California

States - Big Screen

The Golden State is a place where you can "Find Yourself" through a rewarding career, including those with disabilities who are ready to live the California Dream.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon California's VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
0.27%
Change from
2015 to 2016
39,250,017
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.28%
Change from
2015 to 2016
2,023,714
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.76%
Change from
2015 to 2016
701,791
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.48%
Change from
2015 to 2016
34.68%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.47%
Change from
2015 to 2016
74.22%

General

2014 2015 2016
Population. 38,802,500 39,144,818 39,250,017
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 2,010,783 2,017,962 2,023,714
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 669,206 682,393 701,791
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 16,063,918 16,406,161 16,632,184
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.28% 33.82% 34.68%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 72.19% 73.13% 74.22%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.50% 6.20% 5.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.70% 20.50% 20.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.90% 14.80% 13.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,932,270 1,977,622 2,020,143
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 2,118,361 2,119,272 2,186,775
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,705,896 2,726,001 2,749,171
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 329,510 329,300 331,848
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 1,182,279 1,206,749 1,273,677
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 45,379 47,104 47,935
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 418,164 439,378 459,722
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 13,609 15,036 15,006
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 164,216 163,388 178,131
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 373,857 376,687 425,105

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 39,924 41,044 41,719
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.20% 4.40% 4.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 709,509 699,241 682,668

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 17,766 18,061 20,014
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 43,426 44,818 49,907
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 225,908 217,367 221,216
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 7.90% 8.30% 9.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 0.10% 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.30% 0.30% 0.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50% 1.70% 1.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 10.20% 9.60% 11.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 419 516 582
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,079 1,260 1,552
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 5,665 6,282 6,396
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 39,165 35,624 39,862

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 36,836 42,724 46,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,153 2,125 2,373
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,127 1,102 1,176
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00% 0.52% 50.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.94 2.82 3.00

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
26,905
23,327
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 1,572 1,433 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,887 1,777 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 4,666 3,872 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 10,407 9,242 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 6,555 5,189 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,815 1,807 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.60% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 24,121 25,118 24,984
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 1,258,695 1,247,320 1,213,289
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,493 1,257 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $87,718,000 $90,753,000 $92,057,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $57,097,000 $57,360,000 $55,744,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $753,849,000 $806,409,000 $853,743,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 12.00% 12.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 59,661 62,857 66,009
Number of people served in facility based work. 10,242 10,036 9,627
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 N/A 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 25.90 26.00 26.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 56.38% 53.38% 54.07%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 23.60% 22.01% 21.54%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.92% 3.31% 3.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 93.49% 99.41% 99.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 52.33% 50.41% 52.26%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 72.41% 72.38% 75.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.00% 82.17% 83.16%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 20.08% 21.97% 23.20%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 10,193,235
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 12,148
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 123,357
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 4,322,464
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 4,445,821
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 180
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,641
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,821
AbilityOne wages (products). $583,952
AbilityOne wages (services). $61,505,189

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 13 7 3
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 41 36 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 135 89 109
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 8 5 6
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 197 137 119
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 27 40 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 3,288 2,927 35
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 22,639 13,278 17,727
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 744 486 488
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 26,698 16,731 18,280

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~The DPEC works with the State Board, Independent Living Centers, AJCCs, DOR, Department of Developmental Services (DDS), and many other public and private stakeholders to improve employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The DPEC also encourages and assists stakeholders to train staff on disability awareness and effective service delivery. Some of the partnerships and activities supported by the DPEC include: Employment First, Youth Employment Opportunity Program, Youth Leadership Forum, Disability Employment Initiative and Disability Employment Accelerator.  (Page 247)
AB 287 (2009) established the Employment First Policy, which led to a standing Employment First Committee formed by the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. The bill expands employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and identifies best practices and incentives for increasing integrated employment and gainful employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Employment First policy requires Regional Centers to develop Individual Program Plans to ensure individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities beginning at age 14 are provided options, competitive integrated employment, and post-secondary education to enable the consumer to transition from school to work. CDOR is an active participant in the Employment First Committee to help with transition planning. (Page 355)
Attend California Model Employer Initiative meetings in order to increase the number of individuals with disabilities in state employment; identify and implement improvements in furtherance of the state’s “Employment First” policy to gain integrated competitive wages for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities; increase jobs-driven employment and consumer self-sufficiency for consumers who are job ready through work incentives planning; establish new partnerships with employers through the National Employment Team; maximize the use of Talent Acquisition Portal, an online system which includes both a national talent pool of VR candidates looking for employment and a job posting system for businesses looking to hire individuals with disabilities, to link job ready consumers with employers; and, enhancement of staff training curriculums to include the use of social media strategies and the electronic job application process. These efforts are expected to contribute towards passing the performance indicators in FFY 2016. (Page 393)
 

Customized Employment

~~• The CDOR’s Community Resources Development Section continues to conduct comprehensive certification and site reviews of CRPs. The focus of the review process is maximizing employment outcomes for CDOR consumers.
• Efforts are taking place to update the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on Pre-Employment Transition Services and Customized Employment WIOA services.
• In early 2014, a proof of concept titled “Placement Plus” was administered in select CRPs to test a new employment services fee for service structure. The lessons learned and evaluation of the Placement Plus is informing CDOR’s current efforts to redesign employment services statewide. (Page 353)
• Conduct focus groups to solicit feedback about what the partners think is needed to enhance services for people with disabilities.
• Develop a CDOR referral form and referral process for the America’s Job Centers of California.
• Provide training to local America’s Job Center of California staff on topics such as: CDOR services; eligibility; job placement; case management; benefits counseling; job readiness and soft skills; disability awareness and etiquette; hiring persons with disabilities; disability disclosures; competitive integrated employment; customized employment; assistive technology; and, reasonable accommodation.
• Provide tools and resources to the WIOA core programs serving individuals with disabilities such as accommodations for individuals who are blind and visually impaired or deaf and hard of hearing.
• Identify the single point of contact for all local WIOA core program partners. (Page388)
• Efforts are taking place to update the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on Pre-Employment Transition Services and Customized Employment WIOA services.
• In early 2014, a proof of concept titled “Placement Plus” was administered in select CRPs to test a new employment services fee for service structure. The lessons learned and evaluation of the Placement Plus is informing CDOR’s current efforts to redesign employment services statewide. (Page 353)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Strengths: Local Boards have a lot of experience braiding resources and integrating service delivery through the One–Stop system. Local Boards have deep connections to their local communities, and are gaining greater experience working through state and local led regional initiatives, including sector and career pathway strategies as well as initiatives to provide services to target populations. (Page 43)
• Creating cross–system data capacity: using diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and also, the use performance data to assess the value of those investments.
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. (Page 65)
The seven policy strategies emphasized in this State Plan—sector strategies, career pathways, “earn and learn”, organizing regionally, providing supportive services, building cross-system data capacity, and braiding resources and integrating services— are evidence-based and have been shown to work, helping ensure effective delivery of services, and increasing the likelihood that those who receive services obtain gainful employment. ( Page 74)
Integrating service delivery and braiding resources are ways that workforce and education programs can achieve program alignment and assure access to the broad array of services funded across the state’s workforce and education programs. In California, resources will be braided and services integrated and aligned through the creation of “value-dded “partnerships at the state, regional, and local levels.
A value-added partnership is one in which all partners gain from the partnership. Ideally, “gains to exchange” occur and partners transact with one another on the basis of specialization, providing services consistent with each programs’ core competencies. Partners thereby leverage one another’s expertise, building a proverbial “sum that is greater than its parts.” (Page 82)
Creating cross–system data capacity: using diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and also, the use performance data to assess the value of those investments.
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs.  (Page 84)
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and services to meet client needs
• Creating cross–system data capacity, including diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and performance data to assess the value of investments (Page 103)
The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD–WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
The State Board has partnered with EDD to create and staff the One–Stop Design workgroup, which brought together state plan partners and other stakeholders to develop a blueprint for service delivery in the state’s AJCCs. Work by this group will inform state policy on integrated service delivery and the braiding of resources at AJCCs, including policy on operations, required partnership, and the articulation of AJCC services with Regional Sector Pathway programs. (More detail on this is provided in chapter 4).  (Page109)
Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One–Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 110)
Additionally, SBE, CDE, CCCCO, and the State Board will work jointly to identify and recommend best practices and model partnerships that encourage program alignment, coordination, integration of services, and braiding of resources beyond the minimum levels required as part of mandatory One–Stop partnership. To this end, the State Board will issue local and regional planning guidance, supported, when appropriate, by policy directives or other appropriate means of communication issued by SBE, CDE, and CCCCO to foster better program alignment between basic education and basic skills programs and other workforce and education programs and services. Recommended relevant best practices may include but are not limited to the following:
• aligning basic skills coursework with career pathways programs and adopting contextualized learning practices that combine basic education and skills coursework with CTE coursework
• braiding resources from WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs with WIOA Title II programs to provide supportive services to those attending basic education and skills programs so as to facilitate both course and program completion; local partnerships may include charter schools focused on serving out of school youth and operating under Education Code Section 47612.1(a)
• ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with, and have access to, relevant job–readiness training and job search and placement services
• ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with and have access to opportunities to enter postsecondary education programs (Pages 113)
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs (Page 115)
CWDA to ensure integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the use of “earn and learn” and other training and employment services for TANF recipients in California. Partnership activities to support these ends have and will include all of the following:
• CWDA, the State Board, EDD, and CDSS staff will work jointly to assess the level of partnership and current compliance with known future regulatory requirements. This information will be used to ensure that all counties and Local Boards are on a path to compliance.
• CWDA, CDSS, and State Board staff will work jointly to identify models of TANF One–Stop partnership that go beyond baseline federal expectations, as well as the purpose of these partnerships, and the manner in which these partnerships elevate service delivery so as to improve client outcomes. The information gleaned from this analysis will be used to inform local and regional planning guidance and will be combined with baseline compliance rules to provide locals information on how to not only comply with baseline federal requirements, but also to develop the programs that best serve client needs.  (Page 118)
The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD–WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
• As part of the state planning process, the State Board has entered into state level agreements with SBE/CDE (Title II Administrator), EDD (Title I Administrator and Title III Administrator and Program Operator), DOR (Title IV Administrator and Program operator), and both CDSS and CWDA (representatives of both state and local TANF agencies) to ensure coordination at the state level so as to ensure compliance with federal requirements pertaining to One–Stop mandatory partnership of TANF programs. (Pages 120, 121, 124, 126, 128)
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs
The ETP will work with regionally organized Local Boards where the sector priorities of RPUs align with the programmatic direction of ETP, identifying opportunities to train incumbent workers in prioritized sectors using, when appropriate, multi–employer contracts to meet the needs of industry.
Training incumbent workers can create opportunities for populations with barriers to employment by opening up entry level and other positions where and when incumbent workers advance into new positions as a result of the training programs funded by ETP.
As noted above, ETP will also partner with DOR to leverage ETP’s incumbent worker training contracts and contacts in the federal contractor community to improve coordination around federal 503 contracting rules. (Pages 135,137)
• By building links between AJCCs and campuses, including but not limited to, pooling resources to place AJCC staff directly on campuses
• By braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs
The ETP will work with regionally organized Local Boards where the sector priorities of RPUs align with the programmatic direction of ETP, identifying opportunities to train incumbent workers in prioritized sectors using, when appropriate, multi–employer contracts to meet the needs of industry. (Page 144,147)
The State Board will issue regional planning guidance that details best practices and model partnerships between the workforce system and the community college system, recommending that Local Boards meet their WIOA Section 106 requirements pertaining to coordinated service delivery strategies and shared administrative costs in ways that lay the foundation for a strong partnership with community college CTE programs. This can be done in a variety of ways, including the following:
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs (Page 154, 156)
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. (Page 438)
Strengths: Local Boards have a lot of experience braiding resources and integrating service delivery through the One-Stop system. Local Boards have deep connections to their local communities, and are gaining greater experience working through state and local led regional (Page 443)
The seven policy strategies emphasized in this State Plan—sector strategies, career pathways, “earn and learn”, organizing regionally, providing supportive services, building cross-system data capacity, and braiding resources and integrating services— are evidence-based and have been shown to work, helping ensure effective delivery of services, and increasing the likelihood that those who receive services obtain gainful employment. (Page 455)
INTEGRATING SERVICES AND BRAIDING RESOURCES
• “earn and learn”—using training and education practices that combine applied learning opportunities with compensation; the success of earn and learn programs depends on sustained employer engagement, and where appropriate, the involvement of organized labor, especially as this pertains to the development of partnerships with labor–management apprenticeship and pre–apprenticeship programs
• creating cross–system data capacity, including diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and performance data to assess the value of investments (Page 476)
The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD-WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
• The State Board has partnered with EDD to create and staff the One-Stop Design workgroup, which brought together state plan partners and other stakeholders to develop a blueprint for service delivery in the state’s AJCCs. Work by this group will inform state policy on integrated service delivery and the braiding of resources at AJCCs, including policy on operations, required partnership, and the articulation of AJCC services with Regional Sector Pathway programs. (More detail on this is provided in chapter 4). (Pages 485, 486, 488, 489, 490)
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs.  (Page 509)
 

DEI/DRC

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~Activities designed to help expand the expertise of adult education providers to adopt distance learning in their instructional strategies is also a priority. To facilitate integrated success among education agencies, the contractor provides an electronic collaborative environment. This includes discussion boards and work groups for the exchange of information about effective program models, teaching techniques, and curriculum. Piloting, implementing, evaluating, and disseminating models for learner–oriented Web sites to encourage students to obtain the knowledge and skills necessary for employment and self–sufficiency are priority objectives. Finally, providing technical assistance, staff training, and program marketing to ensure the optimum usage of communication technology by adult education providers and learners only strengthens distance learning for optimal usage of WIOA funds. (Page 327)
OTAN disseminates information through a multitude of face-to-face and online workshops, conference presentations, and by producing videos that demonstrate teaching with technology and technology integration lesson plans. All videos are archived on OTAN’s website. OTAN recently piloted a Community Model of Online Learning to increase regional access to high-quality online math curriculum for adult learners. The Online Teaching Academy (OTAC) assists instructors in becoming competent online teachers and mentors using Moodle and other instructional technology. It also hosts the Technology Integration Mentor Academy (TIMAC) training, a year-long professional development project where participants to become mentors and increase the effective use of technology in classrooms. The Technology and Distance Learning Symposium rotates each year between north and south geographic locations in the state. (Page 331-332)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~WIOA prioritizes out–of–school youth as demonstrated by the minimum seventy–five percent expenditure requirement, therefore it is imperative for Local Areas to shift their local programs to serve OSY. At the time of enactment, several Local Areas in California were at or near the minimum seventy–five percent OSY expenditure requirement. Local Boards are engaged in strategies to increase their OSY expenditures through partnership and leveraged funding to meet the needs of underserved OSY. The availability of youth program element services such as financial literacy, entrepreneurship, work experience, and follow–up serves as a pivot toward self–sufficiency. (Page 281)
WIOA prioritizes out-of-school youth as demonstrated by the minimum seventy-five percent expenditure requirement, therefore it is imperative for Local Areas to shift their local programs to serve OSY. At the time of enactment, several Local Areas in California were at or near the minimum seventy-five percent OSY expenditure requirement. Local Boards are engaged in strategies to increase their OSY expenditures through partnership and leveraged funding to meet the needs of underserved OSY. The availability of youth program element services such as financial literacy, entrepreneurship, work experience, and follow-up serves as a pivot toward self-sufficiency. (Page 283)
Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination of significant knowledge from research and other sources to designated State unit professionals and paraprofessionals.
The CDOR continues to routinely acquire and disseminate significant VR research, including:
• Newly published research disseminated via CDOR’s Intranet site.
• Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination of significant knowledge from research and other sources to CDOR personnel.
• Topical webinars from VR leaders including the Research Technical Assistance Center, the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities, and the Employment and Training Administration.
 

School to Work Transition

~~3. Regular payments from railroad retirement, strike benefits from union funds, worker’s compensation, and training stipends;
4. Alimony;
5. Military family allotments or other regular support from an absent family member or someone not living in the household;
6. Pensions whether private, government employee (including Military retirement pay);
7. Regular insurance or annuity payments other than Supplemental Security Income disability (SSI) or veterans’ disability;
8. College or university grants, fellowships, and assistantships;
9. Net gambling or lottery winnings;
10. Social Security Disability Insurance payments (SSDI)
• Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) pays benefits to individuals that have worked in the past, paid Social Security taxes, and are currently unable to work for a year or more because of a disability. SSDI is considered income replacement and must be included in family income (All of page 204)
12. Tribal Government Payments (i.e., Per Capita Payments, Lease Payments, Individual Indian Money (IIM);
13. Old age and survivors insurance benefits received under section 202 of the Social Security Act (42 USC 402).
• Old age and survivors insurance benefits include: Social Security Survivor Benefits – these are benefits paid to people up to age 18 who have had a parent die and the parent paid wages into the system; and
• Social Security Retirement Benefits – these are benefits that are paid to people who reached their social security age and have wages paid in the system. (Page 205)
 

Career Pathways

~~WorkAbility I Program
The WorkAbility I program is administered through the California Department of Education. The goal of the WorkAbility I is to provide pre-employment training, employment placement and follow up for high school students in special education who are transitioning from school to work, independent living and postsecondary education or training. (Page 341)
Employment Transition Services:
• Outreach to schools and closer collaboration between VR and Local Education Agency staff that do not currently have a Transition Partnership Programs cooperative arrangement.
• Expand transition services beyond school to work to include school to postsecondary training transitions.
• Provide information about the transition from school to work at an earlier age to students with disabilities.
• Provide benefits education planning and services to students as well as parents and guardians of students with disabilities.
• Provide specialized training and increase awareness for VR staff and service providers on the unique needs of students with disabilities.
In addition, there are a number of methods that CDOR will utilize to ensure the provision of the core Pre-Employment Transition Services to students with disabilities: (Page 350)
• AB 287 (2009) established the Employment First Policy, which led to a standing Employment First Committee formed by the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. The bill expands employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and identifies best practices and incentives for increasing integrated employment and gainful employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Employment First policy requires Regional Centers to develop Individual Program Plans to ensure individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities beginning at age 14 are provided options, competitive integrated employment, and post-secondary education to enable the consumer to transition from school to work. CDOR is an active participant in the Employment First Committee to help with transition planning.
• California Competitive Integrated Employment: Blueprint for Reform for Individuals with Disabilities. In December 2014, CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to further advance the state’s “Employment First” Policy and other federal and state laws to address employment in integrated settings, at competitive wages, for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The goal of the California Competitive Integrated Employment effort is to develop a “blueprint” that will outline plans for:
 Improving collaboration and coordination between the three departments to prepare and support all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment;
 Building capacity to increase opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment to prepare for and participate in the California workforce development system; (Page 355)
For both youth with disabilities and students with disabilities:
• Outreach to schools and closer collaboration between VR and Local Education Agency staff that do not currently have a Transition Partnership Programs cooperative agreement.
• Expand transition services beyond school to work to school to postsecondary training transitions.
• Provide information about the transition from school to work at an earlier age to youth with disabilities and students with disabilities.
• Provide benefits education planning and services to students with disabilities and youth with disabilities as well as parents and guardians of youth with disabilities and students with disabilities.
• Provide specialized training and increase awareness for VR staff and service providers on the unique needs of youth with disabilities and students with disabilities.  (Page 372)
 

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Requirements for regional plans, and will share regional plan content with state partners, including information pertaining to prioritized sectors and career pathways identified in the course of the regional planning process. The sharing of this information will facilitate, as appropriate, engagement with regional efforts by other State Plan partners such as DOR ETP, and CalWORKs.
Local Boards (Title I) working together regionally will work alongside CTE faculty and Deans from the community colleges, representatives from the CCCCO’s WEDD program, representatives from K–12 CTE programs, state–funded Adult Education Block Grant consortia, and federally funded Title II providers to convene and engage employers, especially the representatives of leading and emergent industry sectors to do the following:
• Assess industry workforce needs
• Determine whether existing training and education programs in the region are producing what industry needs
• Identify existing career pathway programs that meet leading and emergent industry sector needs
• Recommend any necessary adjustments to facilitate the development and validation of career pathway programs to meet industry needs
• Broker regional partnerships to move students and workers through relevant pathway programs that result in the attainment of industry recognized degrees or credentials, including individuals with barriers to employment (Page 107)
Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in–demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post–secondary education.
Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE). (Page108)
The State Board has entered into an agreement with SBE/CDE to support and encourage the integration of work–based learning activities in all locally funded WIOA youth programs to involve interactions with industry professionals and include career awareness, career exploration, internships and career pathways training activities.
• Additionally, the State Board has entered into an agreement with CDSS, the CWDA, and the Chancellor’s Office of Supportive Services to encourage and promote local partnerships that articulate subsidized employment programs operated by County Welfare Departments with career pathways programs, including “Regional Sector Pathway” programs identified and developed in WIOA regional plans. Where robust partnerships develop, these pathway programs should be designed to service TANF recipients, taking care to meet the particular client needs of those being served.
• The State Board has entered a similar agreement with DOR to promote access to competitive integrated employment at the local level so as to ensure quality jobs for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. (Page 110)
• Aligning basic skills coursework with career pathways programs and adopting contextualized learning practices that combine basic education and skills coursework with CTE coursework
• Braiding resources from WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs with WIOA Title II programs to provide supportive services to those attending basic education and skills programs so as to facilitate both course and program completion; local partnerships may include charter schools focused on serving out of school youth and operating under Education Code Section 47612.1(a)
• Ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with, and have access to, relevant job–readiness training and job search and placement services
• Ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with and have access to opportunities to enter postsecondary education programs (Page 113)
AJCC system and, working with EDD, will issue One–Stop policies to secure representation from all mandatory partners in all comprehensive One–Stops.
• The State Board has entered into an agreement with SBE/CDE to support and encourage the integration of work–based learning activities in all locally funded WIOA youth programs to involve interactions with industry professionals and include career awareness, career exploration, internships and career pathways training activities.
• Additionally, the State Board has entered into an agreement with CDSS, the CWDA, and the Chancellor’s Office of Supportive Services to encourage and promote local partnerships that articulate subsidized employment programs operated by County Welfare Departments with career pathways programs, including “Regional Sector Pathway” programs identified and developed in WIOA regional plans. Where robust partnerships develop, these pathway programs should be designed to service TANF recipients, taking care to meet the particular client needs of those being served.
• The State Board has entered a similar agreement with DOR to promote access to competitive integrated employment at the local level so as to ensure quality jobs for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
• Working with EDD, the State Board has already issued policies pertaining to Eligible Training Providers and the use of alternative training models, including OJT, to encourage the use of “earn and learn” approaches to training by local boards.
• Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One–Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 121)
The State Board will also review regional plans to ensure compliance with state guidance and WIOA requirements for regional plans, and will share regional plan content with state partners, including information pertaining to prioritized sectors and career pathways identified in the course of the regional planning process. The sharing of this information will facilitate, as appropriate, engagement with regional efforts by other State Plan partners such as DOR ETP, and CalWORKs.
Local Boards (Title I) working together regionally will work alongside CTE faculty and Deans from the community colleges, representatives from the CCCCO’s WEDD program, representatives from K–12 CTE programs, state–funded Adult Education Block Grant consortia, and federally funded Title II providers to convene and engage employers, especially the representatives of leading and emergent industry sectors to do the following: (Page 142)
Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in–demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post–secondary education.
Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).
DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal laws, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K–12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners.  (Page 143)
• General policy development to further system alignment of workforce, job services, training, and education programs.
• Research and policy development toward the delivery of effective One-Stop services, including policies facilitating One-Stop access for those with barriers to employment.
• Research on policies concerning effective sector engagement.
• Research on the building of career pathways tailored to client population needs, including research on how successful partnerships braid funds to facilitate movement through a career pathway that straddles multiple programs or service delivery structures.
• Examination of effective regional organizing efforts so as to identify the key elements of successful regional partnerships.
• Providing policy information to system partners to aid staff development.
• Providing policy information on successful practices to facilitate the building of local board capacity.
• Evidence-based research and policy development on the use of effective training programs responsive to labor market needs.
The Policy, Legislation, and Research Branch unit played a lead role in convening state plan partners, informing these partners on the legislative requirements of WIOA, sharing policy research on evidence-based practices, and facilitating agreement on the policy content of the State Plan by staffing the multiple workgroups engaged in the planning process. (Page 208)
Activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, Local Boards, One-Stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways.
Flexible Schedules and Coordination with Support Services: The degree to which the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with federal, state, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs (Page 237)
For CRPs within the state:
• Evaluate the vendor reimbursement model to ensure it adequately covers the cost of providing quality services.
• Expand job exploration and placement services for VR consumers to include more time and focus on career pathways and business sector strategies.
• Identify ways for CDOR to assume more of the vendor’s risks such as paying for no-show appointments and background checks for new jobs.
• Increase training and coordination efforts between CDOR staff and CRPs regarding the use of assistive technology, including the procedures for purchasing and requesting repairs.
• More in-depth training for consumers and CRP staff regarding CDOR’s process for plan development and employment services so consumers and vendors will better understand their roles and responsibilities to each other and to the VRSD team. (Page 372)
[1] WIOA section 134 requires that priority of service be given to recipients of public assistance, other low-income individuals, and individuals that are basic skills deficient for any expenditure of WIOA Adult program funds spent on individualized career services and training. Similarly, California Unemployment Insurance Code section 14000 (b) (6) requires that programs and services be accessible to “individuals with employment barriers, such as persons with economic, physical, or other barriers to employment.” California Unemployment Insurance Code section 14013(d)(2) further directs the State Board to develop “strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment, and including individuals with disabilities, with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.” (Page 441)
• Creating a marketing/communication team of WIOA core partners at the State level: (EDD, DOR, CDSS, CCCCO, Adult Ed, the State Board, CWA, DOA, HCD, National programs).
• Identifying a single point of contact for each Local Board to facilitate regular interaction/communication between the state partner programs, including all core programs, and local stakeholders.
• Establishing a protocol and communication policy for all core partners and committing to talking regularly as a system.
• Utilizing social media and virtual communication tools.
• Developing a branding policy for the AJCC.
Through the efforts of the One–Stop Design Workgroup and the WIOA Implementation Committee Workgroups, the State Board has entered into agreements with mandated and voluntary partners and stakeholders to ensure implementation of an integrated, job driven service delivery system that provides job seekers (specifically individuals with barriers to employment) with the skills and credentials necessary to secure and advance in career pathways, and enable employers to identify and hire skilled workers and grow their businesses. (Page 473)
• Sector strategies: aligning workforce and education programs with sector needs; the success of these efforts will depend on the depth of industry engagement.
• Career pathways: enabling progressive skills development through education and training programs, using multiple entry and exit points, so that each level of skills development increases the likelihood of success in the labor market; these pathways should be flexibly designed and include, where necessary, remedial programming, so as to allow those with basic skills deficiencies an ability to participate
• Regional partnerships: building partnerships between industry leaders, workforce professionals, education and training providers, and economic development leaders to support regional economic growth; the success of these efforts will depend on the depth of industry engagement
• “earn and learn”—using training and education practices that combine applied learning opportunities with compensation; the success of earn and learn programs depends on sustained employer engagement, and where appropriate, the involvement of organized labor, especially as this pertains to the development of partnerships with labor–management apprenticeship and pre–apprenticeship programs
• Supportive services: providing ancillary services like childcare, transportation, and counseling to facilitate program completion
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and services to meet client needs
• Creating cross–system data capacity, including diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and performance data to assess the value of investments (Page 476)
Local Boards (Title I) working together regionally will work alongside CTE faculty and Deans from the community colleges, representatives from the CCCCO’s WEDD program, representatives from K–12 CTE programs, state–funded Adult Education Block Grant consortia, and federally funded Title II providers to convene and engage employers, especially the representatives of leading and emergent industry sectors to do the following:
• Assess industry workforce needs
• Determine whether existing training and education programs in the region are producing what industry needs
• Identify existing career pathway programs that meet leading and emergent industry sector needs
• Recommend any necessary adjustments to facilitate the development and validation of career pathway programs to meet industry needs
• broker regional partnerships to move students and workers through relevant pathway programs that result in the attainment of industry recognized degrees or credentials, including individuals with barriers to employment
Local Boards may play the role of convener, broker, and matchmaker in regional efforts, bringing together the regional partners, but need not do so where other regional workforce and education champions step forward to play this role. (Page 481)
Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in–demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post–secondary education.
 Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).
DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal law, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K–12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners. (Page 482)
DOR Priority -- Physical, programmatic and electronic access for youth with disabilities including the following:
Access to One-Stop career services and WIOA Title 1 Youth program (WIOA Strategies: Integrated Service Delivery and Braided Resources, Providing Supportive Services) (Planning Guidance Tier: Required)
Vehicle: One-Stop MOU and certification requirements, Local Planning Guidance.
Access to training and education programs, including career pathways, internships, apprenticeships (WIOA Strategies: Career Pathways, Earn and Learn)(Planning Guidance Tier: Required)
Vehicle: DOR staff working locally and regionally with Local Board staff and training and education providers to increase co-enrollment opportunities of DOR consumers with local training and education providers based on alignment of needs, desires, capacities.
DOR outreach to youth with disabilities through AJCCs and cross training of DOR staff on other services to be provided through AJCCs (Planning Guidance Tier: Required)
Vehicle: One-Stop MOU and certification requirements, Local Planning Guidance; additionally DOR and CWDB will ensure cross-training of frontline staff in the AJCCs; finally, the DOR will provide the Local Boards linkages to DOR’s youth programs. (Page 527)
Regional level include a DOR representative to help make employers aware of incentives and strategies for the hiring of individuals with disabilities.
Participation in Employer Engagement efforts at the state level (WIOA Strategy Sector Strategies).
Vehicle: facilitated access to employers engaged in statewide sector strategies initiatives
Information on Sector Strategies, Career Pathways, Labor Market Information (WIOA Strategy Sector Strategies, Career Pathways)
Vehicle: CWDB will ensure that DOR has access to and participation in the regional WIOA plans and programs which detail targeted sectors, prioritized career pathways, and regional labor market analyses. This will include consideration for individuals and youth with disabilities. (Page 528)
 

