting in employment, independent living, and equality for individuals with disabilities. You may review the current State Plan below.In addition, every three years the DOR conducts a Comprehensive Statewide Assessment (CSA) of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities in California.  The results of the CSA are then used to shape the goals and objectives in DOR's VR Portion of the State Plan as well as inform other DOR policies and planning efforts. If you have any questions regarding the State Plan or the triennial CSA, please contact the California Department of Rehabilitation's Planning Unit. “ 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Secondary Transition Planning “Compliance” - 12/28/2018

~“Resources and guidelines for educators, parents and agencies that will assist transition age youth develop transition plans that comply with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) are available on the Department of Education’s website.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Self-Determination Program - 12/21/2018

~The website of the California Department of Developmental Services includes a message from former Director Santi J. Rogers, Department of Developmental Disabilities: “All individuals, regardless of ability, have the right to access the basic elements that make-up a good life, beginning with: family, independence, personal responsibility, and freedom of choice. The Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act builds upon these basic fundamentals so that all individuals have the right to live their lives as they choose”. The website also includes links to numerous self-determination resources.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Desert/Mountain Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) Local Partnership Agreement - 11/23/2018

~• “A new collaborative agreement was established between Local Education Agencies (LEAs), the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), the Inland Regional Center (IRC), and the Workforce Development Board, with student participation. Its purpose is to provide employment training and support to individuals in need of additional skills to be ready for competitive, integrated employment (CIE), that includes essential components of Customized Employment. The full scope of the agreement and list of services are available by following the link to the agreement.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

DRAFT 2019–20 California State Transition Plan for Career Technical Education - 04/12/2019

~~ “California is dedicated to the belief that all students can learn and that students with disabilities and English Learners must be guaranteed equal opportunity to access career pathways programs to realize their greatest potential. Through statewide employment first policies combined with efforts to ensure competitive integrated employment, California is ensuring high quality educational programs, and services for students with disabilities are mapped to employment. In addition, through partnerships with other State agencies including the Department of Rehabilitation and the Department of Developmental Services, eligible recipients are better able to plan, implement, and evaluate services to increase opportunities for students to enter into competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Veterans’ Employment-Related Assistance Program (VEAP) Program Year (PY) 2018-19 - 01/11/2019

~“This SFP includes services to veterans with significant barriers to employment, including, but not limited to, special disabled1 or disabled veterans2; homeless veterans; recently separated service members who have been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months; an offender, as identified in WIOA Section 3 (38), who is currently incarcerated or who has been released from incarceration; a veteran lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; a low-income individual [as defined by WIOA Section 3 (36)]; women; and minorities”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

“Local Partnership Agreement Template" - 06/17/2017

~~“The California Department of Education (CDE), the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), and the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) seek to foster an environment of collaboration to increase competitive integrated employment (CIE) opportunities for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

Competitive Integrated Employment is described in plain language by the motto: “Real Work for Real Pay in the Real World.” The term means working for pay (at least minimum wage) in the community alongside people without disabilities. Work can be full-time (up to 40 hours per week) or part-time with the same level of benefits and opportunities for advancement as other employees.

The CIE Blueprint outlines the collaborative efforts between the three departments on a statewide level. A Local Partnership Agreement (LPA) identifies the ways in which partners will work together on a local level. Each agreement is built around the core partners of one or more local educational agencies (LEA), one or more DOR district, and one or more regional centers, and can include any number of additional local community partners.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego-Imperial Counties Developmental Services, Inc. "Employment First" - 05/10/2016

~~California’s Employment First Policy was signed into law in October of 2013, by Governor Brown.dds.ca.govCompetitive employment is finding a job within the community where you are paid about the same as other people doing the same job and at least minimum wage. It could also be working for yourself in your own small business.Information about the Employment First Policy can be found on the website of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities (scdd.ca.gov) as well as the Department of Developmental Services (dds.ca.gov).Employment & Your Individual Program Plan (IPP)When you plan with your service coordinator around employment opportunities, the first option that will be considered is competitive integrated employment. Competitive work is a real choice. Your service coordinator can help you find resources in the community to support your employment goals.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