Employer Engagement

~~The CDOR actively coordinates with the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program. Ticket to Work is a voluntary work incentive program for Social Security Disability Insurance or Supplemental Security Income beneficiaries between the ages of 18 and 64 who are interested in going to work. The Ticket to Work Program provides beneficiaries with access to VR, training, and placement services, as well as other services and support. Beneficiaries can use their ticket to obtain employment services and support from CDOR or they can take their ticket to an approved service provider called an Employment Network. A ticket cannot be assigned to an Employment Network and in-use with CDOR at the same time.
The CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners and VR Counselors have an active role in the Ticket to Work program. CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners verify ticket status, provide information as needed, and facilitate referrals to Employment Networks at case closure. VR counselors distribute CDOR’s Ticket to Work fact sheet at intake, verify the ticket status prior to approving the Individualized Plan for Employment, and facilitate sequential services. (Page 346)
 

511

~~• Continue coordination and collaboration with the California Department of Education and the California Department of Developmental Services as outlined in the Blueprint to prepare and support all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment.
• Promote collaboration at the local level and develop local partnership agreements between CDOR Districts, local education agencies, and the California Department of Developmental Services-funded local regional centers that address competitive integrated employment.
• Improve data collection and sharing between CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services.
• Hold stakeholder meetings and forums to communicate information on achieving competitive integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
• Amend the current Interagency Agreements between CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services to include an emphasis on competitive integrated employment and local linkages, as referenced in the Blueprint.
• Consistent with WIOA Section 511, the new VRSD teams will support competitive integrated employment consistent with WIOA and will provide additional career counseling services. The career counseling services will be delivered in a manner that facilitates independent decision making and informed choice as the individual with a disability makes decisions regarding employment and career advancement activities. (Page 390)
Through the use of baseline data and the semi–annual statistic adjustment model, the state plans to update performance accountability measures to assess the effectiveness of serving those with barriers to employment, as well as WIOA and state level policy objectives and the level of services coordinated and identified in the strategic plan.
The State Board will convene core program partners and those strategic partners with whom performance outcomes are aligned to discuss, where appropriate, how the state will negotiate goals with federal agencies and local areas.
In consultation with strategic partners and local areas, the State Board will emphasize the skills attainment measure across programs because greater skill attainment leads to higher median earnings, greater percentages of employed participants, and helps the state reach the goal of one million middle–skill industry recognized credentials over the next ten years.
To help facilitate reliable and valid data for the assessment of programs and ability to serve individuals with barriers, the State Board will work with core program partners to identify strategies for robust data collection in all federally mandated reports, as well as additional measures identified by the state. (Page 471)
 

Mental Health

~~ACCESS FOR THE DISABLED
The state has existing policy guidance, which it will soon be updating and reissuing, regarding individuals with disabilities having equal access to services and information funded by WIOA Title I programs and partner agencies:
• Workforce Services Directives WSD10-1 and WSD10-2 - Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Procedures and Biennial LWIA Self-Assessment, respectively, communicate the requirements regarding compliance with state and federal disability laws and procedures for ensuring accessible physical environments for all customers, including individuals with disabilities.
In support of these policies, the State Board is an active member of DOR’s State Rehabilitation Counsel and the DOR represents individuals with disabilities on Local Boards. EDD maintains a Disability Policy Employment and Collaboration Unit (DPEC), whose primary objective is to develop both WIOA-required and discretionary partnerships to facilitate employment for individuals with disabilities. (Page 247)
The State Board is committed to ensuring individuals with disabilities have physical and programmatic access to the AJCC system and services. The State Board, in consultation with chief elected officials and Local Boards, will establish objective criteria and procedures to evaluate the AJCCs and delivery system for effectiveness. The evaluation will include how well the local job centers ensure equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities to participate in or benefit from AJCC services. The evaluation must also include criteria evaluating how well the centers and local delivery systems take actions to comply with the disability-related regulations implementing WIOA section 188, set forth in 29 CFR part 37. (Page 248)
AJCC Accessibility Certification
The State Board is committed to ensuring individuals with disabilities have physical and programmatic access to the AJCC system and services. The State Board, in consultation with chief elected officials and Local Boards, will establish objective criteria and procedures to evaluate the AJCCs and delivery system for effectiveness. The evaluation will include how well the local job centers ensure equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities to participate in or benefit from AJCC services. The evaluation must also include criteria evaluating how well the centers and local delivery systems take actions to comply with the disability-related regulations implementing WIOA section 188, set forth in 29 CFR part 37. (Page 519)
 

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Home and Community-Based Alternatives (HCBA) Waiver Solicitation for Application (SFA) - 12/04/2017

~~“The Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) has released the Solicitation for Application (SFA) included below, to invite eligible organizations to apply to become HCBA Waiver ‘“Waiver Agencies.’”  Applicants selected to become Contracted Waiver Agencies will receive funding to perform waiver administrative functions within a defined service area and to provide Comprehensive Care Management services to Waiver participants.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Program (SEP) Forms - 11/03/2017

~~This page has links to “forms are provided for use by DOR and service providers for Supported Employment (SE), Transitional Employment, and general (non-SE) job coaching.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

AB-1111 Removing Barriers to Employment Act: Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative - 10/15/2017

~~“Existing law, the California Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, establishes the California Workforce Development Board as the body responsible for assisting the Governor in the development, oversight, and continuous improvement of California’s workforce investment system and the alignment of the education and workforce investment systems to the needs of the 21st century economy and workforce. That act requires the establishment of a local workforce development board in each local workforce development area of the state to, among other things, carry out analyses of the economic conditions in the local region.

This bill would enact the Removing Barriers to Employment Act, which would establish the Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative administered by the California Workforce Development Board. The bill would specify that the purpose of the initiative is to create a grant program to provide individuals with barriers to employment the services they need to enter, participate in, and complete broader workforce preparation, training, and education programs aligned with regional labor market needs. The bill would specify that people completing these programs should have the skills and competencies to successfully enter the labor market, retain employment, and earn wages that lead to self-sufficiency and economic security. The bill would require the board to develop criteria for the selection of grant recipients, as specified. The bill also would specify the criteria by which grants are required to be evaluated, the populations that are eligible to be served by grants, and the activities eligible for grant funding.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

AB-1607 An act to amend Sections 4688.21 and 4850.3 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, Rrelating to Developmental Sservices. - 09/19/2017

~~“Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Existing law establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities….

This bill would authorize a consumer in a supported employment program or work activity program who has the stated goal of integrated competitive employment in his or her IPP to request to use tailored day services in conjunction with his or her existing program to achieve that goal, if specified criteria are met, including that the type, amount, and provider of tailored day service allowed under these provisions is determined through the IPP process. The bill would specify the maximum hours of tailored day services that may be authorized in conjunction with existing services under these provisions.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

California HCBS Transition Plan - 09/01/2017

The California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) has developed a Statewide Transition Plan (STP) submitted to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) on August 14, 2015.  The STP describes how the State will come into compliance with new Federal Home and Community-Based (HCB) setting requirements that became effective March 17, 2014.  These regulations are CMS 2249-F and CMS 2296-F, which affect 1915(c) and 1915(i) HCB services waivers and State Plan programs.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Employment First Policy” - 07/19/2017

~~“Resources and guidelines for educators, parents, and agencies that will assist transition age youth develop postsecondary goals that lead to competitive, integrated employment (CIE).” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Workability Transition Program - 07/03/2017

~~• “The WAI program offers students with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) the opportunity to complete their secondary education while also obtaining marketable job skills. WAI provides secondary students with an understanding of job seeking and job keeping skills. The employability of students improves through occupational class training and on-the-job subsidized or unsubsidized work experience.• • The WAI program seeks employers in the business community who will give students with special needs a chance to prove themselves in a competitive integrated employment setting. Local program sites successfully coordinate state and local service providers to offer comprehensive services tailored to local economic, social, and geographic needs and abilities.• • Two year follow-along support services provided by local program staff greatly increase the potential for student employment success.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Assembly Bill No. 107 CHAPTER 18 - 06/27/2017

~~“Existing law requires the regional center contracts described above to include, among other things, annual performance objectives, as specified. Existing law also establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities.

This bill would require the annual performance objectives included in regional center contracts to measure progress, and report outcomes, in implementing the Employment First Policy, as specified.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“$2 million to assist Californians with disabilities in job searches” - 06/19/2017

~~“People with disabilities in 13 counties will get additional help in landing employment with $2 million in grants announced by the California Employment Development Department today. The Disability Employment Accelerator grants assist people with disabilities obtain skills needed for employment in growing industries such as advanced manufacturing, clean energy, transportation, and healthcare.The disability employment assistance funds will help prepare job seekers with skills and training needed for careers and then connect them with hiring businesses. The organizations receiving the grants will use “earn-and-learn” strategies that empower people with disabilities to earn incomes while they learn new skills that will help them progress into high-growth industries” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Disability Employment Accelerator PY 2016-17“AWARD LIST AND PROJECT SUMMARIES” - 06/19/2017

~~“On June 19, 2017, $2 million of WIOA, Governor’s Discretionary 15 percent funds were awarded to seven workforce development agencies under the Disability Employment Accelerator (DEA) for Program Year (PY) 2016-17 Solicitation for Proposals. Awardee project list and project summaries are listed below. Funding decisions are final.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA
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The Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (AB 1041) - 10/09/2013

“The Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act authorizes the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide support and services to individuals with developmental disabilities.”   “This bill would define competitive employment, microenterprises, and self-employment for these purposes. The bill would additionally require the Employment First Committee to identify existing sources of consumer data that can be matched with employment data, as specified, and to recommend goals for measuring employment participation and outcomes for various consumers within the developmental services system. … This bill would require each regional center planning team, when developing an individual program plan for a transition age youth or working age adult, to consider a specified Employment First Policy.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

2008 California Legislative Session - 01/01/2009

This is a report on the changes made to AB 5, AB 1183, SB 1175, and SB 1774 and their impact on services for people with developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Cal. Welfare and Institutions Code §4646.5

Addresses the requirements behind creating an individual program plan for a transition age youth or working age adult with developmental disabilities.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Cal. Welfare and Institutions Code §§4868 et seq.

Establishes an Employment First Committee under the authority of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. It pledges to “make services and supports available to enable persons with developmental disabilities to approximate the pattern of everyday living available to people without disabilities of the same age, to support the integration of persons with developmental disabilities into the mainstream life of the community, and to bring about more independent, productive, and normal lives for the persons served, it is the policy of the state that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment shall be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities. This policy shall be known as the Employment First Policy.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

California Executive Order S-4-05 - 11/28/2005

“ …WHEREAS, State Government has an opportunity and a responsibility to lead by example, ensuring individuals with disabilities have an open door to the many opportunities in public service;… NOW, THEREFORE, I, ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor of the State of California do hereby issue this order to become effective immediately: 1. All state agencies, departments, boards and commissions shall utilize best efforts with respect to recruitment, hiring, advancement, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment and issue clear, written directives to their managers and supervisors prohibiting discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. 2. Each state agency shall comply with existing law and annually review its hiring practices to identify any barriers to employment of individuals with disabilities, and, in consultation with their disability advisory committee, take appropriate action to eliminate any non job-related barriers to the integration of individuals with disabilities into the workforce. 3. All state agencies, departments, boards, and commissions shall utilize the Limited Examination and Appointment Program (LEAP) lists in filling vacancies. LEAP lists provide a ready pool of qualified candidates, who happen to have a disability, for a variety of jobs. 4. The State Personnel Board shall provide statewide leadership, in partnership with the Department of Rehabilitation, to coordinate and provide technical guidance to fulfill the intent of this executive order…”

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 20 of 37

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Disability Employment Accelerator PY 2016-17“AWARD LIST AND PROJECT SUMMARIES” - 06/19/2017

~~“On June 19, 2017, $2 million of WIOA, Governor’s Discretionary 15 percent funds were awarded to seven workforce development agencies under the Disability Employment Accelerator (DEA) for Program Year (PY) 2016-17 Solicitation for Proposals. Awardee project list and project summaries are listed below. Funding decisions are final.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

2017-18 State Budget Briefing - 06/15/2017

~~“Employment First Policies for Individual with Disabilities:  Adopts trailer bill language that requires that performance objectives included in regional center contracts measure progress and outcomes in implementing the Employment First policy.  Updates the rate paid for vouchered community-based training services and specified supportive employment services to $14.99 per hour and $36.57 per hour, respectively, to reflect the rate increases provided in 2016 enacted legislation, Assembly Bill X2 1 (Thurmond), Chapter 3, Statutes of 2016”.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

California Department of Developmental Services “2014-2015 Annual Report Employment and Day Programs” - 05/17/2017

~~“This report summarizes economic and employment outcomes for DDS consumers with ID/DD.  Consumer information is used to develop program evaluation processes, project growth in costs, and develop future outcome-based program changes. Age group reports, such as a report showing data for 22-31 year olds, provide a look at how education is preparing young adults who are transitioning from school to work and day programs.

The DDS Employment and Day Program Annual Report includes community caseloads, age of individuals served by DDS, purchase of service (POS) dollars expended by service type, percentage of consumers employed by year, statewide counts of persons receiving services, per person costs, and percentage of consumers staying in the same service type year to year. The report includes data aggregated by the following services and/or categories:• Supported Employment Program (SEP) Individual• SEP Group• Work Activity Programs (WAP)• Day Programs• Look Alike Day Programs• Combination of two or more programs• Not In Day Programs or Work Programs”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

WIOA Local Workforce Plan 2017-2020 - 05/10/2017

~~“The City of Los Angeles Workforce Development Board’s Local Plan outlines the vision of its workforce development system to prepare and place individuals into self-sufficient employment, focuses on career pathway employment opportunities, and emphasizes strategies for system collaboration. The three pillars of the Local Plan are: improving the skills (up-skilling) of the workforce; employer engagement focused on sectors; and system building through collaboration. The strategies include:• Focusing on education and training for all job seekers (adults, youth, dislocated and incumbent) by emphasizing credentials and high school graduation attainment.• Engaging employers and industry groups to develop strong sector pathways to address the evolving demands of the economy and the required workplace skills.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

State Council on Developmental Disabilities. (2015). Employment First Committee annual report. - 04/28/2017

~~• ‘Since the national recession, California’s economy has strengthened, especially over the last few years. However, many people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) are not benefiting from one of the strongest economies in the world. However, there is some good news. There are major policy changes underway designed to improve employment for people with I/DD. Well-meaning practices have typically placed people into segregated settings, often receiving subminimum wages.• • These programs are often leave participants less prepared to enter traditional employment than if they had never participated in the program.• • California’s Employment First Policy paired with local projects and national efforts, like the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and changes in the Home and Community Based Services waiver program, should begin to improve employment for people with I/DD.” 

Systems
  • Other

“Youth And Subminimum Wage Employment” - 02/16/2017

~~“The foundation of the Vocational Rehabilitation program is the principle that individuals with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities, are capable of achieving high quality Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) when provided the necessary services and supports. The passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) ensures all individuals with disabilities are provided the necessary services and supports to achieve CIE. This is especially true for youth 24 years of age or younger, as the WIOA emphasizes that youth with disabilities have meaningful opportunities to receive the services they need to achieve employment outcomes in CIE.

The WIOA further reinforces the congressional intent that CIE is the preferred employment outcome by placing limitations on the use of subminimum wage (SMW), especially for youth. The limitations include prescriptive timelines for the transmission of documentation from the school to the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR). The DOR requires that any youth seeking SMW employment is provided mandatory services and documentation prior to working at SMW. Mandatory services include multiple opportunities to discuss and explore CIE in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

“For Employers” on 14(c) subminimum wages - 01/25/2017

~~“Section 511 prohibits employers from paying a subminimum wage to individuals with disabilities unless each individual is provided career counseling and information and referral services (CC&IR) at required intervals. Employers must also provide the individual with information about self-advocacy, self-determination, and peer mentoring training opportunities in the community. WIOA also requires 14(c) certificate holders to maintain documentation that individuals employed at subminimum wage prior to July 22, 2016, receive CC&IR services at least once by July 22, 2017, and annually thereafter. For individuals hired at subminimum wage on or after July 22, 2016, CC&IR services must be provided every six months for the first year of employment and annually thereafter.

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) is available to provide federally required CC&IR services for your employees receiving subminimum wage. Included in the career counseling, employees will learn about federal and state programs and local resources that offer employment-related services and supports designed to enable the individual to explore, experience, and attain competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

“Secondary Transition Planning” - 01/01/2017

~~• “This Web page offers resources and guidelines for assisting educators, parents, and agency partners to improve compliance with state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to transition age youth and improve post-high school outcomes. These resources supplement the California Transition Alliance’s document, Transition Planning: The Basics. Resources are organized into five categories: Employment, Education and Training, Independent Living, Compliance, and the Guideposts for Success document.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017-2021 State Plan - 08/04/2016

~~“Goal 2: Employment Californians with I/DD and their families reflecting the diversity of the state will have increased information to obtain competitive, integrated employment. 1. The Council will increase and promote culturally competent strategies and resources that facilitate competitive, integrated employment (CIE) of people with I/DD. 2. The Council, in consultation with its federal partners, will increase identification, advocacy and/or sponsorship of legislative, regulatory, policy, procedure and/or practice changes to increase CIE for people with I/DD.”

Systems
  • Other

California Department of Developmental Services “Supported Employment Program – Individual Forms” - 07/20/2016

These forms are to be used by work service (formerly Habilitation) providers and regional centers to process This page has links to forms for the Supported Employment Program both for individuals and groups, Work Services information, and Vocational Rehabilitation for such things as service plans, monthly reports, referrals, program changes The Excel forms can be downloaded and completed using the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet program. The PDF instructions can be downloaded and printed using the free Adobe Acrobat Reader. For further information, please read the instructions accompanying each form.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

“Local Partnership Agreement Template" - 06/17/2017

~~“The California Department of Education (CDE), the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), and the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) seek to foster an environment of collaboration to increase competitive integrated employment (CIE) opportunities for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

Competitive Integrated Employment is described in plain language by the motto: “Real Work for Real Pay in the Real World.” The term means working for pay (at least minimum wage) in the community alongside people without disabilities. Work can be full-time (up to 40 hours per week) or part-time with the same level of benefits and opportunities for advancement as other employees.

The CIE Blueprint outlines the collaborative efforts between the three departments on a statewide level. A Local Partnership Agreement (LPA) identifies the ways in which partners will work together on a local level. Each agreement is built around the core partners of one or more local educational agencies (LEA), one or more DOR district, and one or more regional centers, and can include any number of additional local community partners.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego-Imperial Counties Developmental Services, Inc. "Employment First" - 05/10/2016

~~California’s Employment First Policy was signed into law in October of 2013, by Governor Brown.dds.ca.govCompetitive employment is finding a job within the community where you are paid about the same as other people doing the same job and at least minimum wage. It could also be working for yourself in your own small business.Information about the Employment First Policy can be found on the website of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities (scdd.ca.gov) as well as the Department of Developmental Services (dds.ca.gov).Employment & Your Individual Program Plan (IPP)When you plan with your service coordinator around employment opportunities, the first option that will be considered is competitive integrated employment. Competitive work is a real choice. Your service coordinator can help you find resources in the community to support your employment goals.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

CA Employment First Memorandum of Understanding - 12/12/2014

This project will use a multi-faceted approach to apply key elements from high performing states in integrated competitive employment and principles of Collaborative Leadership. A unified value, vision, and expectation for competitive integrated employment will be established and will serve as the basis for the strategies used for stimulating policy to practice, training, technical assistance, and a shared method for monitoring progress through available state and local employment data.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Employment First Committee Annual Report (Partnerships) - 01/16/2013

The Council participates in the Alliance for Full Participation California team. The AFP is a collaboration of major national organizations (including the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities) serving or advocating for improved employment outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The California team is facilitated by the Arc of California. The Council has also started coordinating with the California Committee for the Employment of People with Disabilities, established by statute to promote the employment of people with disabilities. Additionally, members of the Employment First Committee continue to actively work with key groups throughout the state to promote Employment First. 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego Workforce Partnership: Policy and Systemic Influence - 07/02/2007

Project Overview: Grant number, name and location: Customized Employment - 01, San Diego, CA, E-9-4-1-0081 Grant recipient: San Diego Workforce Partnership, Inc. Project Lead: San Diego Workforce Partnership, Inc.

Subcontractors: Five One-Stop Centers; Access Center (an assistive technology technical assistance resource center); and the University Center on Excellence on Disabilities (UCED) at San Diego University.

  Early on, the grantee subcontracted most of its activities to Community Service Providers (Goodwill and Able/Disabled primarily), but radically changed its structure after two years to internalize the activities of the grant in its own system.   Key Lessons/Accomplishments Workforce Investment Board (WIB) and WIB administrative agencies are key players in workforce policy issues, if they choose to take a strong role Performance measures are a manageable challenge when treated constructively by the WIB Lack of experience is a key barrier to customized business-outreach efforts Grant structure (and overuse of subcontractors) severely hinders the capacity for systems and policy change.
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

The California Employment Consortium for Youth and Young Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (CECY)

~~“(CECY) is a collaboration of 23 state agencies, centers, and organizations, families, and self-advocates with responsibilities for the education, rehabilitation, employment, and support of youth with disabilities.  CECY is a five-year (2011-2016) Project of National Significance Partnerships in Employment Systems Change grant (#90DN0284) by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD).  The Tarjan Center at UCLA, a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, provides its administrative leadership. “
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

Transition2Life Project (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

“The Transition2Life Project will provide direct, hands-on training and learning opportunities focusing on effective transitions to inclusive adult lives for young adults with developmental disabilities living in Amador, Calaveras, and Tuolumne counties.” 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

The goal of this project is to implement a “Get a Competitive Edge” Work Safe & Self-Advocacy program for consumers and employees with disabilities as part of The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Progressive Employment Concepts (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

 “This project will provide hands on training to staff and clients in the discovery and customized employment process leading to a customized employment outcome for a minimum of two individuals. This project will allow Progressive Employment Concepts to gain the tools needed to have continued success in finding jobs for the individuals we serve, especially those with higher support needs.” Awarded in  Sacramento and Placer Counties.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

California Readiness Of Minors in Supplemental Security Income (CaPROMISE) Initiative

“The PROMISE initiative is intended to improve the provision and coordination of services for child SSI recipients and their families. The services help child recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these child SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CA State Council on Developmental Disabilities Employment First Committee Annual Report

The second annual report of the Employment First Committee (EFC) of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities includes: priorities adopted by the State Council as recommended by the EFC; second-year work of the EFC, interagency activities, and policy activities; the current status of the employment of individuals with developmental disabilities; and next steps for the EFC.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

California Ticket to Work/Work Incentives Program

Ticket to Work (TTW) is a voluntary work incentive program for Social Security Administration’s (SSA) Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries who are between the ages of 18 and 64 and interested in going to work. The goal of the TTW Program is to assist beneficiaries in obtaining employment and working toward becoming self-sufficient.   Work Incentives are SSA rules that make it possible for people with disabilities receiving SSDI and SSI to explore work options and reach their work goals without losing their benefits prematurely. Social Security Work Incentives help beneficiaries remove barriers to work by offering support services and providing a safety net to assist beneficiaries in finding meaningful employment and succeeding in the workplace.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California Employment Consortium for Youth

“California Employment Consortium for Youth: California was awarded a federal 5-year employment systems change grant by The Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to increase the number of youth and young adults with intellectual disabilities in integrated competitive employment (ICE). The State Council is a lead agency along with the Departments of Rehabilitation, Developmental Services and Education. The California Employment Consortium for Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (CECY) is a 30 member highly knowledgeable and experienced employment work group comprised of the aforementioned lead state agencies, Youth Self-Advocates, Disability Rights California, the Family Resource Center Network of California, the Association of Regional Center Agencies, California Committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities, Community of Practice-Secondary Transition, UCLA Anderson School of Management, and the Tarjan Center UCEDD.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and Supplement for the Supported Employment Services Program State Plan Program Years 2018 – 2020 - 02/11/2018

~~“Priority 3: Capacity Building

Goal: Establish or enhance partnerships to increase the capacity of CDOR and the WIOA core program partners to improve service delivery for adults and youth with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

“$2 million to assist Californians with disabilities in job searches” - 06/19/2017

~~“People with disabilities in 13 counties will get additional help in landing employment with $2 million in grants announced by the California Employment Development Department today. The Disability Employment Accelerator grants assist people with disabilities obtain skills needed for employment in growing industries such as advanced manufacturing, clean energy, transportation, and healthcare.The disability employment assistance funds will help prepare job seekers with skills and training needed for careers and then connect them with hiring businesses. The organizations receiving the grants will use “earn-and-learn” strategies that empower people with disabilities to earn incomes while they learn new skills that will help them progress into high-growth industries” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

“Workforce Development: What's in it For You” - 05/10/2017

~~“Workforce Development (WDS), "What's in it for Your Business?" is a Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) employer outreach program designed to build collaborative partnerships that create staffing solutions for California businesses. The Workforce Development Section (WDS) develops and coordinates linkages with the business community in order to increase meaningful employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD) - 03/12/2017

~~“The California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD) was established to advance the employment of people with disabilities in the state. The primary function of the CCEPD is to consult with and advise the Secretary of the Labor and Workforce Development Agency and the Secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency on all issues related to full inclusion in the workforce of persons with disabilities, in order to:1. Bring individuals with disabilities into gainful employment at a rate that is as close as possible to that of the general population.2. Support the goals of equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for these individuals.3. Ensure that state government is a model employer of individuals with disabilities.4. Support state coordination with, and participation in, benefits planning training and information dissemination projects supported by private foundations and federal grants.

The CCEPD supports an annual event for youth with disabilities. In September of 2015, the CCEPD voted to adopt the California Youth Leadership Forum for Students with Disabilities (YLF) as the youth event for the years 2016-2018.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

CA Employment First: Braiding Day and Employment Services to Build Meaningful Lives - 04/09/2015

This Employment First training presentation focuses on different approaches to promoting Employment First and encouraging integrated, community-based employment opportunities for people with disabilities. Some of the strategies include using Discovery and customized employment with Medicaid waiver day services participants through a braided funding approach including Vocational Rehabilitation. This presentation also provides a number of example case studies.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

The California DEI: Effective Practices in Building an Inclusive Workforce

This presentation summarizes California’s experience with the DEI grant as of 2015. It addresses the history of DEI in the state, the objectives, the strategic service delivery components, the promising practices and the hopes for sustainability after the grant.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

California Customized Employment for Service Members, Veterans & Their Families

This web page discusses Customized Employment as a “Promising Practice for Supporting Employees with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and/or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD),” particularly in the context of US Service Members and Veterans.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

Employment First Committee Annual Report

The Community of Practice (COP) is located within the Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and was formed and funded by the DOE to help improve transition and employment outcomes. This is a voluntary group of educational professionals.   The COP seeks to ensure the seamless transition of services for  youth, ages 16 –22, which will lead to positive post-school outcomes. They carry out their work through a statewide community of practice and a statewide list serve,which disseminates compliance information, resources and evidence-based practices and statewide technical assistance through webinars and conference calls.  Their key goal, with respect to employment ,is integrated ,competitive employment in any area of interest for each individual youth, ages 16-22.  
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California Training Initiatives

“Association of Regional Center Agencies – New day Conference. ARCA sponsored the New Day Conference in Pasadena in September 2012. Over 400 attendees participated in sessions focused on innovations in employment and housing services for individuals with developmental disabilities.” “Four- part employment webinar series aimed to create awareness about employment and to provide a discussion forum for families, individual organizations and professionals.” “Working Conference - Driving Forces Behind Successful Postsecondary Education and Employment for Young Adults with ID and Autism held in Sacramento, CA and sponsored by Think College and California Consortium on Postsecondary Educations and the Center for Disability Studies, University of Hawaii. The conference content addressed significant changes in public policy, insight for promoting inclusive strategies through person-centered protocol and interagency team building to support youth success. … Over 100 families, K-12, rehabilitation, developmental disabilities and higher education professionals, and students with developmental disabilities attended.” “Three-Part webinar series in Triangulating Postsecondary Education Goals for transition specialists and educators. The series aims at identifying postsecondary goals and aligning them with academic and industry standards. This webinar series was hosted by Community of Practice in Secondary Education (CoP).”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

California Community Transitions (CCT) (Money Follows the Person)

“In January 2007, the California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) was awarded special federal grant number 1LICMS30149 to implement a Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration, “California Community Transitions” (CCT). CCT demonstration services are available through September 30, 2016.   “Lead Organizations employ or contract with transition coordinators who work directly with willing and eligible individuals, support networks, and providers to facilitate and monitor their transition from facilities to community settings. Eligible individuals of all ages with physical and mental disabilities have an opportunity to participate in CCT.”    
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California for Community First Choice

On December 1, 2011, the California Department of Health Care Services submitted the first state plan amendment to implement Section 2401 (the Community First Choice Option) of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), providing the provision of medical assistance for home and community-based attendant services including Assistance with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), and health-related tasks, teaching and demonstration for ADLs, IADLs, and other health -related tasks, back-up systems to ensure the continuity of services, and training on the hiring and maintenance of attendants. California has developed a quality assurance plan to monitor the implementation and efficacy of the Community First Choice Option at the county- and state-levels.   .