CA Employment First Memorandum of Understanding - 12/12/2014

This project will use a multi-faceted approach to apply key elements from high performing states in integrated competitive employment and principles of Collaborative Leadership. A unified value, vision, and expectation for competitive integrated employment will be established and will serve as the basis for the strategies used for stimulating policy to practice, training, technical assistance, and a shared method for monitoring progress through available state and local employment data.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Employment First Committee Annual Report (Partnerships) - 01/16/2013

The Council participates in the Alliance for Full Participation California team. The AFP is a collaboration of major national organizations (including the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities) serving or advocating for improved employment outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The California team is facilitated by the Arc of California. The Council has also started coordinating with the California Committee for the Employment of People with Disabilities, established by statute to promote the employment of people with disabilities. Additionally, members of the Employment First Committee continue to actively work with key groups throughout the state to promote Employment First. 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The California Employment Consortium for Youth and Young Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (CECY)

~~“(CECY) is a collaboration of 23 state agencies, centers, and organizations, families, and self-advocates with responsibilities for the education, rehabilitation, employment, and support of youth with disabilities.  CECY is a five-year (2011-2016) Project of National Significance Partnerships in Employment Systems Change grant (#90DN0284) by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD).  The Tarjan Center at UCLA, a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, provides its administrative leadership. “
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

Progressive Employment Concepts (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants) - 04/01/2019

~~“At Progressive Employment Concepts and Community & Employment Services our goal is to provide high quality services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities which enable people to find and maintain employment, to contribute in their communities through volunteerism, to pursue post- secondary education and to start and run small businesses. 

We created this campaign to fund much needed computers, iPads and vehicles. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Breaking Barriers San Diego - 01/07/2016

“A new program funded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Workforce Innovation Fund, Breaking Barriers San Diego (BBSD), assists individuals with disabilities with finding permanent part-time or full-time jobs of their choice.   The network of America’s Job Center of California (AJCC) sites, funded by San Diego Workforce Partnership, will offer customized job placement support based on individuals’ strengths, preferences and skills and an emphasis on starting the job search quickly.   BBSD serves adults with physical and mental disabilities or significant barriers to employment.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

DEI Grantee Abstracts (CA Round 5) - 11/01/2015

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2014, California Employment Development Department, Workforce Services Branch was awarded a Round 2 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DEI Grantee Abstracts (CA Round 2) - 10/01/2014

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2011, California Employment Development Department, Workforce Services Branch was awarded a Round 2 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration.

When this grant ended a Round 5 grant was awarded.  Round 5 began in 2014 and will end in 2017.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

College to Career (C2C) - 01/16/2013

"College to Career (C2C) is a collaborative effort of the California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), California Community College Chancellor’s Office (CCCCO), and the UCLA Tarjan Center UCEDD. This collaboration broke new ground in establishing five, 3-year community college programs that provide youth with intellectual disabilities with education and vocational preparation that will lead to integrated competitive employment".

   
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego State University Interwork Institute’s Creative Support Alternative - Take Charge: Leading the Transition to Adulthood

“The goal of Take Charge is to offer person-driven planning (PDP) to transitioning youth and their families as a strategy to offer skills and experiences resulting in inclusive employment and inclusive lives facilitated by San Diego State University Rehabilitation Counseling (RC) graduate students. In addition, the project will provide educational presentations for students, families, transition teachers, adult service providers, and SDRC staff on the use of PDP to support young adults with developmental disabilities to pursue inclusive employment, including innovative options like micro- enterprise ownership.” Awarded in San Diego County.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Self-Advocacy for Youth (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

“This Self-Advocacy for Youth project goal is to promote self-advocacy and leadership of young adults with developmental disabilities by utilizing person centered planning through trainings and group facilitation of consumers and their advocacy support networks.” Awarded in Fresno County.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kidpower Teenpower Fullpower (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

“This project equips young adults with developmental disabilities and their families with the social emotional tools and skill sets necessary for successful transition to adult life. Outfits adult people with developmental disabilities with the social – emotional tools and skill sets necessary to enter and succeed in gainful work opportunities and increase their self-sufficiency.” Awarded in Multiple Counties.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Transition2Life Project (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

“The Transition2Life Project will provide direct, hands-on training and learning opportunities focusing on effective transitions to inclusive adult lives for young adults with developmental disabilities living in Amador, Calaveras, and Tuolumne counties.” 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