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The Golden State is a place where you can "Find Yourself" through a rewarding career, including those with disabilities who are ready to live the California Dream.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon California's VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
0.27%
Change from
2015 to 2016
39,250,017
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.28%
Change from
2015 to 2016
2,023,714
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.76%
Change from
2015 to 2016
701,791
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.48%
Change from
2015 to 2016
34.68%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.47%
Change from
2015 to 2016
74.22%

State Data

General

2014 2015 2016
Population. 38,802,500 39,144,818 39,250,017
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 2,010,783 2,017,962 2,023,714
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 669,206 682,393 701,791
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 16,063,918 16,406,161 16,632,184
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.28% 33.82% 34.68%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 72.19% 73.13% 74.22%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.50% 6.20% 5.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.70% 20.50% 20.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.90% 14.80% 13.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,932,270 1,977,622 2,020,143
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 2,118,361 2,119,272 2,186,775
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,705,896 2,726,001 2,749,171
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 329,510 329,300 331,848
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 1,182,279 1,206,749 1,273,677
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 45,379 47,104 47,935
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 418,164 439,378 459,722
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 13,609 15,036 15,006
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 164,216 163,388 178,131
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 373,857 376,687 425,105

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 39,924 41,044 41,719
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.20% 4.40% 4.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 709,509 699,241 682,668

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 17,766 18,061 20,014
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 43,426 44,818 49,907
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 225,908 217,367 221,216
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 7.90% 8.30% 9.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 0.10% 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.30% 0.30% 0.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50% 1.70% 1.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 10.20% 9.60% 11.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 419 516 582
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,079 1,260 1,552
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 5,665 6,282 6,396
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 39,165 35,624 39,862

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 36,836 42,724 46,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,153 2,125 2,373
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,127 1,102 1,176
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00% 0.52% 50.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.94 2.82 3.00

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
26,905
23,327
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 1,572 1,433 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,887 1,777 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 4,666 3,872 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 10,407 9,242 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 6,555 5,189 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,815 1,807 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.60% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 24,121 25,118 24,984
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 1,258,695 1,247,320 1,213,289
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,493 1,257 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $87,718,000 $90,753,000 $92,057,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $57,097,000 $57,360,000 $55,744,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $753,849,000 $806,409,000 $853,743,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 12.00% 12.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 59,661 62,857 66,009
Number of people served in facility based work. 10,242 10,036 9,627
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 N/A 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 25.90 26.00 26.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 56.38% 53.38% 54.07%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 23.60% 22.01% 21.54%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.92% 3.31% 3.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 93.49% 99.41% 99.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 52.33% 50.41% 52.26%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 72.41% 72.38% 75.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.00% 82.17% 83.16%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 20.08% 21.97% 23.20%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 10,193,235
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 12,148
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 123,357
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 4,322,464
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 4,445,821
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 180
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,641
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,821
AbilityOne wages (products). $583,952
AbilityOne wages (services). $61,505,189

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 13 7 3
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 41 36 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 135 89 109
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 8 5 6
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 197 137 119
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 27 40 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 3,288 2,927 35
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 22,639 13,278 17,727
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 744 486 488
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 26,698 16,731 18,280

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~The DPEC works with the State Board, Independent Living Centers, AJCCs, DOR, Department of Developmental Services (DDS), and many other public and private stakeholders to improve employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The DPEC also encourages and assists stakeholders to train staff on disability awareness and effective service delivery. Some of the partnerships and activities supported by the DPEC include: Employment First, Youth Employment Opportunity Program, Youth Leadership Forum, Disability Employment Initiative and Disability Employment Accelerator.  (Page 247)
AB 287 (2009) established the Employment First Policy, which led to a standing Employment First Committee formed by the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. The bill expands employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and identifies best practices and incentives for increasing integrated employment and gainful employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Employment First policy requires Regional Centers to develop Individual Program Plans to ensure individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities beginning at age 14 are provided options, competitive integrated employment, and post-secondary education to enable the consumer to transition from school to work. CDOR is an active participant in the Employment First Committee to help with transition planning. (Page 355)
Attend California Model Employer Initiative meetings in order to increase the number of individuals with disabilities in state employment; identify and implement improvements in furtherance of the state’s “Employment First” policy to gain integrated competitive wages for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities; increase jobs-driven employment and consumer self-sufficiency for consumers who are job ready through work incentives planning; establish new partnerships with employers through the National Employment Team; maximize the use of Talent Acquisition Portal, an online system which includes both a national talent pool of VR candidates looking for employment and a job posting system for businesses looking to hire individuals with disabilities, to link job ready consumers with employers; and, enhancement of staff training curriculums to include the use of social media strategies and the electronic job application process. These efforts are expected to contribute towards passing the performance indicators in FFY 2016. (Page 393)
 

Customized Employment

~~• The CDOR’s Community Resources Development Section continues to conduct comprehensive certification and site reviews of CRPs. The focus of the review process is maximizing employment outcomes for CDOR consumers.
• Efforts are taking place to update the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on Pre-Employment Transition Services and Customized Employment WIOA services.
• In early 2014, a proof of concept titled “Placement Plus” was administered in select CRPs to test a new employment services fee for service structure. The lessons learned and evaluation of the Placement Plus is informing CDOR’s current efforts to redesign employment services statewide. (Page 353)
• Conduct focus groups to solicit feedback about what the partners think is needed to enhance services for people with disabilities.
• Develop a CDOR referral form and referral process for the America’s Job Centers of California.
• Provide training to local America’s Job Center of California staff on topics such as: CDOR services; eligibility; job placement; case management; benefits counseling; job readiness and soft skills; disability awareness and etiquette; hiring persons with disabilities; disability disclosures; competitive integrated employment; customized employment; assistive technology; and, reasonable accommodation.
• Provide tools and resources to the WIOA core programs serving individuals with disabilities such as accommodations for individuals who are blind and visually impaired or deaf and hard of hearing.
• Identify the single point of contact for all local WIOA core program partners. (Page388)
• Efforts are taking place to update the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on Pre-Employment Transition Services and Customized Employment WIOA services.
• In early 2014, a proof of concept titled “Placement Plus” was administered in select CRPs to test a new employment services fee for service structure. The lessons learned and evaluation of the Placement Plus is informing CDOR’s current efforts to redesign employment services statewide. (Page 353)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Strengths: Local Boards have a lot of experience braiding resources and integrating service delivery through the One–Stop system. Local Boards have deep connections to their local communities, and are gaining greater experience working through state and local led regional initiatives, including sector and career pathway strategies as well as initiatives to provide services to target populations. (Page 43)
• Creating cross–system data capacity: using diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and also, the use performance data to assess the value of those investments.
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. (Page 65)
The seven policy strategies emphasized in this State Plan—sector strategies, career pathways, “earn and learn”, organizing regionally, providing supportive services, building cross-system data capacity, and braiding resources and integrating services— are evidence-based and have been shown to work, helping ensure effective delivery of services, and increasing the likelihood that those who receive services obtain gainful employment. ( Page 74)
Integrating service delivery and braiding resources are ways that workforce and education programs can achieve program alignment and assure access to the broad array of services funded across the state’s workforce and education programs. In California, resources will be braided and services integrated and aligned through the creation of “value-dded “partnerships at the state, regional, and local levels.
A value-added partnership is one in which all partners gain from the partnership. Ideally, “gains to exchange” occur and partners transact with one another on the basis of specialization, providing services consistent with each programs’ core competencies. Partners thereby leverage one another’s expertise, building a proverbial “sum that is greater than its parts.” (Page 82)
Creating cross–system data capacity: using diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and also, the use performance data to assess the value of those investments.
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs.  (Page 84)
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and services to meet client needs
• Creating cross–system data capacity, including diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and performance data to assess the value of investments (Page 103)
The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD–WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
The State Board has partnered with EDD to create and staff the One–Stop Design workgroup, which brought together state plan partners and other stakeholders to develop a blueprint for service delivery in the state’s AJCCs. Work by this group will inform state policy on integrated service delivery and the braiding of resources at AJCCs, including policy on operations, required partnership, and the articulation of AJCC services with Regional Sector Pathway programs. (More detail on this is provided in chapter 4).  (Page109)
Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One–Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 110)
Additionally, SBE, CDE, CCCCO, and the State Board will work jointly to identify and recommend best practices and model partnerships that encourage program alignment, coordination, integration of services, and braiding of resources beyond the minimum levels required as part of mandatory One–Stop partnership. To this end, the State Board will issue local and regional planning guidance, supported, when appropriate, by policy directives or other appropriate means of communication issued by SBE, CDE, and CCCCO to foster better program alignment between basic education and basic skills programs and other workforce and education programs and services. Recommended relevant best practices may include but are not limited to the following:
• aligning basic skills coursework with career pathways programs and adopting contextualized learning practices that combine basic education and skills coursework with CTE coursework
• braiding resources from WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs with WIOA Title II programs to provide supportive services to those attending basic education and skills programs so as to facilitate both course and program completion; local partnerships may include charter schools focused on serving out of school youth and operating under Education Code Section 47612.1(a)
• ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with, and have access to, relevant job–readiness training and job search and placement services
• ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with and have access to opportunities to enter postsecondary education programs (Pages 113)
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs (Page 115)
CWDA to ensure integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the use of “earn and learn” and other training and employment services for TANF recipients in California. Partnership activities to support these ends have and will include all of the following:
• CWDA, the State Board, EDD, and CDSS staff will work jointly to assess the level of partnership and current compliance with known future regulatory requirements. This information will be used to ensure that all counties and Local Boards are on a path to compliance.
• CWDA, CDSS, and State Board staff will work jointly to identify models of TANF One–Stop partnership that go beyond baseline federal expectations, as well as the purpose of these partnerships, and the manner in which these partnerships elevate service delivery so as to improve client outcomes. The information gleaned from this analysis will be used to inform local and regional planning guidance and will be combined with baseline compliance rules to provide locals information on how to not only comply with baseline federal requirements, but also to develop the programs that best serve client needs.  (Page 118)
The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD–WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
• As part of the state planning process, the State Board has entered into state level agreements with SBE/CDE (Title II Administrator), EDD (Title I Administrator and Title III Administrator and Program Operator), DOR (Title IV Administrator and Program operator), and both CDSS and CWDA (representatives of both state and local TANF agencies) to ensure coordination at the state level so as to ensure compliance with federal requirements pertaining to One–Stop mandatory partnership of TANF programs. (Pages 120, 121, 124, 126, 128)
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs
The ETP will work with regionally organized Local Boards where the sector priorities of RPUs align with the programmatic direction of ETP, identifying opportunities to train incumbent workers in prioritized sectors using, when appropriate, multi–employer contracts to meet the needs of industry.
Training incumbent workers can create opportunities for populations with barriers to employment by opening up entry level and other positions where and when incumbent workers advance into new positions as a result of the training programs funded by ETP.
As noted above, ETP will also partner with DOR to leverage ETP’s incumbent worker training contracts and contacts in the federal contractor community to improve coordination around federal 503 contracting rules. (Pages 135,137)
• By building links between AJCCs and campuses, including but not limited to, pooling resources to place AJCC staff directly on campuses
• By braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs
The ETP will work with regionally organized Local Boards where the sector priorities of RPUs align with the programmatic direction of ETP, identifying opportunities to train incumbent workers in prioritized sectors using, when appropriate, multi–employer contracts to meet the needs of industry. (Page 144,147)
The State Board will issue regional planning guidance that details best practices and model partnerships between the workforce system and the community college system, recommending that Local Boards meet their WIOA Section 106 requirements pertaining to coordinated service delivery strategies and shared administrative costs in ways that lay the foundation for a strong partnership with community college CTE programs. This can be done in a variety of ways, including the following:
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs (Page 154, 156)
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. (Page 438)
Strengths: Local Boards have a lot of experience braiding resources and integrating service delivery through the One-Stop system. Local Boards have deep connections to their local communities, and are gaining greater experience working through state and local led regional (Page 443)
The seven policy strategies emphasized in this State Plan—sector strategies, career pathways, “earn and learn”, organizing regionally, providing supportive services, building cross-system data capacity, and braiding resources and integrating services— are evidence-based and have been shown to work, helping ensure effective delivery of services, and increasing the likelihood that those who receive services obtain gainful employment. (Page 455)
INTEGRATING SERVICES AND BRAIDING RESOURCES
• “earn and learn”—using training and education practices that combine applied learning opportunities with compensation; the success of earn and learn programs depends on sustained employer engagement, and where appropriate, the involvement of organized labor, especially as this pertains to the development of partnerships with labor–management apprenticeship and pre–apprenticeship programs
• creating cross–system data capacity, including diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and performance data to assess the value of investments (Page 476)
The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD-WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
• The State Board has partnered with EDD to create and staff the One-Stop Design workgroup, which brought together state plan partners and other stakeholders to develop a blueprint for service delivery in the state’s AJCCs. Work by this group will inform state policy on integrated service delivery and the braiding of resources at AJCCs, including policy on operations, required partnership, and the articulation of AJCC services with Regional Sector Pathway programs. (More detail on this is provided in chapter 4). (Pages 485, 486, 488, 489, 490)
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs.  (Page 509)
 

DEI/DRC

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~Activities designed to help expand the expertise of adult education providers to adopt distance learning in their instructional strategies is also a priority. To facilitate integrated success among education agencies, the contractor provides an electronic collaborative environment. This includes discussion boards and work groups for the exchange of information about effective program models, teaching techniques, and curriculum. Piloting, implementing, evaluating, and disseminating models for learner–oriented Web sites to encourage students to obtain the knowledge and skills necessary for employment and self–sufficiency are priority objectives. Finally, providing technical assistance, staff training, and program marketing to ensure the optimum usage of communication technology by adult education providers and learners only strengthens distance learning for optimal usage of WIOA funds. (Page 327)
OTAN disseminates information through a multitude of face-to-face and online workshops, conference presentations, and by producing videos that demonstrate teaching with technology and technology integration lesson plans. All videos are archived on OTAN’s website. OTAN recently piloted a Community Model of Online Learning to increase regional access to high-quality online math curriculum for adult learners. The Online Teaching Academy (OTAC) assists instructors in becoming competent online teachers and mentors using Moodle and other instructional technology. It also hosts the Technology Integration Mentor Academy (TIMAC) training, a year-long professional development project where participants to become mentors and increase the effective use of technology in classrooms. The Technology and Distance Learning Symposium rotates each year between north and south geographic locations in the state. (Page 331-332)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~WIOA prioritizes out–of–school youth as demonstrated by the minimum seventy–five percent expenditure requirement, therefore it is imperative for Local Areas to shift their local programs to serve OSY. At the time of enactment, several Local Areas in California were at or near the minimum seventy–five percent OSY expenditure requirement. Local Boards are engaged in strategies to increase their OSY expenditures through partnership and leveraged funding to meet the needs of underserved OSY. The availability of youth program element services such as financial literacy, entrepreneurship, work experience, and follow–up serves as a pivot toward self–sufficiency. (Page 281)
WIOA prioritizes out-of-school youth as demonstrated by the minimum seventy-five percent expenditure requirement, therefore it is imperative for Local Areas to shift their local programs to serve OSY. At the time of enactment, several Local Areas in California were at or near the minimum seventy-five percent OSY expenditure requirement. Local Boards are engaged in strategies to increase their OSY expenditures through partnership and leveraged funding to meet the needs of underserved OSY. The availability of youth program element services such as financial literacy, entrepreneurship, work experience, and follow-up serves as a pivot toward self-sufficiency. (Page 283)
Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination of significant knowledge from research and other sources to designated State unit professionals and paraprofessionals.
The CDOR continues to routinely acquire and disseminate significant VR research, including:
• Newly published research disseminated via CDOR’s Intranet site.
• Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination of significant knowledge from research and other sources to CDOR personnel.
• Topical webinars from VR leaders including the Research Technical Assistance Center, the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities, and the Employment and Training Administration.
 

School to Work Transition

~~3. Regular payments from railroad retirement, strike benefits from union funds, worker’s compensation, and training stipends;
4. Alimony;
5. Military family allotments or other regular support from an absent family member or someone not living in the household;
6. Pensions whether private, government employee (including Military retirement pay);
7. Regular insurance or annuity payments other than Supplemental Security Income disability (SSI) or veterans’ disability;
8. College or university grants, fellowships, and assistantships;
9. Net gambling or lottery winnings;
10. Social Security Disability Insurance payments (SSDI)
• Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) pays benefits to individuals that have worked in the past, paid Social Security taxes, and are currently unable to work for a year or more because of a disability. SSDI is considered income replacement and must be included in family income (All of page 204)
12. Tribal Government Payments (i.e., Per Capita Payments, Lease Payments, Individual Indian Money (IIM);
13. Old age and survivors insurance benefits received under section 202 of the Social Security Act (42 USC 402).
• Old age and survivors insurance benefits include: Social Security Survivor Benefits – these are benefits paid to people up to age 18 who have had a parent die and the parent paid wages into the system; and
• Social Security Retirement Benefits – these are benefits that are paid to people who reached their social security age and have wages paid in the system. (Page 205)
 

Career Pathways

~~WorkAbility I Program
The WorkAbility I program is administered through the California Department of Education. The goal of the WorkAbility I is to provide pre-employment training, employment placement and follow up for high school students in special education who are transitioning from school to work, independent living and postsecondary education or training. (Page 341)
Employment Transition Services:
• Outreach to schools and closer collaboration between VR and Local Education Agency staff that do not currently have a Transition Partnership Programs cooperative arrangement.
• Expand transition services beyond school to work to include school to postsecondary training transitions.
• Provide information about the transition from school to work at an earlier age to students with disabilities.
• Provide benefits education planning and services to students as well as parents and guardians of students with disabilities.
• Provide specialized training and increase awareness for VR staff and service providers on the unique needs of students with disabilities.
In addition, there are a number of methods that CDOR will utilize to ensure the provision of the core Pre-Employment Transition Services to students with disabilities: (Page 350)
• AB 287 (2009) established the Employment First Policy, which led to a standing Employment First Committee formed by the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. The bill expands employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and identifies best practices and incentives for increasing integrated employment and gainful employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Employment First policy requires Regional Centers to develop Individual Program Plans to ensure individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities beginning at age 14 are provided options, competitive integrated employment, and post-secondary education to enable the consumer to transition from school to work. CDOR is an active participant in the Employment First Committee to help with transition planning.
• California Competitive Integrated Employment: Blueprint for Reform for Individuals with Disabilities. In December 2014, CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to further advance the state’s “Employment First” Policy and other federal and state laws to address employment in integrated settings, at competitive wages, for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The goal of the California Competitive Integrated Employment effort is to develop a “blueprint” that will outline plans for:
 Improving collaboration and coordination between the three departments to prepare and support all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment;
 Building capacity to increase opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment to prepare for and participate in the California workforce development system; (Page 355)
For both youth with disabilities and students with disabilities:
• Outreach to schools and closer collaboration between VR and Local Education Agency staff that do not currently have a Transition Partnership Programs cooperative agreement.
• Expand transition services beyond school to work to school to postsecondary training transitions.
• Provide information about the transition from school to work at an earlier age to youth with disabilities and students with disabilities.
• Provide benefits education planning and services to students with disabilities and youth with disabilities as well as parents and guardians of youth with disabilities and students with disabilities.
• Provide specialized training and increase awareness for VR staff and service providers on the unique needs of youth with disabilities and students with disabilities.  (Page 372)
 

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Requirements for regional plans, and will share regional plan content with state partners, including information pertaining to prioritized sectors and career pathways identified in the course of the regional planning process. The sharing of this information will facilitate, as appropriate, engagement with regional efforts by other State Plan partners such as DOR ETP, and CalWORKs.
Local Boards (Title I) working together regionally will work alongside CTE faculty and Deans from the community colleges, representatives from the CCCCO’s WEDD program, representatives from K–12 CTE programs, state–funded Adult Education Block Grant consortia, and federally funded Title II providers to convene and engage employers, especially the representatives of leading and emergent industry sectors to do the following:
• Assess industry workforce needs
• Determine whether existing training and education programs in the region are producing what industry needs
• Identify existing career pathway programs that meet leading and emergent industry sector needs
• Recommend any necessary adjustments to facilitate the development and validation of career pathway programs to meet industry needs
• Broker regional partnerships to move students and workers through relevant pathway programs that result in the attainment of industry recognized degrees or credentials, including individuals with barriers to employment (Page 107)
Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in–demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post–secondary education.
Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE). (Page108)
The State Board has entered into an agreement with SBE/CDE to support and encourage the integration of work–based learning activities in all locally funded WIOA youth programs to involve interactions with industry professionals and include career awareness, career exploration, internships and career pathways training activities.
• Additionally, the State Board has entered into an agreement with CDSS, the CWDA, and the Chancellor’s Office of Supportive Services to encourage and promote local partnerships that articulate subsidized employment programs operated by County Welfare Departments with career pathways programs, including “Regional Sector Pathway” programs identified and developed in WIOA regional plans. Where robust partnerships develop, these pathway programs should be designed to service TANF recipients, taking care to meet the particular client needs of those being served.
• The State Board has entered a similar agreement with DOR to promote access to competitive integrated employment at the local level so as to ensure quality jobs for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. (Page 110)
• Aligning basic skills coursework with career pathways programs and adopting contextualized learning practices that combine basic education and skills coursework with CTE coursework
• Braiding resources from WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs with WIOA Title II programs to provide supportive services to those attending basic education and skills programs so as to facilitate both course and program completion; local partnerships may include charter schools focused on serving out of school youth and operating under Education Code Section 47612.1(a)
• Ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with, and have access to, relevant job–readiness training and job search and placement services
• Ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with and have access to opportunities to enter postsecondary education programs (Page 113)
AJCC system and, working with EDD, will issue One–Stop policies to secure representation from all mandatory partners in all comprehensive One–Stops.
• The State Board has entered into an agreement with SBE/CDE to support and encourage the integration of work–based learning activities in all locally funded WIOA youth programs to involve interactions with industry professionals and include career awareness, career exploration, internships and career pathways training activities.
• Additionally, the State Board has entered into an agreement with CDSS, the CWDA, and the Chancellor’s Office of Supportive Services to encourage and promote local partnerships that articulate subsidized employment programs operated by County Welfare Departments with career pathways programs, including “Regional Sector Pathway” programs identified and developed in WIOA regional plans. Where robust partnerships develop, these pathway programs should be designed to service TANF recipients, taking care to meet the particular client needs of those being served.
• The State Board has entered a similar agreement with DOR to promote access to competitive integrated employment at the local level so as to ensure quality jobs for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
• Working with EDD, the State Board has already issued policies pertaining to Eligible Training Providers and the use of alternative training models, including OJT, to encourage the use of “earn and learn” approaches to training by local boards.
• Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One–Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 121)
The State Board will also review regional plans to ensure compliance with state guidance and WIOA requirements for regional plans, and will share regional plan content with state partners, including information pertaining to prioritized sectors and career pathways identified in the course of the regional planning process. The sharing of this information will facilitate, as appropriate, engagement with regional efforts by other State Plan partners such as DOR ETP, and CalWORKs.
Local Boards (Title I) working together regionally will work alongside CTE faculty and Deans from the community colleges, representatives from the CCCCO’s WEDD program, representatives from K–12 CTE programs, state–funded Adult Education Block Grant consortia, and federally funded Title II providers to convene and engage employers, especially the representatives of leading and emergent industry sectors to do the following: (Page 142)
Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in–demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post–secondary education.
Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).
DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal laws, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K–12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners.  (Page 143)
• General policy development to further system alignment of workforce, job services, training, and education programs.
• Research and policy development toward the delivery of effective One-Stop services, including policies facilitating One-Stop access for those with barriers to employment.
• Research on policies concerning effective sector engagement.
• Research on the building of career pathways tailored to client population needs, including research on how successful partnerships braid funds to facilitate movement through a career pathway that straddles multiple programs or service delivery structures.
• Examination of effective regional organizing efforts so as to identify the key elements of successful regional partnerships.
• Providing policy information to system partners to aid staff development.
• Providing policy information on successful practices to facilitate the building of local board capacity.
• Evidence-based research and policy development on the use of effective training programs responsive to labor market needs.
The Policy, Legislation, and Research Branch unit played a lead role in convening state plan partners, informing these partners on the legislative requirements of WIOA, sharing policy research on evidence-based practices, and facilitating agreement on the policy content of the State Plan by staffing the multiple workgroups engaged in the planning process. (Page 208)
Activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, Local Boards, One-Stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways.
Flexible Schedules and Coordination with Support Services: The degree to which the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with federal, state, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs (Page 237)
For CRPs within the state:
• Evaluate the vendor reimbursement model to ensure it adequately covers the cost of providing quality services.
• Expand job exploration and placement services for VR consumers to include more time and focus on career pathways and business sector strategies.
• Identify ways for CDOR to assume more of the vendor’s risks such as paying for no-show appointments and background checks for new jobs.
• Increase training and coordination efforts between CDOR staff and CRPs regarding the use of assistive technology, including the procedures for purchasing and requesting repairs.
• More in-depth training for consumers and CRP staff regarding CDOR’s process for plan development and employment services so consumers and vendors will better understand their roles and responsibilities to each other and to the VRSD team. (Page 372)
[1] WIOA section 134 requires that priority of service be given to recipients of public assistance, other low-income individuals, and individuals that are basic skills deficient for any expenditure of WIOA Adult program funds spent on individualized career services and training. Similarly, California Unemployment Insurance Code section 14000 (b) (6) requires that programs and services be accessible to “individuals with employment barriers, such as persons with economic, physical, or other barriers to employment.” California Unemployment Insurance Code section 14013(d)(2) further directs the State Board to develop “strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment, and including individuals with disabilities, with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.” (Page 441)
• Creating a marketing/communication team of WIOA core partners at the State level: (EDD, DOR, CDSS, CCCCO, Adult Ed, the State Board, CWA, DOA, HCD, National programs).
• Identifying a single point of contact for each Local Board to facilitate regular interaction/communication between the state partner programs, including all core programs, and local stakeholders.
• Establishing a protocol and communication policy for all core partners and committing to talking regularly as a system.
• Utilizing social media and virtual communication tools.
• Developing a branding policy for the AJCC.
Through the efforts of the One–Stop Design Workgroup and the WIOA Implementation Committee Workgroups, the State Board has entered into agreements with mandated and voluntary partners and stakeholders to ensure implementation of an integrated, job driven service delivery system that provides job seekers (specifically individuals with barriers to employment) with the skills and credentials necessary to secure and advance in career pathways, and enable employers to identify and hire skilled workers and grow their businesses. (Page 473)
• Sector strategies: aligning workforce and education programs with sector needs; the success of these efforts will depend on the depth of industry engagement.
• Career pathways: enabling progressive skills development through education and training programs, using multiple entry and exit points, so that each level of skills development increases the likelihood of success in the labor market; these pathways should be flexibly designed and include, where necessary, remedial programming, so as to allow those with basic skills deficiencies an ability to participate
• Regional partnerships: building partnerships between industry leaders, workforce professionals, education and training providers, and economic development leaders to support regional economic growth; the success of these efforts will depend on the depth of industry engagement
• “earn and learn”—using training and education practices that combine applied learning opportunities with compensation; the success of earn and learn programs depends on sustained employer engagement, and where appropriate, the involvement of organized labor, especially as this pertains to the development of partnerships with labor–management apprenticeship and pre–apprenticeship programs
• Supportive services: providing ancillary services like childcare, transportation, and counseling to facilitate program completion
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and services to meet client needs
• Creating cross–system data capacity, including diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and performance data to assess the value of investments (Page 476)
Local Boards (Title I) working together regionally will work alongside CTE faculty and Deans from the community colleges, representatives from the CCCCO’s WEDD program, representatives from K–12 CTE programs, state–funded Adult Education Block Grant consortia, and federally funded Title II providers to convene and engage employers, especially the representatives of leading and emergent industry sectors to do the following:
• Assess industry workforce needs
• Determine whether existing training and education programs in the region are producing what industry needs
• Identify existing career pathway programs that meet leading and emergent industry sector needs
• Recommend any necessary adjustments to facilitate the development and validation of career pathway programs to meet industry needs
• broker regional partnerships to move students and workers through relevant pathway programs that result in the attainment of industry recognized degrees or credentials, including individuals with barriers to employment
Local Boards may play the role of convener, broker, and matchmaker in regional efforts, bringing together the regional partners, but need not do so where other regional workforce and education champions step forward to play this role. (Page 481)
Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in–demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post–secondary education.
 Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).
DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal law, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K–12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners. (Page 482)
DOR Priority -- Physical, programmatic and electronic access for youth with disabilities including the following:
Access to One-Stop career services and WIOA Title 1 Youth program (WIOA Strategies: Integrated Service Delivery and Braided Resources, Providing Supportive Services) (Planning Guidance Tier: Required)
Vehicle: One-Stop MOU and certification requirements, Local Planning Guidance.
Access to training and education programs, including career pathways, internships, apprenticeships (WIOA Strategies: Career Pathways, Earn and Learn)(Planning Guidance Tier: Required)
Vehicle: DOR staff working locally and regionally with Local Board staff and training and education providers to increase co-enrollment opportunities of DOR consumers with local training and education providers based on alignment of needs, desires, capacities.
DOR outreach to youth with disabilities through AJCCs and cross training of DOR staff on other services to be provided through AJCCs (Planning Guidance Tier: Required)
Vehicle: One-Stop MOU and certification requirements, Local Planning Guidance; additionally DOR and CWDB will ensure cross-training of frontline staff in the AJCCs; finally, the DOR will provide the Local Boards linkages to DOR’s youth programs. (Page 527)
Regional level include a DOR representative to help make employers aware of incentives and strategies for the hiring of individuals with disabilities.
Participation in Employer Engagement efforts at the state level (WIOA Strategy Sector Strategies).
Vehicle: facilitated access to employers engaged in statewide sector strategies initiatives
Information on Sector Strategies, Career Pathways, Labor Market Information (WIOA Strategy Sector Strategies, Career Pathways)
Vehicle: CWDB will ensure that DOR has access to and participation in the regional WIOA plans and programs which detail targeted sectors, prioritized career pathways, and regional labor market analyses. This will include consideration for individuals and youth with disabilities. (Page 528)
 

Employer Engagement

~~The CDOR actively coordinates with the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program. Ticket to Work is a voluntary work incentive program for Social Security Disability Insurance or Supplemental Security Income beneficiaries between the ages of 18 and 64 who are interested in going to work. The Ticket to Work Program provides beneficiaries with access to VR, training, and placement services, as well as other services and support. Beneficiaries can use their ticket to obtain employment services and support from CDOR or they can take their ticket to an approved service provider called an Employment Network. A ticket cannot be assigned to an Employment Network and in-use with CDOR at the same time.
The CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners and VR Counselors have an active role in the Ticket to Work program. CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners verify ticket status, provide information as needed, and facilitate referrals to Employment Networks at case closure. VR counselors distribute CDOR’s Ticket to Work fact sheet at intake, verify the ticket status prior to approving the Individualized Plan for Employment, and facilitate sequential services. (Page 346)
 

511

~~• Continue coordination and collaboration with the California Department of Education and the California Department of Developmental Services as outlined in the Blueprint to prepare and support all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment.
• Promote collaboration at the local level and develop local partnership agreements between CDOR Districts, local education agencies, and the California Department of Developmental Services-funded local regional centers that address competitive integrated employment.
• Improve data collection and sharing between CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services.
• Hold stakeholder meetings and forums to communicate information on achieving competitive integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
• Amend the current Interagency Agreements between CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services to include an emphasis on competitive integrated employment and local linkages, as referenced in the Blueprint.
• Consistent with WIOA Section 511, the new VRSD teams will support competitive integrated employment consistent with WIOA and will provide additional career counseling services. The career counseling services will be delivered in a manner that facilitates independent decision making and informed choice as the individual with a disability makes decisions regarding employment and career advancement activities. (Page 390)
Through the use of baseline data and the semi–annual statistic adjustment model, the state plans to update performance accountability measures to assess the effectiveness of serving those with barriers to employment, as well as WIOA and state level policy objectives and the level of services coordinated and identified in the strategic plan.
The State Board will convene core program partners and those strategic partners with whom performance outcomes are aligned to discuss, where appropriate, how the state will negotiate goals with federal agencies and local areas.
In consultation with strategic partners and local areas, the State Board will emphasize the skills attainment measure across programs because greater skill attainment leads to higher median earnings, greater percentages of employed participants, and helps the state reach the goal of one million middle–skill industry recognized credentials over the next ten years.
To help facilitate reliable and valid data for the assessment of programs and ability to serve individuals with barriers, the State Board will work with core program partners to identify strategies for robust data collection in all federally mandated reports, as well as additional measures identified by the state. (Page 471)
 

Mental Health

~~ACCESS FOR THE DISABLED
The state has existing policy guidance, which it will soon be updating and reissuing, regarding individuals with disabilities having equal access to services and information funded by WIOA Title I programs and partner agencies:
• Workforce Services Directives WSD10-1 and WSD10-2 - Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Procedures and Biennial LWIA Self-Assessment, respectively, communicate the requirements regarding compliance with state and federal disability laws and procedures for ensuring accessible physical environments for all customers, including individuals with disabilities.
In support of these policies, the State Board is an active member of DOR’s State Rehabilitation Counsel and the DOR represents individuals with disabilities on Local Boards. EDD maintains a Disability Policy Employment and Collaboration Unit (DPEC), whose primary objective is to develop both WIOA-required and discretionary partnerships to facilitate employment for individuals with disabilities. (Page 247)
The State Board is committed to ensuring individuals with disabilities have physical and programmatic access to the AJCC system and services. The State Board, in consultation with chief elected officials and Local Boards, will establish objective criteria and procedures to evaluate the AJCCs and delivery system for effectiveness. The evaluation will include how well the local job centers ensure equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities to participate in or benefit from AJCC services. The evaluation must also include criteria evaluating how well the centers and local delivery systems take actions to comply with the disability-related regulations implementing WIOA section 188, set forth in 29 CFR part 37. (Page 248)
AJCC Accessibility Certification
The State Board is committed to ensuring individuals with disabilities have physical and programmatic access to the AJCC system and services. The State Board, in consultation with chief elected officials and Local Boards, will establish objective criteria and procedures to evaluate the AJCCs and delivery system for effectiveness. The evaluation will include how well the local job centers ensure equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities to participate in or benefit from AJCC services. The evaluation must also include criteria evaluating how well the centers and local delivery systems take actions to comply with the disability-related regulations implementing WIOA section 188, set forth in 29 CFR part 37. (Page 519)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 11 - 20 of 96

Home and Community-Based Alternatives (HCBA) Waiver Solicitation for Application (SFA) - 12/04/2017

~~“The Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) has released the Solicitation for Application (SFA) included below, to invite eligible organizations to apply to become HCBA Waiver ‘“Waiver Agencies.’”  Applicants selected to become Contracted Waiver Agencies will receive funding to perform waiver administrative functions within a defined service area and to provide Comprehensive Care Management services to Waiver participants.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Program (SEP) Forms - 11/03/2017

~~This page has links to “forms are provided for use by DOR and service providers for Supported Employment (SE), Transitional Employment, and general (non-SE) job coaching.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

AB-1111 Removing Barriers to Employment Act: Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative - 10/15/2017

~~“Existing law, the California Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, establishes the California Workforce Development Board as the body responsible for assisting the Governor in the development, oversight, and continuous improvement of California’s workforce investment system and the alignment of the education and workforce investment systems to the needs of the 21st century economy and workforce. That act requires the establishment of a local workforce development board in each local workforce development area of the state to, among other things, carry out analyses of the economic conditions in the local region.

This bill would enact the Removing Barriers to Employment Act, which would establish the Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative administered by the California Workforce Development Board. The bill would specify that the purpose of the initiative is to create a grant program to provide individuals with barriers to employment the services they need to enter, participate in, and complete broader workforce preparation, training, and education programs aligned with regional labor market needs. The bill would specify that people completing these programs should have the skills and competencies to successfully enter the labor market, retain employment, and earn wages that lead to self-sufficiency and economic security. The bill would require the board to develop criteria for the selection of grant recipients, as specified. The bill also would specify the criteria by which grants are required to be evaluated, the populations that are eligible to be served by grants, and the activities eligible for grant funding.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

AB-1607 An act to amend Sections 4688.21 and 4850.3 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, Rrelating to Developmental Sservices. - 09/19/2017

~~“Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Existing law establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities….

This bill would authorize a consumer in a supported employment program or work activity program who has the stated goal of integrated competitive employment in his or her IPP to request to use tailored day services in conjunction with his or her existing program to achieve that goal, if specified criteria are met, including that the type, amount, and provider of tailored day service allowed under these provisions is determined through the IPP process. The bill would specify the maximum hours of tailored day services that may be authorized in conjunction with existing services under these provisions.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

California HCBS Transition Plan - 09/01/2017

The California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) has developed a Statewide Transition Plan (STP) submitted to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) on August 14, 2015.  The STP describes how the State will come into compliance with new Federal Home and Community-Based (HCB) setting requirements that became effective March 17, 2014.  These regulations are CMS 2249-F and CMS 2296-F, which affect 1915(c) and 1915(i) HCB services waivers and State Plan programs.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Employment First Policy” - 07/19/2017

~~“Resources and guidelines for educators, parents, and agencies that will assist transition age youth develop postsecondary goals that lead to competitive, integrated employment (CIE).” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Workability Transition Program - 07/03/2017

~~• “The WAI program offers students with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) the opportunity to complete their secondary education while also obtaining marketable job skills. WAI provides secondary students with an understanding of job seeking and job keeping skills. The employability of students improves through occupational class training and on-the-job subsidized or unsubsidized work experience.• • The WAI program seeks employers in the business community who will give students with special needs a chance to prove themselves in a competitive integrated employment setting. Local program sites successfully coordinate state and local service providers to offer comprehensive services tailored to local economic, social, and geographic needs and abilities.• • Two year follow-along support services provided by local program staff greatly increase the potential for student employment success.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Assembly Bill No. 107 CHAPTER 18 - 06/27/2017

~~“Existing law requires the regional center contracts described above to include, among other things, annual performance objectives, as specified. Existing law also establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities.

This bill would require the annual performance objectives included in regional center contracts to measure progress, and report outcomes, in implementing the Employment First Policy, as specified.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“$2 million to assist Californians with disabilities in job searches” - 06/19/2017

~~“People with disabilities in 13 counties will get additional help in landing employment with $2 million in grants announced by the California Employment Development Department today. The Disability Employment Accelerator grants assist people with disabilities obtain skills needed for employment in growing industries such as advanced manufacturing, clean energy, transportation, and healthcare.The disability employment assistance funds will help prepare job seekers with skills and training needed for careers and then connect them with hiring businesses. The organizations receiving the grants will use “earn-and-learn” strategies that empower people with disabilities to earn incomes while they learn new skills that will help them progress into high-growth industries” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Disability Employment Accelerator PY 2016-17“AWARD LIST AND PROJECT SUMMARIES” - 06/19/2017

~~“On June 19, 2017, $2 million of WIOA, Governor’s Discretionary 15 percent funds were awarded to seven workforce development agencies under the Disability Employment Accelerator (DEA) for Program Year (PY) 2016-17 Solicitation for Proposals. Awardee project list and project summaries are listed below. Funding decisions are final.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

The Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (AB 1041) - 10/09/2013

“The Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act authorizes the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide support and services to individuals with developmental disabilities.”   “This bill would define competitive employment, microenterprises, and self-employment for these purposes. The bill would additionally require the Employment First Committee to identify existing sources of consumer data that can be matched with employment data, as specified, and to recommend goals for measuring employment participation and outcomes for various consumers within the developmental services system. … This bill would require each regional center planning team, when developing an individual program plan for a transition age youth or working age adult, to consider a specified Employment First Policy.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

2008 California Legislative Session - 01/01/2009

This is a report on the changes made to AB 5, AB 1183, SB 1175, and SB 1774 and their impact on services for people with developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Cal. Welfare and Institutions Code §4646.5

Addresses the requirements behind creating an individual program plan for a transition age youth or working age adult with developmental disabilities.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Cal. Welfare and Institutions Code §§4868 et seq.

Establishes an Employment First Committee under the authority of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. It pledges to “make services and supports available to enable persons with developmental disabilities to approximate the pattern of everyday living available to people without disabilities of the same age, to support the integration of persons with developmental disabilities into the mainstream life of the community, and to bring about more independent, productive, and normal lives for the persons served, it is the policy of the state that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment shall be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities. This policy shall be known as the Employment First Policy.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

California Executive Order S-4-05 - 11/28/2005

“ …WHEREAS, State Government has an opportunity and a responsibility to lead by example, ensuring individuals with disabilities have an open door to the many opportunities in public service;… NOW, THEREFORE, I, ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor of the State of California do hereby issue this order to become effective immediately: 1. All state agencies, departments, boards and commissions shall utilize best efforts with respect to recruitment, hiring, advancement, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment and issue clear, written directives to their managers and supervisors prohibiting discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. 2. Each state agency shall comply with existing law and annually review its hiring practices to identify any barriers to employment of individuals with disabilities, and, in consultation with their disability advisory committee, take appropriate action to eliminate any non job-related barriers to the integration of individuals with disabilities into the workforce. 3. All state agencies, departments, boards, and commissions shall utilize the Limited Examination and Appointment Program (LEAP) lists in filling vacancies. LEAP lists provide a ready pool of qualified candidates, who happen to have a disability, for a variety of jobs. 4. The State Personnel Board shall provide statewide leadership, in partnership with the Department of Rehabilitation, to coordinate and provide technical guidance to fulfill the intent of this executive order…”

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 20 of 37

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Disability Employment Accelerator PY 2016-17“AWARD LIST AND PROJECT SUMMARIES” - 06/19/2017

~~“On June 19, 2017, $2 million of WIOA, Governor’s Discretionary 15 percent funds were awarded to seven workforce development agencies under the Disability Employment Accelerator (DEA) for Program Year (PY) 2016-17 Solicitation for Proposals. Awardee project list and project summaries are listed below. Funding decisions are final.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

2017-18 State Budget Briefing - 06/15/2017

~~“Employment First Policies for Individual with Disabilities:  Adopts trailer bill language that requires that performance objectives included in regional center contracts measure progress and outcomes in implementing the Employment First policy.  Updates the rate paid for vouchered community-based training services and specified supportive employment services to $14.99 per hour and $36.57 per hour, respectively, to reflect the rate increases provided in 2016 enacted legislation, Assembly Bill X2 1 (Thurmond), Chapter 3, Statutes of 2016”.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

California Department of Developmental Services “2014-2015 Annual Report Employment and Day Programs” - 05/17/2017

~~“This report summarizes economic and employment outcomes for DDS consumers with ID/DD.  Consumer information is used to develop program evaluation processes, project growth in costs, and develop future outcome-based program changes. Age group reports, such as a report showing data for 22-31 year olds, provide a look at how education is preparing young adults who are transitioning from school to work and day programs.

The DDS Employment and Day Program Annual Report includes community caseloads, age of individuals served by DDS, purchase of service (POS) dollars expended by service type, percentage of consumers employed by year, statewide counts of persons receiving services, per person costs, and percentage of consumers staying in the same service type year to year. The report includes data aggregated by the following services and/or categories:• Supported Employment Program (SEP) Individual• SEP Group• Work Activity Programs (WAP)• Day Programs• Look Alike Day Programs• Combination of two or more programs• Not In Day Programs or Work Programs”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

WIOA Local Workforce Plan 2017-2020 - 05/10/2017

~~“The City of Los Angeles Workforce Development Board’s Local Plan outlines the vision of its workforce development system to prepare and place individuals into self-sufficient employment, focuses on career pathway employment opportunities, and emphasizes strategies for system collaboration. The three pillars of the Local Plan are: improving the skills (up-skilling) of the workforce; employer engagement focused on sectors; and system building through collaboration. The strategies include:• Focusing on education and training for all job seekers (adults, youth, dislocated and incumbent) by emphasizing credentials and high school graduation attainment.• Engaging employers and industry groups to develop strong sector pathways to address the evolving demands of the economy and the required workplace skills.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

State Council on Developmental Disabilities. (2015). Employment First Committee annual report. - 04/28/2017

~~• ‘Since the national recession, California’s economy has strengthened, especially over the last few years. However, many people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) are not benefiting from one of the strongest economies in the world. However, there is some good news. There are major policy changes underway designed to improve employment for people with I/DD. Well-meaning practices have typically placed people into segregated settings, often receiving subminimum wages.• • These programs are often leave participants less prepared to enter traditional employment than if they had never participated in the program.• • California’s Employment First Policy paired with local projects and national efforts, like the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and changes in the Home and Community Based Services waiver program, should begin to improve employment for people with I/DD.” 

Systems
  • Other

“Youth And Subminimum Wage Employment” - 02/16/2017

~~“The foundation of the Vocational Rehabilitation program is the principle that individuals with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities, are capable of achieving high quality Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) when provided the necessary services and supports. The passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) ensures all individuals with disabilities are provided the necessary services and supports to achieve CIE. This is especially true for youth 24 years of age or younger, as the WIOA emphasizes that youth with disabilities have meaningful opportunities to receive the services they need to achieve employment outcomes in CIE.

The WIOA further reinforces the congressional intent that CIE is the preferred employment outcome by placing limitations on the use of subminimum wage (SMW), especially for youth. The limitations include prescriptive timelines for the transmission of documentation from the school to the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR). The DOR requires that any youth seeking SMW employment is provided mandatory services and documentation prior to working at SMW. Mandatory services include multiple opportunities to discuss and explore CIE in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

“For Employers” on 14(c) subminimum wages - 01/25/2017

~~“Section 511 prohibits employers from paying a subminimum wage to individuals with disabilities unless each individual is provided career counseling and information and referral services (CC&IR) at required intervals. Employers must also provide the individual with information about self-advocacy, self-determination, and peer mentoring training opportunities in the community. WIOA also requires 14(c) certificate holders to maintain documentation that individuals employed at subminimum wage prior to July 22, 2016, receive CC&IR services at least once by July 22, 2017, and annually thereafter. For individuals hired at subminimum wage on or after July 22, 2016, CC&IR services must be provided every six months for the first year of employment and annually thereafter.

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) is available to provide federally required CC&IR services for your employees receiving subminimum wage. Included in the career counseling, employees will learn about federal and state programs and local resources that offer employment-related services and supports designed to enable the individual to explore, experience, and attain competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

“Secondary Transition Planning” - 01/01/2017

~~• “This Web page offers resources and guidelines for assisting educators, parents, and agency partners to improve compliance with state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to transition age youth and improve post-high school outcomes. These resources supplement the California Transition Alliance’s document, Transition Planning: The Basics. Resources are organized into five categories: Employment, Education and Training, Independent Living, Compliance, and the Guideposts for Success document.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017-2021 State Plan - 08/04/2016

~~“Goal 2: Employment Californians with I/DD and their families reflecting the diversity of the state will have increased information to obtain competitive, integrated employment. 1. The Council will increase and promote culturally competent strategies and resources that facilitate competitive, integrated employment (CIE) of people with I/DD. 2. The Council, in consultation with its federal partners, will increase identification, advocacy and/or sponsorship of legislative, regulatory, policy, procedure and/or practice changes to increase CIE for people with I/DD.”

Systems
  • Other

California Department of Developmental Services “Supported Employment Program – Individual Forms” - 07/20/2016

These forms are to be used by work service (formerly Habilitation) providers and regional centers to process This page has links to forms for the Supported Employment Program both for individuals and groups, Work Services information, and Vocational Rehabilitation for such things as service plans, monthly reports, referrals, program changes The Excel forms can be downloaded and completed using the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet program. The PDF instructions can be downloaded and printed using the free Adobe Acrobat Reader. For further information, please read the instructions accompanying each form.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

“Local Partnership Agreement Template" - 06/17/2017

~~“The California Department of Education (CDE), the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), and the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) seek to foster an environment of collaboration to increase competitive integrated employment (CIE) opportunities for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

Competitive Integrated Employment is described in plain language by the motto: “Real Work for Real Pay in the Real World.” The term means working for pay (at least minimum wage) in the community alongside people without disabilities. Work can be full-time (up to 40 hours per week) or part-time with the same level of benefits and opportunities for advancement as other employees.

The CIE Blueprint outlines the collaborative efforts between the three departments on a statewide level. A Local Partnership Agreement (LPA) identifies the ways in which partners will work together on a local level. Each agreement is built around the core partners of one or more local educational agencies (LEA), one or more DOR district, and one or more regional centers, and can include any number of additional local community partners.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego-Imperial Counties Developmental Services, Inc. "Employment First" - 05/10/2016

~~California’s Employment First Policy was signed into law in October of 2013, by Governor Brown.dds.ca.govCompetitive employment is finding a job within the community where you are paid about the same as other people doing the same job and at least minimum wage. It could also be working for yourself in your own small business.Information about the Employment First Policy can be found on the website of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities (scdd.ca.gov) as well as the Department of Developmental Services (dds.ca.gov).Employment & Your Individual Program Plan (IPP)When you plan with your service coordinator around employment opportunities, the first option that will be considered is competitive integrated employment. Competitive work is a real choice. Your service coordinator can help you find resources in the community to support your employment goals.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

CA Employment First Memorandum of Understanding - 12/12/2014

This project will use a multi-faceted approach to apply key elements from high performing states in integrated competitive employment and principles of Collaborative Leadership. A unified value, vision, and expectation for competitive integrated employment will be established and will serve as the basis for the strategies used for stimulating policy to practice, training, technical assistance, and a shared method for monitoring progress through available state and local employment data.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Employment First Committee Annual Report (Partnerships) - 01/16/2013

The Council participates in the Alliance for Full Participation California team. The AFP is a collaboration of major national organizations (including the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities) serving or advocating for improved employment outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The California team is facilitated by the Arc of California. The Council has also started coordinating with the California Committee for the Employment of People with Disabilities, established by statute to promote the employment of people with disabilities. Additionally, members of the Employment First Committee continue to actively work with key groups throughout the state to promote Employment First. 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego Workforce Partnership: Policy and Systemic Influence - 07/02/2007

Project Overview: Grant number, name and location: Customized Employment - 01, San Diego, CA, E-9-4-1-0081 Grant recipient: San Diego Workforce Partnership, Inc. Project Lead: San Diego Workforce Partnership, Inc.

Subcontractors: Five One-Stop Centers; Access Center (an assistive technology technical assistance resource center); and the University Center on Excellence on Disabilities (UCED) at San Diego University.

  Early on, the grantee subcontracted most of its activities to Community Service Providers (Goodwill and Able/Disabled primarily), but radically changed its structure after two years to internalize the activities of the grant in its own system.   Key Lessons/Accomplishments Workforce Investment Board (WIB) and WIB administrative agencies are key players in workforce policy issues, if they choose to take a strong role Performance measures are a manageable challenge when treated constructively by the WIB Lack of experience is a key barrier to customized business-outreach efforts Grant structure (and overuse of subcontractors) severely hinders the capacity for systems and policy change.
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

The California Employment Consortium for Youth and Young Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (CECY)

~~“(CECY) is a collaboration of 23 state agencies, centers, and organizations, families, and self-advocates with responsibilities for the education, rehabilitation, employment, and support of youth with disabilities.  CECY is a five-year (2011-2016) Project of National Significance Partnerships in Employment Systems Change grant (#90DN0284) by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD).  The Tarjan Center at UCLA, a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, provides its administrative leadership. “
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

Transition2Life Project (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

“The Transition2Life Project will provide direct, hands-on training and learning opportunities focusing on effective transitions to inclusive adult lives for young adults with developmental disabilities living in Amador, Calaveras, and Tuolumne counties.” 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

The goal of this project is to implement a “Get a Competitive Edge” Work Safe & Self-Advocacy program for consumers and employees with disabilities as part of The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Progressive Employment Concepts (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

 “This project will provide hands on training to staff and clients in the discovery and customized employment process leading to a customized employment outcome for a minimum of two individuals. This project will allow Progressive Employment Concepts to gain the tools needed to have continued success in finding jobs for the individuals we serve, especially those with higher support needs.” Awarded in  Sacramento and Placer Counties.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

California Readiness Of Minors in Supplemental Security Income (CaPROMISE) Initiative

“The PROMISE initiative is intended to improve the provision and coordination of services for child SSI recipients and their families. The services help child recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these child SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CA State Council on Developmental Disabilities Employment First Committee Annual Report

The second annual report of the Employment First Committee (EFC) of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities includes: priorities adopted by the State Council as recommended by the EFC; second-year work of the EFC, interagency activities, and policy activities; the current status of the employment of individuals with developmental disabilities; and next steps for the EFC.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

California Ticket to Work/Work Incentives Program

Ticket to Work (TTW) is a voluntary work incentive program for Social Security Administration’s (SSA) Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries who are between the ages of 18 and 64 and interested in going to work. The goal of the TTW Program is to assist beneficiaries in obtaining employment and working toward becoming self-sufficient.   Work Incentives are SSA rules that make it possible for people with disabilities receiving SSDI and SSI to explore work options and reach their work goals without losing their benefits prematurely. Social Security Work Incentives help beneficiaries remove barriers to work by offering support services and providing a safety net to assist beneficiaries in finding meaningful employment and succeeding in the workplace.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California Employment Consortium for Youth

“California Employment Consortium for Youth: California was awarded a federal 5-year employment systems change grant by The Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to increase the number of youth and young adults with intellectual disabilities in integrated competitive employment (ICE). The State Council is a lead agency along with the Departments of Rehabilitation, Developmental Services and Education. The California Employment Consortium for Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (CECY) is a 30 member highly knowledgeable and experienced employment work group comprised of the aforementioned lead state agencies, Youth Self-Advocates, Disability Rights California, the Family Resource Center Network of California, the Association of Regional Center Agencies, California Committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities, Community of Practice-Secondary Transition, UCLA Anderson School of Management, and the Tarjan Center UCEDD.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and Supplement for the Supported Employment Services Program State Plan Program Years 2018 – 2020 - 02/11/2018

~~“Priority 3: Capacity Building

Goal: Establish or enhance partnerships to increase the capacity of CDOR and the WIOA core program partners to improve service delivery for adults and youth with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

“$2 million to assist Californians with disabilities in job searches” - 06/19/2017

~~“People with disabilities in 13 counties will get additional help in landing employment with $2 million in grants announced by the California Employment Development Department today. The Disability Employment Accelerator grants assist people with disabilities obtain skills needed for employment in growing industries such as advanced manufacturing, clean energy, transportation, and healthcare.The disability employment assistance funds will help prepare job seekers with skills and training needed for careers and then connect them with hiring businesses. The organizations receiving the grants will use “earn-and-learn” strategies that empower people with disabilities to earn incomes while they learn new skills that will help them progress into high-growth industries” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

“Workforce Development: What's in it For You” - 05/10/2017

~~“Workforce Development (WDS), "What's in it for Your Business?" is a Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) employer outreach program designed to build collaborative partnerships that create staffing solutions for California businesses. The Workforce Development Section (WDS) develops and coordinates linkages with the business community in order to increase meaningful employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD) - 03/12/2017

~~“The California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD) was established to advance the employment of people with disabilities in the state. The primary function of the CCEPD is to consult with and advise the Secretary of the Labor and Workforce Development Agency and the Secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency on all issues related to full inclusion in the workforce of persons with disabilities, in order to:1. Bring individuals with disabilities into gainful employment at a rate that is as close as possible to that of the general population.2. Support the goals of equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for these individuals.3. Ensure that state government is a model employer of individuals with disabilities.4. Support state coordination with, and participation in, benefits planning training and information dissemination projects supported by private foundations and federal grants.

The CCEPD supports an annual event for youth with disabilities. In September of 2015, the CCEPD voted to adopt the California Youth Leadership Forum for Students with Disabilities (YLF) as the youth event for the years 2016-2018.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

CA Employment First: Braiding Day and Employment Services to Build Meaningful Lives - 04/09/2015

This Employment First training presentation focuses on different approaches to promoting Employment First and encouraging integrated, community-based employment opportunities for people with disabilities. Some of the strategies include using Discovery and customized employment with Medicaid waiver day services participants through a braided funding approach including Vocational Rehabilitation. This presentation also provides a number of example case studies.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

The California DEI: Effective Practices in Building an Inclusive Workforce

This presentation summarizes California’s experience with the DEI grant as of 2015. It addresses the history of DEI in the state, the objectives, the strategic service delivery components, the promising practices and the hopes for sustainability after the grant.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

California Customized Employment for Service Members, Veterans & Their Families

This web page discusses Customized Employment as a “Promising Practice for Supporting Employees with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and/or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD),” particularly in the context of US Service Members and Veterans.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

Employment First Committee Annual Report

The Community of Practice (COP) is located within the Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and was formed and funded by the DOE to help improve transition and employment outcomes. This is a voluntary group of educational professionals.   The COP seeks to ensure the seamless transition of services for  youth, ages 16 –22, which will lead to positive post-school outcomes. They carry out their work through a statewide community of practice and a statewide list serve,which disseminates compliance information, resources and evidence-based practices and statewide technical assistance through webinars and conference calls.  Their key goal, with respect to employment ,is integrated ,competitive employment in any area of interest for each individual youth, ages 16-22.  
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California Training Initiatives

“Association of Regional Center Agencies – New day Conference. ARCA sponsored the New Day Conference in Pasadena in September 2012. Over 400 attendees participated in sessions focused on innovations in employment and housing services for individuals with developmental disabilities.” “Four- part employment webinar series aimed to create awareness about employment and to provide a discussion forum for families, individual organizations and professionals.” “Working Conference - Driving Forces Behind Successful Postsecondary Education and Employment for Young Adults with ID and Autism held in Sacramento, CA and sponsored by Think College and California Consortium on Postsecondary Educations and the Center for Disability Studies, University of Hawaii. The conference content addressed significant changes in public policy, insight for promoting inclusive strategies through person-centered protocol and interagency team building to support youth success. … Over 100 families, K-12, rehabilitation, developmental disabilities and higher education professionals, and students with developmental disabilities attended.” “Three-Part webinar series in Triangulating Postsecondary Education Goals for transition specialists and educators. The series aims at identifying postsecondary goals and aligning them with academic and industry standards. This webinar series was hosted by Community of Practice in Secondary Education (CoP).”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

California Community Transitions (CCT) (Money Follows the Person)

“In January 2007, the California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) was awarded special federal grant number 1LICMS30149 to implement a Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration, “California Community Transitions” (CCT). CCT demonstration services are available through September 30, 2016.   “Lead Organizations employ or contract with transition coordinators who work directly with willing and eligible individuals, support networks, and providers to facilitate and monitor their transition from facilities to community settings. Eligible individuals of all ages with physical and mental disabilities have an opportunity to participate in CCT.”    
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California for Community First Choice

On December 1, 2011, the California Department of Health Care Services submitted the first state plan amendment to implement Section 2401 (the Community First Choice Option) of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), providing the provision of medical assistance for home and community-based attendant services including Assistance with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), and health-related tasks, teaching and demonstration for ADLs, IADLs, and other health -related tasks, back-up systems to ensure the continuity of services, and training on the hiring and maintenance of attendants. California has developed a quality assurance plan to monitor the implementation and efficacy of the Community First Choice Option at the county- and state-levels.   .

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The Golden State is a place where you can "Find Yourself" through a rewarding career, including those with disabilities who are ready to live the California Dream.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon California's VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
0.27%
Change from
2015 to 2016
39,250,017
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.28%
Change from
2015 to 2016
2,023,714
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.76%
Change from
2015 to 2016
701,791
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.48%
Change from
2015 to 2016
34.68%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.47%
Change from
2015 to 2016
74.22%

State Data

General

2014 2015 2016
Population. 38,802,500 39,144,818 39,250,017
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 2,010,783 2,017,962 2,023,714
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 669,206 682,393 701,791
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 16,063,918 16,406,161 16,632,184
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.28% 33.82% 34.68%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 72.19% 73.13% 74.22%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.50% 6.20% 5.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.70% 20.50% 20.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.90% 14.80% 13.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,932,270 1,977,622 2,020,143
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 2,118,361 2,119,272 2,186,775
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,705,896 2,726,001 2,749,171
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 329,510 329,300 331,848
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 1,182,279 1,206,749 1,273,677
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 45,379 47,104 47,935
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 418,164 439,378 459,722
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 13,609 15,036 15,006
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 164,216 163,388 178,131
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 373,857 376,687 425,105

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 39,924 41,044 41,719
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.20% 4.40% 4.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 709,509 699,241 682,668

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 17,766 18,061 20,014
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 43,426 44,818 49,907
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 225,908 217,367 221,216
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 7.90% 8.30% 9.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 0.10% 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.30% 0.30% 0.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50% 1.70% 1.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 10.20% 9.60% 11.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 419 516 582
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,079 1,260 1,552
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 5,665 6,282 6,396
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 39,165 35,624 39,862

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 36,836 42,724 46,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,153 2,125 2,373
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,127 1,102 1,176
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00% 0.52% 50.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.94 2.82 3.00

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
26,905
23,327
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 1,572 1,433 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,887 1,777 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 4,666 3,872 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 10,407 9,242 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 6,555 5,189 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,815 1,807 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.60% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 24,121 25,118 24,984
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 1,258,695 1,247,320 1,213,289
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,493 1,257 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $87,718,000 $90,753,000 $92,057,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $57,097,000 $57,360,000 $55,744,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $753,849,000 $806,409,000 $853,743,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 12.00% 12.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 59,661 62,857 66,009
Number of people served in facility based work. 10,242 10,036 9,627
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 N/A 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 25.90 26.00 26.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 56.38% 53.38% 54.07%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 23.60% 22.01% 21.54%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.92% 3.31% 3.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 93.49% 99.41% 99.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 52.33% 50.41% 52.26%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 72.41% 72.38% 75.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.00% 82.17% 83.16%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 20.08% 21.97% 23.20%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 10,193,235
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 12,148
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 123,357
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 4,322,464
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 4,445,821
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 180
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,641
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,821
AbilityOne wages (products). $583,952
AbilityOne wages (services). $61,505,189

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 13 7 3
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 41 36 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 135 89 109
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 8 5 6
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 197 137 119
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 27 40 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 3,288 2,927 35
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 22,639 13,278 17,727
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 744 486 488
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 26,698 16,731 18,280

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~The DPEC works with the State Board, Independent Living Centers, AJCCs, DOR, Department of Developmental Services (DDS), and many other public and private stakeholders to improve employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The DPEC also encourages and assists stakeholders to train staff on disability awareness and effective service delivery. Some of the partnerships and activities supported by the DPEC include: Employment First, Youth Employment Opportunity Program, Youth Leadership Forum, Disability Employment Initiative and Disability Employment Accelerator.  (Page 247)
AB 287 (2009) established the Employment First Policy, which led to a standing Employment First Committee formed by the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. The bill expands employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and identifies best practices and incentives for increasing integrated employment and gainful employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Employment First policy requires Regional Centers to develop Individual Program Plans to ensure individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities beginning at age 14 are provided options, competitive integrated employment, and post-secondary education to enable the consumer to transition from school to work. CDOR is an active participant in the Employment First Committee to help with transition planning. (Page 355)
Attend California Model Employer Initiative meetings in order to increase the number of individuals with disabilities in state employment; identify and implement improvements in furtherance of the state’s “Employment First” policy to gain integrated competitive wages for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities; increase jobs-driven employment and consumer self-sufficiency for consumers who are job ready through work incentives planning; establish new partnerships with employers through the National Employment Team; maximize the use of Talent Acquisition Portal, an online system which includes both a national talent pool of VR candidates looking for employment and a job posting system for businesses looking to hire individuals with disabilities, to link job ready consumers with employers; and, enhancement of staff training curriculums to include the use of social media strategies and the electronic job application process. These efforts are expected to contribute towards passing the performance indicators in FFY 2016. (Page 393)
 

Customized Employment

~~• The CDOR’s Community Resources Development Section continues to conduct comprehensive certification and site reviews of CRPs. The focus of the review process is maximizing employment outcomes for CDOR consumers.
• Efforts are taking place to update the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on Pre-Employment Transition Services and Customized Employment WIOA services.
• In early 2014, a proof of concept titled “Placement Plus” was administered in select CRPs to test a new employment services fee for service structure. The lessons learned and evaluation of the Placement Plus is informing CDOR’s current efforts to redesign employment services statewide. (Page 353)
• Conduct focus groups to solicit feedback about what the partners think is needed to enhance services for people with disabilities.
• Develop a CDOR referral form and referral process for the America’s Job Centers of California.
• Provide training to local America’s Job Center of California staff on topics such as: CDOR services; eligibility; job placement; case management; benefits counseling; job readiness and soft skills; disability awareness and etiquette; hiring persons with disabilities; disability disclosures; competitive integrated employment; customized employment; assistive technology; and, reasonable accommodation.
• Provide tools and resources to the WIOA core programs serving individuals with disabilities such as accommodations for individuals who are blind and visually impaired or deaf and hard of hearing.
• Identify the single point of contact for all local WIOA core program partners. (Page388)
• Efforts are taking place to update the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on Pre-Employment Transition Services and Customized Employment WIOA services.
• In early 2014, a proof of concept titled “Placement Plus” was administered in select CRPs to test a new employment services fee for service structure. The lessons learned and evaluation of the Placement Plus is informing CDOR’s current efforts to redesign employment services statewide. (Page 353)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Strengths: Local Boards have a lot of experience braiding resources and integrating service delivery through the One–Stop system. Local Boards have deep connections to their local communities, and are gaining greater experience working through state and local led regional initiatives, including sector and career pathway strategies as well as initiatives to provide services to target populations. (Page 43)
• Creating cross–system data capacity: using diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and also, the use performance data to assess the value of those investments.
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. (Page 65)
The seven policy strategies emphasized in this State Plan—sector strategies, career pathways, “earn and learn”, organizing regionally, providing supportive services, building cross-system data capacity, and braiding resources and integrating services— are evidence-based and have been shown to work, helping ensure effective delivery of services, and increasing the likelihood that those who receive services obtain gainful employment. ( Page 74)
Integrating service delivery and braiding resources are ways that workforce and education programs can achieve program alignment and assure access to the broad array of services funded across the state’s workforce and education programs. In California, resources will be braided and services integrated and aligned through the creation of “value-dded “partnerships at the state, regional, and local levels.
A value-added partnership is one in which all partners gain from the partnership. Ideally, “gains to exchange” occur and partners transact with one another on the basis of specialization, providing services consistent with each programs’ core competencies. Partners thereby leverage one another’s expertise, building a proverbial “sum that is greater than its parts.” (Page 82)
Creating cross–system data capacity: using diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and also, the use performance data to assess the value of those investments.
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs.  (Page 84)
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and services to meet client needs
• Creating cross–system data capacity, including diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and performance data to assess the value of investments (Page 103)
The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD–WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
The State Board has partnered with EDD to create and staff the One–Stop Design workgroup, which brought together state plan partners and other stakeholders to develop a blueprint for service delivery in the state’s AJCCs. Work by this group will inform state policy on integrated service delivery and the braiding of resources at AJCCs, including policy on operations, required partnership, and the articulation of AJCC services with Regional Sector Pathway programs. (More detail on this is provided in chapter 4).  (Page109)
Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One–Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 110)
Additionally, SBE, CDE, CCCCO, and the State Board will work jointly to identify and recommend best practices and model partnerships that encourage program alignment, coordination, integration of services, and braiding of resources beyond the minimum levels required as part of mandatory One–Stop partnership. To this end, the State Board will issue local and regional planning guidance, supported, when appropriate, by policy directives or other appropriate means of communication issued by SBE, CDE, and CCCCO to foster better program alignment between basic education and basic skills programs and other workforce and education programs and services. Recommended relevant best practices may include but are not limited to the following:
• aligning basic skills coursework with career pathways programs and adopting contextualized learning practices that combine basic education and skills coursework with CTE coursework
• braiding resources from WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs with WIOA Title II programs to provide supportive services to those attending basic education and skills programs so as to facilitate both course and program completion; local partnerships may include charter schools focused on serving out of school youth and operating under Education Code Section 47612.1(a)
• ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with, and have access to, relevant job–readiness training and job search and placement services
• ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with and have access to opportunities to enter postsecondary education programs (Pages 113)
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs (Page 115)
CWDA to ensure integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the use of “earn and learn” and other training and employment services for TANF recipients in California. Partnership activities to support these ends have and will include all of the following:
• CWDA, the State Board, EDD, and CDSS staff will work jointly to assess the level of partnership and current compliance with known future regulatory requirements. This information will be used to ensure that all counties and Local Boards are on a path to compliance.
• CWDA, CDSS, and State Board staff will work jointly to identify models of TANF One–Stop partnership that go beyond baseline federal expectations, as well as the purpose of these partnerships, and the manner in which these partnerships elevate service delivery so as to improve client outcomes. The information gleaned from this analysis will be used to inform local and regional planning guidance and will be combined with baseline compliance rules to provide locals information on how to not only comply with baseline federal requirements, but also to develop the programs that best serve client needs.  (Page 118)
The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD–WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
• As part of the state planning process, the State Board has entered into state level agreements with SBE/CDE (Title II Administrator), EDD (Title I Administrator and Title III Administrator and Program Operator), DOR (Title IV Administrator and Program operator), and both CDSS and CWDA (representatives of both state and local TANF agencies) to ensure coordination at the state level so as to ensure compliance with federal requirements pertaining to One–Stop mandatory partnership of TANF programs. (Pages 120, 121, 124, 126, 128)
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs
The ETP will work with regionally organized Local Boards where the sector priorities of RPUs align with the programmatic direction of ETP, identifying opportunities to train incumbent workers in prioritized sectors using, when appropriate, multi–employer contracts to meet the needs of industry.
Training incumbent workers can create opportunities for populations with barriers to employment by opening up entry level and other positions where and when incumbent workers advance into new positions as a result of the training programs funded by ETP.
As noted above, ETP will also partner with DOR to leverage ETP’s incumbent worker training contracts and contacts in the federal contractor community to improve coordination around federal 503 contracting rules. (Pages 135,137)
• By building links between AJCCs and campuses, including but not limited to, pooling resources to place AJCC staff directly on campuses
• By braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs
The ETP will work with regionally organized Local Boards where the sector priorities of RPUs align with the programmatic direction of ETP, identifying opportunities to train incumbent workers in prioritized sectors using, when appropriate, multi–employer contracts to meet the needs of industry. (Page 144,147)
The State Board will issue regional planning guidance that details best practices and model partnerships between the workforce system and the community college system, recommending that Local Boards meet their WIOA Section 106 requirements pertaining to coordinated service delivery strategies and shared administrative costs in ways that lay the foundation for a strong partnership with community college CTE programs. This can be done in a variety of ways, including the following:
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs (Page 154, 156)
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. (Page 438)
Strengths: Local Boards have a lot of experience braiding resources and integrating service delivery through the One-Stop system. Local Boards have deep connections to their local communities, and are gaining greater experience working through state and local led regional (Page 443)
The seven policy strategies emphasized in this State Plan—sector strategies, career pathways, “earn and learn”, organizing regionally, providing supportive services, building cross-system data capacity, and braiding resources and integrating services— are evidence-based and have been shown to work, helping ensure effective delivery of services, and increasing the likelihood that those who receive services obtain gainful employment. (Page 455)
INTEGRATING SERVICES AND BRAIDING RESOURCES
• “earn and learn”—using training and education practices that combine applied learning opportunities with compensation; the success of earn and learn programs depends on sustained employer engagement, and where appropriate, the involvement of organized labor, especially as this pertains to the development of partnerships with labor–management apprenticeship and pre–apprenticeship programs
• creating cross–system data capacity, including diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and performance data to assess the value of investments (Page 476)
The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD-WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
• The State Board has partnered with EDD to create and staff the One-Stop Design workgroup, which brought together state plan partners and other stakeholders to develop a blueprint for service delivery in the state’s AJCCs. Work by this group will inform state policy on integrated service delivery and the braiding of resources at AJCCs, including policy on operations, required partnership, and the articulation of AJCC services with Regional Sector Pathway programs. (More detail on this is provided in chapter 4). (Pages 485, 486, 488, 489, 490)
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs.  (Page 509)
 

DEI/DRC

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~Activities designed to help expand the expertise of adult education providers to adopt distance learning in their instructional strategies is also a priority. To facilitate integrated success among education agencies, the contractor provides an electronic collaborative environment. This includes discussion boards and work groups for the exchange of information about effective program models, teaching techniques, and curriculum. Piloting, implementing, evaluating, and disseminating models for learner–oriented Web sites to encourage students to obtain the knowledge and skills necessary for employment and self–sufficiency are priority objectives. Finally, providing technical assistance, staff training, and program marketing to ensure the optimum usage of communication technology by adult education providers and learners only strengthens distance learning for optimal usage of WIOA funds. (Page 327)
OTAN disseminates information through a multitude of face-to-face and online workshops, conference presentations, and by producing videos that demonstrate teaching with technology and technology integration lesson plans. All videos are archived on OTAN’s website. OTAN recently piloted a Community Model of Online Learning to increase regional access to high-quality online math curriculum for adult learners. The Online Teaching Academy (OTAC) assists instructors in becoming competent online teachers and mentors using Moodle and other instructional technology. It also hosts the Technology Integration Mentor Academy (TIMAC) training, a year-long professional development project where participants to become mentors and increase the effective use of technology in classrooms. The Technology and Distance Learning Symposium rotates each year between north and south geographic locations in the state. (Page 331-332)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~WIOA prioritizes out–of–school youth as demonstrated by the minimum seventy–five percent expenditure requirement, therefore it is imperative for Local Areas to shift their local programs to serve OSY. At the time of enactment, several Local Areas in California were at or near the minimum seventy–five percent OSY expenditure requirement. Local Boards are engaged in strategies to increase their OSY expenditures through partnership and leveraged funding to meet the needs of underserved OSY. The availability of youth program element services such as financial literacy, entrepreneurship, work experience, and follow–up serves as a pivot toward self–sufficiency. (Page 281)
WIOA prioritizes out-of-school youth as demonstrated by the minimum seventy-five percent expenditure requirement, therefore it is imperative for Local Areas to shift their local programs to serve OSY. At the time of enactment, several Local Areas in California were at or near the minimum seventy-five percent OSY expenditure requirement. Local Boards are engaged in strategies to increase their OSY expenditures through partnership and leveraged funding to meet the needs of underserved OSY. The availability of youth program element services such as financial literacy, entrepreneurship, work experience, and follow-up serves as a pivot toward self-sufficiency. (Page 283)
Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination of significant knowledge from research and other sources to designated State unit professionals and paraprofessionals.
The CDOR continues to routinely acquire and disseminate significant VR research, including:
• Newly published research disseminated via CDOR’s Intranet site.
• Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination of significant knowledge from research and other sources to CDOR personnel.
• Topical webinars from VR leaders including the Research Technical Assistance Center, the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities, and the Employment and Training Administration.
 

School to Work Transition

~~3. Regular payments from railroad retirement, strike benefits from union funds, worker’s compensation, and training stipends;
4. Alimony;
5. Military family allotments or other regular support from an absent family member or someone not living in the household;
6. Pensions whether private, government employee (including Military retirement pay);
7. Regular insurance or annuity payments other than Supplemental Security Income disability (SSI) or veterans’ disability;
8. College or university grants, fellowships, and assistantships;
9. Net gambling or lottery winnings;
10. Social Security Disability Insurance payments (SSDI)
• Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) pays benefits to individuals that have worked in the past, paid Social Security taxes, and are currently unable to work for a year or more because of a disability. SSDI is considered income replacement and must be included in family income (All of page 204)
12. Tribal Government Payments (i.e., Per Capita Payments, Lease Payments, Individual Indian Money (IIM);
13. Old age and survivors insurance benefits received under section 202 of the Social Security Act (42 USC 402).
• Old age and survivors insurance benefits include: Social Security Survivor Benefits – these are benefits paid to people up to age 18 who have had a parent die and the parent paid wages into the system; and
• Social Security Retirement Benefits – these are benefits that are paid to people who reached their social security age and have wages paid in the system. (Page 205)
 

Career Pathways

~~WorkAbility I Program
The WorkAbility I program is administered through the California Department of Education. The goal of the WorkAbility I is to provide pre-employment training, employment placement and follow up for high school students in special education who are transitioning from school to work, independent living and postsecondary education or training. (Page 341)
Employment Transition Services:
• Outreach to schools and closer collaboration between VR and Local Education Agency staff that do not currently have a Transition Partnership Programs cooperative arrangement.
• Expand transition services beyond school to work to include school to postsecondary training transitions.
• Provide information about the transition from school to work at an earlier age to students with disabilities.
• Provide benefits education planning and services to students as well as parents and guardians of students with disabilities.
• Provide specialized training and increase awareness for VR staff and service providers on the unique needs of students with disabilities.
In addition, there are a number of methods that CDOR will utilize to ensure the provision of the core Pre-Employment Transition Services to students with disabilities: (Page 350)
• AB 287 (2009) established the Employment First Policy, which led to a standing Employment First Committee formed by the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. The bill expands employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and identifies best practices and incentives for increasing integrated employment and gainful employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Employment First policy requires Regional Centers to develop Individual Program Plans to ensure individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities beginning at age 14 are provided options, competitive integrated employment, and post-secondary education to enable the consumer to transition from school to work. CDOR is an active participant in the Employment First Committee to help with transition planning.
• California Competitive Integrated Employment: Blueprint for Reform for Individuals with Disabilities. In December 2014, CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to further advance the state’s “Employment First” Policy and other federal and state laws to address employment in integrated settings, at competitive wages, for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The goal of the California Competitive Integrated Employment effort is to develop a “blueprint” that will outline plans for:
 Improving collaboration and coordination between the three departments to prepare and support all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment;
 Building capacity to increase opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment to prepare for and participate in the California workforce development system; (Page 355)
For both youth with disabilities and students with disabilities:
• Outreach to schools and closer collaboration between VR and Local Education Agency staff that do not currently have a Transition Partnership Programs cooperative agreement.
• Expand transition services beyond school to work to school to postsecondary training transitions.
• Provide information about the transition from school to work at an earlier age to youth with disabilities and students with disabilities.
• Provide benefits education planning and services to students with disabilities and youth with disabilities as well as parents and guardians of youth with disabilities and students with disabilities.
• Provide specialized training and increase awareness for VR staff and service providers on the unique needs of youth with disabilities and students with disabilities.  (Page 372)
 

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Requirements for regional plans, and will share regional plan content with state partners, including information pertaining to prioritized sectors and career pathways identified in the course of the regional planning process. The sharing of this information will facilitate, as appropriate, engagement with regional efforts by other State Plan partners such as DOR ETP, and CalWORKs.
Local Boards (Title I) working together regionally will work alongside CTE faculty and Deans from the community colleges, representatives from the CCCCO’s WEDD program, representatives from K–12 CTE programs, state–funded Adult Education Block Grant consortia, and federally funded Title II providers to convene and engage employers, especially the representatives of leading and emergent industry sectors to do the following:
• Assess industry workforce needs
• Determine whether existing training and education programs in the region are producing what industry needs
• Identify existing career pathway programs that meet leading and emergent industry sector needs
• Recommend any necessary adjustments to facilitate the development and validation of career pathway programs to meet industry needs
• Broker regional partnerships to move students and workers through relevant pathway programs that result in the attainment of industry recognized degrees or credentials, including individuals with barriers to employment (Page 107)
Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in–demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post–secondary education.
Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE). (Page108)
The State Board has entered into an agreement with SBE/CDE to support and encourage the integration of work–based learning activities in all locally funded WIOA youth programs to involve interactions with industry professionals and include career awareness, career exploration, internships and career pathways training activities.
• Additionally, the State Board has entered into an agreement with CDSS, the CWDA, and the Chancellor’s Office of Supportive Services to encourage and promote local partnerships that articulate subsidized employment programs operated by County Welfare Departments with career pathways programs, including “Regional Sector Pathway” programs identified and developed in WIOA regional plans. Where robust partnerships develop, these pathway programs should be designed to service TANF recipients, taking care to meet the particular client needs of those being served.
• The State Board has entered a similar agreement with DOR to promote access to competitive integrated employment at the local level so as to ensure quality jobs for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. (Page 110)
• Aligning basic skills coursework with career pathways programs and adopting contextualized learning practices that combine basic education and skills coursework with CTE coursework
• Braiding resources from WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs with WIOA Title II programs to provide supportive services to those attending basic education and skills programs so as to facilitate both course and program completion; local partnerships may include charter schools focused on serving out of school youth and operating under Education Code Section 47612.1(a)
• Ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with, and have access to, relevant job–readiness training and job search and placement services
• Ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with and have access to opportunities to enter postsecondary education programs (Page 113)
AJCC system and, working with EDD, will issue One–Stop policies to secure representation from all mandatory partners in all comprehensive One–Stops.
• The State Board has entered into an agreement with SBE/CDE to support and encourage the integration of work–based learning activities in all locally funded WIOA youth programs to involve interactions with industry professionals and include career awareness, career exploration, internships and career pathways training activities.
• Additionally, the State Board has entered into an agreement with CDSS, the CWDA, and the Chancellor’s Office of Supportive Services to encourage and promote local partnerships that articulate subsidized employment programs operated by County Welfare Departments with career pathways programs, including “Regional Sector Pathway” programs identified and developed in WIOA regional plans. Where robust partnerships develop, these pathway programs should be designed to service TANF recipients, taking care to meet the particular client needs of those being served.
• The State Board has entered a similar agreement with DOR to promote access to competitive integrated employment at the local level so as to ensure quality jobs for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
• Working with EDD, the State Board has already issued policies pertaining to Eligible Training Providers and the use of alternative training models, including OJT, to encourage the use of “earn and learn” approaches to training by local boards.
• Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One–Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 121)
The State Board will also review regional plans to ensure compliance with state guidance and WIOA requirements for regional plans, and will share regional plan content with state partners, including information pertaining to prioritized sectors and career pathways identified in the course of the regional planning process. The sharing of this information will facilitate, as appropriate, engagement with regional efforts by other State Plan partners such as DOR ETP, and CalWORKs.
Local Boards (Title I) working together regionally will work alongside CTE faculty and Deans from the community colleges, representatives from the CCCCO’s WEDD program, representatives from K–12 CTE programs, state–funded Adult Education Block Grant consortia, and federally funded Title II providers to convene and engage employers, especially the representatives of leading and emergent industry sectors to do the following: (Page 142)
Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in–demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post–secondary education.
Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).
DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal laws, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K–12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners.  (Page 143)
• General policy development to further system alignment of workforce, job services, training, and education programs.
• Research and policy development toward the delivery of effective One-Stop services, including policies facilitating One-Stop access for those with barriers to employment.
• Research on policies concerning effective sector engagement.
• Research on the building of career pathways tailored to client population needs, including research on how successful partnerships braid funds to facilitate movement through a career pathway that straddles multiple programs or service delivery structures.
• Examination of effective regional organizing efforts so as to identify the key elements of successful regional partnerships.
• Providing policy information to system partners to aid staff development.
• Providing policy information on successful practices to facilitate the building of local board capacity.
• Evidence-based research and policy development on the use of effective training programs responsive to labor market needs.
The Policy, Legislation, and Research Branch unit played a lead role in convening state plan partners, informing these partners on the legislative requirements of WIOA, sharing policy research on evidence-based practices, and facilitating agreement on the policy content of the State Plan by staffing the multiple workgroups engaged in the planning process. (Page 208)
Activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, Local Boards, One-Stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways.
Flexible Schedules and Coordination with Support Services: The degree to which the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with federal, state, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs (Page 237)
For CRPs within the state:
• Evaluate the vendor reimbursement model to ensure it adequately covers the cost of providing quality services.
• Expand job exploration and placement services for VR consumers to include more time and focus on career pathways and business sector strategies.
• Identify ways for CDOR to assume more of the vendor’s risks such as paying for no-show appointments and background checks for new jobs.
• Increase training and coordination efforts between CDOR staff and CRPs regarding the use of assistive technology, including the procedures for purchasing and requesting repairs.
• More in-depth training for consumers and CRP staff regarding CDOR’s process for plan development and employment services so consumers and vendors will better understand their roles and responsibilities to each other and to the VRSD team. (Page 372)
[1] WIOA section 134 requires that priority of service be given to recipients of public assistance, other low-income individuals, and individuals that are basic skills deficient for any expenditure of WIOA Adult program funds spent on individualized career services and training. Similarly, California Unemployment Insurance Code section 14000 (b) (6) requires that programs and services be accessible to “individuals with employment barriers, such as persons with economic, physical, or other barriers to employment.” California Unemployment Insurance Code section 14013(d)(2) further directs the State Board to develop “strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment, and including individuals with disabilities, with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.” (Page 441)
• Creating a marketing/communication team of WIOA core partners at the State level: (EDD, DOR, CDSS, CCCCO, Adult Ed, the State Board, CWA, DOA, HCD, National programs).
• Identifying a single point of contact for each Local Board to facilitate regular interaction/communication between the state partner programs, including all core programs, and local stakeholders.
• Establishing a protocol and communication policy for all core partners and committing to talking regularly as a system.
• Utilizing social media and virtual communication tools.
• Developing a branding policy for the AJCC.
Through the efforts of the One–Stop Design Workgroup and the WIOA Implementation Committee Workgroups, the State Board has entered into agreements with mandated and voluntary partners and stakeholders to ensure implementation of an integrated, job driven service delivery system that provides job seekers (specifically individuals with barriers to employment) with the skills and credentials necessary to secure and advance in career pathways, and enable employers to identify and hire skilled workers and grow their businesses. (Page 473)
• Sector strategies: aligning workforce and education programs with sector needs; the success of these efforts will depend on the depth of industry engagement.
• Career pathways: enabling progressive skills development through education and training programs, using multiple entry and exit points, so that each level of skills development increases the likelihood of success in the labor market; these pathways should be flexibly designed and include, where necessary, remedial programming, so as to allow those with basic skills deficiencies an ability to participate
• Regional partnerships: building partnerships between industry leaders, workforce professionals, education and training providers, and economic development leaders to support regional economic growth; the success of these efforts will depend on the depth of industry engagement
• “earn and learn”—using training and education practices that combine applied learning opportunities with compensation; the success of earn and learn programs depends on sustained employer engagement, and where appropriate, the involvement of organized labor, especially as this pertains to the development of partnerships with labor–management apprenticeship and pre–apprenticeship programs
• Supportive services: providing ancillary services like childcare, transportation, and counseling to facilitate program completion
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and services to meet client needs
• Creating cross–system data capacity, including diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and performance data to assess the value of investments (Page 476)
Local Boards (Title I) working together regionally will work alongside CTE faculty and Deans from the community colleges, representatives from the CCCCO’s WEDD program, representatives from K–12 CTE programs, state–funded Adult Education Block Grant consortia, and federally funded Title II providers to convene and engage employers, especially the representatives of leading and emergent industry sectors to do the following:
• Assess industry workforce needs
• Determine whether existing training and education programs in the region are producing what industry needs
• Identify existing career pathway programs that meet leading and emergent industry sector needs
• Recommend any necessary adjustments to facilitate the development and validation of career pathway programs to meet industry needs
• broker regional partnerships to move students and workers through relevant pathway programs that result in the attainment of industry recognized degrees or credentials, including individuals with barriers to employment
Local Boards may play the role of convener, broker, and matchmaker in regional efforts, bringing together the regional partners, but need not do so where other regional workforce and education champions step forward to play this role. (Page 481)
Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in–demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post–secondary education.
 Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).
DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal law, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K–12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners. (Page 482)
DOR Priority -- Physical, programmatic and electronic access for youth with disabilities including the following:
Access to One-Stop career services and WIOA Title 1 Youth program (WIOA Strategies: Integrated Service Delivery and Braided Resources, Providing Supportive Services) (Planning Guidance Tier: Required)
Vehicle: One-Stop MOU and certification requirements, Local Planning Guidance.
Access to training and education programs, including career pathways, internships, apprenticeships (WIOA Strategies: Career Pathways, Earn and Learn)(Planning Guidance Tier: Required)
Vehicle: DOR staff working locally and regionally with Local Board staff and training and education providers to increase co-enrollment opportunities of DOR consumers with local training and education providers based on alignment of needs, desires, capacities.
DOR outreach to youth with disabilities through AJCCs and cross training of DOR staff on other services to be provided through AJCCs (Planning Guidance Tier: Required)
Vehicle: One-Stop MOU and certification requirements, Local Planning Guidance; additionally DOR and CWDB will ensure cross-training of frontline staff in the AJCCs; finally, the DOR will provide the Local Boards linkages to DOR’s youth programs. (Page 527)
Regional level include a DOR representative to help make employers aware of incentives and strategies for the hiring of individuals with disabilities.
Participation in Employer Engagement efforts at the state level (WIOA Strategy Sector Strategies).
Vehicle: facilitated access to employers engaged in statewide sector strategies initiatives
Information on Sector Strategies, Career Pathways, Labor Market Information (WIOA Strategy Sector Strategies, Career Pathways)
Vehicle: CWDB will ensure that DOR has access to and participation in the regional WIOA plans and programs which detail targeted sectors, prioritized career pathways, and regional labor market analyses. This will include consideration for individuals and youth with disabilities. (Page 528)
 

Employer Engagement

~~The CDOR actively coordinates with the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program. Ticket to Work is a voluntary work incentive program for Social Security Disability Insurance or Supplemental Security Income beneficiaries between the ages of 18 and 64 who are interested in going to work. The Ticket to Work Program provides beneficiaries with access to VR, training, and placement services, as well as other services and support. Beneficiaries can use their ticket to obtain employment services and support from CDOR or they can take their ticket to an approved service provider called an Employment Network. A ticket cannot be assigned to an Employment Network and in-use with CDOR at the same time.
The CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners and VR Counselors have an active role in the Ticket to Work program. CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners verify ticket status, provide information as needed, and facilitate referrals to Employment Networks at case closure. VR counselors distribute CDOR’s Ticket to Work fact sheet at intake, verify the ticket status prior to approving the Individualized Plan for Employment, and facilitate sequential services. (Page 346)
 

511

~~• Continue coordination and collaboration with the California Department of Education and the California Department of Developmental Services as outlined in the Blueprint to prepare and support all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment.
• Promote collaboration at the local level and develop local partnership agreements between CDOR Districts, local education agencies, and the California Department of Developmental Services-funded local regional centers that address competitive integrated employment.
• Improve data collection and sharing between CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services.
• Hold stakeholder meetings and forums to communicate information on achieving competitive integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
• Amend the current Interagency Agreements between CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services to include an emphasis on competitive integrated employment and local linkages, as referenced in the Blueprint.
• Consistent with WIOA Section 511, the new VRSD teams will support competitive integrated employment consistent with WIOA and will provide additional career counseling services. The career counseling services will be delivered in a manner that facilitates independent decision making and informed choice as the individual with a disability makes decisions regarding employment and career advancement activities. (Page 390)
Through the use of baseline data and the semi–annual statistic adjustment model, the state plans to update performance accountability measures to assess the effectiveness of serving those with barriers to employment, as well as WIOA and state level policy objectives and the level of services coordinated and identified in the strategic plan.
The State Board will convene core program partners and those strategic partners with whom performance outcomes are aligned to discuss, where appropriate, how the state will negotiate goals with federal agencies and local areas.
In consultation with strategic partners and local areas, the State Board will emphasize the skills attainment measure across programs because greater skill attainment leads to higher median earnings, greater percentages of employed participants, and helps the state reach the goal of one million middle–skill industry recognized credentials over the next ten years.
To help facilitate reliable and valid data for the assessment of programs and ability to serve individuals with barriers, the State Board will work with core program partners to identify strategies for robust data collection in all federally mandated reports, as well as additional measures identified by the state. (Page 471)
 

Mental Health

~~ACCESS FOR THE DISABLED
The state has existing policy guidance, which it will soon be updating and reissuing, regarding individuals with disabilities having equal access to services and information funded by WIOA Title I programs and partner agencies:
• Workforce Services Directives WSD10-1 and WSD10-2 - Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Procedures and Biennial LWIA Self-Assessment, respectively, communicate the requirements regarding compliance with state and federal disability laws and procedures for ensuring accessible physical environments for all customers, including individuals with disabilities.
In support of these policies, the State Board is an active member of DOR’s State Rehabilitation Counsel and the DOR represents individuals with disabilities on Local Boards. EDD maintains a Disability Policy Employment and Collaboration Unit (DPEC), whose primary objective is to develop both WIOA-required and discretionary partnerships to facilitate employment for individuals with disabilities. (Page 247)
The State Board is committed to ensuring individuals with disabilities have physical and programmatic access to the AJCC system and services. The State Board, in consultation with chief elected officials and Local Boards, will establish objective criteria and procedures to evaluate the AJCCs and delivery system for effectiveness. The evaluation will include how well the local job centers ensure equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities to participate in or benefit from AJCC services. The evaluation must also include criteria evaluating how well the centers and local delivery systems take actions to comply with the disability-related regulations implementing WIOA section 188, set forth in 29 CFR part 37. (Page 248)
AJCC Accessibility Certification
The State Board is committed to ensuring individuals with disabilities have physical and programmatic access to the AJCC system and services. The State Board, in consultation with chief elected officials and Local Boards, will establish objective criteria and procedures to evaluate the AJCCs and delivery system for effectiveness. The evaluation will include how well the local job centers ensure equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities to participate in or benefit from AJCC services. The evaluation must also include criteria evaluating how well the centers and local delivery systems take actions to comply with the disability-related regulations implementing WIOA section 188, set forth in 29 CFR part 37. (Page 519)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 11 - 20 of 96

Home and Community-Based Alternatives (HCBA) Waiver Solicitation for Application (SFA) - 12/04/2017

~~“The Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) has released the Solicitation for Application (SFA) included below, to invite eligible organizations to apply to become HCBA Waiver ‘“Waiver Agencies.’”  Applicants selected to become Contracted Waiver Agencies will receive funding to perform waiver administrative functions within a defined service area and to provide Comprehensive Care Management services to Waiver participants.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Program (SEP) Forms - 11/03/2017

~~This page has links to “forms are provided for use by DOR and service providers for Supported Employment (SE), Transitional Employment, and general (non-SE) job coaching.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

AB-1111 Removing Barriers to Employment Act: Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative - 10/15/2017

~~“Existing law, the California Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, establishes the California Workforce Development Board as the body responsible for assisting the Governor in the development, oversight, and continuous improvement of California’s workforce investment system and the alignment of the education and workforce investment systems to the needs of the 21st century economy and workforce. That act requires the establishment of a local workforce development board in each local workforce development area of the state to, among other things, carry out analyses of the economic conditions in the local region.

This bill would enact the Removing Barriers to Employment Act, which would establish the Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative administered by the California Workforce Development Board. The bill would specify that the purpose of the initiative is to create a grant program to provide individuals with barriers to employment the services they need to enter, participate in, and complete broader workforce preparation, training, and education programs aligned with regional labor market needs. The bill would specify that people completing these programs should have the skills and competencies to successfully enter the labor market, retain employment, and earn wages that lead to self-sufficiency and economic security. The bill would require the board to develop criteria for the selection of grant recipients, as specified. The bill also would specify the criteria by which grants are required to be evaluated, the populations that are eligible to be served by grants, and the activities eligible for grant funding.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

AB-1607 An act to amend Sections 4688.21 and 4850.3 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, Rrelating to Developmental Sservices. - 09/19/2017

~~“Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Existing law establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities….

This bill would authorize a consumer in a supported employment program or work activity program who has the stated goal of integrated competitive employment in his or her IPP to request to use tailored day services in conjunction with his or her existing program to achieve that goal, if specified criteria are met, including that the type, amount, and provider of tailored day service allowed under these provisions is determined through the IPP process. The bill would specify the maximum hours of tailored day services that may be authorized in conjunction with existing services under these provisions.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

California HCBS Transition Plan - 09/01/2017

The California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) has developed a Statewide Transition Plan (STP) submitted to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) on August 14, 2015.  The STP describes how the State will come into compliance with new Federal Home and Community-Based (HCB) setting requirements that became effective March 17, 2014.  These regulations are CMS 2249-F and CMS 2296-F, which affect 1915(c) and 1915(i) HCB services waivers and State Plan programs.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Employment First Policy” - 07/19/2017

~~“Resources and guidelines for educators, parents, and agencies that will assist transition age youth develop postsecondary goals that lead to competitive, integrated employment (CIE).” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Workability Transition Program - 07/03/2017

~~• “The WAI program offers students with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) the opportunity to complete their secondary education while also obtaining marketable job skills. WAI provides secondary students with an understanding of job seeking and job keeping skills. The employability of students improves through occupational class training and on-the-job subsidized or unsubsidized work experience.• • The WAI program seeks employers in the business community who will give students with special needs a chance to prove themselves in a competitive integrated employment setting. Local program sites successfully coordinate state and local service providers to offer comprehensive services tailored to local economic, social, and geographic needs and abilities.• • Two year follow-along support services provided by local program staff greatly increase the potential for student employment success.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Assembly Bill No. 107 CHAPTER 18 - 06/27/2017

~~“Existing law requires the regional center contracts described above to include, among other things, annual performance objectives, as specified. Existing law also establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities.

This bill would require the annual performance objectives included in regional center contracts to measure progress, and report outcomes, in implementing the Employment First Policy, as specified.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“$2 million to assist Californians with disabilities in job searches” - 06/19/2017

~~“People with disabilities in 13 counties will get additional help in landing employment with $2 million in grants announced by the California Employment Development Department today. The Disability Employment Accelerator grants assist people with disabilities obtain skills needed for employment in growing industries such as advanced manufacturing, clean energy, transportation, and healthcare.The disability employment assistance funds will help prepare job seekers with skills and training needed for careers and then connect them with hiring businesses. The organizations receiving the grants will use “earn-and-learn” strategies that empower people with disabilities to earn incomes while they learn new skills that will help them progress into high-growth industries” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Disability Employment Accelerator PY 2016-17“AWARD LIST AND PROJECT SUMMARIES” - 06/19/2017

~~“On June 19, 2017, $2 million of WIOA, Governor’s Discretionary 15 percent funds were awarded to seven workforce development agencies under the Disability Employment Accelerator (DEA) for Program Year (PY) 2016-17 Solicitation for Proposals. Awardee project list and project summaries are listed below. Funding decisions are final.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

The Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (AB 1041) - 10/09/2013

“The Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act authorizes the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide support and services to individuals with developmental disabilities.”   “This bill would define competitive employment, microenterprises, and self-employment for these purposes. The bill would additionally require the Employment First Committee to identify existing sources of consumer data that can be matched with employment data, as specified, and to recommend goals for measuring employment participation and outcomes for various consumers within the developmental services system. … This bill would require each regional center planning team, when developing an individual program plan for a transition age youth or working age adult, to consider a specified Employment First Policy.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

2008 California Legislative Session - 01/01/2009

This is a report on the changes made to AB 5, AB 1183, SB 1175, and SB 1774 and their impact on services for people with developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Cal. Welfare and Institutions Code §4646.5

Addresses the requirements behind creating an individual program plan for a transition age youth or working age adult with developmental disabilities.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Cal. Welfare and Institutions Code §§4868 et seq.

Establishes an Employment First Committee under the authority of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. It pledges to “make services and supports available to enable persons with developmental disabilities to approximate the pattern of everyday living available to people without disabilities of the same age, to support the integration of persons with developmental disabilities into the mainstream life of the community, and to bring about more independent, productive, and normal lives for the persons served, it is the policy of the state that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment shall be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities. This policy shall be known as the Employment First Policy.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

California Executive Order S-4-05 - 11/28/2005

“ …WHEREAS, State Government has an opportunity and a responsibility to lead by example, ensuring individuals with disabilities have an open door to the many opportunities in public service;… NOW, THEREFORE, I, ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor of the State of California do hereby issue this order to become effective immediately: 1. All state agencies, departments, boards and commissions shall utilize best efforts with respect to recruitment, hiring, advancement, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment and issue clear, written directives to their managers and supervisors prohibiting discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. 2. Each state agency shall comply with existing law and annually review its hiring practices to identify any barriers to employment of individuals with disabilities, and, in consultation with their disability advisory committee, take appropriate action to eliminate any non job-related barriers to the integration of individuals with disabilities into the workforce. 3. All state agencies, departments, boards, and commissions shall utilize the Limited Examination and Appointment Program (LEAP) lists in filling vacancies. LEAP lists provide a ready pool of qualified candidates, who happen to have a disability, for a variety of jobs. 4. The State Personnel Board shall provide statewide leadership, in partnership with the Department of Rehabilitation, to coordinate and provide technical guidance to fulfill the intent of this executive order…”

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 20 of 37

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Disability Employment Accelerator PY 2016-17“AWARD LIST AND PROJECT SUMMARIES” - 06/19/2017

~~“On June 19, 2017, $2 million of WIOA, Governor’s Discretionary 15 percent funds were awarded to seven workforce development agencies under the Disability Employment Accelerator (DEA) for Program Year (PY) 2016-17 Solicitation for Proposals. Awardee project list and project summaries are listed below. Funding decisions are final.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

2017-18 State Budget Briefing - 06/15/2017

~~“Employment First Policies for Individual with Disabilities:  Adopts trailer bill language that requires that performance objectives included in regional center contracts measure progress and outcomes in implementing the Employment First policy.  Updates the rate paid for vouchered community-based training services and specified supportive employment services to $14.99 per hour and $36.57 per hour, respectively, to reflect the rate increases provided in 2016 enacted legislation, Assembly Bill X2 1 (Thurmond), Chapter 3, Statutes of 2016”.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

California Department of Developmental Services “2014-2015 Annual Report Employment and Day Programs” - 05/17/2017

~~“This report summarizes economic and employment outcomes for DDS consumers with ID/DD.  Consumer information is used to develop program evaluation processes, project growth in costs, and develop future outcome-based program changes. Age group reports, such as a report showing data for 22-31 year olds, provide a look at how education is preparing young adults who are transitioning from school to work and day programs.

The DDS Employment and Day Program Annual Report includes community caseloads, age of individuals served by DDS, purchase of service (POS) dollars expended by service type, percentage of consumers employed by year, statewide counts of persons receiving services, per person costs, and percentage of consumers staying in the same service type year to year. The report includes data aggregated by the following services and/or categories:• Supported Employment Program (SEP) Individual• SEP Group• Work Activity Programs (WAP)• Day Programs• Look Alike Day Programs• Combination of two or more programs• Not In Day Programs or Work Programs”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

WIOA Local Workforce Plan 2017-2020 - 05/10/2017

~~“The City of Los Angeles Workforce Development Board’s Local Plan outlines the vision of its workforce development system to prepare and place individuals into self-sufficient employment, focuses on career pathway employment opportunities, and emphasizes strategies for system collaboration. The three pillars of the Local Plan are: improving the skills (up-skilling) of the workforce; employer engagement focused on sectors; and system building through collaboration. The strategies include:• Focusing on education and training for all job seekers (adults, youth, dislocated and incumbent) by emphasizing credentials and high school graduation attainment.• Engaging employers and industry groups to develop strong sector pathways to address the evolving demands of the economy and the required workplace skills.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

State Council on Developmental Disabilities. (2015). Employment First Committee annual report. - 04/28/2017

~~• ‘Since the national recession, California’s economy has strengthened, especially over the last few years. However, many people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) are not benefiting from one of the strongest economies in the world. However, there is some good news. There are major policy changes underway designed to improve employment for people with I/DD. Well-meaning practices have typically placed people into segregated settings, often receiving subminimum wages.• • These programs are often leave participants less prepared to enter traditional employment than if they had never participated in the program.• • California’s Employment First Policy paired with local projects and national efforts, like the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and changes in the Home and Community Based Services waiver program, should begin to improve employment for people with I/DD.” 

Systems
  • Other

“Youth And Subminimum Wage Employment” - 02/16/2017

~~“The foundation of the Vocational Rehabilitation program is the principle that individuals with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities, are capable of achieving high quality Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) when provided the necessary services and supports. The passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) ensures all individuals with disabilities are provided the necessary services and supports to achieve CIE. This is especially true for youth 24 years of age or younger, as the WIOA emphasizes that youth with disabilities have meaningful opportunities to receive the services they need to achieve employment outcomes in CIE.

The WIOA further reinforces the congressional intent that CIE is the preferred employment outcome by placing limitations on the use of subminimum wage (SMW), especially for youth. The limitations include prescriptive timelines for the transmission of documentation from the school to the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR). The DOR requires that any youth seeking SMW employment is provided mandatory services and documentation prior to working at SMW. Mandatory services include multiple opportunities to discuss and explore CIE in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

“For Employers” on 14(c) subminimum wages - 01/25/2017

~~“Section 511 prohibits employers from paying a subminimum wage to individuals with disabilities unless each individual is provided career counseling and information and referral services (CC&IR) at required intervals. Employers must also provide the individual with information about self-advocacy, self-determination, and peer mentoring training opportunities in the community. WIOA also requires 14(c) certificate holders to maintain documentation that individuals employed at subminimum wage prior to July 22, 2016, receive CC&IR services at least once by July 22, 2017, and annually thereafter. For individuals hired at subminimum wage on or after July 22, 2016, CC&IR services must be provided every six months for the first year of employment and annually thereafter.

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) is available to provide federally required CC&IR services for your employees receiving subminimum wage. Included in the career counseling, employees will learn about federal and state programs and local resources that offer employment-related services and supports designed to enable the individual to explore, experience, and attain competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

“Secondary Transition Planning” - 01/01/2017

~~• “This Web page offers resources and guidelines for assisting educators, parents, and agency partners to improve compliance with state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to transition age youth and improve post-high school outcomes. These resources supplement the California Transition Alliance’s document, Transition Planning: The Basics. Resources are organized into five categories: Employment, Education and Training, Independent Living, Compliance, and the Guideposts for Success document.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017-2021 State Plan - 08/04/2016

~~“Goal 2: Employment Californians with I/DD and their families reflecting the diversity of the state will have increased information to obtain competitive, integrated employment. 1. The Council will increase and promote culturally competent strategies and resources that facilitate competitive, integrated employment (CIE) of people with I/DD. 2. The Council, in consultation with its federal partners, will increase identification, advocacy and/or sponsorship of legislative, regulatory, policy, procedure and/or practice changes to increase CIE for people with I/DD.”

Systems
  • Other

California Department of Developmental Services “Supported Employment Program – Individual Forms” - 07/20/2016

These forms are to be used by work service (formerly Habilitation) providers and regional centers to process This page has links to forms for the Supported Employment Program both for individuals and groups, Work Services information, and Vocational Rehabilitation for such things as service plans, monthly reports, referrals, program changes The Excel forms can be downloaded and completed using the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet program. The PDF instructions can be downloaded and printed using the free Adobe Acrobat Reader. For further information, please read the instructions accompanying each form.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

“Local Partnership Agreement Template" - 06/17/2017

~~“The California Department of Education (CDE), the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), and the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) seek to foster an environment of collaboration to increase competitive integrated employment (CIE) opportunities for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

Competitive Integrated Employment is described in plain language by the motto: “Real Work for Real Pay in the Real World.” The term means working for pay (at least minimum wage) in the community alongside people without disabilities. Work can be full-time (up to 40 hours per week) or part-time with the same level of benefits and opportunities for advancement as other employees.

The CIE Blueprint outlines the collaborative efforts between the three departments on a statewide level. A Local Partnership Agreement (LPA) identifies the ways in which partners will work together on a local level. Each agreement is built around the core partners of one or more local educational agencies (LEA), one or more DOR district, and one or more regional centers, and can include any number of additional local community partners.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego-Imperial Counties Developmental Services, Inc. "Employment First" - 05/10/2016

~~California’s Employment First Policy was signed into law in October of 2013, by Governor Brown.dds.ca.govCompetitive employment is finding a job within the community where you are paid about the same as other people doing the same job and at least minimum wage. It could also be working for yourself in your own small business.Information about the Employment First Policy can be found on the website of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities (scdd.ca.gov) as well as the Department of Developmental Services (dds.ca.gov).Employment & Your Individual Program Plan (IPP)When you plan with your service coordinator around employment opportunities, the first option that will be considered is competitive integrated employment. Competitive work is a real choice. Your service coordinator can help you find resources in the community to support your employment goals.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

CA Employment First Memorandum of Understanding - 12/12/2014

This project will use a multi-faceted approach to apply key elements from high performing states in integrated competitive employment and principles of Collaborative Leadership. A unified value, vision, and expectation for competitive integrated employment will be established and will serve as the basis for the strategies used for stimulating policy to practice, training, technical assistance, and a shared method for monitoring progress through available state and local employment data.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Employment First Committee Annual Report (Partnerships) - 01/16/2013

The Council participates in the Alliance for Full Participation California team. The AFP is a collaboration of major national organizations (including the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities) serving or advocating for improved employment outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The California team is facilitated by the Arc of California. The Council has also started coordinating with the California Committee for the Employment of People with Disabilities, established by statute to promote the employment of people with disabilities. Additionally, members of the Employment First Committee continue to actively work with key groups throughout the state to promote Employment First. 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego Workforce Partnership: Policy and Systemic Influence - 07/02/2007

Project Overview: Grant number, name and location: Customized Employment - 01, San Diego, CA, E-9-4-1-0081 Grant recipient: San Diego Workforce Partnership, Inc. Project Lead: San Diego Workforce Partnership, Inc.

Subcontractors: Five One-Stop Centers; Access Center (an assistive technology technical assistance resource center); and the University Center on Excellence on Disabilities (UCED) at San Diego University.

  Early on, the grantee subcontracted most of its activities to Community Service Providers (Goodwill and Able/Disabled primarily), but radically changed its structure after two years to internalize the activities of the grant in its own system.   Key Lessons/Accomplishments Workforce Investment Board (WIB) and WIB administrative agencies are key players in workforce policy issues, if they choose to take a strong role Performance measures are a manageable challenge when treated constructively by the WIB Lack of experience is a key barrier to customized business-outreach efforts Grant structure (and overuse of subcontractors) severely hinders the capacity for systems and policy change.
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

The California Employment Consortium for Youth and Young Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (CECY)

~~“(CECY) is a collaboration of 23 state agencies, centers, and organizations, families, and self-advocates with responsibilities for the education, rehabilitation, employment, and support of youth with disabilities.  CECY is a five-year (2011-2016) Project of National Significance Partnerships in Employment Systems Change grant (#90DN0284) by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD).  The Tarjan Center at UCLA, a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, provides its administrative leadership. “
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

Transition2Life Project (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

“The Transition2Life Project will provide direct, hands-on training and learning opportunities focusing on effective transitions to inclusive adult lives for young adults with developmental disabilities living in Amador, Calaveras, and Tuolumne counties.” 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

The goal of this project is to implement a “Get a Competitive Edge” Work Safe & Self-Advocacy program for consumers and employees with disabilities as part of The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Progressive Employment Concepts (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

 “This project will provide hands on training to staff and clients in the discovery and customized employment process leading to a customized employment outcome for a minimum of two individuals. This project will allow Progressive Employment Concepts to gain the tools needed to have continued success in finding jobs for the individuals we serve, especially those with higher support needs.” Awarded in  Sacramento and Placer Counties.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

California Readiness Of Minors in Supplemental Security Income (CaPROMISE) Initiative

“The PROMISE initiative is intended to improve the provision and coordination of services for child SSI recipients and their families. The services help child recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these child SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CA State Council on Developmental Disabilities Employment First Committee Annual Report

The second annual report of the Employment First Committee (EFC) of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities includes: priorities adopted by the State Council as recommended by the EFC; second-year work of the EFC, interagency activities, and policy activities; the current status of the employment of individuals with developmental disabilities; and next steps for the EFC.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

California Ticket to Work/Work Incentives Program

Ticket to Work (TTW) is a voluntary work incentive program for Social Security Administration’s (SSA) Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries who are between the ages of 18 and 64 and interested in going to work. The goal of the TTW Program is to assist beneficiaries in obtaining employment and working toward becoming self-sufficient.   Work Incentives are SSA rules that make it possible for people with disabilities receiving SSDI and SSI to explore work options and reach their work goals without losing their benefits prematurely. Social Security Work Incentives help beneficiaries remove barriers to work by offering support services and providing a safety net to assist beneficiaries in finding meaningful employment and succeeding in the workplace.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California Employment Consortium for Youth

“California Employment Consortium for Youth: California was awarded a federal 5-year employment systems change grant by The Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to increase the number of youth and young adults with intellectual disabilities in integrated competitive employment (ICE). The State Council is a lead agency along with the Departments of Rehabilitation, Developmental Services and Education. The California Employment Consortium for Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (CECY) is a 30 member highly knowledgeable and experienced employment work group comprised of the aforementioned lead state agencies, Youth Self-Advocates, Disability Rights California, the Family Resource Center Network of California, the Association of Regional Center Agencies, California Committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities, Community of Practice-Secondary Transition, UCLA Anderson School of Management, and the Tarjan Center UCEDD.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and Supplement for the Supported Employment Services Program State Plan Program Years 2018 – 2020 - 02/11/2018

~~“Priority 3: Capacity Building

Goal: Establish or enhance partnerships to increase the capacity of CDOR and the WIOA core program partners to improve service delivery for adults and youth with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

“$2 million to assist Californians with disabilities in job searches” - 06/19/2017

~~“People with disabilities in 13 counties will get additional help in landing employment with $2 million in grants announced by the California Employment Development Department today. The Disability Employment Accelerator grants assist people with disabilities obtain skills needed for employment in growing industries such as advanced manufacturing, clean energy, transportation, and healthcare.The disability employment assistance funds will help prepare job seekers with skills and training needed for careers and then connect them with hiring businesses. The organizations receiving the grants will use “earn-and-learn” strategies that empower people with disabilities to earn incomes while they learn new skills that will help them progress into high-growth industries” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

“Workforce Development: What's in it For You” - 05/10/2017

~~“Workforce Development (WDS), "What's in it for Your Business?" is a Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) employer outreach program designed to build collaborative partnerships that create staffing solutions for California businesses. The Workforce Development Section (WDS) develops and coordinates linkages with the business community in order to increase meaningful employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD) - 03/12/2017

~~“The California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD) was established to advance the employment of people with disabilities in the state. The primary function of the CCEPD is to consult with and advise the Secretary of the Labor and Workforce Development Agency and the Secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency on all issues related to full inclusion in the workforce of persons with disabilities, in order to:1. Bring individuals with disabilities into gainful employment at a rate that is as close as possible to that of the general population.2. Support the goals of equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for these individuals.3. Ensure that state government is a model employer of individuals with disabilities.4. Support state coordination with, and participation in, benefits planning training and information dissemination projects supported by private foundations and federal grants.

The CCEPD supports an annual event for youth with disabilities. In September of 2015, the CCEPD voted to adopt the California Youth Leadership Forum for Students with Disabilities (YLF) as the youth event for the years 2016-2018.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

CA Employment First: Braiding Day and Employment Services to Build Meaningful Lives - 04/09/2015

This Employment First training presentation focuses on different approaches to promoting Employment First and encouraging integrated, community-based employment opportunities for people with disabilities. Some of the strategies include using Discovery and customized employment with Medicaid waiver day services participants through a braided funding approach including Vocational Rehabilitation. This presentation also provides a number of example case studies.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

The California DEI: Effective Practices in Building an Inclusive Workforce

This presentation summarizes California’s experience with the DEI grant as of 2015. It addresses the history of DEI in the state, the objectives, the strategic service delivery components, the promising practices and the hopes for sustainability after the grant.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

California Customized Employment for Service Members, Veterans & Their Families

This web page discusses Customized Employment as a “Promising Practice for Supporting Employees with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and/or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD),” particularly in the context of US Service Members and Veterans.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

Employment First Committee Annual Report

The Community of Practice (COP) is located within the Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and was formed and funded by the DOE to help improve transition and employment outcomes. This is a voluntary group of educational professionals.   The COP seeks to ensure the seamless transition of services for  youth, ages 16 –22, which will lead to positive post-school outcomes. They carry out their work through a statewide community of practice and a statewide list serve,which disseminates compliance information, resources and evidence-based practices and statewide technical assistance through webinars and conference calls.  Their key goal, with respect to employment ,is integrated ,competitive employment in any area of interest for each individual youth, ages 16-22.  
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California Training Initiatives

“Association of Regional Center Agencies – New day Conference. ARCA sponsored the New Day Conference in Pasadena in September 2012. Over 400 attendees participated in sessions focused on innovations in employment and housing services for individuals with developmental disabilities.” “Four- part employment webinar series aimed to create awareness about employment and to provide a discussion forum for families, individual organizations and professionals.” “Working Conference - Driving Forces Behind Successful Postsecondary Education and Employment for Young Adults with ID and Autism held in Sacramento, CA and sponsored by Think College and California Consortium on Postsecondary Educations and the Center for Disability Studies, University of Hawaii. The conference content addressed significant changes in public policy, insight for promoting inclusive strategies through person-centered protocol and interagency team building to support youth success. … Over 100 families, K-12, rehabilitation, developmental disabilities and higher education professionals, and students with developmental disabilities attended.” “Three-Part webinar series in Triangulating Postsecondary Education Goals for transition specialists and educators. The series aims at identifying postsecondary goals and aligning them with academic and industry standards. This webinar series was hosted by Community of Practice in Secondary Education (CoP).”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

California Community Transitions (CCT) (Money Follows the Person)

“In January 2007, the California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) was awarded special federal grant number 1LICMS30149 to implement a Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration, “California Community Transitions” (CCT). CCT demonstration services are available through September 30, 2016.   “Lead Organizations employ or contract with transition coordinators who work directly with willing and eligible individuals, support networks, and providers to facilitate and monitor their transition from facilities to community settings. Eligible individuals of all ages with physical and mental disabilities have an opportunity to participate in CCT.”    
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California for Community First Choice

On December 1, 2011, the California Department of Health Care Services submitted the first state plan amendment to implement Section 2401 (the Community First Choice Option) of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), providing the provision of medical assistance for home and community-based attendant services including Assistance with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), and health-related tasks, teaching and demonstration for ADLs, IADLs, and other health -related tasks, back-up systems to ensure the continuity of services, and training on the hiring and maintenance of attendants. California has developed a quality assurance plan to monitor the implementation and efficacy of the Community First Choice Option at the county- and state-levels.   .

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The Golden State is a place where you can "Find Yourself" through a rewarding career, including those with disabilities who are ready to live the California Dream.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon California's VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
0.27%
Change from
2015 to 2016
39,250,017
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.28%
Change from
2015 to 2016
2,023,714
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.76%
Change from
2015 to 2016
701,791
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.48%
Change from
2015 to 2016
34.68%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.47%
Change from
2015 to 2016
74.22%

State Data

General

2016
Population. 39,250,017
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 2,023,714
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 701,791
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 16,632,184
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.68%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.22%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 2,020,143
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 2,186,775
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,749,171
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 331,848
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 1,273,677
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 47,935
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 459,722
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 15,006
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 178,131
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 425,105

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 41,719
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 682,668

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 20,014
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 49,907
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 221,216
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 9.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 11.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 582
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,552
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,396
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 39,862

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 46,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,373
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,176
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 50.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 3.00

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 24,984
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 1,213,289
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $92,057,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $55,744,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $853,743,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 66,009
Number of people served in facility based work. 9,627
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 26.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 54.07%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 21.54%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 52.26%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 75.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 83.16%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.20%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 10,193,235
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 12,148
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 123,357
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 4,322,464
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 4,445,821
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 180
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,641
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,821
AbilityOne wages (products). $583,952
AbilityOne wages (services). $61,505,189

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 109
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 6
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 119
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 35
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 17,727
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 488
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 18,280

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~The DPEC works with the State Board, Independent Living Centers, AJCCs, DOR, Department of Developmental Services (DDS), and many other public and private stakeholders to improve employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The DPEC also encourages and assists stakeholders to train staff on disability awareness and effective service delivery. Some of the partnerships and activities supported by the DPEC include: Employment First, Youth Employment Opportunity Program, Youth Leadership Forum, Disability Employment Initiative and Disability Employment Accelerator.  (Page 247)
AB 287 (2009) established the Employment First Policy, which led to a standing Employment First Committee formed by the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. The bill expands employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and identifies best practices and incentives for increasing integrated employment and gainful employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Employment First policy requires Regional Centers to develop Individual Program Plans to ensure individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities beginning at age 14 are provided options, competitive integrated employment, and post-secondary education to enable the consumer to transition from school to work. CDOR is an active participant in the Employment First Committee to help with transition planning. (Page 355)
Attend California Model Employer Initiative meetings in order to increase the number of individuals with disabilities in state employment; identify and implement improvements in furtherance of the state’s “Employment First” policy to gain integrated competitive wages for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities; increase jobs-driven employment and consumer self-sufficiency for consumers who are job ready through work incentives planning; establish new partnerships with employers through the National Employment Team; maximize the use of Talent Acquisition Portal, an online system which includes both a national talent pool of VR candidates looking for employment and a job posting system for businesses looking to hire individuals with disabilities, to link job ready consumers with employers; and, enhancement of staff training curriculums to include the use of social media strategies and the electronic job application process. These efforts are expected to contribute towards passing the performance indicators in FFY 2016. (Page 393)
 

Customized Employment

~~• The CDOR’s Community Resources Development Section continues to conduct comprehensive certification and site reviews of CRPs. The focus of the review process is maximizing employment outcomes for CDOR consumers.
• Efforts are taking place to update the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on Pre-Employment Transition Services and Customized Employment WIOA services.
• In early 2014, a proof of concept titled “Placement Plus” was administered in select CRPs to test a new employment services fee for service structure. The lessons learned and evaluation of the Placement Plus is informing CDOR’s current efforts to redesign employment services statewide. (Page 353)
• Conduct focus groups to solicit feedback about what the partners think is needed to enhance services for people with disabilities.
• Develop a CDOR referral form and referral process for the America’s Job Centers of California.
• Provide training to local America’s Job Center of California staff on topics such as: CDOR services; eligibility; job placement; case management; benefits counseling; job readiness and soft skills; disability awareness and etiquette; hiring persons with disabilities; disability disclosures; competitive integrated employment; customized employment; assistive technology; and, reasonable accommodation.
• Provide tools and resources to the WIOA core programs serving individuals with disabilities such as accommodations for individuals who are blind and visually impaired or deaf and hard of hearing.
• Identify the single point of contact for all local WIOA core program partners. (Page388)
• Efforts are taking place to update the CRP Vendorization and Certification Guidelines with information on Pre-Employment Transition Services and Customized Employment WIOA services.
• In early 2014, a proof of concept titled “Placement Plus” was administered in select CRPs to test a new employment services fee for service structure. The lessons learned and evaluation of the Placement Plus is informing CDOR’s current efforts to redesign employment services statewide. (Page 353)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Strengths: Local Boards have a lot of experience braiding resources and integrating service delivery through the One–Stop system. Local Boards have deep connections to their local communities, and are gaining greater experience working through state and local led regional initiatives, including sector and career pathway strategies as well as initiatives to provide services to target populations. (Page 43)
• Creating cross–system data capacity: using diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and also, the use performance data to assess the value of those investments.
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. (Page 65)
The seven policy strategies emphasized in this State Plan—sector strategies, career pathways, “earn and learn”, organizing regionally, providing supportive services, building cross-system data capacity, and braiding resources and integrating services— are evidence-based and have been shown to work, helping ensure effective delivery of services, and increasing the likelihood that those who receive services obtain gainful employment. ( Page 74)
Integrating service delivery and braiding resources are ways that workforce and education programs can achieve program alignment and assure access to the broad array of services funded across the state’s workforce and education programs. In California, resources will be braided and services integrated and aligned through the creation of “value-dded “partnerships at the state, regional, and local levels.
A value-added partnership is one in which all partners gain from the partnership. Ideally, “gains to exchange” occur and partners transact with one another on the basis of specialization, providing services consistent with each programs’ core competencies. Partners thereby leverage one another’s expertise, building a proverbial “sum that is greater than its parts.” (Page 82)
Creating cross–system data capacity: using diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and also, the use performance data to assess the value of those investments.
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs.  (Page 84)
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and services to meet client needs
• Creating cross–system data capacity, including diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and performance data to assess the value of investments (Page 103)
The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD–WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
The State Board has partnered with EDD to create and staff the One–Stop Design workgroup, which brought together state plan partners and other stakeholders to develop a blueprint for service delivery in the state’s AJCCs. Work by this group will inform state policy on integrated service delivery and the braiding of resources at AJCCs, including policy on operations, required partnership, and the articulation of AJCC services with Regional Sector Pathway programs. (More detail on this is provided in chapter 4).  (Page109)
Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One–Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 110)
Additionally, SBE, CDE, CCCCO, and the State Board will work jointly to identify and recommend best practices and model partnerships that encourage program alignment, coordination, integration of services, and braiding of resources beyond the minimum levels required as part of mandatory One–Stop partnership. To this end, the State Board will issue local and regional planning guidance, supported, when appropriate, by policy directives or other appropriate means of communication issued by SBE, CDE, and CCCCO to foster better program alignment between basic education and basic skills programs and other workforce and education programs and services. Recommended relevant best practices may include but are not limited to the following:
• aligning basic skills coursework with career pathways programs and adopting contextualized learning practices that combine basic education and skills coursework with CTE coursework
• braiding resources from WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs with WIOA Title II programs to provide supportive services to those attending basic education and skills programs so as to facilitate both course and program completion; local partnerships may include charter schools focused on serving out of school youth and operating under Education Code Section 47612.1(a)
• ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with, and have access to, relevant job–readiness training and job search and placement services
• ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with and have access to opportunities to enter postsecondary education programs (Pages 113)
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs (Page 115)
CWDA to ensure integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the use of “earn and learn” and other training and employment services for TANF recipients in California. Partnership activities to support these ends have and will include all of the following:
• CWDA, the State Board, EDD, and CDSS staff will work jointly to assess the level of partnership and current compliance with known future regulatory requirements. This information will be used to ensure that all counties and Local Boards are on a path to compliance.
• CWDA, CDSS, and State Board staff will work jointly to identify models of TANF One–Stop partnership that go beyond baseline federal expectations, as well as the purpose of these partnerships, and the manner in which these partnerships elevate service delivery so as to improve client outcomes. The information gleaned from this analysis will be used to inform local and regional planning guidance and will be combined with baseline compliance rules to provide locals information on how to not only comply with baseline federal requirements, but also to develop the programs that best serve client needs.  (Page 118)
The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD–WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
• As part of the state planning process, the State Board has entered into state level agreements with SBE/CDE (Title II Administrator), EDD (Title I Administrator and Title III Administrator and Program Operator), DOR (Title IV Administrator and Program operator), and both CDSS and CWDA (representatives of both state and local TANF agencies) to ensure coordination at the state level so as to ensure compliance with federal requirements pertaining to One–Stop mandatory partnership of TANF programs. (Pages 120, 121, 124, 126, 128)
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs
The ETP will work with regionally organized Local Boards where the sector priorities of RPUs align with the programmatic direction of ETP, identifying opportunities to train incumbent workers in prioritized sectors using, when appropriate, multi–employer contracts to meet the needs of industry.
Training incumbent workers can create opportunities for populations with barriers to employment by opening up entry level and other positions where and when incumbent workers advance into new positions as a result of the training programs funded by ETP.
As noted above, ETP will also partner with DOR to leverage ETP’s incumbent worker training contracts and contacts in the federal contractor community to improve coordination around federal 503 contracting rules. (Pages 135,137)
• By building links between AJCCs and campuses, including but not limited to, pooling resources to place AJCC staff directly on campuses
• By braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs
The ETP will work with regionally organized Local Boards where the sector priorities of RPUs align with the programmatic direction of ETP, identifying opportunities to train incumbent workers in prioritized sectors using, when appropriate, multi–employer contracts to meet the needs of industry. (Page 144,147)
The State Board will issue regional planning guidance that details best practices and model partnerships between the workforce system and the community college system, recommending that Local Boards meet their WIOA Section 106 requirements pertaining to coordinated service delivery strategies and shared administrative costs in ways that lay the foundation for a strong partnership with community college CTE programs. This can be done in a variety of ways, including the following:
• by braiding resources to fund job readiness training and provide supportive services for eligible students enrolled in and completing Regional Sector Pathway programs (Page 154, 156)
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. (Page 438)
Strengths: Local Boards have a lot of experience braiding resources and integrating service delivery through the One-Stop system. Local Boards have deep connections to their local communities, and are gaining greater experience working through state and local led regional (Page 443)
The seven policy strategies emphasized in this State Plan—sector strategies, career pathways, “earn and learn”, organizing regionally, providing supportive services, building cross-system data capacity, and braiding resources and integrating services— are evidence-based and have been shown to work, helping ensure effective delivery of services, and increasing the likelihood that those who receive services obtain gainful employment. (Page 455)
INTEGRATING SERVICES AND BRAIDING RESOURCES
• “earn and learn”—using training and education practices that combine applied learning opportunities with compensation; the success of earn and learn programs depends on sustained employer engagement, and where appropriate, the involvement of organized labor, especially as this pertains to the development of partnerships with labor–management apprenticeship and pre–apprenticeship programs
• creating cross–system data capacity, including diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and performance data to assess the value of investments (Page 476)
The State Board will promote integrated service delivery, the braiding of resources, the provision of supportive services, and the promotion of “earn and learn” training models through policy directives outlining the responsibilities of Local Boards and their local partners. Working with its state plan partners, such as EDD-WSB, the State Board will promote the building of local partnerships to carry out these policy strategies and will provide technical assistance to Local Boards and their local partners to see that relevant policies are implemented. Work by the State Board in this area includes the following:
• The State Board has partnered with EDD to create and staff the One-Stop Design workgroup, which brought together state plan partners and other stakeholders to develop a blueprint for service delivery in the state’s AJCCs. Work by this group will inform state policy on integrated service delivery and the braiding of resources at AJCCs, including policy on operations, required partnership, and the articulation of AJCC services with Regional Sector Pathway programs. (More detail on this is provided in chapter 4). (Pages 485, 486, 488, 489, 490)
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs.  (Page 509)
 

DEI/DRC

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~Activities designed to help expand the expertise of adult education providers to adopt distance learning in their instructional strategies is also a priority. To facilitate integrated success among education agencies, the contractor provides an electronic collaborative environment. This includes discussion boards and work groups for the exchange of information about effective program models, teaching techniques, and curriculum. Piloting, implementing, evaluating, and disseminating models for learner–oriented Web sites to encourage students to obtain the knowledge and skills necessary for employment and self–sufficiency are priority objectives. Finally, providing technical assistance, staff training, and program marketing to ensure the optimum usage of communication technology by adult education providers and learners only strengthens distance learning for optimal usage of WIOA funds. (Page 327)
OTAN disseminates information through a multitude of face-to-face and online workshops, conference presentations, and by producing videos that demonstrate teaching with technology and technology integration lesson plans. All videos are archived on OTAN’s website. OTAN recently piloted a Community Model of Online Learning to increase regional access to high-quality online math curriculum for adult learners. The Online Teaching Academy (OTAC) assists instructors in becoming competent online teachers and mentors using Moodle and other instructional technology. It also hosts the Technology Integration Mentor Academy (TIMAC) training, a year-long professional development project where participants to become mentors and increase the effective use of technology in classrooms. The Technology and Distance Learning Symposium rotates each year between north and south geographic locations in the state. (Page 331-332)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~WIOA prioritizes out–of–school youth as demonstrated by the minimum seventy–five percent expenditure requirement, therefore it is imperative for Local Areas to shift their local programs to serve OSY. At the time of enactment, several Local Areas in California were at or near the minimum seventy–five percent OSY expenditure requirement. Local Boards are engaged in strategies to increase their OSY expenditures through partnership and leveraged funding to meet the needs of underserved OSY. The availability of youth program element services such as financial literacy, entrepreneurship, work experience, and follow–up serves as a pivot toward self–sufficiency. (Page 281)
WIOA prioritizes out-of-school youth as demonstrated by the minimum seventy-five percent expenditure requirement, therefore it is imperative for Local Areas to shift their local programs to serve OSY. At the time of enactment, several Local Areas in California were at or near the minimum seventy-five percent OSY expenditure requirement. Local Boards are engaged in strategies to increase their OSY expenditures through partnership and leveraged funding to meet the needs of underserved OSY. The availability of youth program element services such as financial literacy, entrepreneurship, work experience, and follow-up serves as a pivot toward self-sufficiency. (Page 283)
Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination of significant knowledge from research and other sources to designated State unit professionals and paraprofessionals.
The CDOR continues to routinely acquire and disseminate significant VR research, including:
• Newly published research disseminated via CDOR’s Intranet site.
• Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination of significant knowledge from research and other sources to CDOR personnel.
• Topical webinars from VR leaders including the Research Technical Assistance Center, the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities, and the Employment and Training Administration.
 

School to Work Transition

~~3. Regular payments from railroad retirement, strike benefits from union funds, worker’s compensation, and training stipends;
4. Alimony;
5. Military family allotments or other regular support from an absent family member or someone not living in the household;
6. Pensions whether private, government employee (including Military retirement pay);
7. Regular insurance or annuity payments other than Supplemental Security Income disability (SSI) or veterans’ disability;
8. College or university grants, fellowships, and assistantships;
9. Net gambling or lottery winnings;
10. Social Security Disability Insurance payments (SSDI)
• Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) pays benefits to individuals that have worked in the past, paid Social Security taxes, and are currently unable to work for a year or more because of a disability. SSDI is considered income replacement and must be included in family income (All of page 204)
12. Tribal Government Payments (i.e., Per Capita Payments, Lease Payments, Individual Indian Money (IIM);
13. Old age and survivors insurance benefits received under section 202 of the Social Security Act (42 USC 402).
• Old age and survivors insurance benefits include: Social Security Survivor Benefits – these are benefits paid to people up to age 18 who have had a parent die and the parent paid wages into the system; and
• Social Security Retirement Benefits – these are benefits that are paid to people who reached their social security age and have wages paid in the system. (Page 205)
 

Career Pathways

~~WorkAbility I Program
The WorkAbility I program is administered through the California Department of Education. The goal of the WorkAbility I is to provide pre-employment training, employment placement and follow up for high school students in special education who are transitioning from school to work, independent living and postsecondary education or training. (Page 341)
Employment Transition Services:
• Outreach to schools and closer collaboration between VR and Local Education Agency staff that do not currently have a Transition Partnership Programs cooperative arrangement.
• Expand transition services beyond school to work to include school to postsecondary training transitions.
• Provide information about the transition from school to work at an earlier age to students with disabilities.
• Provide benefits education planning and services to students as well as parents and guardians of students with disabilities.
• Provide specialized training and increase awareness for VR staff and service providers on the unique needs of students with disabilities.
In addition, there are a number of methods that CDOR will utilize to ensure the provision of the core Pre-Employment Transition Services to students with disabilities: (Page 350)
• AB 287 (2009) established the Employment First Policy, which led to a standing Employment First Committee formed by the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. The bill expands employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and identifies best practices and incentives for increasing integrated employment and gainful employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Employment First policy requires Regional Centers to develop Individual Program Plans to ensure individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities beginning at age 14 are provided options, competitive integrated employment, and post-secondary education to enable the consumer to transition from school to work. CDOR is an active participant in the Employment First Committee to help with transition planning.
• California Competitive Integrated Employment: Blueprint for Reform for Individuals with Disabilities. In December 2014, CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to further advance the state’s “Employment First” Policy and other federal and state laws to address employment in integrated settings, at competitive wages, for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The goal of the California Competitive Integrated Employment effort is to develop a “blueprint” that will outline plans for:
 Improving collaboration and coordination between the three departments to prepare and support all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment;
 Building capacity to increase opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment to prepare for and participate in the California workforce development system; (Page 355)
For both youth with disabilities and students with disabilities:
• Outreach to schools and closer collaboration between VR and Local Education Agency staff that do not currently have a Transition Partnership Programs cooperative agreement.
• Expand transition services beyond school to work to school to postsecondary training transitions.
• Provide information about the transition from school to work at an earlier age to youth with disabilities and students with disabilities.
• Provide benefits education planning and services to students with disabilities and youth with disabilities as well as parents and guardians of youth with disabilities and students with disabilities.
• Provide specialized training and increase awareness for VR staff and service providers on the unique needs of youth with disabilities and students with disabilities.  (Page 372)
 

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Requirements for regional plans, and will share regional plan content with state partners, including information pertaining to prioritized sectors and career pathways identified in the course of the regional planning process. The sharing of this information will facilitate, as appropriate, engagement with regional efforts by other State Plan partners such as DOR ETP, and CalWORKs.
Local Boards (Title I) working together regionally will work alongside CTE faculty and Deans from the community colleges, representatives from the CCCCO’s WEDD program, representatives from K–12 CTE programs, state–funded Adult Education Block Grant consortia, and federally funded Title II providers to convene and engage employers, especially the representatives of leading and emergent industry sectors to do the following:
• Assess industry workforce needs
• Determine whether existing training and education programs in the region are producing what industry needs
• Identify existing career pathway programs that meet leading and emergent industry sector needs
• Recommend any necessary adjustments to facilitate the development and validation of career pathway programs to meet industry needs
• Broker regional partnerships to move students and workers through relevant pathway programs that result in the attainment of industry recognized degrees or credentials, including individuals with barriers to employment (Page 107)
Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in–demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post–secondary education.
Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE). (Page108)
The State Board has entered into an agreement with SBE/CDE to support and encourage the integration of work–based learning activities in all locally funded WIOA youth programs to involve interactions with industry professionals and include career awareness, career exploration, internships and career pathways training activities.
• Additionally, the State Board has entered into an agreement with CDSS, the CWDA, and the Chancellor’s Office of Supportive Services to encourage and promote local partnerships that articulate subsidized employment programs operated by County Welfare Departments with career pathways programs, including “Regional Sector Pathway” programs identified and developed in WIOA regional plans. Where robust partnerships develop, these pathway programs should be designed to service TANF recipients, taking care to meet the particular client needs of those being served.
• The State Board has entered a similar agreement with DOR to promote access to competitive integrated employment at the local level so as to ensure quality jobs for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. (Page 110)
• Aligning basic skills coursework with career pathways programs and adopting contextualized learning practices that combine basic education and skills coursework with CTE coursework
• Braiding resources from WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs with WIOA Title II programs to provide supportive services to those attending basic education and skills programs so as to facilitate both course and program completion; local partnerships may include charter schools focused on serving out of school youth and operating under Education Code Section 47612.1(a)
• Ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with, and have access to, relevant job–readiness training and job search and placement services
• Ensuring that Title II and other adult education program participants are familiar with and have access to opportunities to enter postsecondary education programs (Page 113)
AJCC system and, working with EDD, will issue One–Stop policies to secure representation from all mandatory partners in all comprehensive One–Stops.
• The State Board has entered into an agreement with SBE/CDE to support and encourage the integration of work–based learning activities in all locally funded WIOA youth programs to involve interactions with industry professionals and include career awareness, career exploration, internships and career pathways training activities.
• Additionally, the State Board has entered into an agreement with CDSS, the CWDA, and the Chancellor’s Office of Supportive Services to encourage and promote local partnerships that articulate subsidized employment programs operated by County Welfare Departments with career pathways programs, including “Regional Sector Pathway” programs identified and developed in WIOA regional plans. Where robust partnerships develop, these pathway programs should be designed to service TANF recipients, taking care to meet the particular client needs of those being served.
• The State Board has entered a similar agreement with DOR to promote access to competitive integrated employment at the local level so as to ensure quality jobs for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
• Working with EDD, the State Board has already issued policies pertaining to Eligible Training Providers and the use of alternative training models, including OJT, to encourage the use of “earn and learn” approaches to training by local boards.
• Working with partner state agencies, such as DOR and CDSS, the State Board will issue joint communications, policy directives, and local planning guidance designed to not only secure an adequate level of partnership in the One–Stops, but also to adopt best practices and model partnerships at the local level that emphasize skills attainment for individuals with barriers to employment. A central feature of these partnerships will be the braiding of resources to ensure access to a comprehensive menu of services tailored to the individuals needs and provided by program partners on the basis of program core competencies. (Page 121)
The State Board will also review regional plans to ensure compliance with state guidance and WIOA requirements for regional plans, and will share regional plan content with state partners, including information pertaining to prioritized sectors and career pathways identified in the course of the regional planning process. The sharing of this information will facilitate, as appropriate, engagement with regional efforts by other State Plan partners such as DOR ETP, and CalWORKs.
Local Boards (Title I) working together regionally will work alongside CTE faculty and Deans from the community colleges, representatives from the CCCCO’s WEDD program, representatives from K–12 CTE programs, state–funded Adult Education Block Grant consortia, and federally funded Title II providers to convene and engage employers, especially the representatives of leading and emergent industry sectors to do the following: (Page 142)
Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in–demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post–secondary education.
Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).
DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal laws, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K–12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners.  (Page 143)
• General policy development to further system alignment of workforce, job services, training, and education programs.
• Research and policy development toward the delivery of effective One-Stop services, including policies facilitating One-Stop access for those with barriers to employment.
• Research on policies concerning effective sector engagement.
• Research on the building of career pathways tailored to client population needs, including research on how successful partnerships braid funds to facilitate movement through a career pathway that straddles multiple programs or service delivery structures.
• Examination of effective regional organizing efforts so as to identify the key elements of successful regional partnerships.
• Providing policy information to system partners to aid staff development.
• Providing policy information on successful practices to facilitate the building of local board capacity.
• Evidence-based research and policy development on the use of effective training programs responsive to labor market needs.
The Policy, Legislation, and Research Branch unit played a lead role in convening state plan partners, informing these partners on the legislative requirements of WIOA, sharing policy research on evidence-based practices, and facilitating agreement on the policy content of the State Plan by staffing the multiple workgroups engaged in the planning process. (Page 208)
Activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, Local Boards, One-Stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways.
Flexible Schedules and Coordination with Support Services: The degree to which the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with federal, state, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs (Page 237)
For CRPs within the state:
• Evaluate the vendor reimbursement model to ensure it adequately covers the cost of providing quality services.
• Expand job exploration and placement services for VR consumers to include more time and focus on career pathways and business sector strategies.
• Identify ways for CDOR to assume more of the vendor’s risks such as paying for no-show appointments and background checks for new jobs.
• Increase training and coordination efforts between CDOR staff and CRPs regarding the use of assistive technology, including the procedures for purchasing and requesting repairs.
• More in-depth training for consumers and CRP staff regarding CDOR’s process for plan development and employment services so consumers and vendors will better understand their roles and responsibilities to each other and to the VRSD team. (Page 372)
[1] WIOA section 134 requires that priority of service be given to recipients of public assistance, other low-income individuals, and individuals that are basic skills deficient for any expenditure of WIOA Adult program funds spent on individualized career services and training. Similarly, California Unemployment Insurance Code section 14000 (b) (6) requires that programs and services be accessible to “individuals with employment barriers, such as persons with economic, physical, or other barriers to employment.” California Unemployment Insurance Code section 14013(d)(2) further directs the State Board to develop “strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment, and including individuals with disabilities, with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.” (Page 441)
• Creating a marketing/communication team of WIOA core partners at the State level: (EDD, DOR, CDSS, CCCCO, Adult Ed, the State Board, CWA, DOA, HCD, National programs).
• Identifying a single point of contact for each Local Board to facilitate regular interaction/communication between the state partner programs, including all core programs, and local stakeholders.
• Establishing a protocol and communication policy for all core partners and committing to talking regularly as a system.
• Utilizing social media and virtual communication tools.
• Developing a branding policy for the AJCC.
Through the efforts of the One–Stop Design Workgroup and the WIOA Implementation Committee Workgroups, the State Board has entered into agreements with mandated and voluntary partners and stakeholders to ensure implementation of an integrated, job driven service delivery system that provides job seekers (specifically individuals with barriers to employment) with the skills and credentials necessary to secure and advance in career pathways, and enable employers to identify and hire skilled workers and grow their businesses. (Page 473)
• Sector strategies: aligning workforce and education programs with sector needs; the success of these efforts will depend on the depth of industry engagement.
• Career pathways: enabling progressive skills development through education and training programs, using multiple entry and exit points, so that each level of skills development increases the likelihood of success in the labor market; these pathways should be flexibly designed and include, where necessary, remedial programming, so as to allow those with basic skills deficiencies an ability to participate
• Regional partnerships: building partnerships between industry leaders, workforce professionals, education and training providers, and economic development leaders to support regional economic growth; the success of these efforts will depend on the depth of industry engagement
• “earn and learn”—using training and education practices that combine applied learning opportunities with compensation; the success of earn and learn programs depends on sustained employer engagement, and where appropriate, the involvement of organized labor, especially as this pertains to the development of partnerships with labor–management apprenticeship and pre–apprenticeship programs
• Supportive services: providing ancillary services like childcare, transportation, and counseling to facilitate program completion
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and services to meet client needs
• Creating cross–system data capacity, including diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and performance data to assess the value of investments (Page 476)
Local Boards (Title I) working together regionally will work alongside CTE faculty and Deans from the community colleges, representatives from the CCCCO’s WEDD program, representatives from K–12 CTE programs, state–funded Adult Education Block Grant consortia, and federally funded Title II providers to convene and engage employers, especially the representatives of leading and emergent industry sectors to do the following:
• Assess industry workforce needs
• Determine whether existing training and education programs in the region are producing what industry needs
• Identify existing career pathway programs that meet leading and emergent industry sector needs
• Recommend any necessary adjustments to facilitate the development and validation of career pathway programs to meet industry needs
• broker regional partnerships to move students and workers through relevant pathway programs that result in the attainment of industry recognized degrees or credentials, including individuals with barriers to employment
Local Boards may play the role of convener, broker, and matchmaker in regional efforts, bringing together the regional partners, but need not do so where other regional workforce and education champions step forward to play this role. (Page 481)
Additionally, the State Board CDE, CCCCO, DOR, and EDD have agreed to encourage the leveraging of local resources to align education, employment, training, and supportive services so as to provide opportunities for career exploration and guidance, and to support further educational attainment by making opportunities for skills training in in–demand industries and occupations available to youth who wish to enter a career pathway and/or enroll in post–secondary education.
 Additionally, based on information developed through the regional planning process and disseminated by the State Board and its local partners, DOR will use information pertaining to Regional Sector Pathway programs to inform its consumers about career pathways programs aligned with regional labor market needs so as to provide for informed consumer choice in the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).
DOR staff and their partners in the disability services community, to the extent permissible under state and federal law, will work locally and regionally with Local Board staff as well as training and education providers, including K–12 and community college partners, to increase enrollment opportunities for DOR consumers and referrals to AJCC of individuals with disabilities who are not served by DOR, taking into account the alignment of needs, preferences, and the capacities of the consumers being served. Efforts will need to be made to ensure physical, technological, and programmatic access to Regional Sector Pathway programs for the disabled. This is a shared responsibility of state plan partners. (Page 482)
DOR Priority -- Physical, programmatic and electronic access for youth with disabilities including the following:
Access to One-Stop career services and WIOA Title 1 Youth program (WIOA Strategies: Integrated Service Delivery and Braided Resources, Providing Supportive Services) (Planning Guidance Tier: Required)
Vehicle: One-Stop MOU and certification requirements, Local Planning Guidance.
Access to training and education programs, including career pathways, internships, apprenticeships (WIOA Strategies: Career Pathways, Earn and Learn)(Planning Guidance Tier: Required)
Vehicle: DOR staff working locally and regionally with Local Board staff and training and education providers to increase co-enrollment opportunities of DOR consumers with local training and education providers based on alignment of needs, desires, capacities.
DOR outreach to youth with disabilities through AJCCs and cross training of DOR staff on other services to be provided through AJCCs (Planning Guidance Tier: Required)
Vehicle: One-Stop MOU and certification requirements, Local Planning Guidance; additionally DOR and CWDB will ensure cross-training of frontline staff in the AJCCs; finally, the DOR will provide the Local Boards linkages to DOR’s youth programs. (Page 527)
Regional level include a DOR representative to help make employers aware of incentives and strategies for the hiring of individuals with disabilities.
Participation in Employer Engagement efforts at the state level (WIOA Strategy Sector Strategies).
Vehicle: facilitated access to employers engaged in statewide sector strategies initiatives
Information on Sector Strategies, Career Pathways, Labor Market Information (WIOA Strategy Sector Strategies, Career Pathways)
Vehicle: CWDB will ensure that DOR has access to and participation in the regional WIOA plans and programs which detail targeted sectors, prioritized career pathways, and regional labor market analyses. This will include consideration for individuals and youth with disabilities. (Page 528)
 

Employer Engagement

~~The CDOR actively coordinates with the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program. Ticket to Work is a voluntary work incentive program for Social Security Disability Insurance or Supplemental Security Income beneficiaries between the ages of 18 and 64 who are interested in going to work. The Ticket to Work Program provides beneficiaries with access to VR, training, and placement services, as well as other services and support. Beneficiaries can use their ticket to obtain employment services and support from CDOR or they can take their ticket to an approved service provider called an Employment Network. A ticket cannot be assigned to an Employment Network and in-use with CDOR at the same time.
The CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners and VR Counselors have an active role in the Ticket to Work program. CDOR’s Work Incentives Planners verify ticket status, provide information as needed, and facilitate referrals to Employment Networks at case closure. VR counselors distribute CDOR’s Ticket to Work fact sheet at intake, verify the ticket status prior to approving the Individualized Plan for Employment, and facilitate sequential services. (Page 346)
 

511

~~• Continue coordination and collaboration with the California Department of Education and the California Department of Developmental Services as outlined in the Blueprint to prepare and support all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who choose competitive integrated employment.
• Promote collaboration at the local level and develop local partnership agreements between CDOR Districts, local education agencies, and the California Department of Developmental Services-funded local regional centers that address competitive integrated employment.
• Improve data collection and sharing between CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services.
• Hold stakeholder meetings and forums to communicate information on achieving competitive integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
• Amend the current Interagency Agreements between CDOR, the California Department of Education, and the California Department of Developmental Services to include an emphasis on competitive integrated employment and local linkages, as referenced in the Blueprint.
• Consistent with WIOA Section 511, the new VRSD teams will support competitive integrated employment consistent with WIOA and will provide additional career counseling services. The career counseling services will be delivered in a manner that facilitates independent decision making and informed choice as the individual with a disability makes decisions regarding employment and career advancement activities. (Page 390)
Through the use of baseline data and the semi–annual statistic adjustment model, the state plans to update performance accountability measures to assess the effectiveness of serving those with barriers to employment, as well as WIOA and state level policy objectives and the level of services coordinated and identified in the strategic plan.
The State Board will convene core program partners and those strategic partners with whom performance outcomes are aligned to discuss, where appropriate, how the state will negotiate goals with federal agencies and local areas.
In consultation with strategic partners and local areas, the State Board will emphasize the skills attainment measure across programs because greater skill attainment leads to higher median earnings, greater percentages of employed participants, and helps the state reach the goal of one million middle–skill industry recognized credentials over the next ten years.
To help facilitate reliable and valid data for the assessment of programs and ability to serve individuals with barriers, the State Board will work with core program partners to identify strategies for robust data collection in all federally mandated reports, as well as additional measures identified by the state. (Page 471)
 

Mental Health

~~ACCESS FOR THE DISABLED
The state has existing policy guidance, which it will soon be updating and reissuing, regarding individuals with disabilities having equal access to services and information funded by WIOA Title I programs and partner agencies:
• Workforce Services Directives WSD10-1 and WSD10-2 - Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Procedures and Biennial LWIA Self-Assessment, respectively, communicate the requirements regarding compliance with state and federal disability laws and procedures for ensuring accessible physical environments for all customers, including individuals with disabilities.
In support of these policies, the State Board is an active member of DOR’s State Rehabilitation Counsel and the DOR represents individuals with disabilities on Local Boards. EDD maintains a Disability Policy Employment and Collaboration Unit (DPEC), whose primary objective is to develop both WIOA-required and discretionary partnerships to facilitate employment for individuals with disabilities. (Page 247)
The State Board is committed to ensuring individuals with disabilities have physical and programmatic access to the AJCC system and services. The State Board, in consultation with chief elected officials and Local Boards, will establish objective criteria and procedures to evaluate the AJCCs and delivery system for effectiveness. The evaluation will include how well the local job centers ensure equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities to participate in or benefit from AJCC services. The evaluation must also include criteria evaluating how well the centers and local delivery systems take actions to comply with the disability-related regulations implementing WIOA section 188, set forth in 29 CFR part 37. (Page 248)
AJCC Accessibility Certification
The State Board is committed to ensuring individuals with disabilities have physical and programmatic access to the AJCC system and services. The State Board, in consultation with chief elected officials and Local Boards, will establish objective criteria and procedures to evaluate the AJCCs and delivery system for effectiveness. The evaluation will include how well the local job centers ensure equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities to participate in or benefit from AJCC services. The evaluation must also include criteria evaluating how well the centers and local delivery systems take actions to comply with the disability-related regulations implementing WIOA section 188, set forth in 29 CFR part 37. (Page 519)
 

Policies and Initiatives

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Home and Community-Based Alternatives (HCBA) Waiver Solicitation for Application (SFA) - 12/04/2017

~~“The Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) has released the Solicitation for Application (SFA) included below, to invite eligible organizations to apply to become HCBA Waiver ‘“Waiver Agencies.’”  Applicants selected to become Contracted Waiver Agencies will receive funding to perform waiver administrative functions within a defined service area and to provide Comprehensive Care Management services to Waiver participants.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Program (SEP) Forms - 11/03/2017

~~This page has links to “forms are provided for use by DOR and service providers for Supported Employment (SE), Transitional Employment, and general (non-SE) job coaching.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

AB-1111 Removing Barriers to Employment Act: Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative - 10/15/2017

~~“Existing law, the California Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, establishes the California Workforce Development Board as the body responsible for assisting the Governor in the development, oversight, and continuous improvement of California’s workforce investment system and the alignment of the education and workforce investment systems to the needs of the 21st century economy and workforce. That act requires the establishment of a local workforce development board in each local workforce development area of the state to, among other things, carry out analyses of the economic conditions in the local region.

This bill would enact the Removing Barriers to Employment Act, which would establish the Breaking Barriers to Employment Initiative administered by the California Workforce Development Board. The bill would specify that the purpose of the initiative is to create a grant program to provide individuals with barriers to employment the services they need to enter, participate in, and complete broader workforce preparation, training, and education programs aligned with regional labor market needs. The bill would specify that people completing these programs should have the skills and competencies to successfully enter the labor market, retain employment, and earn wages that lead to self-sufficiency and economic security. The bill would require the board to develop criteria for the selection of grant recipients, as specified. The bill also would specify the criteria by which grants are required to be evaluated, the populations that are eligible to be served by grants, and the activities eligible for grant funding.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

AB-1607 An act to amend Sections 4688.21 and 4850.3 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, Rrelating to Developmental Sservices. - 09/19/2017

~~“Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Existing law establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities….

This bill would authorize a consumer in a supported employment program or work activity program who has the stated goal of integrated competitive employment in his or her IPP to request to use tailored day services in conjunction with his or her existing program to achieve that goal, if specified criteria are met, including that the type, amount, and provider of tailored day service allowed under these provisions is determined through the IPP process. The bill would specify the maximum hours of tailored day services that may be authorized in conjunction with existing services under these provisions.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

California HCBS Transition Plan - 09/01/2017

The California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) has developed a Statewide Transition Plan (STP) submitted to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) on August 14, 2015.  The STP describes how the State will come into compliance with new Federal Home and Community-Based (HCB) setting requirements that became effective March 17, 2014.  These regulations are CMS 2249-F and CMS 2296-F, which affect 1915(c) and 1915(i) HCB services waivers and State Plan programs.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Employment First Policy” - 07/19/2017

~~“Resources and guidelines for educators, parents, and agencies that will assist transition age youth develop postsecondary goals that lead to competitive, integrated employment (CIE).” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Workability Transition Program - 07/03/2017

~~• “The WAI program offers students with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) the opportunity to complete their secondary education while also obtaining marketable job skills. WAI provides secondary students with an understanding of job seeking and job keeping skills. The employability of students improves through occupational class training and on-the-job subsidized or unsubsidized work experience.• • The WAI program seeks employers in the business community who will give students with special needs a chance to prove themselves in a competitive integrated employment setting. Local program sites successfully coordinate state and local service providers to offer comprehensive services tailored to local economic, social, and geographic needs and abilities.• • Two year follow-along support services provided by local program staff greatly increase the potential for student employment success.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Assembly Bill No. 107 CHAPTER 18 - 06/27/2017

~~“Existing law requires the regional center contracts described above to include, among other things, annual performance objectives, as specified. Existing law also establishes the Employment First Policy, which is the policy that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities.

This bill would require the annual performance objectives included in regional center contracts to measure progress, and report outcomes, in implementing the Employment First Policy, as specified.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“$2 million to assist Californians with disabilities in job searches” - 06/19/2017

~~“People with disabilities in 13 counties will get additional help in landing employment with $2 million in grants announced by the California Employment Development Department today. The Disability Employment Accelerator grants assist people with disabilities obtain skills needed for employment in growing industries such as advanced manufacturing, clean energy, transportation, and healthcare.The disability employment assistance funds will help prepare job seekers with skills and training needed for careers and then connect them with hiring businesses. The organizations receiving the grants will use “earn-and-learn” strategies that empower people with disabilities to earn incomes while they learn new skills that will help them progress into high-growth industries” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Disability Employment Accelerator PY 2016-17“AWARD LIST AND PROJECT SUMMARIES” - 06/19/2017

~~“On June 19, 2017, $2 million of WIOA, Governor’s Discretionary 15 percent funds were awarded to seven workforce development agencies under the Disability Employment Accelerator (DEA) for Program Year (PY) 2016-17 Solicitation for Proposals. Awardee project list and project summaries are listed below. Funding decisions are final.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

The Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (AB 1041) - 10/09/2013

“The Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act authorizes the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide support and services to individuals with developmental disabilities.”   “This bill would define competitive employment, microenterprises, and self-employment for these purposes. The bill would additionally require the Employment First Committee to identify existing sources of consumer data that can be matched with employment data, as specified, and to recommend goals for measuring employment participation and outcomes for various consumers within the developmental services system. … This bill would require each regional center planning team, when developing an individual program plan for a transition age youth or working age adult, to consider a specified Employment First Policy.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

2008 California Legislative Session - 01/01/2009

This is a report on the changes made to AB 5, AB 1183, SB 1175, and SB 1774 and their impact on services for people with developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Cal. Welfare and Institutions Code §4646.5

Addresses the requirements behind creating an individual program plan for a transition age youth or working age adult with developmental disabilities.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Cal. Welfare and Institutions Code §§4868 et seq.

Establishes an Employment First Committee under the authority of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. It pledges to “make services and supports available to enable persons with developmental disabilities to approximate the pattern of everyday living available to people without disabilities of the same age, to support the integration of persons with developmental disabilities into the mainstream life of the community, and to bring about more independent, productive, and normal lives for the persons served, it is the policy of the state that opportunities for integrated, competitive employment shall be given the highest priority for working age individuals with developmental disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities. This policy shall be known as the Employment First Policy.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

California Executive Order S-4-05 - 11/28/2005

“ …WHEREAS, State Government has an opportunity and a responsibility to lead by example, ensuring individuals with disabilities have an open door to the many opportunities in public service;… NOW, THEREFORE, I, ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor of the State of California do hereby issue this order to become effective immediately: 1. All state agencies, departments, boards and commissions shall utilize best efforts with respect to recruitment, hiring, advancement, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment and issue clear, written directives to their managers and supervisors prohibiting discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. 2. Each state agency shall comply with existing law and annually review its hiring practices to identify any barriers to employment of individuals with disabilities, and, in consultation with their disability advisory committee, take appropriate action to eliminate any non job-related barriers to the integration of individuals with disabilities into the workforce. 3. All state agencies, departments, boards, and commissions shall utilize the Limited Examination and Appointment Program (LEAP) lists in filling vacancies. LEAP lists provide a ready pool of qualified candidates, who happen to have a disability, for a variety of jobs. 4. The State Personnel Board shall provide statewide leadership, in partnership with the Department of Rehabilitation, to coordinate and provide technical guidance to fulfill the intent of this executive order…”

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 20 of 37

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Disability Employment Accelerator PY 2016-17“AWARD LIST AND PROJECT SUMMARIES” - 06/19/2017

~~“On June 19, 2017, $2 million of WIOA, Governor’s Discretionary 15 percent funds were awarded to seven workforce development agencies under the Disability Employment Accelerator (DEA) for Program Year (PY) 2016-17 Solicitation for Proposals. Awardee project list and project summaries are listed below. Funding decisions are final.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

2017-18 State Budget Briefing - 06/15/2017

~~“Employment First Policies for Individual with Disabilities:  Adopts trailer bill language that requires that performance objectives included in regional center contracts measure progress and outcomes in implementing the Employment First policy.  Updates the rate paid for vouchered community-based training services and specified supportive employment services to $14.99 per hour and $36.57 per hour, respectively, to reflect the rate increases provided in 2016 enacted legislation, Assembly Bill X2 1 (Thurmond), Chapter 3, Statutes of 2016”.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

California Department of Developmental Services “2014-2015 Annual Report Employment and Day Programs” - 05/17/2017

~~“This report summarizes economic and employment outcomes for DDS consumers with ID/DD.  Consumer information is used to develop program evaluation processes, project growth in costs, and develop future outcome-based program changes. Age group reports, such as a report showing data for 22-31 year olds, provide a look at how education is preparing young adults who are transitioning from school to work and day programs.

The DDS Employment and Day Program Annual Report includes community caseloads, age of individuals served by DDS, purchase of service (POS) dollars expended by service type, percentage of consumers employed by year, statewide counts of persons receiving services, per person costs, and percentage of consumers staying in the same service type year to year. The report includes data aggregated by the following services and/or categories:• Supported Employment Program (SEP) Individual• SEP Group• Work Activity Programs (WAP)• Day Programs• Look Alike Day Programs• Combination of two or more programs• Not In Day Programs or Work Programs”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

WIOA Local Workforce Plan 2017-2020 - 05/10/2017

~~“The City of Los Angeles Workforce Development Board’s Local Plan outlines the vision of its workforce development system to prepare and place individuals into self-sufficient employment, focuses on career pathway employment opportunities, and emphasizes strategies for system collaboration. The three pillars of the Local Plan are: improving the skills (up-skilling) of the workforce; employer engagement focused on sectors; and system building through collaboration. The strategies include:• Focusing on education and training for all job seekers (adults, youth, dislocated and incumbent) by emphasizing credentials and high school graduation attainment.• Engaging employers and industry groups to develop strong sector pathways to address the evolving demands of the economy and the required workplace skills.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

State Council on Developmental Disabilities. (2015). Employment First Committee annual report. - 04/28/2017

~~• ‘Since the national recession, California’s economy has strengthened, especially over the last few years. However, many people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) are not benefiting from one of the strongest economies in the world. However, there is some good news. There are major policy changes underway designed to improve employment for people with I/DD. Well-meaning practices have typically placed people into segregated settings, often receiving subminimum wages.• • These programs are often leave participants less prepared to enter traditional employment than if they had never participated in the program.• • California’s Employment First Policy paired with local projects and national efforts, like the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and changes in the Home and Community Based Services waiver program, should begin to improve employment for people with I/DD.” 

Systems
  • Other

“Youth And Subminimum Wage Employment” - 02/16/2017

~~“The foundation of the Vocational Rehabilitation program is the principle that individuals with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities, are capable of achieving high quality Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) when provided the necessary services and supports. The passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) ensures all individuals with disabilities are provided the necessary services and supports to achieve CIE. This is especially true for youth 24 years of age or younger, as the WIOA emphasizes that youth with disabilities have meaningful opportunities to receive the services they need to achieve employment outcomes in CIE.

The WIOA further reinforces the congressional intent that CIE is the preferred employment outcome by placing limitations on the use of subminimum wage (SMW), especially for youth. The limitations include prescriptive timelines for the transmission of documentation from the school to the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR). The DOR requires that any youth seeking SMW employment is provided mandatory services and documentation prior to working at SMW. Mandatory services include multiple opportunities to discuss and explore CIE in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

“For Employers” on 14(c) subminimum wages - 01/25/2017

~~“Section 511 prohibits employers from paying a subminimum wage to individuals with disabilities unless each individual is provided career counseling and information and referral services (CC&IR) at required intervals. Employers must also provide the individual with information about self-advocacy, self-determination, and peer mentoring training opportunities in the community. WIOA also requires 14(c) certificate holders to maintain documentation that individuals employed at subminimum wage prior to July 22, 2016, receive CC&IR services at least once by July 22, 2017, and annually thereafter. For individuals hired at subminimum wage on or after July 22, 2016, CC&IR services must be provided every six months for the first year of employment and annually thereafter.

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) is available to provide federally required CC&IR services for your employees receiving subminimum wage. Included in the career counseling, employees will learn about federal and state programs and local resources that offer employment-related services and supports designed to enable the individual to explore, experience, and attain competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

“Secondary Transition Planning” - 01/01/2017

~~• “This Web page offers resources and guidelines for assisting educators, parents, and agency partners to improve compliance with state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to transition age youth and improve post-high school outcomes. These resources supplement the California Transition Alliance’s document, Transition Planning: The Basics. Resources are organized into five categories: Employment, Education and Training, Independent Living, Compliance, and the Guideposts for Success document.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017-2021 State Plan - 08/04/2016

~~“Goal 2: Employment Californians with I/DD and their families reflecting the diversity of the state will have increased information to obtain competitive, integrated employment. 1. The Council will increase and promote culturally competent strategies and resources that facilitate competitive, integrated employment (CIE) of people with I/DD. 2. The Council, in consultation with its federal partners, will increase identification, advocacy and/or sponsorship of legislative, regulatory, policy, procedure and/or practice changes to increase CIE for people with I/DD.”

Systems
  • Other

California Department of Developmental Services “Supported Employment Program – Individual Forms” - 07/20/2016

These forms are to be used by work service (formerly Habilitation) providers and regional centers to process This page has links to forms for the Supported Employment Program both for individuals and groups, Work Services information, and Vocational Rehabilitation for such things as service plans, monthly reports, referrals, program changes The Excel forms can be downloaded and completed using the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet program. The PDF instructions can be downloaded and printed using the free Adobe Acrobat Reader. For further information, please read the instructions accompanying each form.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

“Local Partnership Agreement Template" - 06/17/2017

~~“The California Department of Education (CDE), the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), and the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) seek to foster an environment of collaboration to increase competitive integrated employment (CIE) opportunities for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD).

Competitive Integrated Employment is described in plain language by the motto: “Real Work for Real Pay in the Real World.” The term means working for pay (at least minimum wage) in the community alongside people without disabilities. Work can be full-time (up to 40 hours per week) or part-time with the same level of benefits and opportunities for advancement as other employees.

The CIE Blueprint outlines the collaborative efforts between the three departments on a statewide level. A Local Partnership Agreement (LPA) identifies the ways in which partners will work together on a local level. Each agreement is built around the core partners of one or more local educational agencies (LEA), one or more DOR district, and one or more regional centers, and can include any number of additional local community partners.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego-Imperial Counties Developmental Services, Inc. "Employment First" - 05/10/2016

~~California’s Employment First Policy was signed into law in October of 2013, by Governor Brown.dds.ca.govCompetitive employment is finding a job within the community where you are paid about the same as other people doing the same job and at least minimum wage. It could also be working for yourself in your own small business.Information about the Employment First Policy can be found on the website of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities (scdd.ca.gov) as well as the Department of Developmental Services (dds.ca.gov).Employment & Your Individual Program Plan (IPP)When you plan with your service coordinator around employment opportunities, the first option that will be considered is competitive integrated employment. Competitive work is a real choice. Your service coordinator can help you find resources in the community to support your employment goals.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

CA Employment First Memorandum of Understanding - 12/12/2014

This project will use a multi-faceted approach to apply key elements from high performing states in integrated competitive employment and principles of Collaborative Leadership. A unified value, vision, and expectation for competitive integrated employment will be established and will serve as the basis for the strategies used for stimulating policy to practice, training, technical assistance, and a shared method for monitoring progress through available state and local employment data.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Employment First Committee Annual Report (Partnerships) - 01/16/2013

The Council participates in the Alliance for Full Participation California team. The AFP is a collaboration of major national organizations (including the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities) serving or advocating for improved employment outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The California team is facilitated by the Arc of California. The Council has also started coordinating with the California Committee for the Employment of People with Disabilities, established by statute to promote the employment of people with disabilities. Additionally, members of the Employment First Committee continue to actively work with key groups throughout the state to promote Employment First. 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

San Diego Workforce Partnership: Policy and Systemic Influence - 07/02/2007

Project Overview: Grant number, name and location: Customized Employment - 01, San Diego, CA, E-9-4-1-0081 Grant recipient: San Diego Workforce Partnership, Inc. Project Lead: San Diego Workforce Partnership, Inc.

Subcontractors: Five One-Stop Centers; Access Center (an assistive technology technical assistance resource center); and the University Center on Excellence on Disabilities (UCED) at San Diego University.

  Early on, the grantee subcontracted most of its activities to Community Service Providers (Goodwill and Able/Disabled primarily), but radically changed its structure after two years to internalize the activities of the grant in its own system.   Key Lessons/Accomplishments Workforce Investment Board (WIB) and WIB administrative agencies are key players in workforce policy issues, if they choose to take a strong role Performance measures are a manageable challenge when treated constructively by the WIB Lack of experience is a key barrier to customized business-outreach efforts Grant structure (and overuse of subcontractors) severely hinders the capacity for systems and policy change.
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

The California Employment Consortium for Youth and Young Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (CECY)

~~“(CECY) is a collaboration of 23 state agencies, centers, and organizations, families, and self-advocates with responsibilities for the education, rehabilitation, employment, and support of youth with disabilities.  CECY is a five-year (2011-2016) Project of National Significance Partnerships in Employment Systems Change grant (#90DN0284) by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD).  The Tarjan Center at UCLA, a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, provides its administrative leadership. “
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

Transition2Life Project (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

“The Transition2Life Project will provide direct, hands-on training and learning opportunities focusing on effective transitions to inclusive adult lives for young adults with developmental disabilities living in Amador, Calaveras, and Tuolumne counties.” 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

The goal of this project is to implement a “Get a Competitive Edge” Work Safe & Self-Advocacy program for consumers and employees with disabilities as part of The Rusty Wagon Adult Vocational Program.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Progressive Employment Concepts (CA State Council on DD Community Development Grants)

 “This project will provide hands on training to staff and clients in the discovery and customized employment process leading to a customized employment outcome for a minimum of two individuals. This project will allow Progressive Employment Concepts to gain the tools needed to have continued success in finding jobs for the individuals we serve, especially those with higher support needs.” Awarded in  Sacramento and Placer Counties.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

California Readiness Of Minors in Supplemental Security Income (CaPROMISE) Initiative

“The PROMISE initiative is intended to improve the provision and coordination of services for child SSI recipients and their families. The services help child recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these child SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CA State Council on Developmental Disabilities Employment First Committee Annual Report

The second annual report of the Employment First Committee (EFC) of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities includes: priorities adopted by the State Council as recommended by the EFC; second-year work of the EFC, interagency activities, and policy activities; the current status of the employment of individuals with developmental disabilities; and next steps for the EFC.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

California Ticket to Work/Work Incentives Program

Ticket to Work (TTW) is a voluntary work incentive program for Social Security Administration’s (SSA) Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries who are between the ages of 18 and 64 and interested in going to work. The goal of the TTW Program is to assist beneficiaries in obtaining employment and working toward becoming self-sufficient.   Work Incentives are SSA rules that make it possible for people with disabilities receiving SSDI and SSI to explore work options and reach their work goals without losing their benefits prematurely. Social Security Work Incentives help beneficiaries remove barriers to work by offering support services and providing a safety net to assist beneficiaries in finding meaningful employment and succeeding in the workplace.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California Employment Consortium for Youth

“California Employment Consortium for Youth: California was awarded a federal 5-year employment systems change grant by The Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to increase the number of youth and young adults with intellectual disabilities in integrated competitive employment (ICE). The State Council is a lead agency along with the Departments of Rehabilitation, Developmental Services and Education. The California Employment Consortium for Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (CECY) is a 30 member highly knowledgeable and experienced employment work group comprised of the aforementioned lead state agencies, Youth Self-Advocates, Disability Rights California, the Family Resource Center Network of California, the Association of Regional Center Agencies, California Committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities, Community of Practice-Secondary Transition, UCLA Anderson School of Management, and the Tarjan Center UCEDD.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and Supplement for the Supported Employment Services Program State Plan Program Years 2018 – 2020 - 02/11/2018

~~“Priority 3: Capacity Building

Goal: Establish or enhance partnerships to increase the capacity of CDOR and the WIOA core program partners to improve service delivery for adults and youth with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

“$2 million to assist Californians with disabilities in job searches” - 06/19/2017

~~“People with disabilities in 13 counties will get additional help in landing employment with $2 million in grants announced by the California Employment Development Department today. The Disability Employment Accelerator grants assist people with disabilities obtain skills needed for employment in growing industries such as advanced manufacturing, clean energy, transportation, and healthcare.The disability employment assistance funds will help prepare job seekers with skills and training needed for careers and then connect them with hiring businesses. The organizations receiving the grants will use “earn-and-learn” strategies that empower people with disabilities to earn incomes while they learn new skills that will help them progress into high-growth industries” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • WIOA

“Workforce Development: What's in it For You” - 05/10/2017

~~“Workforce Development (WDS), "What's in it for Your Business?" is a Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) employer outreach program designed to build collaborative partnerships that create staffing solutions for California businesses. The Workforce Development Section (WDS) develops and coordinates linkages with the business community in order to increase meaningful employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD) - 03/12/2017

~~“The California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD) was established to advance the employment of people with disabilities in the state. The primary function of the CCEPD is to consult with and advise the Secretary of the Labor and Workforce Development Agency and the Secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency on all issues related to full inclusion in the workforce of persons with disabilities, in order to:1. Bring individuals with disabilities into gainful employment at a rate that is as close as possible to that of the general population.2. Support the goals of equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for these individuals.3. Ensure that state government is a model employer of individuals with disabilities.4. Support state coordination with, and participation in, benefits planning training and information dissemination projects supported by private foundations and federal grants.

The CCEPD supports an annual event for youth with disabilities. In September of 2015, the CCEPD voted to adopt the California Youth Leadership Forum for Students with Disabilities (YLF) as the youth event for the years 2016-2018.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

CA Employment First: Braiding Day and Employment Services to Build Meaningful Lives - 04/09/2015

This Employment First training presentation focuses on different approaches to promoting Employment First and encouraging integrated, community-based employment opportunities for people with disabilities. Some of the strategies include using Discovery and customized employment with Medicaid waiver day services participants through a braided funding approach including Vocational Rehabilitation. This presentation also provides a number of example case studies.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

The California DEI: Effective Practices in Building an Inclusive Workforce

This presentation summarizes California’s experience with the DEI grant as of 2015. It addresses the history of DEI in the state, the objectives, the strategic service delivery components, the promising practices and the hopes for sustainability after the grant.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

California Customized Employment for Service Members, Veterans & Their Families

This web page discusses Customized Employment as a “Promising Practice for Supporting Employees with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and/or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD),” particularly in the context of US Service Members and Veterans.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

Employment First Committee Annual Report

The Community of Practice (COP) is located within the Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and was formed and funded by the DOE to help improve transition and employment outcomes. This is a voluntary group of educational professionals.   The COP seeks to ensure the seamless transition of services for  youth, ages 16 –22, which will lead to positive post-school outcomes. They carry out their work through a statewide community of practice and a statewide list serve,which disseminates compliance information, resources and evidence-based practices and statewide technical assistance through webinars and conference calls.  Their key goal, with respect to employment ,is integrated ,competitive employment in any area of interest for each individual youth, ages 16-22.  
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

California Training Initiatives

“Association of Regional Center Agencies – New day Conference. ARCA sponsored the New Day Conference in Pasadena in September 2012. Over 400 attendees participated in sessions focused on innovations in employment and housing services for individuals with developmental disabilities.” “Four- part employment webinar series aimed to create awareness about employment and to provide a discussion forum for families, individual organizations and professionals.” “Working Conference - Driving Forces Behind Successful Postsecondary Education and Employment for Young Adults with ID and Autism held in Sacramento, CA and sponsored by Think College and California Consortium on Postsecondary Educations and the Center for Disability Studies, University of Hawaii. The conference content addressed significant changes in public policy, insight for promoting inclusive strategies through person-centered protocol and interagency team building to support youth success. … Over 100 families, K-12, rehabilitation, developmental disabilities and higher education professionals, and students with developmental disabilities attended.” “Three-Part webinar series in Triangulating Postsecondary Education Goals for transition specialists and educators. The series aims at identifying postsecondary goals and aligning them with academic and industry standards. This webinar series was hosted by Community of Practice in Secondary Education (CoP).”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

California Community Transitions (CCT) (Money Follows the Person)

“In January 2007, the California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) was awarded special federal grant number 1LICMS30149 to implement a Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration, “California Community Transitions” (CCT). CCT demonstration services are available through September 30, 2016.   “Lead Organizations employ or contract with transition coordinators who work directly with willing and eligible individuals, support networks, and providers to facilitate and monitor their transition from facilities to community settings. Eligible individuals of all ages with physical and mental disabilities have an opportunity to participate in CCT.”    
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

California for Community First Choice

On December 1, 2011, the California Department of Health Care Services submitted the first state plan amendment to implement Section 2401 (the Community First Choice Option) of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), providing the provision of medical assistance for home and community-based attendant services including Assistance with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), and health-related tasks, teaching and demonstration for ADLs, IADLs, and other health -related tasks, back-up systems to ensure the continuity of services, and training on the hiring and maintenance of attendants. California has developed a quality assurance plan to monitor the implementation and efficacy of the Community First Choice Option at the county- and state-levels.   .

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
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Snapshot

The Golden State is a place where you can "Find Yourself" through a rewarding career, including those with disabilities who are ready to live the California Dream.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon California's VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
0.27%
Change from
2015 to 2016
39,250,017
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.28%
Change from
2015 to 2016
2,023,714
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.76%
Change from
2015 to 2016
701,791
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.48%
Change from
2015 to 2016
34.68%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.47%
Change from
2015 to 2016
74.22%

State Data

General

2016
Population. 39,250,017
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 2,023,714
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 701,791
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 16,632,184
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.68%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.22%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 2,020,143
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 2,186,775
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,749,171
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 331,848
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 1,273,677
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 47,935
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 459,722
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 15,006
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 178,131
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 425,105

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 41,719
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 682,668

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 20,014
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 49,907
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 221,216
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 9.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 11.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 582
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,552
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,396
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 39,862

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 46,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,373
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,176
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 50.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 3.00

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 24,984
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 1,213,289
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $92,057,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $55,744,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $853,743,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 66,009
Number of people served in facility based work. 9,627
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 26.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 54.07%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 21.54%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 52.26%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 75.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 83.16%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.20%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 10,193,235
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 12,148
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 123,357
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 4,322,464
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 4,445,821
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 180
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,641
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,821
AbilityOne wages (products). $583,952
AbilityOne wages (services). $61,505,189

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 109
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 6
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 119
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 35
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 17,727
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 488
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 18,280