The goal of this project is to implement a “Get a Competitive Edge” Work Safe & Self-Advocacy program for consumers and employees with disabilities as part of The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and Supplement for the Supported Employment Services Program State Plan Program Years 2018 – 2020 - 02/11/2018

~~“Priority 3: Capacity Building

Goal: Establish or enhance partnerships to increase the capacity of CDOR and the WIOA core program partners to improve service delivery for adults and youth with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

“$2 million to assist Californians with disabilities in job searches” - 06/19/2017

~~“People with disabilities in 13 counties will get additional help in landing employment with $2 million in grants announced by the California Employment Development Department today. The Disability Employment Accelerator grants assist people with disabilities obtain skills needed for employment in growing industries such as advanced manufacturing, clean energy, transportation, and healthcare.The disability employment assistance funds will help prepare job seekers with skills and training needed for careers and then connect them with hiring businesses. The organizations receiving the grants will use “earn-and-learn” strategies that empower people with disabilities to earn incomes while they learn new skills that will help them progress into high-growth industries” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD) - 03/12/2017

~~“The California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD)advances employment for people with disabilities by making policy recommendations to the Secretary of the Labor and Workforce Development Agency and the Secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency .

The CCEPD also supports an annual event for youth with disabilities. In November of 2017, the CCEPD voted to adopt the California Youth Leadership Forum for Students with Disabilities (YLF) as the youth event until 2020, unless another model is created by the Youth Event Committee. For more information about the YLF, please visit the DOR YLF website or contact us with any questions.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

CA Employment First: Braiding Day and Employment Services to Build Meaningful Lives - 04/09/2015

This Employment First training presentation focuses on different approaches to promoting Employment First and encouraging integrated, community-based employment opportunities for people with disabilities. Some of the strategies include using Discovery and customized employment with Medicaid waiver day services participants through a braided funding approach including Vocational Rehabilitation. This presentation also provides a number of example case studies.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

The California DEI: Effective Practices in Building an Inclusive Workforce

This presentation summarizes California’s experience with the DEI grant as of 2015. It addresses the history of DEI in the state, the objectives, the strategic service delivery components, the promising practices and the hopes for sustainability after the grant.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

California Customized Employment for Service Members, Veterans & Their Families

This web page discusses Customized Employment as a “Promising Practice for Supporting Employees with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and/or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD),” particularly in the context of US Service Members and Veterans.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

Employment First Committee Annual Report

The Community of Practice (COP) is located within the Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and was formed and funded by the DOE to help improve transition and employment outcomes. This is a voluntary group of educational professionals.   The COP seeks to ensure the seamless transition of services for  youth, ages 16 –22, which will lead to positive post-school outcomes. They carry out their work through a statewide community of practice and a statewide list serve,which disseminates compliance information, resources and evidence-based practices and statewide technical assistance through webinars and conference calls.  Their key goal, with respect to employment ,is integrated ,competitive employment in any area of interest for each individual youth, ages 16-22.  
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California Training Initiatives

“Association of Regional Center Agencies – New day Conference. ARCA sponsored the New Day Conference in Pasadena in September 2012. Over 400 attendees participated in sessions focused on innovations in employment and housing services for individuals with developmental disabilities.” “Four- part employment webinar series aimed to create awareness about employment and to provide a discussion forum for families, individual organizations and professionals.” “Working Conference - Driving Forces Behind Successful Postsecondary Education and Employment for Young Adults with ID and Autism held in Sacramento, CA and sponsored by Think College and California Consortium on Postsecondary Educations and the Center for Disability Studies, University of Hawaii. The conference content addressed significant changes in public policy, insight for promoting inclusive strategies through person-centered protocol and interagency team building to support youth success. … Over 100 families, K-12, rehabilitation, developmental disabilities and higher education professionals, and students with developmental disabilities attended.” “Three-Part webinar series in Triangulating Postsecondary Education Goals for transition specialists and educators. The series aims at identifying postsecondary goals and aligning them with academic and industry standards. This webinar series was hosted by Community of Practice in Secondary Education (CoP).”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Triton Management Services to Pay $110,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Lawsuit - 10/10/2018

~“Triton Management Services, LLC, headquartered in Carlsbad, Calif., agreed to pay $110,000 and provide other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, an employee requiring medical attention and a leave of absence for a disability was denied leave and was instead fired. The EEOC said Triton failed to provide the employee a reasonable accommodation for her disability.

Such alleged conduct violates the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), which makes it unlawful for an employer to fire-or otherwise discriminate against an employee due to a disability.

The EEOC filed suit at the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California (EEOC v. Triton, Inc., Case No.: 3:17-cv-02004-BAS-KSC), after first attempting to reach a voluntary, pre-litigation settlement through its conciliation process.

In addition to monetary relief, the three-year consent decree, which remains under the court's jurisdiction during the term of the decree, includes injunctive relief intended to prevent further workplace discrimination. Triton will review and revise its written policies to achieve compliance with the ADA, provide regular training to all employees regarding the ADA, maintain a log detailing accommodation requests and complaints and conduct regular audits, and oversee recordkeeping and reporting requirements through a designated equal opportunity officer. The EEOC will monitor compliance with the terms of this agreement.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

California Medicaid State Plan - 06/27/2019

~~“The Medicaid State Plan is based on the requirements set forth in Title XIX of the Social Security Act and is a comprehensive written document created by the State of California that describes the nature and scope of its Medicaid (Medi-Cal) program.  It serves as a contractual agreement between the State of California and the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and must be administered in conformity with specific requirements of Title XIX of the Social Security Act and regulations outlined in Chapter IV of the Code of Federal Regulations. The State Plan contains all information necessary for CMS to determine if the State can receive Federal Financial Participation (FFP) for its Medicaid program. This website includes the current Medicaid State Plan for California as well as State Plan Amendments (SPAs). For all Title XXI- Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) State Plan Amendments please visit the CHIP Homepage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Home and Community-Based Alternatives (HCBA) Waiver - 05/06/2019

~~“The HCBA Waiver (formerly the Nursing Facility/Acute Hospital (NF/AH) Waiver) was approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on May 16, 2017.  Medicaid's Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver programs, including the HCBA Waiver, are authorized under Section1915(c) of the Social Security Act; governed by Title 42, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR); and administered by CMS.

The HCBA Waiver provides care management services to persons at risk for nursing home or institutional placement. The care management services are provided by a multidisciplinary care team comprised of a nurse and social worker. The care management team coordinates Waiver and State Plan services (e.g., medical, behavioral health, In-Home Supportive Services, etc.), and arranges for other available long-term services and supports available in the local community. Care management and Waiver services are provided in the Participant’s community-based residence. This residence can be privately owned, secured through a tenant lease arrangement, or the residence of a Participant’s family member. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Waiver for Californians with Developmental Disabilities: CA.0336.R04.02 - 05/01/2019

~~“The purpose of this amendment is to provide time limited rate increases in specific geographic areas for providers of Community-Based Day Services, In-Home Respite Agencies, and providers of Community Living Arrangement Services under the Alternative Residential Model. This amendment will also include Community Crisis Homes as a new provider type under Behavioral Intervention Services, add Community Based Adult Services as a new waiver service, and add Adult Day HealthCare Center as a provider type under Community Based Adult Services”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California HCBS Transition Plan - 02/23/2019

~~“California’s HCBS programs, which are the focus of this Statewide Transition Plan (STP) are either directly administered or overseen by the Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) as the single state agency for Medicaid/Medi-Cal.  However, several of the HCBS waivers and the 1915(i) State Plan program are administered jointly by DHCS and the State or local entity with program responsibility.  Administrative teams comprised of employees from the State department/entity with program responsibility exist at DHCS, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), the Department of Developmental Services (DDS), the California Department of Aging (CDA), and the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH).  The SFDPH administers a HCBS Waiver program in accordance with terms of an Agreement with DHCS.”     

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Amendment to Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for the Developmentally Disabled - 12/14/2018

~“The HCBS waiver is available statewide to provide individuals with developmental disabilities the desired services and supports needed to implement their Individual Program Plan (IPP). The proposed amendment will include the following changes: …Community Based Adult Services

    The addition of Community Based Adult Services as a new service, and establishment of the rate to be the maximum rate based on the Schedule of Maximum Allowances, to align the HCBS Waiver for Persons with Developmental Disabilities with services available in the 1915(i) State Plan”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Fact Sheet: Home and Community Based Setting Rule - 11/28/2018

~“The purpose of the rules is to ensure that individuals receive services in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services to the same degree as individuals who do not receive regional center services. It means that settings need to focus on the nature and quality of individuals' experiences and not just about the buildings where the services are delivered. Individuals have an active role in the development of their plan, the planning process is person-centered, and the plan reflects the individual's service and supports and what is important to them.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California Department of Developmental Services 1915(i) HCBS State Plan Services - 07/01/2018

~~“ServicesHabilitation-Community Living Arrangement Services; Habilitation-Day Services; Habilitation-Behavioral Intervention Services; Respite Care; Enhanced Habilitation- Supported Employment -Individual; Enhanced Habilitation- Prevocational Services; Homemaker Services; Home Health Aide Services; Community Based Adult Services; Personal Emergency Response Systems; Vehicle Modification and Adaptation; Speech, Hearing and Language Services; Dental Services; Optometric/Optician Services; Prescription Lenses and Frames; Psychology Services; Chore Services; Communication Aides; Environmental Accessibility Adaptations; Non-Medical Transportation; Nutritional Consultation; Skilled Nursing; Specialized Medical Equipment and Supplies; Transition/Set-Up Expenses; Community-Based Training Services; Financial Management Services; Family Support Services; Housing Access Services; Occupational Therapy; Physical Therapy; and Family/Consumer Training” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medi‐Cal Health Homes Program Guide - 04/08/2018

~~1915(c) Waiver Programs1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver programs provide services to many Medi‐Cal members who will likely also meet the eligibility criteria for HHP. There are comprehensive care management components within theseprograms that are duplicative of HHP services. Members who are receiving 1915(c) services have a choice of continuing 1915(c) services or receiving HHP services.The 1915(c) HCBS waiver programs include:HIV/AIDS, Assisted Living Waiver (ALW), Developmentally Disabled (DD), In‐HomeOperations (IHO), Multipurpose Senior Services Program (MSSP), Nursing Facility Acute Hospital (NF/AH), and Pediatric Palliative Care (PPC). 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Number: CA.0336.R04.00, California's HCBS DD Waiver - 01/01/2018

~~“California’'s HCBS DD Waiver offers community-based services not otherwise available through a participant’s Medicaid program. The purpose of the HCBS DD Waiver is to serve participants in their own homes and communities as an alternative to placing Medicaid-eligible individuals in intermediate care facilities for persons with developmental disabilities.  The HCBS DD Waiver  program recognizes that many individuals at risk of being placed in these facilities can be cared for in their homes and communities, preserving their independence and ties to family and friends at a cost no higher than that of institutional care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

CA HCBS Waiver for Californians w/DD (0336.R03.00) - 03/29/2012

"This waiver "provides behavioral intervention, community living arrangements, day service, home health aide, homemaker, prevocational services, respite care, supported employment (enhanced habilitation), chore, communication aides, community-based training, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations, FMS, non-medical transportation, nutritional consultation, optometric/optician services, PERS, prescription lenses and frames, psychology services, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, specialized therapeutic services, speech/hearing and language services, transition/set up expenses, vehicle mods and adaptations for individuals w/autism, DD, IID"

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The Golden State is a place where you can "Find Yourself" through a rewarding career, including those with disabilities who are ready to live the California Dream.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon California's VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.05%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39,557,045
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.43%
Change from
2017 to 2018
1,896,634
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.01%
Change from
2017 to 2018
700,456
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
8.77%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39.93%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.79%
Change from
2017 to 2018
75.61%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 39,557,045
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,896,634
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 700,456
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 17,104,193
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.93%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.61%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,937,820
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 2,128,351
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,651,000
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 312,801
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 1,240,562
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 47,303
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 457,927
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 15,401
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 186,022
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 395,717

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 40,775
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 641,737

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 20,381
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 47,289
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 199,371
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 10.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 10.10%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 568
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,172
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 8,301
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 44,074

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 46,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,373
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,176
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 50.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 3.00

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 24,319
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 1,186,089
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $115,626,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $48,783,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $1,018,595,250
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 72,005
Number of people served in facility based work. 7,838
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 27.67

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES