Connecticut

States - Big Screen

People know what constitutes great employment opportunities for workers with disabilities in the Constitution State of Connecticut.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Connecticut's VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.33%
Change from
2016 to 2017
3,588,184
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.2%
Change from
2016 to 2017
189,419
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76,096
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.96%
Change from
2016 to 2017
40.17%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.10%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 3,590,886 3,576,452 3,588,184
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 190,691 191,687 189,419
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 67,517 74,715 76,096
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,606,605 1,596,352 1,582,806
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.41% 38.98% 40.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.68% 78.80% 78.10%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.60% 5.10% 4.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.20% 17.50% 17.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 9.60% 8.80% 8.60%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 185,838 183,458 184,187
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 203,852 211,678 207,675
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 306,452 314,740 310,248
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 41,668 40,279 38,719
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 52,535 56,622 58,256
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 1,358 1,629 3,056
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,041 7,750 8,928
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 12,490 11,355 11,276
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 19,638 19,190 19,635

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,082 4,125 4,125
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 7.10% 7.00% 6.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 81,784 81,330 81,260

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 10,377 10,685 9,178
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 20,043 20,043 16,578
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 43,772 43,992 37,157
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 23.70% 24.30% 24.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.20% 6.30% 8.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.40% 4.10% 5.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.60% 3.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,666 2,639 3,407
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,261 1,716 2,244
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 275 267 1,367
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,420 2,994 2,367
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.02 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 26 27 50
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 12 18 27
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 46.00% 67.00% 54.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.33 0.50 0.75

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,341
2,754
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 9 11 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 799 896 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 351 388 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 448 567 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 684 837 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 50 55 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 40.10% 41.50% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,113 2,211 3,020
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 124,361 125,226 126,638
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 26 44 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 59 76 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $74,928,000 $74,998,000 $75,899,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $5,613,000 $4,664,000 $4,171,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $126,697,000 $128,749,000 $135,947,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $10,202,000 $12,233,000 $13,710,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 47.00% 46.00% 43.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 723 842 889
Number of people served in facility based work. 344 302 266
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,571 4,691 4,841
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 131.80 129.60 127.10

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.67% 67.74% 67.33%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 5.20% 5.21% 5.50%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 8.40% 8.35% 8.03%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.92% 99.93% 99.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 49.73% 46.66% 51.34%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 73.57% 65.24% 66.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 86.51% 78.74% 79.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.84% 18.58% 15.28%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,354,163
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,584
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 46,321
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 621,956
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 668,277
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 245
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 837
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,082
AbilityOne wages (products). $158,294
AbilityOne wages (services). $9,751,263

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 3 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 15 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 46 54 35
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 64 58 35
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 3 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 135 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,983 3,814 2,210
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 116 116 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3,237 3,933 2,210

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~In November 2015, Connecticut was one of four states selected to participate as a Core State in the 2016 Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) offered through the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP).
Connecticut was chosen through an application process to become an EFSLMP Core State. Connecticut committed to a cross–system, cross–disability effort to promote Employment First, a national movement in both philosophy and policy stating that employment is the first priority and preferred outcome of individuals with disabilities. (Page 50)
Two workgroups were formed, comprised of leadership representing six state agencies including the Departments of Labor, Developmental Services, Rehabilitation Services, Education, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Social Services, as well as key stakeholders including the CT Council on Developmental Disabilities and the CT Business Leadership Network. These workgroups receive a combination of virtual and onsite mentoring, intensive technical assistance, and training from a national pool of subject matter experts under the program. One workgroup is focused on coordinating and streamlining business engagement and outreach strategies across government agencies and providers. A second workgroup required under the program called Vision Quest, is charged developing and implementing policy to support the state’s Employment First systems change efforts. (Page 50)
Participate in cross agency trainings through the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) to strengthen state agency partnerships. (Page 419)
Staff from the Bureau participates in meetings and training seminars organized by the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE). This organization links community providers, employers, state agency representatives and other resources together to exchange information on job placement strategies, funding sources and employer job leads. Bureau staff have presented at meetings of this organization on blindness related topics such as adaptive technology so that other providers in attendance would be aware of the options that exist for bringing about a successful job placement when accepting a referral from BESB for a client who is seeking a job placement with supported employment services. (Page 451)
 

Customized Employment

~~Employer services, such as:
i. Customized screening and referral of qualified participants in training services to employers;
ii. Customized employment-related services to employers, employer associations, or other such organization on a fee-for-service basis that are in addition to labor exchange services available to employers under the Wagner-Peyser Act Employment Service;
iii. Activities to provide business services and strategies that meet the workforce investment needs of area employers, as determined by the Local WDB and consistent with the local plan (see § 678.435 of this chapter and WIOA sec. 134(d)(1)(A)(ix)); and (Page 183 & 333)
The challenging economy continues to impact on the scope and variety of job placement options available to clients, making customized employment particularly difficult to secure. The need for long–term funding support is an additional step that is necessary for supported employment placements at the onset. These two variables in combination make the timing challenging in filling job vacancies with a client who requires long–term supports. Dedicating two counselors to work specifically with the transition–age client population will facilitate discussions on supported employment options much earlier in the Planning and Placement Team process, starting as early as junior high school. This should allow for increased time to explore and secure long–term funding commitments and also to develop job opportunities for clients. (Page 501)
Supported Employment refers to competitive integrated employment, including customized employment, that is individualized and customized consistent with the strengths, abilities, interests, and informed choice of a client with a most significant disability, and that includes ongoing support services. Supported employment services may be considered for individuals for whom competitive integrated employment has not historically occurred, or for whom competitive integrated employment has been interrupted or intermittent, and where there is a need for extended services after the transition from support provided by the Bureau, (Page 502)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Limited capacity of many workforce service providers to deal effectively with the complexities of braiding funds (Page 53)
Connecticut’s American Job Center (AJC) One–Stop system is the vehicle through which service delivery and targeting, leveraging and braiding of available resources is coordinated. Connecticut has a history and tradition of innovative collaboration among multiple partners and stakeholders to coordinate services and resources at the local level through its One–Stop system. (Page 84)
 

DEI/DRC

~~Jobs Corps Job Corps is a national, federally funded educational and vocational training program administered by USDOL that helps low income youth (ages16–24) gain workplace skills, train for high–demand occupations, and become independent and self–sufficient. With centers in Hartford and New Haven, more than 400 students enroll each year to earn a high school diploma or GED, learn a trade, obtain third party certifications and receive assistance finding a job. CTDOL has an assigned staff member who provides on–site support to the Hartford and New Haven Job Corp Centers. Transforming System Capacity Disability Employment Initiative In October 2013 Connecticut was one of eight states to receive a grant through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). CTDOL’s Office of Workforce Competitiveness (OWC) administers the three–year $3,058,706 award from USDOL’ s Employment and Training Administration and Office of Disability Employment Policy. Broad objectives are to provide additional education, training and employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, and to expand the workforce system’s capacity to serve eligible beneficiaries in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program. The initiative features strong partnerships and collaboration among key agencies; service coordination through an Integrated Resource Team; integrated services and resources, including blended, braided and leveraged funding and resources; and, innovative asset development strategies. Services are offered in two of Connecticut’s workforce regions. Two participating WDBs employ Disability Resource Coordinators to implement project activities and coordinate services. Integrated Resource Teams address individual needs and provide increased support for jobseekers with disabilities. Partners include CTDOL’s Office for Veterans Workforce Development and the Departments of Rehabilitative Services, Labor, Education, Mental Health and Addiction Services, Social Services, Transportation, and various other public and private sector representatives. ( Page 48)
DEI efforts focus on:
• Promoting inclusiveness of individuals with disabilities to enhance competitive advantage
• Organizing business–to–business forums to share strategies on recruiting, hiring and retaining people with disabilities ( Page 48)
• Re–imagine delivery of customer services to individual jobseekers and workers in the American Job Center One–Stop system. Develop and implement streamlined service flow with efficiently aligned and integrated processes implemented by coordinated service teams representing the full range of contributions from system partners and stakeholders, consistent with principles and criteria developed by the WIOA Transition Service Design and Delivery Work Group. Build on lessons learned from implementation of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) and Secure Jobs pilots as models for innovative and effective multi–partner service coordination. (Page 64)
In October 2013, Connecticut was one of eight states to receive a grant under USDOL’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). Awarded to OWC, the three–year $3,058,706 grant promotes strategic approaches to enhance employment services for individuals with disabilities served by the public workforce investment system. (All of page 120)
 

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~Transform System Capacity:
• Re–imagine delivery of customer services to individual jobseekers and workers in the American Job Center One–Stop system. Develop and implement streamlined service flow with efficiently aligned and integrated processes implemented by coordinated service teams representing the full range of contributions from system partners and stakeholders, consistent with principles and criteria developed by the WIOA Transition Service Design and Delivery Work Group. Build on lessons learned from implementation of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) and Secure Jobs pilots as models for innovative and effective multi–partner service coordination. (Page 64)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Short-term pre-vocational services, including development of learning skills, communication skills, interviewing skills, punctuality, personal maintenance skills, and professional conduct, to prepare individuals for unsubsidized employment or training;
g.   Work Experience/Internships;
h.   Adult Basic Education/Financial Literacy Services. (Page 209)
10. Comprehensive guidance and counseling, including drug and alcohol abuse counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the individual youth;
11. Financial literacy education;
12. Entrepreneurial skills training;
13. Services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area*, such as career awareness, career counseling, and career exploration services; and
14. Activities that help youth prepare for and transition to post-secondary education and training. WIOA Regs. 20 CFR Part 681.460 (Page 211)
Along with the strategies mentioned above to address goals and ways to overcome barriers to equitable access to VR services, BRS also anticipates using innovation and expansion (I&E) funds in FFY 2017 to support the State Rehabilitation Council, the State Independent Living Council, and to continue Individualized Financial Capability Coaching, a project to increase financial literacy and capability for people with disabilities. Other proposals will be assessed upon submission and considered based on the alignment with the state’s goals and priorities. (Page 422)
Measures of success will be based on a consumer’s improved financial literacy and his/her ability to budget a household, create realistic goals, understand credit scores (and demonstrate actions to maintain or improve them), increase self–sufficiency, obtain employment/increase wages, and go off of SSDI and/or SSI benefits. The number of new checking, savings or equivalent accounts that are opened will also be counted. (Page 429)
 

School to Work Transition

~~Regular payments from railroad retirement, strike benefits from union funds, worker’s compensation, and training stipends;
4.   Alimony;
5.   Military family allotments or other regular support from an absent family member or someone not living in the household;
6.   Pensions whether private, government employee (including Military retirement pay);
7.   Regular insurance or annuity payments other than Supplemental Security Income disability (SSI) or veterans’ disability;
8.   College or university grants, fellowships, and assistantships;
9.   Net gambling or lottery winnings;
10.   Social Security Disability Insurance payments (SSDI)
•    Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) pays benefits to individuals that have worked in the past, paid Social Security taxes, and are currently unable to work for a year or more because of a disability. SSDI is considered income replacement and must be included in family income (All of page 204)
12.   Tribal Government Payments (i.e., Per Capita Payments, Lease Payments, Individual Indian Money (IIM);
13.   Old age and survivors insurance benefits received under section 202 of the Social Security Act (42 USC 402).
• Old age and survivors insurance benefits include: Social Security Survivor Benefits – these are benefits paid to people up to age 18 who have had a parent die and the parent paid wages into the system; and
• Social Security Retirement Benefits – these are benefits that are paid to people who reached their social security age and have wages paid in the system. (Page 205)

Career Pathways

~~DORS: Partner Alignment with Educational Institutions Both Vocational Rehabilitation Programs at DORS are actively involved in a variety of transition school–to–work initiatives, with extensive collaboration and coordination at the administrative and service delivery levels of the organization. Through a cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education, the roles and responsibilities of the VR programs and the public educational system are clearly defined, including financial responsibilities and coordination of services and staff training. Representatives from both VR programs serve on an interagency transition task force and appointed representatives from the Connecticut State Department of Education serves on the State Rehabilitation Council to BESB and to BRS. VR program information is presented at in–service training programs for public school teachers and guidance counselors on issues affecting students who have disabilities. (Page 90)
Prior to initiation of pre–employment transition efforts, BRS had liaison counselors assigned to each high school to work directly with students and collaborate with education administrators to sign a referral protocol yearly. With implementation of WIOA, 10 VR counselors have been assigned to work exclusively with students with disabilities. (Page 397)
The Vocational Rehabilitation Program at the Bureau of Education and Services for the Blind is actively involved in a variety of transition school–to–work initiatives, with extensive collaboration and coordination at the administrative and service delivery levels of the organization. (Page 447)
Through a cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education, the roles and responsibilities of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program and the public educational system are clearly defined. This includes financial responsibilities as well as coordination of services and staff training. To facilitate this coordination, the Transition School to Work Coordinator from BESB serves on an interagency transition task force and there is an appointed representative from the State Department of Education serving on the State Rehabilitation Council to BESB. (Page 449)

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Connecticut Employment and Training Commission (CETC – the State Workforce Board), the State agencies responsible for administration of the core WIOA programs encompassed by this Unified State Plan (Connecticut Department of Labor (CTDOL), Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE), and Department of Rehabilitation Services (DORS)), the Connecticut Department of Social Services (CTDSS) and the five Workforce Development Boards – propose and will support a set of broadly–conceived strategies intended to achieve the vision and goals outlined above. These strategies will serve as a framework for Connecticut’s implementation efforts, with corresponding detailed State and local implementing actions to be developed.
(1)  Describe the strategies the State will implement, including industry or sector partnerships related to in–demand industry sectors and occupations and career pathways, as required by WIOA section 101(d)(3)(B), (D). “Career pathway” is defined at WIOA section 3(7). “In– demand industry sector or occupation” is defined at WIOA section 3(23). (Page 61)
With representatives of secondary and postsecondary education programs, lead efforts to develop and implement career pathways within the local area by aligning the employment, training, education, and supportive services that are needed by adults and youth, particularly individuals with barriers to employment. (Page 139)
 

Employer Engagement

~~As required by DEI, two local WDBs – Northwest Regional Workforce Investment Board and Capital Workforce Partners (North Central area) – became active Employment Networks (ENs) in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program, thereby expanding the Connecticut workforce system’s capacity to serve eligible beneficiaries. DEI also requires the State’s participation in an evaluation process to measure the project’s impact on outcomes for jobseekers with disabilities.  (Page 120)

511

~~Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) DORS has a contract with a software provider to maintain a case management system for the vocational rehabilitation programs. This system runs locally on servers housed within DORS and contains case information relevant to individual consumers and reportable data. The vendor has maintained an active relationship with the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) who governs data collection for public vocational rehabilitation programs. Modifications to the system are currently being planned to manage the upcoming changes in data collection required by WIOA. RSA data elements will be adjusted to be compatible with the WIOA–Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) document. (Page 97)
Measure: Documentation of Vocational Rehabilitation staff participation in statewide meeting regarding the development of a common–front end data collection system. (Page 480)
 

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 119)
(3)  A standing committee to provide information and to assist with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, including issues relating to compliance with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding providing programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the one-stop delivery system, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing supports for or accommodations to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. (Page 137)
(o) Develop a budget for the activities of the Local WDB, with approval of the chief elected official and consistent with the local plan and the duties of the Local WDB.
(p) Assess, on an annual basis, the physical and programmatic accessibility of all one- stop centers in the local area, in accordance with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.). (Page 141)
(ii) How the Local WDB will facilitate access to services provided through the one-stop delivery system, including in remote areas, through the use of technology and other means;
(iii) How entities within the one-stop delivery system, including one-stop operators and the one-stop partners, will comply with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities; and
(iv) The roles and resource contributions of the one-stop partners; (Page 145)
2.   WIOA funds may not be used for employment in the construction, operation, or maintenance of any part of any facility that is used or will be used for sectarian instruction or as a place for religious worship with the exception of maintenance of facilities that are not primarily used for instruction or for worship and are operated by organizations providing services to WIOA participants. WIOA Sec. 188(a)(3); 20 CFR Part 683.255; 29 CFR Part 2, subpart D, and 29 CFR Part 37.6(f)(1) (Reference TEGL 1-05 dated July 6, 2005)  (Page 150)
O.   Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity. 1. All eligible service and training providers receiving WIOA Title IB funds must comply fully with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA Section 188 and Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination Regulations at 29 CFR Part 37. 2. (Page 151)
4.   Provider agreements will contain assurance language that it will comply with Equal Opportunity requirements of Section 188 of the Act, 29 CFR Part 37, and 1604, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and all other applicable equal opportunity laws and regulations. The assurance may be incorporated by reference. (Page 152)
5.   Discriminatory discharge prohibited. No person, organization or agency may discharge, or in any other manner discriminate or retaliate against any person, or deny to any person a benefit to which that person is entitled under the provisions of the Act because such person has filed any complaint, instituted or caused to be instituted any proceeding under or related to the Act, has testified or is about to testify in any such proceeding or investigation, or has provided information or assisted in an investigation. WIOA Sec. 181, 188; 29 CFR Part 37; MCA 9-2-303(b) (Page 152)
 

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Connecticut Medicaid State Plan Amendments

A Medicaid and CHIP state plan is an agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs…When a state is planning to make a change to its program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. States also submit SPAs to request permissible program changes, make corrections, or update their Medicaid or CHIP state plan with new information   This webpage includes Medicaid State Plan amendments for the state of Connecticut  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plans

~~The Connecticut Medicaid state plan is an agreement between the state and the Federal government describing how Connecticut administers its Medicaid program. The plan details how the state will follow Federal rules and guidelines.  It also gives details on how the state may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

“To request a copy of the SPA from DSS or to send comments about the SPA, please email: Public.Comment.DSS@ct.gov or write: Department of Social Services, Medical Policy Unit, 55 Farmington Avenue, 9th Floor, Hartford, CT 06105 (Phone: 860-424-5067)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut SAMHSA/CMHS Employment Development Initiative: Fiscal Year 2011 & 2012 Projects

This initiative provided training and technical assistance for entrepreneurs with psychiatric disorders to start a small business. “This project demonstrated that entrepreneurship is indeed a viable option for persons in recovery. The Business Advisors from the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) observed that the business plans submitted by the individuals in this program were stronger and demonstrated more commitment than those of the general population. All of the persons receiving mini-grants as well as the majority of persons who were not were encouraged by their Business Advisors to continue working on their business plans, which the Advisors felt had real potential to succeed with additional effort.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

CT Balancing Incentive Payment Project

“The State of Connecticut’s Department of Social Services, Division of Health Services (DHS), with the Legislative and stakeholder support, seeks approval for application to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for participation in the Balancing Incentive Payment Program (BIP). The $72,780,505 enhanced federal medical assistance received will be used to expand community long-term services and supports (LTSS) and develop infrastructure necessary to support uniform access and a more streamlined process for persons seeking community LTSS. Ultimately, the goal of Connecticut’s BIP project is to remove policy, procedure and access barriers that prevent persons from receiving equitable community LTSS and that lead to unnecessary institutionalization.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Connecticut State Rehabilitation Council (SRC)

“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is an important partner with the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) to help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. BRS administers the Title I Vocational Rehabilitation and Title VI Supported Employment programs of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, that mandates employment services for people with disabilities. This act is the federal law that requires each designated state agency (BRS in Connecticut) to work closely with its SRC in developing the State Plan, strategic plans, reports, and state goals and priorities and in conducting needs assessment and evaluations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Role of the Connecticut Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

“The Governor’s Committee shall be composed of people with disabilities; agency representatives, including a representative of the State Job Service, the Division of Rehabilitation Services, the Veterans Employment and training Service and the United States Department of Veterans Affairs; representatives of employers, representatives of organized labor and other interested persons.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Connecticut Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

The Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities’ (GCEPD) mission is to “promote the employment of people with disabilities; produce and provide an environment that strives to include and integrate people with disabilities into the workforce; [and] promote and establish initiatives designed to highlight the benefits of employing people with disabilities.”   GCEPD’s initiatives include “[providing] education and awareness on the benefits of hiring qualified candidates with disabilities; [promoting and supporting] the activities of local communities throughout the state to enhance the employment of persons with disabilities; [and maintaining] a website of disability resources for both employers and job seekers.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Southwest Connecticut Workforce Investment Board: 2012-2016 Local Plan

"The WorkPlace helps people prepare for careers and strengthens the workforce for employers. We are a progressive, socially enterprising operation that is driven by innovation an entrepreneurial spirit. As Southwestern Connecticut’s Regional Workforce Development Board, we administer workforce development funds and coordinate providers of job training and education programs that meet the needs of residents and employers in the Southwestern Connecticut Region.

The WorkPlace administers job training and preparation funds allocated by state and federal agencies. We operate CTWorks Career Centers in Bridgeport, Stamford and Derby, CT. These centers provide programs and services to job seekers including career counseling, job search assistance, skills assessment and occupational training. Customers using the centers have access to computers, internet, telephones, copy machines as well as printed materials to help them search for a job."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

CT General Statutes within the Jurisdiction of the CT Department of Labor

Updated through 2012 June Spec. Sess. These General Statues are applicable to the performance of the Connecticut Department of Labor. They define the various types of services that will be available through the state Department of Labor, and the American Job Centers. Under the section on the "Mortgage Crisis Job Training Program," Customized Employment is listed as a service to be provided: "The WorkPlace, Inc. and Capital Workforce Partners shall manage such teams. The teams, in cooperation with the regional workforce development boards and the one-stop centers, shall ensure the provision of rapid, customized employment services, job training, repair training and job placement assistance to borrowers who are unemployed, underemployed or in need of a second job. The WorkPlace, Inc. shall arrange for the provision of financial literacy and credit counseling for participants in the program with the Connecticut Housing Finance Authority."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Connecticut Small Contractor Set Aside Program (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann 4a-60g)

Statute requiring state agencies and political subdivisions of the state to set aside at least 25 percent of their budgets each fiscal year for small contractors.  This requirement is limited to those agencies and subdivisions that have annual contracting budgets of more than $10,000.  Of this set-aside, 25 percent must be reserved for awards to minority business enterprises, including disability-owned businesses. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

H.B. No. 5253 AN ACT EXPANDING ACCESS TO THE MONEY FOLLOWS THE PERSON DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AND REPEALING OBSOLETE STATUTES - 06/06/2018

~~“The Commissioner of Social Services, pursuant to Section 6071 of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, shall submit an application to the Secretary of Health and Human Services to establish a Money Follows the Person demonstration project. Such project shall [serve not more than five thousand persons and shall] be designed to achieve the objectives set forth in Section 6071(a) of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. Services available under the demonstration project shall include,but need not be limited to, personal care assistance services. The commissioner may apply for a Medicaid research and demonstration waiver under Section 1115 of the Social Security Act, if such waiver is necessary to implement the demonstration project. The commissioner may, if necessary, modify any existing Medicaid home or community based waiver if such modification is required to implement the demonstration project”.“

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Senate Bill No. 502 May Special Session, Public Act No. 16-3AN ACT CONCERNING REVENUE AND OTHER ITEMS TO IMPLEMENT THE BUDGET FOR THE BIENNIUM ENDING JUNE 30, 2017. - 07/01/2016

“Sec. 60. Subsection (a) of section 17b-666 of the general statutes is repealed and the following is substituted in lieu thereof (Effective July 1, 2016): (a) The Department of Rehabilitation Services may receive state and federal funds to administer, within available appropriations, an employment opportunities program to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities who do not meet the eligibility requirements of supported employment programs administered by the Departments of Developmental Services, Social Services and Mental Health and Addiction Services. For the purposes of this section, "individuals with the most significant disabilities" means those individuals who (1) have serious employment limitations in a total of three or more functional areas including, but not limited to, mobility, communication, self-care, interpersonal skills, work tolerance or work skills, or (2) will require significant ongoing disability-related services on the job in order to maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Connecticut HB 6738 - 06/03/2015

"The State Treasurer shall establish a qualified ABLE program pursuant to the federal ABLE Act and sections 1 to 8, inclusive, of this act. Under the program: (A) The State Treasurer shall administer individual ABLE accounts to encourage and assist eligible individuals and their families in saving private funds to provide support for eligible individuals, and (B) a person may make contributions to an individual ABLE account to meet the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

CT General Statutes within the Jurisdiction of the CT Department of Labor

Updated through 2012 June Spec. Sess. These General Statues are applicable to the performance of the Connecticut Department of Labor. They define the various types of services that will be available through the state Department of Labor, and the American Job Centers. Under the section on the "Mortgage Crisis Job Training Program," Customized Employment is listed as a service to be provided: "The WorkPlace, Inc. and Capital Workforce Partners shall manage such teams. The teams, in cooperation with the regional workforce development boards and the one-stop centers, shall ensure the provision of rapid, customized employment services, job training, repair training and job placement assistance to borrowers who are unemployed, underemployed or in need of a second job. The WorkPlace, Inc. shall arrange for the provision of financial literacy and credit counseling for participants in the program with the Connecticut Housing Finance Authority."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Connecticut Small Contractor Set Aside Program (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann 4a-60g)

Statute requiring state agencies and political subdivisions of the state to set aside at least 25 percent of their budgets each fiscal year for small contractors.  This requirement is limited to those agencies and subdivisions that have annual contracting budgets of more than $10,000.  Of this set-aside, 25 percent must be reserved for awards to minority business enterprises, including disability-owned businesses. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Mental Health Supported Employment Services - 07/26/2017

~~“DMHAS continues to work closely with Individual Placement and Support (IPS) Employment Center at Rockville Institute to implement the SAMHSA-endorsed Evidence-based Supported Employment Practice (EBP) for persons with serious and persistent psychiatric disorders.  This includes embedding employment staff in clinical treatment teams to promote integration, where employment becomes “everyone’s business.”  Employment staff is responsible for helping people choose, find and keep “integrated competitive employment,” that is, jobs that are open for all to apply and pay competitive wages.  The EBP approach features non-exclusion from employment services based on diagnosis or symptomology, rapid job search for positions that match individual interests, strong relationship building with area employers, and customized follow-along supports on- and off-the-job for as long as needed (see link to IPS Works)”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

State Rehabilitation Report 2016 - 07/25/2017

~~Mission:“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) provides assessment, advice and recommendations to the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) and others regarding coordination and effectiveness of programs and strategies which promote  community-based competitive employment for persons with disabilities.GOALS:To assess the effectiveness and delivery of vocational services provided by BRS to individuals with disabilitiesTo improve the coordination of vocational services among BRS, state agencies and public and private entities for the benefit of BRS job seekers.To make recommendations to BRS, the Governor, the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) and others for developing and improving strategies for the employment of, and vocational services for individuals with disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

“Employment and Other Day Service Options” - 04/11/2017

~~“DDS Funded Day Services:SUPP0RTED EMPLOYMENT - These include supports to help individuals work as a paid employee in work settings that also employ people without disabilities. These services assist individuals find and apply for jobs, and offer job coaching support to people once work is secured. This service includes individual and group supported employment. This service is designed to provide support and supervision but is not intended to provide ongoing long term 1:1 support to help a person complete their work activities.GROUP EMPLOYMENT - These include sheltered workshops and day support options. These services are provided in a facility-based program that focuses on developing meaningful skills in the area of work, socialization and community participation.INDIVIDUAL DAY - This waiver service includes individually tailored supports that help consumers gain or maintain skills to participate more fully and productively in work, leisure or community activities. This may include the development of independent functioning skills, relationship skills, exploring job interests or retirement programs. It can also provide funds for staff supports for individuals who have their own businesses.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Council on Developmental Services Department of Developmental Services - 01/12/2017

~~The Council on Developmental Services was established to advise and consult on issues affecting the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) and its programs and services for Connecticut residents with intellectual disability and their families. In consultation with the Commissioner of Developmental Services, the Council recommends to the Governor and the Connecticut General Assembly legislation that would enhance and improve the quality of the programs and services provided by the department.  The Council, with input from the public, advocates for all persons with developmental and intellectual disabilities in Connecticut.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Connecticut State Department of Education “Transition Bill of Rights” - 05/04/2016

“This Transition Bill of Rights for parents of students receiving special education will help parents and students understand a student’s rights related to getting an education and other important issues regarding the transition to life after high school. School districts will provide this document annually at a planning and placement team meeting to all parents, guardians, and surrogate parents of students who are receiving special education services in Grades 6-12 as well as to students who are 18 years of age or older.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

IEP Manual and Forms - 12/01/2015

~~“The United States Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), has advised states that all IEPs written on or after July 1, 2005, must comply with the requirements of the 2004 Reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA). The position of the Connecticut State Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education, is that the January 2006 and February 2009 revised IEP forms serve a number of purposes. The first purpose is to help insure compliance with the statutory requirements of IDEA and State law. In addition, these forms assist as a data collection and student educational program-planning tool. Therefore, the State Department of Education has directed that all IEPs written for students in the State of Connecticut be completed on these forms.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Connecticut Unified State Plan 2017 –Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Services Portion

Goal 1: To implement the provisions of WIOA specific to the VR program. Priority areas: • pre-employment transition services • employer services • service delivery • performance accountability measures • subminimum wage

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services

Employment Services Employment Services are integral to the DMHAS’ goal of offering a recovery-oriented system of care for persons in recovery who experience behavioral health conditions. One of the first significant steps to be taken in this direction is to ensure that all DMHAS consumers have both the necessary opportunities and supports to become involved in meaningful activities of their choice as well as to contribute to the broader community. Individuals with behavioral health conditions consistently express their desire for employment. From the recovery perspective, meaningful employment has been shown to promote recovery from psychiatric and addiction disorders and to facilitate improvements in diverse domains from symptom relief to successful community integration. Currently, DMHAS funds 36 agencies across Connecticut to provide a broad menu of employment and education services. While employment strategies must be tailored to meet individual needs, agencies generally offer a range of services including career planning, job search assistance, job placement, on- and off-the-job coaching, and career advancement services. Over 4000 persons per year are assisted in finding and keeping employment through the DMHAS system

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health

Connecticut Department of Developmental Services “Employment First Overview”

We Believe... -Everyone can work and there is a job for everyone. Our job is to be creative and persistent in providing supports that help people with intellectual disabilities to find, get and keep real pay. -Not working should be the exception. All individuals, schools, families and businesses must raise their expectations. -People will be hired because of their ability not because they have a disability. -Communities embrace people who contribute. -Everyone has something to contribute and needs to contribute. -People are healthier, safer and happiest with meaningful work. -True employment is not a social service. -Employment is a win/win for everybody.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Southwest Connecticut Workforce Investment Board: 2012-2016 Local Plan

"The WorkPlace helps people prepare for careers and strengthens the workforce for employers. We are a progressive, socially enterprising operation that is driven by innovation an entrepreneurial spirit. As Southwestern Connecticut’s Regional Workforce Development Board, we administer workforce development funds and coordinate providers of job training and education programs that meet the needs of residents and employers in the Southwestern Connecticut Region.

The WorkPlace administers job training and preparation funds allocated by state and federal agencies. We operate CTWorks Career Centers in Bridgeport, Stamford and Derby, CT. These centers provide programs and services to job seekers including career counseling, job search assistance, skills assessment and occupational training. Customers using the centers have access to computers, internet, telephones, copy machines as well as printed materials to help them search for a job."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services Employer Partnerships

“The Bureau of Rehabilitation Services partners with employers of all sizes and across industries. These partnership arrangements include qualified candidate referrals and individualized on-the-job trainings as well as more formalized training and placement programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services, Bureau of Rehabilitation Services

“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is an important partner with the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) to help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. BRS administers the Title I Vocational Rehabilitation and Title VI Supported Employment programs of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, that mandates employment services for people with disabilities. This act is the federal law that requires each designated state agency (BRS in Connecticut) to work closely with its SRC in developing the State Plan, strategic plans, reports, and state goals and priorities and in conducting needs assessment and evaluations.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Industry Specific Training and Placement Programs (ISTPP)

“Industry Specific Training and Placement Programs (ISTPP)  tuition-based workforce development programs designed to provide job seekers with disabilities the skills necessary for employment in a particular profession or type of business. In order to be most effective, ISTPPs are developed to address the employment needs within a local market or area and are reliant on essential partnerships with community/educational organizations and the targeted industry.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 11 - 11 of 11

Connecticut Connect-Ability

“Connect-Ability began in late 2005 with a federal grant to the State of Connecticut to identify and remove barriers to employment faced by people with disabilities. This five-year, multimillion dollar 'systems change grant' involved a detailed look at the State's employment and disability services infrastructure in order to identify problem areas and implement lasting solutions.

“Connect-Ability has two primary customers:

Employers of all sizes and in all industries who are seeking qualified workers People with disabilities of all ages who are seeking employment for the first time or who want a new challenge.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

26th Annual Conference on Serving Adults with Disabilities - 10/26/2018

~~“The Annual Conference on Serving Adults with Disabilities provides an excellent opportunity for participants to meet with a wide representation of experts and professionals, along with family and friends of individuals with disabilities, and to discuss current strategies and knowledge on the broad spectrum of disabilities.

Conference GoalTo share current knowledge and strategies and to provide answers, direction, and support to:•Adult education teachers•Workforce Practitioners•Employers•Counselors•Families, friends, and colleagues of individuals with disabilities”

Systems
  • Other

“The Impact of Proposed Budget Cuts on 403,370 adults and children with Disabilities in Connecticut” - 05/15/2017

~~“We build capacity: Through our Customized Employment project, we are training provider organizations the skills to identify and develop jobs for people with disabilities. Customized employment training is a defined rubric that has been shown to lead to real jobs for hard to place individuals. Working with Connecticut Legal Services, our Parents with Cognitive Limitations initiative has funded training for parents and court personnel, including judges, to address the unique issues that arise when these parents are involved with the courts. In addition, training was provided to DDS staff, self-advocates and medical personnel, including doctors. In all 330 people were trained in person, and additional individuals received training online.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Resources for Adult Services Providers - 05/11/2017

~~“Successful job development is often a complex set of strategies that requires skill and commitment on the part of the individual seeking a job, their support staff and members of their team.  Successful job developers use person-centered career planning to get to know their job seekers. They are knowledgeable about community resources and are also adept at recognizing and utilizing personal networks.  Customized Employment is a job development process that is a flexible blend of strategies, services and supports designed to increase employment options for job seekers with more complex needs.  Customized Employment is the voluntary negotiation of a personalized employment relationship between an individual and an employer that fulfills the business needs of the employer. This approach may include job carving, job creation, job sharing, self-employment and other types of entrepreneurial approaches.  Customized employment gives an advantage to the job seeker since that person will drive the employment process and uniquely fit a job position that meets their individual needs and interests.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

CT Mental Health Waiver (0653.R01.00) - 04/01/2012

This waiver "provides adult day health, community support, supported employment, assisted living, brief episodic stabilization, community living support, home accessibility adaptations, home delivered meals, non-medical transportation, overnight recovery assistant, peer supports, PERS, recovery assistant, specialized medical equipment, transitional case management for individuals w/mental illness ages 22 and older."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

CT Acquired Brain Injury Waiver (0302.R03.00) - 01/10/2012

Provides case management, homemaker, personal care, prevocational, respite, supported employment, ABI group day, chore, cognitive behavioral programs, community living support, companion, environmental accessibility adaptation, home delivered meals, independent living skill training, PERS, specialized medical equipment and supplies, substance abuse programs, transitional living, transportation, vehicle mods for individuals with brain injury ages 18 - no max age.

Expires 12/31/2016.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment First Overview - 12/01/2011

~~Connecticut Department of Developmental Services Employment First InitiativeReal Work for Real PayWe Believe...• Everyone can work and there is a job for everyone.  Our job is to be creative and persistent in providing supports that help people with intellectual disabilities to find, get and keep real pay.• Not working should be the exception.  All individuals, schools, families and businesses must raise their expectations.• People will be hired because of their ability not because they have a disability.• Communities embrace people who contribute.• Everyone has something to contribute and needs to contribute.• People are healthier, safer and happiest with meaningful work. • True employment is not a social service.• Employment is a win/win for everybody.

Systems
  • Other

CT Employment and Day Supports (0881.R01.00) - 04/01/2011

Provides adult day health, community based day support options, respite, supported employment, independent support broker, behavioral support, individual goods and services, individualized day support, interpreter, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation for individuals w/DD ages 18 - no max age and ID ages 3 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plan Amendments

A Medicaid and CHIP state plan is an agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs…When a state is planning to make a change to its program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. States also submit SPAs to request permissible program changes, make corrections, or update their Medicaid or CHIP state plan with new information   This webpage includes Medicaid State Plan amendments for the state of Connecticut  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plans

~~The Connecticut Medicaid state plan is an agreement between the state and the Federal government describing how Connecticut administers its Medicaid program. The plan details how the state will follow Federal rules and guidelines.  It also gives details on how the state may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

“To request a copy of the SPA from DSS or to send comments about the SPA, please email: Public.Comment.DSS@ct.gov or write: Department of Social Services, Medical Policy Unit, 55 Farmington Avenue, 9th Floor, Hartford, CT 06105 (Phone: 860-424-5067)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

People know what constitutes great employment opportunities for workers with disabilities in the Constitution State of Connecticut.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Connecticut's VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.33%
Change from
2016 to 2017
3,588,184
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.2%
Change from
2016 to 2017
189,419
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76,096
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.96%
Change from
2016 to 2017
40.17%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.10%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 3,590,886 3,576,452 3,588,184
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 190,691 191,687 189,419
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 67,517 74,715 76,096
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,606,605 1,596,352 1,582,806
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.41% 38.98% 40.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.68% 78.80% 78.10%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.60% 5.10% 4.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.20% 17.50% 17.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 9.60% 8.80% 8.60%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 185,838 183,458 184,187
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 203,852 211,678 207,675
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 306,452 314,740 310,248
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 41,668 40,279 38,719
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 52,535 56,622 58,256
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 1,358 1,629 3,056
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,041 7,750 8,928
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 12,490 11,355 11,276
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 19,638 19,190 19,635

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,082 4,125 4,125
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 7.10% 7.00% 6.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 81,784 81,330 81,260

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 10,377 10,685 9,178
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 20,043 20,043 16,578
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 43,772 43,992 37,157
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 23.70% 24.30% 24.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.20% 6.30% 8.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.40% 4.10% 5.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.60% 3.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,666 2,639 3,407
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,261 1,716 2,244
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 275 267 1,367
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,420 2,994 2,367
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.02 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 26 27 50
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 12 18 27
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 46.00% 67.00% 54.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.33 0.50 0.75

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,341
2,754
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 9 11 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 799 896 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 351 388 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 448 567 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 684 837 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 50 55 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 40.10% 41.50% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,113 2,211 3,020
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 124,361 125,226 126,638
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 26 44 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 59 76 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $74,928,000 $74,998,000 $75,899,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $5,613,000 $4,664,000 $4,171,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $126,697,000 $128,749,000 $135,947,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $10,202,000 $12,233,000 $13,710,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 47.00% 46.00% 43.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 723 842 889
Number of people served in facility based work. 344 302 266
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,571 4,691 4,841
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 131.80 129.60 127.10

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.67% 67.74% 67.33%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 5.20% 5.21% 5.50%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 8.40% 8.35% 8.03%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.92% 99.93% 99.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 49.73% 46.66% 51.34%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 73.57% 65.24% 66.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 86.51% 78.74% 79.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.84% 18.58% 15.28%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,354,163
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,584
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 46,321
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 621,956
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 668,277
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 245
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 837
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,082
AbilityOne wages (products). $158,294
AbilityOne wages (services). $9,751,263

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 3 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 15 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 46 54 35
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 64 58 35
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 3 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 135 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,983 3,814 2,210
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 116 116 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3,237 3,933 2,210

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~In November 2015, Connecticut was one of four states selected to participate as a Core State in the 2016 Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) offered through the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP).
Connecticut was chosen through an application process to become an EFSLMP Core State. Connecticut committed to a cross–system, cross–disability effort to promote Employment First, a national movement in both philosophy and policy stating that employment is the first priority and preferred outcome of individuals with disabilities. (Page 50)
Two workgroups were formed, comprised of leadership representing six state agencies including the Departments of Labor, Developmental Services, Rehabilitation Services, Education, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Social Services, as well as key stakeholders including the CT Council on Developmental Disabilities and the CT Business Leadership Network. These workgroups receive a combination of virtual and onsite mentoring, intensive technical assistance, and training from a national pool of subject matter experts under the program. One workgroup is focused on coordinating and streamlining business engagement and outreach strategies across government agencies and providers. A second workgroup required under the program called Vision Quest, is charged developing and implementing policy to support the state’s Employment First systems change efforts. (Page 50)
Participate in cross agency trainings through the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) to strengthen state agency partnerships. (Page 419)
Staff from the Bureau participates in meetings and training seminars organized by the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE). This organization links community providers, employers, state agency representatives and other resources together to exchange information on job placement strategies, funding sources and employer job leads. Bureau staff have presented at meetings of this organization on blindness related topics such as adaptive technology so that other providers in attendance would be aware of the options that exist for bringing about a successful job placement when accepting a referral from BESB for a client who is seeking a job placement with supported employment services. (Page 451)
 

Customized Employment

~~Employer services, such as:
i. Customized screening and referral of qualified participants in training services to employers;
ii. Customized employment-related services to employers, employer associations, or other such organization on a fee-for-service basis that are in addition to labor exchange services available to employers under the Wagner-Peyser Act Employment Service;
iii. Activities to provide business services and strategies that meet the workforce investment needs of area employers, as determined by the Local WDB and consistent with the local plan (see § 678.435 of this chapter and WIOA sec. 134(d)(1)(A)(ix)); and (Page 183 & 333)
The challenging economy continues to impact on the scope and variety of job placement options available to clients, making customized employment particularly difficult to secure. The need for long–term funding support is an additional step that is necessary for supported employment placements at the onset. These two variables in combination make the timing challenging in filling job vacancies with a client who requires long–term supports. Dedicating two counselors to work specifically with the transition–age client population will facilitate discussions on supported employment options much earlier in the Planning and Placement Team process, starting as early as junior high school. This should allow for increased time to explore and secure long–term funding commitments and also to develop job opportunities for clients. (Page 501)
Supported Employment refers to competitive integrated employment, including customized employment, that is individualized and customized consistent with the strengths, abilities, interests, and informed choice of a client with a most significant disability, and that includes ongoing support services. Supported employment services may be considered for individuals for whom competitive integrated employment has not historically occurred, or for whom competitive integrated employment has been interrupted or intermittent, and where there is a need for extended services after the transition from support provided by the Bureau, (Page 502)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Limited capacity of many workforce service providers to deal effectively with the complexities of braiding funds (Page 53)
Connecticut’s American Job Center (AJC) One–Stop system is the vehicle through which service delivery and targeting, leveraging and braiding of available resources is coordinated. Connecticut has a history and tradition of innovative collaboration among multiple partners and stakeholders to coordinate services and resources at the local level through its One–Stop system. (Page 84)
 

DEI/DRC

~~Jobs Corps Job Corps is a national, federally funded educational and vocational training program administered by USDOL that helps low income youth (ages16–24) gain workplace skills, train for high–demand occupations, and become independent and self–sufficient. With centers in Hartford and New Haven, more than 400 students enroll each year to earn a high school diploma or GED, learn a trade, obtain third party certifications and receive assistance finding a job. CTDOL has an assigned staff member who provides on–site support to the Hartford and New Haven Job Corp Centers. Transforming System Capacity Disability Employment Initiative In October 2013 Connecticut was one of eight states to receive a grant through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). CTDOL’s Office of Workforce Competitiveness (OWC) administers the three–year $3,058,706 award from USDOL’ s Employment and Training Administration and Office of Disability Employment Policy. Broad objectives are to provide additional education, training and employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, and to expand the workforce system’s capacity to serve eligible beneficiaries in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program. The initiative features strong partnerships and collaboration among key agencies; service coordination through an Integrated Resource Team; integrated services and resources, including blended, braided and leveraged funding and resources; and, innovative asset development strategies. Services are offered in two of Connecticut’s workforce regions. Two participating WDBs employ Disability Resource Coordinators to implement project activities and coordinate services. Integrated Resource Teams address individual needs and provide increased support for jobseekers with disabilities. Partners include CTDOL’s Office for Veterans Workforce Development and the Departments of Rehabilitative Services, Labor, Education, Mental Health and Addiction Services, Social Services, Transportation, and various other public and private sector representatives. ( Page 48)
DEI efforts focus on:
• Promoting inclusiveness of individuals with disabilities to enhance competitive advantage
• Organizing business–to–business forums to share strategies on recruiting, hiring and retaining people with disabilities ( Page 48)
• Re–imagine delivery of customer services to individual jobseekers and workers in the American Job Center One–Stop system. Develop and implement streamlined service flow with efficiently aligned and integrated processes implemented by coordinated service teams representing the full range of contributions from system partners and stakeholders, consistent with principles and criteria developed by the WIOA Transition Service Design and Delivery Work Group. Build on lessons learned from implementation of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) and Secure Jobs pilots as models for innovative and effective multi–partner service coordination. (Page 64)
In October 2013, Connecticut was one of eight states to receive a grant under USDOL’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). Awarded to OWC, the three–year $3,058,706 grant promotes strategic approaches to enhance employment services for individuals with disabilities served by the public workforce investment system. (All of page 120)
 

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~Transform System Capacity:
• Re–imagine delivery of customer services to individual jobseekers and workers in the American Job Center One–Stop system. Develop and implement streamlined service flow with efficiently aligned and integrated processes implemented by coordinated service teams representing the full range of contributions from system partners and stakeholders, consistent with principles and criteria developed by the WIOA Transition Service Design and Delivery Work Group. Build on lessons learned from implementation of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) and Secure Jobs pilots as models for innovative and effective multi–partner service coordination. (Page 64)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Short-term pre-vocational services, including development of learning skills, communication skills, interviewing skills, punctuality, personal maintenance skills, and professional conduct, to prepare individuals for unsubsidized employment or training;
g.   Work Experience/Internships;
h.   Adult Basic Education/Financial Literacy Services. (Page 209)
10. Comprehensive guidance and counseling, including drug and alcohol abuse counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the individual youth;
11. Financial literacy education;
12. Entrepreneurial skills training;
13. Services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area*, such as career awareness, career counseling, and career exploration services; and
14. Activities that help youth prepare for and transition to post-secondary education and training. WIOA Regs. 20 CFR Part 681.460 (Page 211)
Along with the strategies mentioned above to address goals and ways to overcome barriers to equitable access to VR services, BRS also anticipates using innovation and expansion (I&E) funds in FFY 2017 to support the State Rehabilitation Council, the State Independent Living Council, and to continue Individualized Financial Capability Coaching, a project to increase financial literacy and capability for people with disabilities. Other proposals will be assessed upon submission and considered based on the alignment with the state’s goals and priorities. (Page 422)
Measures of success will be based on a consumer’s improved financial literacy and his/her ability to budget a household, create realistic goals, understand credit scores (and demonstrate actions to maintain or improve them), increase self–sufficiency, obtain employment/increase wages, and go off of SSDI and/or SSI benefits. The number of new checking, savings or equivalent accounts that are opened will also be counted. (Page 429)
 

School to Work Transition

~~Regular payments from railroad retirement, strike benefits from union funds, worker’s compensation, and training stipends;
4.   Alimony;
5.   Military family allotments or other regular support from an absent family member or someone not living in the household;
6.   Pensions whether private, government employee (including Military retirement pay);
7.   Regular insurance or annuity payments other than Supplemental Security Income disability (SSI) or veterans’ disability;
8.   College or university grants, fellowships, and assistantships;
9.   Net gambling or lottery winnings;
10.   Social Security Disability Insurance payments (SSDI)
•    Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) pays benefits to individuals that have worked in the past, paid Social Security taxes, and are currently unable to work for a year or more because of a disability. SSDI is considered income replacement and must be included in family income (All of page 204)
12.   Tribal Government Payments (i.e., Per Capita Payments, Lease Payments, Individual Indian Money (IIM);
13.   Old age and survivors insurance benefits received under section 202 of the Social Security Act (42 USC 402).
• Old age and survivors insurance benefits include: Social Security Survivor Benefits – these are benefits paid to people up to age 18 who have had a parent die and the parent paid wages into the system; and
• Social Security Retirement Benefits – these are benefits that are paid to people who reached their social security age and have wages paid in the system. (Page 205)

Career Pathways

~~DORS: Partner Alignment with Educational Institutions Both Vocational Rehabilitation Programs at DORS are actively involved in a variety of transition school–to–work initiatives, with extensive collaboration and coordination at the administrative and service delivery levels of the organization. Through a cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education, the roles and responsibilities of the VR programs and the public educational system are clearly defined, including financial responsibilities and coordination of services and staff training. Representatives from both VR programs serve on an interagency transition task force and appointed representatives from the Connecticut State Department of Education serves on the State Rehabilitation Council to BESB and to BRS. VR program information is presented at in–service training programs for public school teachers and guidance counselors on issues affecting students who have disabilities. (Page 90)
Prior to initiation of pre–employment transition efforts, BRS had liaison counselors assigned to each high school to work directly with students and collaborate with education administrators to sign a referral protocol yearly. With implementation of WIOA, 10 VR counselors have been assigned to work exclusively with students with disabilities. (Page 397)
The Vocational Rehabilitation Program at the Bureau of Education and Services for the Blind is actively involved in a variety of transition school–to–work initiatives, with extensive collaboration and coordination at the administrative and service delivery levels of the organization. (Page 447)
Through a cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education, the roles and responsibilities of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program and the public educational system are clearly defined. This includes financial responsibilities as well as coordination of services and staff training. To facilitate this coordination, the Transition School to Work Coordinator from BESB serves on an interagency transition task force and there is an appointed representative from the State Department of Education serving on the State Rehabilitation Council to BESB. (Page 449)

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Connecticut Employment and Training Commission (CETC – the State Workforce Board), the State agencies responsible for administration of the core WIOA programs encompassed by this Unified State Plan (Connecticut Department of Labor (CTDOL), Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE), and Department of Rehabilitation Services (DORS)), the Connecticut Department of Social Services (CTDSS) and the five Workforce Development Boards – propose and will support a set of broadly–conceived strategies intended to achieve the vision and goals outlined above. These strategies will serve as a framework for Connecticut’s implementation efforts, with corresponding detailed State and local implementing actions to be developed.
(1)  Describe the strategies the State will implement, including industry or sector partnerships related to in–demand industry sectors and occupations and career pathways, as required by WIOA section 101(d)(3)(B), (D). “Career pathway” is defined at WIOA section 3(7). “In– demand industry sector or occupation” is defined at WIOA section 3(23). (Page 61)
With representatives of secondary and postsecondary education programs, lead efforts to develop and implement career pathways within the local area by aligning the employment, training, education, and supportive services that are needed by adults and youth, particularly individuals with barriers to employment. (Page 139)
 

Employer Engagement

~~As required by DEI, two local WDBs – Northwest Regional Workforce Investment Board and Capital Workforce Partners (North Central area) – became active Employment Networks (ENs) in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program, thereby expanding the Connecticut workforce system’s capacity to serve eligible beneficiaries. DEI also requires the State’s participation in an evaluation process to measure the project’s impact on outcomes for jobseekers with disabilities.  (Page 120)

511

~~Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) DORS has a contract with a software provider to maintain a case management system for the vocational rehabilitation programs. This system runs locally on servers housed within DORS and contains case information relevant to individual consumers and reportable data. The vendor has maintained an active relationship with the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) who governs data collection for public vocational rehabilitation programs. Modifications to the system are currently being planned to manage the upcoming changes in data collection required by WIOA. RSA data elements will be adjusted to be compatible with the WIOA–Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) document. (Page 97)
Measure: Documentation of Vocational Rehabilitation staff participation in statewide meeting regarding the development of a common–front end data collection system. (Page 480)
 

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 119)
(3)  A standing committee to provide information and to assist with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, including issues relating to compliance with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding providing programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the one-stop delivery system, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing supports for or accommodations to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. (Page 137)
(o) Develop a budget for the activities of the Local WDB, with approval of the chief elected official and consistent with the local plan and the duties of the Local WDB.
(p) Assess, on an annual basis, the physical and programmatic accessibility of all one- stop centers in the local area, in accordance with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.). (Page 141)
(ii) How the Local WDB will facilitate access to services provided through the one-stop delivery system, including in remote areas, through the use of technology and other means;
(iii) How entities within the one-stop delivery system, including one-stop operators and the one-stop partners, will comply with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities; and
(iv) The roles and resource contributions of the one-stop partners; (Page 145)
2.   WIOA funds may not be used for employment in the construction, operation, or maintenance of any part of any facility that is used or will be used for sectarian instruction or as a place for religious worship with the exception of maintenance of facilities that are not primarily used for instruction or for worship and are operated by organizations providing services to WIOA participants. WIOA Sec. 188(a)(3); 20 CFR Part 683.255; 29 CFR Part 2, subpart D, and 29 CFR Part 37.6(f)(1) (Reference TEGL 1-05 dated July 6, 2005)  (Page 150)
O.   Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity. 1. All eligible service and training providers receiving WIOA Title IB funds must comply fully with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA Section 188 and Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination Regulations at 29 CFR Part 37. 2. (Page 151)
4.   Provider agreements will contain assurance language that it will comply with Equal Opportunity requirements of Section 188 of the Act, 29 CFR Part 37, and 1604, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and all other applicable equal opportunity laws and regulations. The assurance may be incorporated by reference. (Page 152)
5.   Discriminatory discharge prohibited. No person, organization or agency may discharge, or in any other manner discriminate or retaliate against any person, or deny to any person a benefit to which that person is entitled under the provisions of the Act because such person has filed any complaint, instituted or caused to be instituted any proceeding under or related to the Act, has testified or is about to testify in any such proceeding or investigation, or has provided information or assisted in an investigation. WIOA Sec. 181, 188; 29 CFR Part 37; MCA 9-2-303(b) (Page 152)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 51 - 60 of 68

Connecticut Medicaid State Plan Amendments

A Medicaid and CHIP state plan is an agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs…When a state is planning to make a change to its program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. States also submit SPAs to request permissible program changes, make corrections, or update their Medicaid or CHIP state plan with new information   This webpage includes Medicaid State Plan amendments for the state of Connecticut  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plans

~~The Connecticut Medicaid state plan is an agreement between the state and the Federal government describing how Connecticut administers its Medicaid program. The plan details how the state will follow Federal rules and guidelines.  It also gives details on how the state may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

“To request a copy of the SPA from DSS or to send comments about the SPA, please email: Public.Comment.DSS@ct.gov or write: Department of Social Services, Medical Policy Unit, 55 Farmington Avenue, 9th Floor, Hartford, CT 06105 (Phone: 860-424-5067)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut SAMHSA/CMHS Employment Development Initiative: Fiscal Year 2011 & 2012 Projects

This initiative provided training and technical assistance for entrepreneurs with psychiatric disorders to start a small business. “This project demonstrated that entrepreneurship is indeed a viable option for persons in recovery. The Business Advisors from the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) observed that the business plans submitted by the individuals in this program were stronger and demonstrated more commitment than those of the general population. All of the persons receiving mini-grants as well as the majority of persons who were not were encouraged by their Business Advisors to continue working on their business plans, which the Advisors felt had real potential to succeed with additional effort.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

CT Balancing Incentive Payment Project

“The State of Connecticut’s Department of Social Services, Division of Health Services (DHS), with the Legislative and stakeholder support, seeks approval for application to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for participation in the Balancing Incentive Payment Program (BIP). The $72,780,505 enhanced federal medical assistance received will be used to expand community long-term services and supports (LTSS) and develop infrastructure necessary to support uniform access and a more streamlined process for persons seeking community LTSS. Ultimately, the goal of Connecticut’s BIP project is to remove policy, procedure and access barriers that prevent persons from receiving equitable community LTSS and that lead to unnecessary institutionalization.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Connecticut State Rehabilitation Council (SRC)

“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is an important partner with the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) to help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. BRS administers the Title I Vocational Rehabilitation and Title VI Supported Employment programs of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, that mandates employment services for people with disabilities. This act is the federal law that requires each designated state agency (BRS in Connecticut) to work closely with its SRC in developing the State Plan, strategic plans, reports, and state goals and priorities and in conducting needs assessment and evaluations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Role of the Connecticut Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

“The Governor’s Committee shall be composed of people with disabilities; agency representatives, including a representative of the State Job Service, the Division of Rehabilitation Services, the Veterans Employment and training Service and the United States Department of Veterans Affairs; representatives of employers, representatives of organized labor and other interested persons.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Connecticut Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

The Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities’ (GCEPD) mission is to “promote the employment of people with disabilities; produce and provide an environment that strives to include and integrate people with disabilities into the workforce; [and] promote and establish initiatives designed to highlight the benefits of employing people with disabilities.”   GCEPD’s initiatives include “[providing] education and awareness on the benefits of hiring qualified candidates with disabilities; [promoting and supporting] the activities of local communities throughout the state to enhance the employment of persons with disabilities; [and maintaining] a website of disability resources for both employers and job seekers.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Southwest Connecticut Workforce Investment Board: 2012-2016 Local Plan

"The WorkPlace helps people prepare for careers and strengthens the workforce for employers. We are a progressive, socially enterprising operation that is driven by innovation an entrepreneurial spirit. As Southwestern Connecticut’s Regional Workforce Development Board, we administer workforce development funds and coordinate providers of job training and education programs that meet the needs of residents and employers in the Southwestern Connecticut Region.

The WorkPlace administers job training and preparation funds allocated by state and federal agencies. We operate CTWorks Career Centers in Bridgeport, Stamford and Derby, CT. These centers provide programs and services to job seekers including career counseling, job search assistance, skills assessment and occupational training. Customers using the centers have access to computers, internet, telephones, copy machines as well as printed materials to help them search for a job."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

CT General Statutes within the Jurisdiction of the CT Department of Labor

Updated through 2012 June Spec. Sess. These General Statues are applicable to the performance of the Connecticut Department of Labor. They define the various types of services that will be available through the state Department of Labor, and the American Job Centers. Under the section on the "Mortgage Crisis Job Training Program," Customized Employment is listed as a service to be provided: "The WorkPlace, Inc. and Capital Workforce Partners shall manage such teams. The teams, in cooperation with the regional workforce development boards and the one-stop centers, shall ensure the provision of rapid, customized employment services, job training, repair training and job placement assistance to borrowers who are unemployed, underemployed or in need of a second job. The WorkPlace, Inc. shall arrange for the provision of financial literacy and credit counseling for participants in the program with the Connecticut Housing Finance Authority."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Connecticut Small Contractor Set Aside Program (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann 4a-60g)

Statute requiring state agencies and political subdivisions of the state to set aside at least 25 percent of their budgets each fiscal year for small contractors.  This requirement is limited to those agencies and subdivisions that have annual contracting budgets of more than $10,000.  Of this set-aside, 25 percent must be reserved for awards to minority business enterprises, including disability-owned businesses. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

H.B. No. 5253 AN ACT EXPANDING ACCESS TO THE MONEY FOLLOWS THE PERSON DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AND REPEALING OBSOLETE STATUTES - 06/06/2018

~~“The Commissioner of Social Services, pursuant to Section 6071 of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, shall submit an application to the Secretary of Health and Human Services to establish a Money Follows the Person demonstration project. Such project shall [serve not more than five thousand persons and shall] be designed to achieve the objectives set forth in Section 6071(a) of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. Services available under the demonstration project shall include,but need not be limited to, personal care assistance services. The commissioner may apply for a Medicaid research and demonstration waiver under Section 1115 of the Social Security Act, if such waiver is necessary to implement the demonstration project. The commissioner may, if necessary, modify any existing Medicaid home or community based waiver if such modification is required to implement the demonstration project”.“

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Senate Bill No. 502 May Special Session, Public Act No. 16-3AN ACT CONCERNING REVENUE AND OTHER ITEMS TO IMPLEMENT THE BUDGET FOR THE BIENNIUM ENDING JUNE 30, 2017. - 07/01/2016

“Sec. 60. Subsection (a) of section 17b-666 of the general statutes is repealed and the following is substituted in lieu thereof (Effective July 1, 2016): (a) The Department of Rehabilitation Services may receive state and federal funds to administer, within available appropriations, an employment opportunities program to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities who do not meet the eligibility requirements of supported employment programs administered by the Departments of Developmental Services, Social Services and Mental Health and Addiction Services. For the purposes of this section, "individuals with the most significant disabilities" means those individuals who (1) have serious employment limitations in a total of three or more functional areas including, but not limited to, mobility, communication, self-care, interpersonal skills, work tolerance or work skills, or (2) will require significant ongoing disability-related services on the job in order to maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Connecticut HB 6738 - 06/03/2015

"The State Treasurer shall establish a qualified ABLE program pursuant to the federal ABLE Act and sections 1 to 8, inclusive, of this act. Under the program: (A) The State Treasurer shall administer individual ABLE accounts to encourage and assist eligible individuals and their families in saving private funds to provide support for eligible individuals, and (B) a person may make contributions to an individual ABLE account to meet the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

CT General Statutes within the Jurisdiction of the CT Department of Labor

Updated through 2012 June Spec. Sess. These General Statues are applicable to the performance of the Connecticut Department of Labor. They define the various types of services that will be available through the state Department of Labor, and the American Job Centers. Under the section on the "Mortgage Crisis Job Training Program," Customized Employment is listed as a service to be provided: "The WorkPlace, Inc. and Capital Workforce Partners shall manage such teams. The teams, in cooperation with the regional workforce development boards and the one-stop centers, shall ensure the provision of rapid, customized employment services, job training, repair training and job placement assistance to borrowers who are unemployed, underemployed or in need of a second job. The WorkPlace, Inc. shall arrange for the provision of financial literacy and credit counseling for participants in the program with the Connecticut Housing Finance Authority."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Connecticut Small Contractor Set Aside Program (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann 4a-60g)

Statute requiring state agencies and political subdivisions of the state to set aside at least 25 percent of their budgets each fiscal year for small contractors.  This requirement is limited to those agencies and subdivisions that have annual contracting budgets of more than $10,000.  Of this set-aside, 25 percent must be reserved for awards to minority business enterprises, including disability-owned businesses. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Mental Health Supported Employment Services - 07/26/2017

~~“DMHAS continues to work closely with Individual Placement and Support (IPS) Employment Center at Rockville Institute to implement the SAMHSA-endorsed Evidence-based Supported Employment Practice (EBP) for persons with serious and persistent psychiatric disorders.  This includes embedding employment staff in clinical treatment teams to promote integration, where employment becomes “everyone’s business.”  Employment staff is responsible for helping people choose, find and keep “integrated competitive employment,” that is, jobs that are open for all to apply and pay competitive wages.  The EBP approach features non-exclusion from employment services based on diagnosis or symptomology, rapid job search for positions that match individual interests, strong relationship building with area employers, and customized follow-along supports on- and off-the-job for as long as needed (see link to IPS Works)”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

State Rehabilitation Report 2016 - 07/25/2017

~~Mission:“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) provides assessment, advice and recommendations to the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) and others regarding coordination and effectiveness of programs and strategies which promote  community-based competitive employment for persons with disabilities.GOALS:To assess the effectiveness and delivery of vocational services provided by BRS to individuals with disabilitiesTo improve the coordination of vocational services among BRS, state agencies and public and private entities for the benefit of BRS job seekers.To make recommendations to BRS, the Governor, the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) and others for developing and improving strategies for the employment of, and vocational services for individuals with disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

“Employment and Other Day Service Options” - 04/11/2017

~~“DDS Funded Day Services:SUPP0RTED EMPLOYMENT - These include supports to help individuals work as a paid employee in work settings that also employ people without disabilities. These services assist individuals find and apply for jobs, and offer job coaching support to people once work is secured. This service includes individual and group supported employment. This service is designed to provide support and supervision but is not intended to provide ongoing long term 1:1 support to help a person complete their work activities.GROUP EMPLOYMENT - These include sheltered workshops and day support options. These services are provided in a facility-based program that focuses on developing meaningful skills in the area of work, socialization and community participation.INDIVIDUAL DAY - This waiver service includes individually tailored supports that help consumers gain or maintain skills to participate more fully and productively in work, leisure or community activities. This may include the development of independent functioning skills, relationship skills, exploring job interests or retirement programs. It can also provide funds for staff supports for individuals who have their own businesses.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Council on Developmental Services Department of Developmental Services - 01/12/2017

~~The Council on Developmental Services was established to advise and consult on issues affecting the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) and its programs and services for Connecticut residents with intellectual disability and their families. In consultation with the Commissioner of Developmental Services, the Council recommends to the Governor and the Connecticut General Assembly legislation that would enhance and improve the quality of the programs and services provided by the department.  The Council, with input from the public, advocates for all persons with developmental and intellectual disabilities in Connecticut.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Connecticut State Department of Education “Transition Bill of Rights” - 05/04/2016

“This Transition Bill of Rights for parents of students receiving special education will help parents and students understand a student’s rights related to getting an education and other important issues regarding the transition to life after high school. School districts will provide this document annually at a planning and placement team meeting to all parents, guardians, and surrogate parents of students who are receiving special education services in Grades 6-12 as well as to students who are 18 years of age or older.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

IEP Manual and Forms - 12/01/2015

~~“The United States Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), has advised states that all IEPs written on or after July 1, 2005, must comply with the requirements of the 2004 Reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA). The position of the Connecticut State Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education, is that the January 2006 and February 2009 revised IEP forms serve a number of purposes. The first purpose is to help insure compliance with the statutory requirements of IDEA and State law. In addition, these forms assist as a data collection and student educational program-planning tool. Therefore, the State Department of Education has directed that all IEPs written for students in the State of Connecticut be completed on these forms.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Connecticut Unified State Plan 2017 –Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Services Portion

Goal 1: To implement the provisions of WIOA specific to the VR program. Priority areas: • pre-employment transition services • employer services • service delivery • performance accountability measures • subminimum wage

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services

Employment Services Employment Services are integral to the DMHAS’ goal of offering a recovery-oriented system of care for persons in recovery who experience behavioral health conditions. One of the first significant steps to be taken in this direction is to ensure that all DMHAS consumers have both the necessary opportunities and supports to become involved in meaningful activities of their choice as well as to contribute to the broader community. Individuals with behavioral health conditions consistently express their desire for employment. From the recovery perspective, meaningful employment has been shown to promote recovery from psychiatric and addiction disorders and to facilitate improvements in diverse domains from symptom relief to successful community integration. Currently, DMHAS funds 36 agencies across Connecticut to provide a broad menu of employment and education services. While employment strategies must be tailored to meet individual needs, agencies generally offer a range of services including career planning, job search assistance, job placement, on- and off-the-job coaching, and career advancement services. Over 4000 persons per year are assisted in finding and keeping employment through the DMHAS system

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health

Connecticut Department of Developmental Services “Employment First Overview”

We Believe... -Everyone can work and there is a job for everyone. Our job is to be creative and persistent in providing supports that help people with intellectual disabilities to find, get and keep real pay. -Not working should be the exception. All individuals, schools, families and businesses must raise their expectations. -People will be hired because of their ability not because they have a disability. -Communities embrace people who contribute. -Everyone has something to contribute and needs to contribute. -People are healthier, safer and happiest with meaningful work. -True employment is not a social service. -Employment is a win/win for everybody.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Southwest Connecticut Workforce Investment Board: 2012-2016 Local Plan

"The WorkPlace helps people prepare for careers and strengthens the workforce for employers. We are a progressive, socially enterprising operation that is driven by innovation an entrepreneurial spirit. As Southwestern Connecticut’s Regional Workforce Development Board, we administer workforce development funds and coordinate providers of job training and education programs that meet the needs of residents and employers in the Southwestern Connecticut Region.

The WorkPlace administers job training and preparation funds allocated by state and federal agencies. We operate CTWorks Career Centers in Bridgeport, Stamford and Derby, CT. These centers provide programs and services to job seekers including career counseling, job search assistance, skills assessment and occupational training. Customers using the centers have access to computers, internet, telephones, copy machines as well as printed materials to help them search for a job."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services Employer Partnerships

“The Bureau of Rehabilitation Services partners with employers of all sizes and across industries. These partnership arrangements include qualified candidate referrals and individualized on-the-job trainings as well as more formalized training and placement programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services, Bureau of Rehabilitation Services

“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is an important partner with the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) to help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. BRS administers the Title I Vocational Rehabilitation and Title VI Supported Employment programs of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, that mandates employment services for people with disabilities. This act is the federal law that requires each designated state agency (BRS in Connecticut) to work closely with its SRC in developing the State Plan, strategic plans, reports, and state goals and priorities and in conducting needs assessment and evaluations.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Industry Specific Training and Placement Programs (ISTPP)

“Industry Specific Training and Placement Programs (ISTPP)  tuition-based workforce development programs designed to provide job seekers with disabilities the skills necessary for employment in a particular profession or type of business. In order to be most effective, ISTPPs are developed to address the employment needs within a local market or area and are reliant on essential partnerships with community/educational organizations and the targeted industry.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 11 - 11 of 11

Connecticut Connect-Ability

“Connect-Ability began in late 2005 with a federal grant to the State of Connecticut to identify and remove barriers to employment faced by people with disabilities. This five-year, multimillion dollar 'systems change grant' involved a detailed look at the State's employment and disability services infrastructure in order to identify problem areas and implement lasting solutions.

“Connect-Ability has two primary customers:

Employers of all sizes and in all industries who are seeking qualified workers People with disabilities of all ages who are seeking employment for the first time or who want a new challenge.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

26th Annual Conference on Serving Adults with Disabilities - 10/26/2018

~~“The Annual Conference on Serving Adults with Disabilities provides an excellent opportunity for participants to meet with a wide representation of experts and professionals, along with family and friends of individuals with disabilities, and to discuss current strategies and knowledge on the broad spectrum of disabilities.

Conference GoalTo share current knowledge and strategies and to provide answers, direction, and support to:•Adult education teachers•Workforce Practitioners•Employers•Counselors•Families, friends, and colleagues of individuals with disabilities”

Systems
  • Other

“The Impact of Proposed Budget Cuts on 403,370 adults and children with Disabilities in Connecticut” - 05/15/2017

~~“We build capacity: Through our Customized Employment project, we are training provider organizations the skills to identify and develop jobs for people with disabilities. Customized employment training is a defined rubric that has been shown to lead to real jobs for hard to place individuals. Working with Connecticut Legal Services, our Parents with Cognitive Limitations initiative has funded training for parents and court personnel, including judges, to address the unique issues that arise when these parents are involved with the courts. In addition, training was provided to DDS staff, self-advocates and medical personnel, including doctors. In all 330 people were trained in person, and additional individuals received training online.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Resources for Adult Services Providers - 05/11/2017

~~“Successful job development is often a complex set of strategies that requires skill and commitment on the part of the individual seeking a job, their support staff and members of their team.  Successful job developers use person-centered career planning to get to know their job seekers. They are knowledgeable about community resources and are also adept at recognizing and utilizing personal networks.  Customized Employment is a job development process that is a flexible blend of strategies, services and supports designed to increase employment options for job seekers with more complex needs.  Customized Employment is the voluntary negotiation of a personalized employment relationship between an individual and an employer that fulfills the business needs of the employer. This approach may include job carving, job creation, job sharing, self-employment and other types of entrepreneurial approaches.  Customized employment gives an advantage to the job seeker since that person will drive the employment process and uniquely fit a job position that meets their individual needs and interests.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

CT Mental Health Waiver (0653.R01.00) - 04/01/2012

This waiver "provides adult day health, community support, supported employment, assisted living, brief episodic stabilization, community living support, home accessibility adaptations, home delivered meals, non-medical transportation, overnight recovery assistant, peer supports, PERS, recovery assistant, specialized medical equipment, transitional case management for individuals w/mental illness ages 22 and older."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

CT Acquired Brain Injury Waiver (0302.R03.00) - 01/10/2012

Provides case management, homemaker, personal care, prevocational, respite, supported employment, ABI group day, chore, cognitive behavioral programs, community living support, companion, environmental accessibility adaptation, home delivered meals, independent living skill training, PERS, specialized medical equipment and supplies, substance abuse programs, transitional living, transportation, vehicle mods for individuals with brain injury ages 18 - no max age.

Expires 12/31/2016.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment First Overview - 12/01/2011

~~Connecticut Department of Developmental Services Employment First InitiativeReal Work for Real PayWe Believe...• Everyone can work and there is a job for everyone.  Our job is to be creative and persistent in providing supports that help people with intellectual disabilities to find, get and keep real pay.• Not working should be the exception.  All individuals, schools, families and businesses must raise their expectations.• People will be hired because of their ability not because they have a disability.• Communities embrace people who contribute.• Everyone has something to contribute and needs to contribute.• People are healthier, safer and happiest with meaningful work. • True employment is not a social service.• Employment is a win/win for everybody.

Systems
  • Other

CT Employment and Day Supports (0881.R01.00) - 04/01/2011

Provides adult day health, community based day support options, respite, supported employment, independent support broker, behavioral support, individual goods and services, individualized day support, interpreter, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation for individuals w/DD ages 18 - no max age and ID ages 3 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plan Amendments

A Medicaid and CHIP state plan is an agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs…When a state is planning to make a change to its program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. States also submit SPAs to request permissible program changes, make corrections, or update their Medicaid or CHIP state plan with new information   This webpage includes Medicaid State Plan amendments for the state of Connecticut  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plans

~~The Connecticut Medicaid state plan is an agreement between the state and the Federal government describing how Connecticut administers its Medicaid program. The plan details how the state will follow Federal rules and guidelines.  It also gives details on how the state may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

“To request a copy of the SPA from DSS or to send comments about the SPA, please email: Public.Comment.DSS@ct.gov or write: Department of Social Services, Medical Policy Unit, 55 Farmington Avenue, 9th Floor, Hartford, CT 06105 (Phone: 860-424-5067)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

People know what constitutes great employment opportunities for workers with disabilities in the Constitution State of Connecticut.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Connecticut's VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.33%
Change from
2016 to 2017
3,588,184
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.2%
Change from
2016 to 2017
189,419
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76,096
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.96%
Change from
2016 to 2017
40.17%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.10%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 3,590,886 3,576,452 3,588,184
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 190,691 191,687 189,419
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 67,517 74,715 76,096
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,606,605 1,596,352 1,582,806
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.41% 38.98% 40.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.68% 78.80% 78.10%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.60% 5.10% 4.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.20% 17.50% 17.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 9.60% 8.80% 8.60%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 185,838 183,458 184,187
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 203,852 211,678 207,675
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 306,452 314,740 310,248
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 41,668 40,279 38,719
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 52,535 56,622 58,256
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 1,358 1,629 3,056
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,041 7,750 8,928
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 12,490 11,355 11,276
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 19,638 19,190 19,635

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,082 4,125 4,125
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 7.10% 7.00% 6.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 81,784 81,330 81,260

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 10,377 10,685 9,178
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 20,043 20,043 16,578
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 43,772 43,992 37,157
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 23.70% 24.30% 24.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.20% 6.30% 8.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.40% 4.10% 5.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.60% 3.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,666 2,639 3,407
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,261 1,716 2,244
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 275 267 1,367
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,420 2,994 2,367
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.02 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 26 27 50
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 12 18 27
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 46.00% 67.00% 54.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.33 0.50 0.75

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,341
2,754
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 9 11 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 799 896 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 351 388 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 448 567 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 684 837 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 50 55 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 40.10% 41.50% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,113 2,211 3,020
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 124,361 125,226 126,638
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 26 44 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 59 76 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $74,928,000 $74,998,000 $75,899,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $5,613,000 $4,664,000 $4,171,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $126,697,000 $128,749,000 $135,947,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $10,202,000 $12,233,000 $13,710,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 47.00% 46.00% 43.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 723 842 889
Number of people served in facility based work. 344 302 266
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,571 4,691 4,841
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 131.80 129.60 127.10

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.67% 67.74% 67.33%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 5.20% 5.21% 5.50%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 8.40% 8.35% 8.03%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.92% 99.93% 99.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 49.73% 46.66% 51.34%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 73.57% 65.24% 66.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 86.51% 78.74% 79.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.84% 18.58% 15.28%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,354,163
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,584
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 46,321
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 621,956
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 668,277
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 245
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 837
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,082
AbilityOne wages (products). $158,294
AbilityOne wages (services). $9,751,263

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 3 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 15 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 46 54 35
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 64 58 35
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 3 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 135 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,983 3,814 2,210
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 116 116 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3,237 3,933 2,210

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~In November 2015, Connecticut was one of four states selected to participate as a Core State in the 2016 Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) offered through the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP).
Connecticut was chosen through an application process to become an EFSLMP Core State. Connecticut committed to a cross–system, cross–disability effort to promote Employment First, a national movement in both philosophy and policy stating that employment is the first priority and preferred outcome of individuals with disabilities. (Page 50)
Two workgroups were formed, comprised of leadership representing six state agencies including the Departments of Labor, Developmental Services, Rehabilitation Services, Education, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Social Services, as well as key stakeholders including the CT Council on Developmental Disabilities and the CT Business Leadership Network. These workgroups receive a combination of virtual and onsite mentoring, intensive technical assistance, and training from a national pool of subject matter experts under the program. One workgroup is focused on coordinating and streamlining business engagement and outreach strategies across government agencies and providers. A second workgroup required under the program called Vision Quest, is charged developing and implementing policy to support the state’s Employment First systems change efforts. (Page 50)
Participate in cross agency trainings through the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) to strengthen state agency partnerships. (Page 419)
Staff from the Bureau participates in meetings and training seminars organized by the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE). This organization links community providers, employers, state agency representatives and other resources together to exchange information on job placement strategies, funding sources and employer job leads. Bureau staff have presented at meetings of this organization on blindness related topics such as adaptive technology so that other providers in attendance would be aware of the options that exist for bringing about a successful job placement when accepting a referral from BESB for a client who is seeking a job placement with supported employment services. (Page 451)
 

Customized Employment

~~Employer services, such as:
i. Customized screening and referral of qualified participants in training services to employers;
ii. Customized employment-related services to employers, employer associations, or other such organization on a fee-for-service basis that are in addition to labor exchange services available to employers under the Wagner-Peyser Act Employment Service;
iii. Activities to provide business services and strategies that meet the workforce investment needs of area employers, as determined by the Local WDB and consistent with the local plan (see § 678.435 of this chapter and WIOA sec. 134(d)(1)(A)(ix)); and (Page 183 & 333)
The challenging economy continues to impact on the scope and variety of job placement options available to clients, making customized employment particularly difficult to secure. The need for long–term funding support is an additional step that is necessary for supported employment placements at the onset. These two variables in combination make the timing challenging in filling job vacancies with a client who requires long–term supports. Dedicating two counselors to work specifically with the transition–age client population will facilitate discussions on supported employment options much earlier in the Planning and Placement Team process, starting as early as junior high school. This should allow for increased time to explore and secure long–term funding commitments and also to develop job opportunities for clients. (Page 501)
Supported Employment refers to competitive integrated employment, including customized employment, that is individualized and customized consistent with the strengths, abilities, interests, and informed choice of a client with a most significant disability, and that includes ongoing support services. Supported employment services may be considered for individuals for whom competitive integrated employment has not historically occurred, or for whom competitive integrated employment has been interrupted or intermittent, and where there is a need for extended services after the transition from support provided by the Bureau, (Page 502)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Limited capacity of many workforce service providers to deal effectively with the complexities of braiding funds (Page 53)
Connecticut’s American Job Center (AJC) One–Stop system is the vehicle through which service delivery and targeting, leveraging and braiding of available resources is coordinated. Connecticut has a history and tradition of innovative collaboration among multiple partners and stakeholders to coordinate services and resources at the local level through its One–Stop system. (Page 84)
 

DEI/DRC

~~Jobs Corps Job Corps is a national, federally funded educational and vocational training program administered by USDOL that helps low income youth (ages16–24) gain workplace skills, train for high–demand occupations, and become independent and self–sufficient. With centers in Hartford and New Haven, more than 400 students enroll each year to earn a high school diploma or GED, learn a trade, obtain third party certifications and receive assistance finding a job. CTDOL has an assigned staff member who provides on–site support to the Hartford and New Haven Job Corp Centers. Transforming System Capacity Disability Employment Initiative In October 2013 Connecticut was one of eight states to receive a grant through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). CTDOL’s Office of Workforce Competitiveness (OWC) administers the three–year $3,058,706 award from USDOL’ s Employment and Training Administration and Office of Disability Employment Policy. Broad objectives are to provide additional education, training and employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, and to expand the workforce system’s capacity to serve eligible beneficiaries in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program. The initiative features strong partnerships and collaboration among key agencies; service coordination through an Integrated Resource Team; integrated services and resources, including blended, braided and leveraged funding and resources; and, innovative asset development strategies. Services are offered in two of Connecticut’s workforce regions. Two participating WDBs employ Disability Resource Coordinators to implement project activities and coordinate services. Integrated Resource Teams address individual needs and provide increased support for jobseekers with disabilities. Partners include CTDOL’s Office for Veterans Workforce Development and the Departments of Rehabilitative Services, Labor, Education, Mental Health and Addiction Services, Social Services, Transportation, and various other public and private sector representatives. ( Page 48)
DEI efforts focus on:
• Promoting inclusiveness of individuals with disabilities to enhance competitive advantage
• Organizing business–to–business forums to share strategies on recruiting, hiring and retaining people with disabilities ( Page 48)
• Re–imagine delivery of customer services to individual jobseekers and workers in the American Job Center One–Stop system. Develop and implement streamlined service flow with efficiently aligned and integrated processes implemented by coordinated service teams representing the full range of contributions from system partners and stakeholders, consistent with principles and criteria developed by the WIOA Transition Service Design and Delivery Work Group. Build on lessons learned from implementation of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) and Secure Jobs pilots as models for innovative and effective multi–partner service coordination. (Page 64)
In October 2013, Connecticut was one of eight states to receive a grant under USDOL’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). Awarded to OWC, the three–year $3,058,706 grant promotes strategic approaches to enhance employment services for individuals with disabilities served by the public workforce investment system. (All of page 120)
 

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~Transform System Capacity:
• Re–imagine delivery of customer services to individual jobseekers and workers in the American Job Center One–Stop system. Develop and implement streamlined service flow with efficiently aligned and integrated processes implemented by coordinated service teams representing the full range of contributions from system partners and stakeholders, consistent with principles and criteria developed by the WIOA Transition Service Design and Delivery Work Group. Build on lessons learned from implementation of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) and Secure Jobs pilots as models for innovative and effective multi–partner service coordination. (Page 64)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Short-term pre-vocational services, including development of learning skills, communication skills, interviewing skills, punctuality, personal maintenance skills, and professional conduct, to prepare individuals for unsubsidized employment or training;
g.   Work Experience/Internships;
h.   Adult Basic Education/Financial Literacy Services. (Page 209)
10. Comprehensive guidance and counseling, including drug and alcohol abuse counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the individual youth;
11. Financial literacy education;
12. Entrepreneurial skills training;
13. Services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area*, such as career awareness, career counseling, and career exploration services; and
14. Activities that help youth prepare for and transition to post-secondary education and training. WIOA Regs. 20 CFR Part 681.460 (Page 211)
Along with the strategies mentioned above to address goals and ways to overcome barriers to equitable access to VR services, BRS also anticipates using innovation and expansion (I&E) funds in FFY 2017 to support the State Rehabilitation Council, the State Independent Living Council, and to continue Individualized Financial Capability Coaching, a project to increase financial literacy and capability for people with disabilities. Other proposals will be assessed upon submission and considered based on the alignment with the state’s goals and priorities. (Page 422)
Measures of success will be based on a consumer’s improved financial literacy and his/her ability to budget a household, create realistic goals, understand credit scores (and demonstrate actions to maintain or improve them), increase self–sufficiency, obtain employment/increase wages, and go off of SSDI and/or SSI benefits. The number of new checking, savings or equivalent accounts that are opened will also be counted. (Page 429)
 

School to Work Transition

~~Regular payments from railroad retirement, strike benefits from union funds, worker’s compensation, and training stipends;
4.   Alimony;
5.   Military family allotments or other regular support from an absent family member or someone not living in the household;
6.   Pensions whether private, government employee (including Military retirement pay);
7.   Regular insurance or annuity payments other than Supplemental Security Income disability (SSI) or veterans’ disability;
8.   College or university grants, fellowships, and assistantships;
9.   Net gambling or lottery winnings;
10.   Social Security Disability Insurance payments (SSDI)
•    Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) pays benefits to individuals that have worked in the past, paid Social Security taxes, and are currently unable to work for a year or more because of a disability. SSDI is considered income replacement and must be included in family income (All of page 204)
12.   Tribal Government Payments (i.e., Per Capita Payments, Lease Payments, Individual Indian Money (IIM);
13.   Old age and survivors insurance benefits received under section 202 of the Social Security Act (42 USC 402).
• Old age and survivors insurance benefits include: Social Security Survivor Benefits – these are benefits paid to people up to age 18 who have had a parent die and the parent paid wages into the system; and
• Social Security Retirement Benefits – these are benefits that are paid to people who reached their social security age and have wages paid in the system. (Page 205)

Career Pathways

~~DORS: Partner Alignment with Educational Institutions Both Vocational Rehabilitation Programs at DORS are actively involved in a variety of transition school–to–work initiatives, with extensive collaboration and coordination at the administrative and service delivery levels of the organization. Through a cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education, the roles and responsibilities of the VR programs and the public educational system are clearly defined, including financial responsibilities and coordination of services and staff training. Representatives from both VR programs serve on an interagency transition task force and appointed representatives from the Connecticut State Department of Education serves on the State Rehabilitation Council to BESB and to BRS. VR program information is presented at in–service training programs for public school teachers and guidance counselors on issues affecting students who have disabilities. (Page 90)
Prior to initiation of pre–employment transition efforts, BRS had liaison counselors assigned to each high school to work directly with students and collaborate with education administrators to sign a referral protocol yearly. With implementation of WIOA, 10 VR counselors have been assigned to work exclusively with students with disabilities. (Page 397)
The Vocational Rehabilitation Program at the Bureau of Education and Services for the Blind is actively involved in a variety of transition school–to–work initiatives, with extensive collaboration and coordination at the administrative and service delivery levels of the organization. (Page 447)
Through a cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education, the roles and responsibilities of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program and the public educational system are clearly defined. This includes financial responsibilities as well as coordination of services and staff training. To facilitate this coordination, the Transition School to Work Coordinator from BESB serves on an interagency transition task force and there is an appointed representative from the State Department of Education serving on the State Rehabilitation Council to BESB. (Page 449)

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Connecticut Employment and Training Commission (CETC – the State Workforce Board), the State agencies responsible for administration of the core WIOA programs encompassed by this Unified State Plan (Connecticut Department of Labor (CTDOL), Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE), and Department of Rehabilitation Services (DORS)), the Connecticut Department of Social Services (CTDSS) and the five Workforce Development Boards – propose and will support a set of broadly–conceived strategies intended to achieve the vision and goals outlined above. These strategies will serve as a framework for Connecticut’s implementation efforts, with corresponding detailed State and local implementing actions to be developed.
(1)  Describe the strategies the State will implement, including industry or sector partnerships related to in–demand industry sectors and occupations and career pathways, as required by WIOA section 101(d)(3)(B), (D). “Career pathway” is defined at WIOA section 3(7). “In– demand industry sector or occupation” is defined at WIOA section 3(23). (Page 61)
With representatives of secondary and postsecondary education programs, lead efforts to develop and implement career pathways within the local area by aligning the employment, training, education, and supportive services that are needed by adults and youth, particularly individuals with barriers to employment. (Page 139)
 

Employer Engagement

~~As required by DEI, two local WDBs – Northwest Regional Workforce Investment Board and Capital Workforce Partners (North Central area) – became active Employment Networks (ENs) in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program, thereby expanding the Connecticut workforce system’s capacity to serve eligible beneficiaries. DEI also requires the State’s participation in an evaluation process to measure the project’s impact on outcomes for jobseekers with disabilities.  (Page 120)

511

~~Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) DORS has a contract with a software provider to maintain a case management system for the vocational rehabilitation programs. This system runs locally on servers housed within DORS and contains case information relevant to individual consumers and reportable data. The vendor has maintained an active relationship with the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) who governs data collection for public vocational rehabilitation programs. Modifications to the system are currently being planned to manage the upcoming changes in data collection required by WIOA. RSA data elements will be adjusted to be compatible with the WIOA–Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) document. (Page 97)
Measure: Documentation of Vocational Rehabilitation staff participation in statewide meeting regarding the development of a common–front end data collection system. (Page 480)
 

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 119)
(3)  A standing committee to provide information and to assist with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, including issues relating to compliance with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding providing programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the one-stop delivery system, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing supports for or accommodations to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. (Page 137)
(o) Develop a budget for the activities of the Local WDB, with approval of the chief elected official and consistent with the local plan and the duties of the Local WDB.
(p) Assess, on an annual basis, the physical and programmatic accessibility of all one- stop centers in the local area, in accordance with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.). (Page 141)
(ii) How the Local WDB will facilitate access to services provided through the one-stop delivery system, including in remote areas, through the use of technology and other means;
(iii) How entities within the one-stop delivery system, including one-stop operators and the one-stop partners, will comply with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities; and
(iv) The roles and resource contributions of the one-stop partners; (Page 145)
2.   WIOA funds may not be used for employment in the construction, operation, or maintenance of any part of any facility that is used or will be used for sectarian instruction or as a place for religious worship with the exception of maintenance of facilities that are not primarily used for instruction or for worship and are operated by organizations providing services to WIOA participants. WIOA Sec. 188(a)(3); 20 CFR Part 683.255; 29 CFR Part 2, subpart D, and 29 CFR Part 37.6(f)(1) (Reference TEGL 1-05 dated July 6, 2005)  (Page 150)
O.   Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity. 1. All eligible service and training providers receiving WIOA Title IB funds must comply fully with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA Section 188 and Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination Regulations at 29 CFR Part 37. 2. (Page 151)
4.   Provider agreements will contain assurance language that it will comply with Equal Opportunity requirements of Section 188 of the Act, 29 CFR Part 37, and 1604, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and all other applicable equal opportunity laws and regulations. The assurance may be incorporated by reference. (Page 152)
5.   Discriminatory discharge prohibited. No person, organization or agency may discharge, or in any other manner discriminate or retaliate against any person, or deny to any person a benefit to which that person is entitled under the provisions of the Act because such person has filed any complaint, instituted or caused to be instituted any proceeding under or related to the Act, has testified or is about to testify in any such proceeding or investigation, or has provided information or assisted in an investigation. WIOA Sec. 181, 188; 29 CFR Part 37; MCA 9-2-303(b) (Page 152)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 51 - 60 of 68

Connecticut Medicaid State Plan Amendments

A Medicaid and CHIP state plan is an agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs…When a state is planning to make a change to its program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. States also submit SPAs to request permissible program changes, make corrections, or update their Medicaid or CHIP state plan with new information   This webpage includes Medicaid State Plan amendments for the state of Connecticut  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plans

~~The Connecticut Medicaid state plan is an agreement between the state and the Federal government describing how Connecticut administers its Medicaid program. The plan details how the state will follow Federal rules and guidelines.  It also gives details on how the state may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

“To request a copy of the SPA from DSS or to send comments about the SPA, please email: Public.Comment.DSS@ct.gov or write: Department of Social Services, Medical Policy Unit, 55 Farmington Avenue, 9th Floor, Hartford, CT 06105 (Phone: 860-424-5067)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut SAMHSA/CMHS Employment Development Initiative: Fiscal Year 2011 & 2012 Projects

This initiative provided training and technical assistance for entrepreneurs with psychiatric disorders to start a small business. “This project demonstrated that entrepreneurship is indeed a viable option for persons in recovery. The Business Advisors from the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) observed that the business plans submitted by the individuals in this program were stronger and demonstrated more commitment than those of the general population. All of the persons receiving mini-grants as well as the majority of persons who were not were encouraged by their Business Advisors to continue working on their business plans, which the Advisors felt had real potential to succeed with additional effort.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

CT Balancing Incentive Payment Project

“The State of Connecticut’s Department of Social Services, Division of Health Services (DHS), with the Legislative and stakeholder support, seeks approval for application to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for participation in the Balancing Incentive Payment Program (BIP). The $72,780,505 enhanced federal medical assistance received will be used to expand community long-term services and supports (LTSS) and develop infrastructure necessary to support uniform access and a more streamlined process for persons seeking community LTSS. Ultimately, the goal of Connecticut’s BIP project is to remove policy, procedure and access barriers that prevent persons from receiving equitable community LTSS and that lead to unnecessary institutionalization.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Connecticut State Rehabilitation Council (SRC)

“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is an important partner with the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) to help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. BRS administers the Title I Vocational Rehabilitation and Title VI Supported Employment programs of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, that mandates employment services for people with disabilities. This act is the federal law that requires each designated state agency (BRS in Connecticut) to work closely with its SRC in developing the State Plan, strategic plans, reports, and state goals and priorities and in conducting needs assessment and evaluations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Role of the Connecticut Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

“The Governor’s Committee shall be composed of people with disabilities; agency representatives, including a representative of the State Job Service, the Division of Rehabilitation Services, the Veterans Employment and training Service and the United States Department of Veterans Affairs; representatives of employers, representatives of organized labor and other interested persons.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Connecticut Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

The Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities’ (GCEPD) mission is to “promote the employment of people with disabilities; produce and provide an environment that strives to include and integrate people with disabilities into the workforce; [and] promote and establish initiatives designed to highlight the benefits of employing people with disabilities.”   GCEPD’s initiatives include “[providing] education and awareness on the benefits of hiring qualified candidates with disabilities; [promoting and supporting] the activities of local communities throughout the state to enhance the employment of persons with disabilities; [and maintaining] a website of disability resources for both employers and job seekers.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Southwest Connecticut Workforce Investment Board: 2012-2016 Local Plan

"The WorkPlace helps people prepare for careers and strengthens the workforce for employers. We are a progressive, socially enterprising operation that is driven by innovation an entrepreneurial spirit. As Southwestern Connecticut’s Regional Workforce Development Board, we administer workforce development funds and coordinate providers of job training and education programs that meet the needs of residents and employers in the Southwestern Connecticut Region.

The WorkPlace administers job training and preparation funds allocated by state and federal agencies. We operate CTWorks Career Centers in Bridgeport, Stamford and Derby, CT. These centers provide programs and services to job seekers including career counseling, job search assistance, skills assessment and occupational training. Customers using the centers have access to computers, internet, telephones, copy machines as well as printed materials to help them search for a job."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

CT General Statutes within the Jurisdiction of the CT Department of Labor

Updated through 2012 June Spec. Sess. These General Statues are applicable to the performance of the Connecticut Department of Labor. They define the various types of services that will be available through the state Department of Labor, and the American Job Centers. Under the section on the "Mortgage Crisis Job Training Program," Customized Employment is listed as a service to be provided: "The WorkPlace, Inc. and Capital Workforce Partners shall manage such teams. The teams, in cooperation with the regional workforce development boards and the one-stop centers, shall ensure the provision of rapid, customized employment services, job training, repair training and job placement assistance to borrowers who are unemployed, underemployed or in need of a second job. The WorkPlace, Inc. shall arrange for the provision of financial literacy and credit counseling for participants in the program with the Connecticut Housing Finance Authority."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Connecticut Small Contractor Set Aside Program (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann 4a-60g)

Statute requiring state agencies and political subdivisions of the state to set aside at least 25 percent of their budgets each fiscal year for small contractors.  This requirement is limited to those agencies and subdivisions that have annual contracting budgets of more than $10,000.  Of this set-aside, 25 percent must be reserved for awards to minority business enterprises, including disability-owned businesses. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

H.B. No. 5253 AN ACT EXPANDING ACCESS TO THE MONEY FOLLOWS THE PERSON DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AND REPEALING OBSOLETE STATUTES - 06/06/2018

~~“The Commissioner of Social Services, pursuant to Section 6071 of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, shall submit an application to the Secretary of Health and Human Services to establish a Money Follows the Person demonstration project. Such project shall [serve not more than five thousand persons and shall] be designed to achieve the objectives set forth in Section 6071(a) of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. Services available under the demonstration project shall include,but need not be limited to, personal care assistance services. The commissioner may apply for a Medicaid research and demonstration waiver under Section 1115 of the Social Security Act, if such waiver is necessary to implement the demonstration project. The commissioner may, if necessary, modify any existing Medicaid home or community based waiver if such modification is required to implement the demonstration project”.“

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Senate Bill No. 502 May Special Session, Public Act No. 16-3AN ACT CONCERNING REVENUE AND OTHER ITEMS TO IMPLEMENT THE BUDGET FOR THE BIENNIUM ENDING JUNE 30, 2017. - 07/01/2016

“Sec. 60. Subsection (a) of section 17b-666 of the general statutes is repealed and the following is substituted in lieu thereof (Effective July 1, 2016): (a) The Department of Rehabilitation Services may receive state and federal funds to administer, within available appropriations, an employment opportunities program to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities who do not meet the eligibility requirements of supported employment programs administered by the Departments of Developmental Services, Social Services and Mental Health and Addiction Services. For the purposes of this section, "individuals with the most significant disabilities" means those individuals who (1) have serious employment limitations in a total of three or more functional areas including, but not limited to, mobility, communication, self-care, interpersonal skills, work tolerance or work skills, or (2) will require significant ongoing disability-related services on the job in order to maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Connecticut HB 6738 - 06/03/2015

"The State Treasurer shall establish a qualified ABLE program pursuant to the federal ABLE Act and sections 1 to 8, inclusive, of this act. Under the program: (A) The State Treasurer shall administer individual ABLE accounts to encourage and assist eligible individuals and their families in saving private funds to provide support for eligible individuals, and (B) a person may make contributions to an individual ABLE account to meet the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

CT General Statutes within the Jurisdiction of the CT Department of Labor

Updated through 2012 June Spec. Sess. These General Statues are applicable to the performance of the Connecticut Department of Labor. They define the various types of services that will be available through the state Department of Labor, and the American Job Centers. Under the section on the "Mortgage Crisis Job Training Program," Customized Employment is listed as a service to be provided: "The WorkPlace, Inc. and Capital Workforce Partners shall manage such teams. The teams, in cooperation with the regional workforce development boards and the one-stop centers, shall ensure the provision of rapid, customized employment services, job training, repair training and job placement assistance to borrowers who are unemployed, underemployed or in need of a second job. The WorkPlace, Inc. shall arrange for the provision of financial literacy and credit counseling for participants in the program with the Connecticut Housing Finance Authority."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Connecticut Small Contractor Set Aside Program (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann 4a-60g)

Statute requiring state agencies and political subdivisions of the state to set aside at least 25 percent of their budgets each fiscal year for small contractors.  This requirement is limited to those agencies and subdivisions that have annual contracting budgets of more than $10,000.  Of this set-aside, 25 percent must be reserved for awards to minority business enterprises, including disability-owned businesses. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Mental Health Supported Employment Services - 07/26/2017

~~“DMHAS continues to work closely with Individual Placement and Support (IPS) Employment Center at Rockville Institute to implement the SAMHSA-endorsed Evidence-based Supported Employment Practice (EBP) for persons with serious and persistent psychiatric disorders.  This includes embedding employment staff in clinical treatment teams to promote integration, where employment becomes “everyone’s business.”  Employment staff is responsible for helping people choose, find and keep “integrated competitive employment,” that is, jobs that are open for all to apply and pay competitive wages.  The EBP approach features non-exclusion from employment services based on diagnosis or symptomology, rapid job search for positions that match individual interests, strong relationship building with area employers, and customized follow-along supports on- and off-the-job for as long as needed (see link to IPS Works)”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

State Rehabilitation Report 2016 - 07/25/2017

~~Mission:“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) provides assessment, advice and recommendations to the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) and others regarding coordination and effectiveness of programs and strategies which promote  community-based competitive employment for persons with disabilities.GOALS:To assess the effectiveness and delivery of vocational services provided by BRS to individuals with disabilitiesTo improve the coordination of vocational services among BRS, state agencies and public and private entities for the benefit of BRS job seekers.To make recommendations to BRS, the Governor, the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) and others for developing and improving strategies for the employment of, and vocational services for individuals with disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

“Employment and Other Day Service Options” - 04/11/2017

~~“DDS Funded Day Services:SUPP0RTED EMPLOYMENT - These include supports to help individuals work as a paid employee in work settings that also employ people without disabilities. These services assist individuals find and apply for jobs, and offer job coaching support to people once work is secured. This service includes individual and group supported employment. This service is designed to provide support and supervision but is not intended to provide ongoing long term 1:1 support to help a person complete their work activities.GROUP EMPLOYMENT - These include sheltered workshops and day support options. These services are provided in a facility-based program that focuses on developing meaningful skills in the area of work, socialization and community participation.INDIVIDUAL DAY - This waiver service includes individually tailored supports that help consumers gain or maintain skills to participate more fully and productively in work, leisure or community activities. This may include the development of independent functioning skills, relationship skills, exploring job interests or retirement programs. It can also provide funds for staff supports for individuals who have their own businesses.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Council on Developmental Services Department of Developmental Services - 01/12/2017

~~The Council on Developmental Services was established to advise and consult on issues affecting the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) and its programs and services for Connecticut residents with intellectual disability and their families. In consultation with the Commissioner of Developmental Services, the Council recommends to the Governor and the Connecticut General Assembly legislation that would enhance and improve the quality of the programs and services provided by the department.  The Council, with input from the public, advocates for all persons with developmental and intellectual disabilities in Connecticut.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Connecticut State Department of Education “Transition Bill of Rights” - 05/04/2016

“This Transition Bill of Rights for parents of students receiving special education will help parents and students understand a student’s rights related to getting an education and other important issues regarding the transition to life after high school. School districts will provide this document annually at a planning and placement team meeting to all parents, guardians, and surrogate parents of students who are receiving special education services in Grades 6-12 as well as to students who are 18 years of age or older.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

IEP Manual and Forms - 12/01/2015

~~“The United States Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), has advised states that all IEPs written on or after July 1, 2005, must comply with the requirements of the 2004 Reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA). The position of the Connecticut State Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education, is that the January 2006 and February 2009 revised IEP forms serve a number of purposes. The first purpose is to help insure compliance with the statutory requirements of IDEA and State law. In addition, these forms assist as a data collection and student educational program-planning tool. Therefore, the State Department of Education has directed that all IEPs written for students in the State of Connecticut be completed on these forms.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Connecticut Unified State Plan 2017 –Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Services Portion

Goal 1: To implement the provisions of WIOA specific to the VR program. Priority areas: • pre-employment transition services • employer services • service delivery • performance accountability measures • subminimum wage

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services

Employment Services Employment Services are integral to the DMHAS’ goal of offering a recovery-oriented system of care for persons in recovery who experience behavioral health conditions. One of the first significant steps to be taken in this direction is to ensure that all DMHAS consumers have both the necessary opportunities and supports to become involved in meaningful activities of their choice as well as to contribute to the broader community. Individuals with behavioral health conditions consistently express their desire for employment. From the recovery perspective, meaningful employment has been shown to promote recovery from psychiatric and addiction disorders and to facilitate improvements in diverse domains from symptom relief to successful community integration. Currently, DMHAS funds 36 agencies across Connecticut to provide a broad menu of employment and education services. While employment strategies must be tailored to meet individual needs, agencies generally offer a range of services including career planning, job search assistance, job placement, on- and off-the-job coaching, and career advancement services. Over 4000 persons per year are assisted in finding and keeping employment through the DMHAS system

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health

Connecticut Department of Developmental Services “Employment First Overview”

We Believe... -Everyone can work and there is a job for everyone. Our job is to be creative and persistent in providing supports that help people with intellectual disabilities to find, get and keep real pay. -Not working should be the exception. All individuals, schools, families and businesses must raise their expectations. -People will be hired because of their ability not because they have a disability. -Communities embrace people who contribute. -Everyone has something to contribute and needs to contribute. -People are healthier, safer and happiest with meaningful work. -True employment is not a social service. -Employment is a win/win for everybody.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Southwest Connecticut Workforce Investment Board: 2012-2016 Local Plan

"The WorkPlace helps people prepare for careers and strengthens the workforce for employers. We are a progressive, socially enterprising operation that is driven by innovation an entrepreneurial spirit. As Southwestern Connecticut’s Regional Workforce Development Board, we administer workforce development funds and coordinate providers of job training and education programs that meet the needs of residents and employers in the Southwestern Connecticut Region.

The WorkPlace administers job training and preparation funds allocated by state and federal agencies. We operate CTWorks Career Centers in Bridgeport, Stamford and Derby, CT. These centers provide programs and services to job seekers including career counseling, job search assistance, skills assessment and occupational training. Customers using the centers have access to computers, internet, telephones, copy machines as well as printed materials to help them search for a job."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services Employer Partnerships

“The Bureau of Rehabilitation Services partners with employers of all sizes and across industries. These partnership arrangements include qualified candidate referrals and individualized on-the-job trainings as well as more formalized training and placement programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services, Bureau of Rehabilitation Services

“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is an important partner with the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) to help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. BRS administers the Title I Vocational Rehabilitation and Title VI Supported Employment programs of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, that mandates employment services for people with disabilities. This act is the federal law that requires each designated state agency (BRS in Connecticut) to work closely with its SRC in developing the State Plan, strategic plans, reports, and state goals and priorities and in conducting needs assessment and evaluations.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Industry Specific Training and Placement Programs (ISTPP)

“Industry Specific Training and Placement Programs (ISTPP)  tuition-based workforce development programs designed to provide job seekers with disabilities the skills necessary for employment in a particular profession or type of business. In order to be most effective, ISTPPs are developed to address the employment needs within a local market or area and are reliant on essential partnerships with community/educational organizations and the targeted industry.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 11 - 11 of 11

Connecticut Connect-Ability

“Connect-Ability began in late 2005 with a federal grant to the State of Connecticut to identify and remove barriers to employment faced by people with disabilities. This five-year, multimillion dollar 'systems change grant' involved a detailed look at the State's employment and disability services infrastructure in order to identify problem areas and implement lasting solutions.

“Connect-Ability has two primary customers:

Employers of all sizes and in all industries who are seeking qualified workers People with disabilities of all ages who are seeking employment for the first time or who want a new challenge.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

26th Annual Conference on Serving Adults with Disabilities - 10/26/2018

~~“The Annual Conference on Serving Adults with Disabilities provides an excellent opportunity for participants to meet with a wide representation of experts and professionals, along with family and friends of individuals with disabilities, and to discuss current strategies and knowledge on the broad spectrum of disabilities.

Conference GoalTo share current knowledge and strategies and to provide answers, direction, and support to:•Adult education teachers•Workforce Practitioners•Employers•Counselors•Families, friends, and colleagues of individuals with disabilities”

Systems
  • Other

“The Impact of Proposed Budget Cuts on 403,370 adults and children with Disabilities in Connecticut” - 05/15/2017

~~“We build capacity: Through our Customized Employment project, we are training provider organizations the skills to identify and develop jobs for people with disabilities. Customized employment training is a defined rubric that has been shown to lead to real jobs for hard to place individuals. Working with Connecticut Legal Services, our Parents with Cognitive Limitations initiative has funded training for parents and court personnel, including judges, to address the unique issues that arise when these parents are involved with the courts. In addition, training was provided to DDS staff, self-advocates and medical personnel, including doctors. In all 330 people were trained in person, and additional individuals received training online.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Resources for Adult Services Providers - 05/11/2017

~~“Successful job development is often a complex set of strategies that requires skill and commitment on the part of the individual seeking a job, their support staff and members of their team.  Successful job developers use person-centered career planning to get to know their job seekers. They are knowledgeable about community resources and are also adept at recognizing and utilizing personal networks.  Customized Employment is a job development process that is a flexible blend of strategies, services and supports designed to increase employment options for job seekers with more complex needs.  Customized Employment is the voluntary negotiation of a personalized employment relationship between an individual and an employer that fulfills the business needs of the employer. This approach may include job carving, job creation, job sharing, self-employment and other types of entrepreneurial approaches.  Customized employment gives an advantage to the job seeker since that person will drive the employment process and uniquely fit a job position that meets their individual needs and interests.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

CT Mental Health Waiver (0653.R01.00) - 04/01/2012

This waiver "provides adult day health, community support, supported employment, assisted living, brief episodic stabilization, community living support, home accessibility adaptations, home delivered meals, non-medical transportation, overnight recovery assistant, peer supports, PERS, recovery assistant, specialized medical equipment, transitional case management for individuals w/mental illness ages 22 and older."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

CT Acquired Brain Injury Waiver (0302.R03.00) - 01/10/2012

Provides case management, homemaker, personal care, prevocational, respite, supported employment, ABI group day, chore, cognitive behavioral programs, community living support, companion, environmental accessibility adaptation, home delivered meals, independent living skill training, PERS, specialized medical equipment and supplies, substance abuse programs, transitional living, transportation, vehicle mods for individuals with brain injury ages 18 - no max age.

Expires 12/31/2016.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment First Overview - 12/01/2011

~~Connecticut Department of Developmental Services Employment First InitiativeReal Work for Real PayWe Believe...• Everyone can work and there is a job for everyone.  Our job is to be creative and persistent in providing supports that help people with intellectual disabilities to find, get and keep real pay.• Not working should be the exception.  All individuals, schools, families and businesses must raise their expectations.• People will be hired because of their ability not because they have a disability.• Communities embrace people who contribute.• Everyone has something to contribute and needs to contribute.• People are healthier, safer and happiest with meaningful work. • True employment is not a social service.• Employment is a win/win for everybody.

Systems
  • Other

CT Employment and Day Supports (0881.R01.00) - 04/01/2011

Provides adult day health, community based day support options, respite, supported employment, independent support broker, behavioral support, individual goods and services, individualized day support, interpreter, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation for individuals w/DD ages 18 - no max age and ID ages 3 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plan Amendments

A Medicaid and CHIP state plan is an agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs…When a state is planning to make a change to its program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. States also submit SPAs to request permissible program changes, make corrections, or update their Medicaid or CHIP state plan with new information   This webpage includes Medicaid State Plan amendments for the state of Connecticut  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plans

~~The Connecticut Medicaid state plan is an agreement between the state and the Federal government describing how Connecticut administers its Medicaid program. The plan details how the state will follow Federal rules and guidelines.  It also gives details on how the state may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

“To request a copy of the SPA from DSS or to send comments about the SPA, please email: Public.Comment.DSS@ct.gov or write: Department of Social Services, Medical Policy Unit, 55 Farmington Avenue, 9th Floor, Hartford, CT 06105 (Phone: 860-424-5067)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

People know what constitutes great employment opportunities for workers with disabilities in the Constitution State of Connecticut.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Connecticut's VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.33%
Change from
2016 to 2017
3,588,184
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.2%
Change from
2016 to 2017
189,419
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76,096
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.96%
Change from
2016 to 2017
40.17%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.10%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 3,588,184
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 189,419
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 76,096
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,582,806
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.10%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.60%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 184,187
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 207,675
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 310,248
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 38,719
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 58,256
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,056
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,928
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 11,276
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 19,635

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,125
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 81,260

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 9,178
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 16,578
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 37,157
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 24.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 8.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,407
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,244
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,367
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,367
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 50
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 27
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 54.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.75

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,020
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 126,638
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $75,899,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $4,171,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $135,947,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $13,710,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 43.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 889
Number of people served in facility based work. 266
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,841
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 127.10

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 67.33%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 5.50%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 8.03%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 51.34%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 79.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 15.28%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,354,163
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,584
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 46,321
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 621,956
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 668,277
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 245
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 837
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,082
AbilityOne wages (products). $158,294
AbilityOne wages (services). $9,751,263

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 35
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 35
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,210
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,210

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~In November 2015, Connecticut was one of four states selected to participate as a Core State in the 2016 Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) offered through the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP).
Connecticut was chosen through an application process to become an EFSLMP Core State. Connecticut committed to a cross–system, cross–disability effort to promote Employment First, a national movement in both philosophy and policy stating that employment is the first priority and preferred outcome of individuals with disabilities. (Page 50)
Two workgroups were formed, comprised of leadership representing six state agencies including the Departments of Labor, Developmental Services, Rehabilitation Services, Education, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Social Services, as well as key stakeholders including the CT Council on Developmental Disabilities and the CT Business Leadership Network. These workgroups receive a combination of virtual and onsite mentoring, intensive technical assistance, and training from a national pool of subject matter experts under the program. One workgroup is focused on coordinating and streamlining business engagement and outreach strategies across government agencies and providers. A second workgroup required under the program called Vision Quest, is charged developing and implementing policy to support the state’s Employment First systems change efforts. (Page 50)
Participate in cross agency trainings through the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) to strengthen state agency partnerships. (Page 419)
Staff from the Bureau participates in meetings and training seminars organized by the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE). This organization links community providers, employers, state agency representatives and other resources together to exchange information on job placement strategies, funding sources and employer job leads. Bureau staff have presented at meetings of this organization on blindness related topics such as adaptive technology so that other providers in attendance would be aware of the options that exist for bringing about a successful job placement when accepting a referral from BESB for a client who is seeking a job placement with supported employment services. (Page 451)
 

Customized Employment

~~Employer services, such as:
i. Customized screening and referral of qualified participants in training services to employers;
ii. Customized employment-related services to employers, employer associations, or other such organization on a fee-for-service basis that are in addition to labor exchange services available to employers under the Wagner-Peyser Act Employment Service;
iii. Activities to provide business services and strategies that meet the workforce investment needs of area employers, as determined by the Local WDB and consistent with the local plan (see § 678.435 of this chapter and WIOA sec. 134(d)(1)(A)(ix)); and (Page 183 & 333)
The challenging economy continues to impact on the scope and variety of job placement options available to clients, making customized employment particularly difficult to secure. The need for long–term funding support is an additional step that is necessary for supported employment placements at the onset. These two variables in combination make the timing challenging in filling job vacancies with a client who requires long–term supports. Dedicating two counselors to work specifically with the transition–age client population will facilitate discussions on supported employment options much earlier in the Planning and Placement Team process, starting as early as junior high school. This should allow for increased time to explore and secure long–term funding commitments and also to develop job opportunities for clients. (Page 501)
Supported Employment refers to competitive integrated employment, including customized employment, that is individualized and customized consistent with the strengths, abilities, interests, and informed choice of a client with a most significant disability, and that includes ongoing support services. Supported employment services may be considered for individuals for whom competitive integrated employment has not historically occurred, or for whom competitive integrated employment has been interrupted or intermittent, and where there is a need for extended services after the transition from support provided by the Bureau, (Page 502)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Limited capacity of many workforce service providers to deal effectively with the complexities of braiding funds (Page 53)
Connecticut’s American Job Center (AJC) One–Stop system is the vehicle through which service delivery and targeting, leveraging and braiding of available resources is coordinated. Connecticut has a history and tradition of innovative collaboration among multiple partners and stakeholders to coordinate services and resources at the local level through its One–Stop system. (Page 84)
 

DEI/DRC

~~Jobs Corps Job Corps is a national, federally funded educational and vocational training program administered by USDOL that helps low income youth (ages16–24) gain workplace skills, train for high–demand occupations, and become independent and self–sufficient. With centers in Hartford and New Haven, more than 400 students enroll each year to earn a high school diploma or GED, learn a trade, obtain third party certifications and receive assistance finding a job. CTDOL has an assigned staff member who provides on–site support to the Hartford and New Haven Job Corp Centers. Transforming System Capacity Disability Employment Initiative In October 2013 Connecticut was one of eight states to receive a grant through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). CTDOL’s Office of Workforce Competitiveness (OWC) administers the three–year $3,058,706 award from USDOL’ s Employment and Training Administration and Office of Disability Employment Policy. Broad objectives are to provide additional education, training and employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, and to expand the workforce system’s capacity to serve eligible beneficiaries in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program. The initiative features strong partnerships and collaboration among key agencies; service coordination through an Integrated Resource Team; integrated services and resources, including blended, braided and leveraged funding and resources; and, innovative asset development strategies. Services are offered in two of Connecticut’s workforce regions. Two participating WDBs employ Disability Resource Coordinators to implement project activities and coordinate services. Integrated Resource Teams address individual needs and provide increased support for jobseekers with disabilities. Partners include CTDOL’s Office for Veterans Workforce Development and the Departments of Rehabilitative Services, Labor, Education, Mental Health and Addiction Services, Social Services, Transportation, and various other public and private sector representatives. ( Page 48)
DEI efforts focus on:
• Promoting inclusiveness of individuals with disabilities to enhance competitive advantage
• Organizing business–to–business forums to share strategies on recruiting, hiring and retaining people with disabilities ( Page 48)
• Re–imagine delivery of customer services to individual jobseekers and workers in the American Job Center One–Stop system. Develop and implement streamlined service flow with efficiently aligned and integrated processes implemented by coordinated service teams representing the full range of contributions from system partners and stakeholders, consistent with principles and criteria developed by the WIOA Transition Service Design and Delivery Work Group. Build on lessons learned from implementation of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) and Secure Jobs pilots as models for innovative and effective multi–partner service coordination. (Page 64)
In October 2013, Connecticut was one of eight states to receive a grant under USDOL’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). Awarded to OWC, the three–year $3,058,706 grant promotes strategic approaches to enhance employment services for individuals with disabilities served by the public workforce investment system. (All of page 120)
 

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~Transform System Capacity:
• Re–imagine delivery of customer services to individual jobseekers and workers in the American Job Center One–Stop system. Develop and implement streamlined service flow with efficiently aligned and integrated processes implemented by coordinated service teams representing the full range of contributions from system partners and stakeholders, consistent with principles and criteria developed by the WIOA Transition Service Design and Delivery Work Group. Build on lessons learned from implementation of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) and Secure Jobs pilots as models for innovative and effective multi–partner service coordination. (Page 64)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Short-term pre-vocational services, including development of learning skills, communication skills, interviewing skills, punctuality, personal maintenance skills, and professional conduct, to prepare individuals for unsubsidized employment or training;
g.   Work Experience/Internships;
h.   Adult Basic Education/Financial Literacy Services. (Page 209)
10. Comprehensive guidance and counseling, including drug and alcohol abuse counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the individual youth;
11. Financial literacy education;
12. Entrepreneurial skills training;
13. Services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area*, such as career awareness, career counseling, and career exploration services; and
14. Activities that help youth prepare for and transition to post-secondary education and training. WIOA Regs. 20 CFR Part 681.460 (Page 211)
Along with the strategies mentioned above to address goals and ways to overcome barriers to equitable access to VR services, BRS also anticipates using innovation and expansion (I&E) funds in FFY 2017 to support the State Rehabilitation Council, the State Independent Living Council, and to continue Individualized Financial Capability Coaching, a project to increase financial literacy and capability for people with disabilities. Other proposals will be assessed upon submission and considered based on the alignment with the state’s goals and priorities. (Page 422)
Measures of success will be based on a consumer’s improved financial literacy and his/her ability to budget a household, create realistic goals, understand credit scores (and demonstrate actions to maintain or improve them), increase self–sufficiency, obtain employment/increase wages, and go off of SSDI and/or SSI benefits. The number of new checking, savings or equivalent accounts that are opened will also be counted. (Page 429)
 

School to Work Transition

~~Regular payments from railroad retirement, strike benefits from union funds, worker’s compensation, and training stipends;
4.   Alimony;
5.   Military family allotments or other regular support from an absent family member or someone not living in the household;
6.   Pensions whether private, government employee (including Military retirement pay);
7.   Regular insurance or annuity payments other than Supplemental Security Income disability (SSI) or veterans’ disability;
8.   College or university grants, fellowships, and assistantships;
9.   Net gambling or lottery winnings;
10.   Social Security Disability Insurance payments (SSDI)
•    Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) pays benefits to individuals that have worked in the past, paid Social Security taxes, and are currently unable to work for a year or more because of a disability. SSDI is considered income replacement and must be included in family income (All of page 204)
12.   Tribal Government Payments (i.e., Per Capita Payments, Lease Payments, Individual Indian Money (IIM);
13.   Old age and survivors insurance benefits received under section 202 of the Social Security Act (42 USC 402).
• Old age and survivors insurance benefits include: Social Security Survivor Benefits – these are benefits paid to people up to age 18 who have had a parent die and the parent paid wages into the system; and
• Social Security Retirement Benefits – these are benefits that are paid to people who reached their social security age and have wages paid in the system. (Page 205)

Career Pathways

~~DORS: Partner Alignment with Educational Institutions Both Vocational Rehabilitation Programs at DORS are actively involved in a variety of transition school–to–work initiatives, with extensive collaboration and coordination at the administrative and service delivery levels of the organization. Through a cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education, the roles and responsibilities of the VR programs and the public educational system are clearly defined, including financial responsibilities and coordination of services and staff training. Representatives from both VR programs serve on an interagency transition task force and appointed representatives from the Connecticut State Department of Education serves on the State Rehabilitation Council to BESB and to BRS. VR program information is presented at in–service training programs for public school teachers and guidance counselors on issues affecting students who have disabilities. (Page 90)
Prior to initiation of pre–employment transition efforts, BRS had liaison counselors assigned to each high school to work directly with students and collaborate with education administrators to sign a referral protocol yearly. With implementation of WIOA, 10 VR counselors have been assigned to work exclusively with students with disabilities. (Page 397)
The Vocational Rehabilitation Program at the Bureau of Education and Services for the Blind is actively involved in a variety of transition school–to–work initiatives, with extensive collaboration and coordination at the administrative and service delivery levels of the organization. (Page 447)
Through a cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education, the roles and responsibilities of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program and the public educational system are clearly defined. This includes financial responsibilities as well as coordination of services and staff training. To facilitate this coordination, the Transition School to Work Coordinator from BESB serves on an interagency transition task force and there is an appointed representative from the State Department of Education serving on the State Rehabilitation Council to BESB. (Page 449)

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Connecticut Employment and Training Commission (CETC – the State Workforce Board), the State agencies responsible for administration of the core WIOA programs encompassed by this Unified State Plan (Connecticut Department of Labor (CTDOL), Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE), and Department of Rehabilitation Services (DORS)), the Connecticut Department of Social Services (CTDSS) and the five Workforce Development Boards – propose and will support a set of broadly–conceived strategies intended to achieve the vision and goals outlined above. These strategies will serve as a framework for Connecticut’s implementation efforts, with corresponding detailed State and local implementing actions to be developed.
(1)  Describe the strategies the State will implement, including industry or sector partnerships related to in–demand industry sectors and occupations and career pathways, as required by WIOA section 101(d)(3)(B), (D). “Career pathway” is defined at WIOA section 3(7). “In– demand industry sector or occupation” is defined at WIOA section 3(23). (Page 61)
With representatives of secondary and postsecondary education programs, lead efforts to develop and implement career pathways within the local area by aligning the employment, training, education, and supportive services that are needed by adults and youth, particularly individuals with barriers to employment. (Page 139)
 

Employer Engagement

~~As required by DEI, two local WDBs – Northwest Regional Workforce Investment Board and Capital Workforce Partners (North Central area) – became active Employment Networks (ENs) in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program, thereby expanding the Connecticut workforce system’s capacity to serve eligible beneficiaries. DEI also requires the State’s participation in an evaluation process to measure the project’s impact on outcomes for jobseekers with disabilities.  (Page 120)

511

~~Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) DORS has a contract with a software provider to maintain a case management system for the vocational rehabilitation programs. This system runs locally on servers housed within DORS and contains case information relevant to individual consumers and reportable data. The vendor has maintained an active relationship with the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) who governs data collection for public vocational rehabilitation programs. Modifications to the system are currently being planned to manage the upcoming changes in data collection required by WIOA. RSA data elements will be adjusted to be compatible with the WIOA–Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) document. (Page 97)
Measure: Documentation of Vocational Rehabilitation staff participation in statewide meeting regarding the development of a common–front end data collection system. (Page 480)
 

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 119)
(3)  A standing committee to provide information and to assist with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, including issues relating to compliance with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding providing programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the one-stop delivery system, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing supports for or accommodations to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. (Page 137)
(o) Develop a budget for the activities of the Local WDB, with approval of the chief elected official and consistent with the local plan and the duties of the Local WDB.
(p) Assess, on an annual basis, the physical and programmatic accessibility of all one- stop centers in the local area, in accordance with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.). (Page 141)
(ii) How the Local WDB will facilitate access to services provided through the one-stop delivery system, including in remote areas, through the use of technology and other means;
(iii) How entities within the one-stop delivery system, including one-stop operators and the one-stop partners, will comply with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities; and
(iv) The roles and resource contributions of the one-stop partners; (Page 145)
2.   WIOA funds may not be used for employment in the construction, operation, or maintenance of any part of any facility that is used or will be used for sectarian instruction or as a place for religious worship with the exception of maintenance of facilities that are not primarily used for instruction or for worship and are operated by organizations providing services to WIOA participants. WIOA Sec. 188(a)(3); 20 CFR Part 683.255; 29 CFR Part 2, subpart D, and 29 CFR Part 37.6(f)(1) (Reference TEGL 1-05 dated July 6, 2005)  (Page 150)
O.   Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity. 1. All eligible service and training providers receiving WIOA Title IB funds must comply fully with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA Section 188 and Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination Regulations at 29 CFR Part 37. 2. (Page 151)
4.   Provider agreements will contain assurance language that it will comply with Equal Opportunity requirements of Section 188 of the Act, 29 CFR Part 37, and 1604, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and all other applicable equal opportunity laws and regulations. The assurance may be incorporated by reference. (Page 152)
5.   Discriminatory discharge prohibited. No person, organization or agency may discharge, or in any other manner discriminate or retaliate against any person, or deny to any person a benefit to which that person is entitled under the provisions of the Act because such person has filed any complaint, instituted or caused to be instituted any proceeding under or related to the Act, has testified or is about to testify in any such proceeding or investigation, or has provided information or assisted in an investigation. WIOA Sec. 181, 188; 29 CFR Part 37; MCA 9-2-303(b) (Page 152)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 51 - 60 of 68

Connecticut Medicaid State Plan Amendments

A Medicaid and CHIP state plan is an agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs…When a state is planning to make a change to its program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. States also submit SPAs to request permissible program changes, make corrections, or update their Medicaid or CHIP state plan with new information   This webpage includes Medicaid State Plan amendments for the state of Connecticut  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plans

~~The Connecticut Medicaid state plan is an agreement between the state and the Federal government describing how Connecticut administers its Medicaid program. The plan details how the state will follow Federal rules and guidelines.  It also gives details on how the state may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

“To request a copy of the SPA from DSS or to send comments about the SPA, please email: Public.Comment.DSS@ct.gov or write: Department of Social Services, Medical Policy Unit, 55 Farmington Avenue, 9th Floor, Hartford, CT 06105 (Phone: 860-424-5067)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut SAMHSA/CMHS Employment Development Initiative: Fiscal Year 2011 & 2012 Projects

This initiative provided training and technical assistance for entrepreneurs with psychiatric disorders to start a small business. “This project demonstrated that entrepreneurship is indeed a viable option for persons in recovery. The Business Advisors from the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) observed that the business plans submitted by the individuals in this program were stronger and demonstrated more commitment than those of the general population. All of the persons receiving mini-grants as well as the majority of persons who were not were encouraged by their Business Advisors to continue working on their business plans, which the Advisors felt had real potential to succeed with additional effort.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

CT Balancing Incentive Payment Project

“The State of Connecticut’s Department of Social Services, Division of Health Services (DHS), with the Legislative and stakeholder support, seeks approval for application to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for participation in the Balancing Incentive Payment Program (BIP). The $72,780,505 enhanced federal medical assistance received will be used to expand community long-term services and supports (LTSS) and develop infrastructure necessary to support uniform access and a more streamlined process for persons seeking community LTSS. Ultimately, the goal of Connecticut’s BIP project is to remove policy, procedure and access barriers that prevent persons from receiving equitable community LTSS and that lead to unnecessary institutionalization.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Connecticut State Rehabilitation Council (SRC)

“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is an important partner with the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) to help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. BRS administers the Title I Vocational Rehabilitation and Title VI Supported Employment programs of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, that mandates employment services for people with disabilities. This act is the federal law that requires each designated state agency (BRS in Connecticut) to work closely with its SRC in developing the State Plan, strategic plans, reports, and state goals and priorities and in conducting needs assessment and evaluations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Role of the Connecticut Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

“The Governor’s Committee shall be composed of people with disabilities; agency representatives, including a representative of the State Job Service, the Division of Rehabilitation Services, the Veterans Employment and training Service and the United States Department of Veterans Affairs; representatives of employers, representatives of organized labor and other interested persons.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Connecticut Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

The Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities’ (GCEPD) mission is to “promote the employment of people with disabilities; produce and provide an environment that strives to include and integrate people with disabilities into the workforce; [and] promote and establish initiatives designed to highlight the benefits of employing people with disabilities.”   GCEPD’s initiatives include “[providing] education and awareness on the benefits of hiring qualified candidates with disabilities; [promoting and supporting] the activities of local communities throughout the state to enhance the employment of persons with disabilities; [and maintaining] a website of disability resources for both employers and job seekers.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Southwest Connecticut Workforce Investment Board: 2012-2016 Local Plan

"The WorkPlace helps people prepare for careers and strengthens the workforce for employers. We are a progressive, socially enterprising operation that is driven by innovation an entrepreneurial spirit. As Southwestern Connecticut’s Regional Workforce Development Board, we administer workforce development funds and coordinate providers of job training and education programs that meet the needs of residents and employers in the Southwestern Connecticut Region.

The WorkPlace administers job training and preparation funds allocated by state and federal agencies. We operate CTWorks Career Centers in Bridgeport, Stamford and Derby, CT. These centers provide programs and services to job seekers including career counseling, job search assistance, skills assessment and occupational training. Customers using the centers have access to computers, internet, telephones, copy machines as well as printed materials to help them search for a job."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

CT General Statutes within the Jurisdiction of the CT Department of Labor

Updated through 2012 June Spec. Sess. These General Statues are applicable to the performance of the Connecticut Department of Labor. They define the various types of services that will be available through the state Department of Labor, and the American Job Centers. Under the section on the "Mortgage Crisis Job Training Program," Customized Employment is listed as a service to be provided: "The WorkPlace, Inc. and Capital Workforce Partners shall manage such teams. The teams, in cooperation with the regional workforce development boards and the one-stop centers, shall ensure the provision of rapid, customized employment services, job training, repair training and job placement assistance to borrowers who are unemployed, underemployed or in need of a second job. The WorkPlace, Inc. shall arrange for the provision of financial literacy and credit counseling for participants in the program with the Connecticut Housing Finance Authority."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Connecticut Small Contractor Set Aside Program (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann 4a-60g)

Statute requiring state agencies and political subdivisions of the state to set aside at least 25 percent of their budgets each fiscal year for small contractors.  This requirement is limited to those agencies and subdivisions that have annual contracting budgets of more than $10,000.  Of this set-aside, 25 percent must be reserved for awards to minority business enterprises, including disability-owned businesses. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

H.B. No. 5253 AN ACT EXPANDING ACCESS TO THE MONEY FOLLOWS THE PERSON DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AND REPEALING OBSOLETE STATUTES - 06/06/2018

~~“The Commissioner of Social Services, pursuant to Section 6071 of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, shall submit an application to the Secretary of Health and Human Services to establish a Money Follows the Person demonstration project. Such project shall [serve not more than five thousand persons and shall] be designed to achieve the objectives set forth in Section 6071(a) of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. Services available under the demonstration project shall include,but need not be limited to, personal care assistance services. The commissioner may apply for a Medicaid research and demonstration waiver under Section 1115 of the Social Security Act, if such waiver is necessary to implement the demonstration project. The commissioner may, if necessary, modify any existing Medicaid home or community based waiver if such modification is required to implement the demonstration project”.“

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Senate Bill No. 502 May Special Session, Public Act No. 16-3AN ACT CONCERNING REVENUE AND OTHER ITEMS TO IMPLEMENT THE BUDGET FOR THE BIENNIUM ENDING JUNE 30, 2017. - 07/01/2016

“Sec. 60. Subsection (a) of section 17b-666 of the general statutes is repealed and the following is substituted in lieu thereof (Effective July 1, 2016): (a) The Department of Rehabilitation Services may receive state and federal funds to administer, within available appropriations, an employment opportunities program to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities who do not meet the eligibility requirements of supported employment programs administered by the Departments of Developmental Services, Social Services and Mental Health and Addiction Services. For the purposes of this section, "individuals with the most significant disabilities" means those individuals who (1) have serious employment limitations in a total of three or more functional areas including, but not limited to, mobility, communication, self-care, interpersonal skills, work tolerance or work skills, or (2) will require significant ongoing disability-related services on the job in order to maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Connecticut HB 6738 - 06/03/2015

"The State Treasurer shall establish a qualified ABLE program pursuant to the federal ABLE Act and sections 1 to 8, inclusive, of this act. Under the program: (A) The State Treasurer shall administer individual ABLE accounts to encourage and assist eligible individuals and their families in saving private funds to provide support for eligible individuals, and (B) a person may make contributions to an individual ABLE account to meet the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

CT General Statutes within the Jurisdiction of the CT Department of Labor

Updated through 2012 June Spec. Sess. These General Statues are applicable to the performance of the Connecticut Department of Labor. They define the various types of services that will be available through the state Department of Labor, and the American Job Centers. Under the section on the "Mortgage Crisis Job Training Program," Customized Employment is listed as a service to be provided: "The WorkPlace, Inc. and Capital Workforce Partners shall manage such teams. The teams, in cooperation with the regional workforce development boards and the one-stop centers, shall ensure the provision of rapid, customized employment services, job training, repair training and job placement assistance to borrowers who are unemployed, underemployed or in need of a second job. The WorkPlace, Inc. shall arrange for the provision of financial literacy and credit counseling for participants in the program with the Connecticut Housing Finance Authority."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Connecticut Small Contractor Set Aside Program (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann 4a-60g)

Statute requiring state agencies and political subdivisions of the state to set aside at least 25 percent of their budgets each fiscal year for small contractors.  This requirement is limited to those agencies and subdivisions that have annual contracting budgets of more than $10,000.  Of this set-aside, 25 percent must be reserved for awards to minority business enterprises, including disability-owned businesses. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Mental Health Supported Employment Services - 07/26/2017

~~“DMHAS continues to work closely with Individual Placement and Support (IPS) Employment Center at Rockville Institute to implement the SAMHSA-endorsed Evidence-based Supported Employment Practice (EBP) for persons with serious and persistent psychiatric disorders.  This includes embedding employment staff in clinical treatment teams to promote integration, where employment becomes “everyone’s business.”  Employment staff is responsible for helping people choose, find and keep “integrated competitive employment,” that is, jobs that are open for all to apply and pay competitive wages.  The EBP approach features non-exclusion from employment services based on diagnosis or symptomology, rapid job search for positions that match individual interests, strong relationship building with area employers, and customized follow-along supports on- and off-the-job for as long as needed (see link to IPS Works)”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

State Rehabilitation Report 2016 - 07/25/2017

~~Mission:“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) provides assessment, advice and recommendations to the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) and others regarding coordination and effectiveness of programs and strategies which promote  community-based competitive employment for persons with disabilities.GOALS:To assess the effectiveness and delivery of vocational services provided by BRS to individuals with disabilitiesTo improve the coordination of vocational services among BRS, state agencies and public and private entities for the benefit of BRS job seekers.To make recommendations to BRS, the Governor, the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) and others for developing and improving strategies for the employment of, and vocational services for individuals with disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

“Employment and Other Day Service Options” - 04/11/2017

~~“DDS Funded Day Services:SUPP0RTED EMPLOYMENT - These include supports to help individuals work as a paid employee in work settings that also employ people without disabilities. These services assist individuals find and apply for jobs, and offer job coaching support to people once work is secured. This service includes individual and group supported employment. This service is designed to provide support and supervision but is not intended to provide ongoing long term 1:1 support to help a person complete their work activities.GROUP EMPLOYMENT - These include sheltered workshops and day support options. These services are provided in a facility-based program that focuses on developing meaningful skills in the area of work, socialization and community participation.INDIVIDUAL DAY - This waiver service includes individually tailored supports that help consumers gain or maintain skills to participate more fully and productively in work, leisure or community activities. This may include the development of independent functioning skills, relationship skills, exploring job interests or retirement programs. It can also provide funds for staff supports for individuals who have their own businesses.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Council on Developmental Services Department of Developmental Services - 01/12/2017

~~The Council on Developmental Services was established to advise and consult on issues affecting the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) and its programs and services for Connecticut residents with intellectual disability and their families. In consultation with the Commissioner of Developmental Services, the Council recommends to the Governor and the Connecticut General Assembly legislation that would enhance and improve the quality of the programs and services provided by the department.  The Council, with input from the public, advocates for all persons with developmental and intellectual disabilities in Connecticut.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Connecticut State Department of Education “Transition Bill of Rights” - 05/04/2016

“This Transition Bill of Rights for parents of students receiving special education will help parents and students understand a student’s rights related to getting an education and other important issues regarding the transition to life after high school. School districts will provide this document annually at a planning and placement team meeting to all parents, guardians, and surrogate parents of students who are receiving special education services in Grades 6-12 as well as to students who are 18 years of age or older.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

IEP Manual and Forms - 12/01/2015

~~“The United States Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), has advised states that all IEPs written on or after July 1, 2005, must comply with the requirements of the 2004 Reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA). The position of the Connecticut State Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education, is that the January 2006 and February 2009 revised IEP forms serve a number of purposes. The first purpose is to help insure compliance with the statutory requirements of IDEA and State law. In addition, these forms assist as a data collection and student educational program-planning tool. Therefore, the State Department of Education has directed that all IEPs written for students in the State of Connecticut be completed on these forms.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Connecticut Unified State Plan 2017 –Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Services Portion

Goal 1: To implement the provisions of WIOA specific to the VR program. Priority areas: • pre-employment transition services • employer services • service delivery • performance accountability measures • subminimum wage

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services

Employment Services Employment Services are integral to the DMHAS’ goal of offering a recovery-oriented system of care for persons in recovery who experience behavioral health conditions. One of the first significant steps to be taken in this direction is to ensure that all DMHAS consumers have both the necessary opportunities and supports to become involved in meaningful activities of their choice as well as to contribute to the broader community. Individuals with behavioral health conditions consistently express their desire for employment. From the recovery perspective, meaningful employment has been shown to promote recovery from psychiatric and addiction disorders and to facilitate improvements in diverse domains from symptom relief to successful community integration. Currently, DMHAS funds 36 agencies across Connecticut to provide a broad menu of employment and education services. While employment strategies must be tailored to meet individual needs, agencies generally offer a range of services including career planning, job search assistance, job placement, on- and off-the-job coaching, and career advancement services. Over 4000 persons per year are assisted in finding and keeping employment through the DMHAS system

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health

Connecticut Department of Developmental Services “Employment First Overview”

We Believe... -Everyone can work and there is a job for everyone. Our job is to be creative and persistent in providing supports that help people with intellectual disabilities to find, get and keep real pay. -Not working should be the exception. All individuals, schools, families and businesses must raise their expectations. -People will be hired because of their ability not because they have a disability. -Communities embrace people who contribute. -Everyone has something to contribute and needs to contribute. -People are healthier, safer and happiest with meaningful work. -True employment is not a social service. -Employment is a win/win for everybody.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Southwest Connecticut Workforce Investment Board: 2012-2016 Local Plan

"The WorkPlace helps people prepare for careers and strengthens the workforce for employers. We are a progressive, socially enterprising operation that is driven by innovation an entrepreneurial spirit. As Southwestern Connecticut’s Regional Workforce Development Board, we administer workforce development funds and coordinate providers of job training and education programs that meet the needs of residents and employers in the Southwestern Connecticut Region.

The WorkPlace administers job training and preparation funds allocated by state and federal agencies. We operate CTWorks Career Centers in Bridgeport, Stamford and Derby, CT. These centers provide programs and services to job seekers including career counseling, job search assistance, skills assessment and occupational training. Customers using the centers have access to computers, internet, telephones, copy machines as well as printed materials to help them search for a job."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services Employer Partnerships

“The Bureau of Rehabilitation Services partners with employers of all sizes and across industries. These partnership arrangements include qualified candidate referrals and individualized on-the-job trainings as well as more formalized training and placement programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services, Bureau of Rehabilitation Services

“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is an important partner with the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) to help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. BRS administers the Title I Vocational Rehabilitation and Title VI Supported Employment programs of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, that mandates employment services for people with disabilities. This act is the federal law that requires each designated state agency (BRS in Connecticut) to work closely with its SRC in developing the State Plan, strategic plans, reports, and state goals and priorities and in conducting needs assessment and evaluations.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Industry Specific Training and Placement Programs (ISTPP)

“Industry Specific Training and Placement Programs (ISTPP)  tuition-based workforce development programs designed to provide job seekers with disabilities the skills necessary for employment in a particular profession or type of business. In order to be most effective, ISTPPs are developed to address the employment needs within a local market or area and are reliant on essential partnerships with community/educational organizations and the targeted industry.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 11 - 11 of 11

Connecticut Connect-Ability

“Connect-Ability began in late 2005 with a federal grant to the State of Connecticut to identify and remove barriers to employment faced by people with disabilities. This five-year, multimillion dollar 'systems change grant' involved a detailed look at the State's employment and disability services infrastructure in order to identify problem areas and implement lasting solutions.

“Connect-Ability has two primary customers:

Employers of all sizes and in all industries who are seeking qualified workers People with disabilities of all ages who are seeking employment for the first time or who want a new challenge.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

26th Annual Conference on Serving Adults with Disabilities - 10/26/2018

~~“The Annual Conference on Serving Adults with Disabilities provides an excellent opportunity for participants to meet with a wide representation of experts and professionals, along with family and friends of individuals with disabilities, and to discuss current strategies and knowledge on the broad spectrum of disabilities.

Conference GoalTo share current knowledge and strategies and to provide answers, direction, and support to:•Adult education teachers•Workforce Practitioners•Employers•Counselors•Families, friends, and colleagues of individuals with disabilities”

Systems
  • Other

“The Impact of Proposed Budget Cuts on 403,370 adults and children with Disabilities in Connecticut” - 05/15/2017

~~“We build capacity: Through our Customized Employment project, we are training provider organizations the skills to identify and develop jobs for people with disabilities. Customized employment training is a defined rubric that has been shown to lead to real jobs for hard to place individuals. Working with Connecticut Legal Services, our Parents with Cognitive Limitations initiative has funded training for parents and court personnel, including judges, to address the unique issues that arise when these parents are involved with the courts. In addition, training was provided to DDS staff, self-advocates and medical personnel, including doctors. In all 330 people were trained in person, and additional individuals received training online.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Resources for Adult Services Providers - 05/11/2017

~~“Successful job development is often a complex set of strategies that requires skill and commitment on the part of the individual seeking a job, their support staff and members of their team.  Successful job developers use person-centered career planning to get to know their job seekers. They are knowledgeable about community resources and are also adept at recognizing and utilizing personal networks.  Customized Employment is a job development process that is a flexible blend of strategies, services and supports designed to increase employment options for job seekers with more complex needs.  Customized Employment is the voluntary negotiation of a personalized employment relationship between an individual and an employer that fulfills the business needs of the employer. This approach may include job carving, job creation, job sharing, self-employment and other types of entrepreneurial approaches.  Customized employment gives an advantage to the job seeker since that person will drive the employment process and uniquely fit a job position that meets their individual needs and interests.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

CT Mental Health Waiver (0653.R01.00) - 04/01/2012

This waiver "provides adult day health, community support, supported employment, assisted living, brief episodic stabilization, community living support, home accessibility adaptations, home delivered meals, non-medical transportation, overnight recovery assistant, peer supports, PERS, recovery assistant, specialized medical equipment, transitional case management for individuals w/mental illness ages 22 and older."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

CT Acquired Brain Injury Waiver (0302.R03.00) - 01/10/2012

Provides case management, homemaker, personal care, prevocational, respite, supported employment, ABI group day, chore, cognitive behavioral programs, community living support, companion, environmental accessibility adaptation, home delivered meals, independent living skill training, PERS, specialized medical equipment and supplies, substance abuse programs, transitional living, transportation, vehicle mods for individuals with brain injury ages 18 - no max age.

Expires 12/31/2016.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment First Overview - 12/01/2011

~~Connecticut Department of Developmental Services Employment First InitiativeReal Work for Real PayWe Believe...• Everyone can work and there is a job for everyone.  Our job is to be creative and persistent in providing supports that help people with intellectual disabilities to find, get and keep real pay.• Not working should be the exception.  All individuals, schools, families and businesses must raise their expectations.• People will be hired because of their ability not because they have a disability.• Communities embrace people who contribute.• Everyone has something to contribute and needs to contribute.• People are healthier, safer and happiest with meaningful work. • True employment is not a social service.• Employment is a win/win for everybody.

Systems
  • Other

CT Employment and Day Supports (0881.R01.00) - 04/01/2011

Provides adult day health, community based day support options, respite, supported employment, independent support broker, behavioral support, individual goods and services, individualized day support, interpreter, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation for individuals w/DD ages 18 - no max age and ID ages 3 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plan Amendments

A Medicaid and CHIP state plan is an agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs…When a state is planning to make a change to its program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. States also submit SPAs to request permissible program changes, make corrections, or update their Medicaid or CHIP state plan with new information   This webpage includes Medicaid State Plan amendments for the state of Connecticut  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plans

~~The Connecticut Medicaid state plan is an agreement between the state and the Federal government describing how Connecticut administers its Medicaid program. The plan details how the state will follow Federal rules and guidelines.  It also gives details on how the state may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

“To request a copy of the SPA from DSS or to send comments about the SPA, please email: Public.Comment.DSS@ct.gov or write: Department of Social Services, Medical Policy Unit, 55 Farmington Avenue, 9th Floor, Hartford, CT 06105 (Phone: 860-424-5067)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

People know what constitutes great employment opportunities for workers with disabilities in the Constitution State of Connecticut.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Connecticut's VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.33%
Change from
2016 to 2017
3,588,184
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.2%
Change from
2016 to 2017
189,419
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76,096
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.96%
Change from
2016 to 2017
40.17%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.10%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 3,588,184
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 189,419
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 76,096
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,582,806
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.10%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.60%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 184,187
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 207,675
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 310,248
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 38,719
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 58,256
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,056
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,928
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 11,276
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 19,635

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,125
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 81,260

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 9,178
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 16,578
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 37,157
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 24.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 8.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,407
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,244
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,367
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,367
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 50
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 27
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 54.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.75

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,020
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 126,638
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $75,899,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $4,171,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $135,947,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $13,710,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 43.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 889
Number of people served in facility based work. 266
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,841
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 127.10

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 67.33%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 5.50%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 8.03%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 51.34%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 79.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 15.28%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,354,163
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,584
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 46,321
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 621,956
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 668,277
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 245
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 837
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,082
AbilityOne wages (products). $158,294
AbilityOne wages (services). $9,751,263

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 35
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 35
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,210
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,210

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~In November 2015, Connecticut was one of four states selected to participate as a Core State in the 2016 Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) offered through the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP).
Connecticut was chosen through an application process to become an EFSLMP Core State. Connecticut committed to a cross–system, cross–disability effort to promote Employment First, a national movement in both philosophy and policy stating that employment is the first priority and preferred outcome of individuals with disabilities. (Page 50)
Two workgroups were formed, comprised of leadership representing six state agencies including the Departments of Labor, Developmental Services, Rehabilitation Services, Education, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Social Services, as well as key stakeholders including the CT Council on Developmental Disabilities and the CT Business Leadership Network. These workgroups receive a combination of virtual and onsite mentoring, intensive technical assistance, and training from a national pool of subject matter experts under the program. One workgroup is focused on coordinating and streamlining business engagement and outreach strategies across government agencies and providers. A second workgroup required under the program called Vision Quest, is charged developing and implementing policy to support the state’s Employment First systems change efforts. (Page 50)
Participate in cross agency trainings through the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) to strengthen state agency partnerships. (Page 419)
Staff from the Bureau participates in meetings and training seminars organized by the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE). This organization links community providers, employers, state agency representatives and other resources together to exchange information on job placement strategies, funding sources and employer job leads. Bureau staff have presented at meetings of this organization on blindness related topics such as adaptive technology so that other providers in attendance would be aware of the options that exist for bringing about a successful job placement when accepting a referral from BESB for a client who is seeking a job placement with supported employment services. (Page 451)
 

Customized Employment

~~Employer services, such as:
i. Customized screening and referral of qualified participants in training services to employers;
ii. Customized employment-related services to employers, employer associations, or other such organization on a fee-for-service basis that are in addition to labor exchange services available to employers under the Wagner-Peyser Act Employment Service;
iii. Activities to provide business services and strategies that meet the workforce investment needs of area employers, as determined by the Local WDB and consistent with the local plan (see § 678.435 of this chapter and WIOA sec. 134(d)(1)(A)(ix)); and (Page 183 & 333)
The challenging economy continues to impact on the scope and variety of job placement options available to clients, making customized employment particularly difficult to secure. The need for long–term funding support is an additional step that is necessary for supported employment placements at the onset. These two variables in combination make the timing challenging in filling job vacancies with a client who requires long–term supports. Dedicating two counselors to work specifically with the transition–age client population will facilitate discussions on supported employment options much earlier in the Planning and Placement Team process, starting as early as junior high school. This should allow for increased time to explore and secure long–term funding commitments and also to develop job opportunities for clients. (Page 501)
Supported Employment refers to competitive integrated employment, including customized employment, that is individualized and customized consistent with the strengths, abilities, interests, and informed choice of a client with a most significant disability, and that includes ongoing support services. Supported employment services may be considered for individuals for whom competitive integrated employment has not historically occurred, or for whom competitive integrated employment has been interrupted or intermittent, and where there is a need for extended services after the transition from support provided by the Bureau, (Page 502)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Limited capacity of many workforce service providers to deal effectively with the complexities of braiding funds (Page 53)
Connecticut’s American Job Center (AJC) One–Stop system is the vehicle through which service delivery and targeting, leveraging and braiding of available resources is coordinated. Connecticut has a history and tradition of innovative collaboration among multiple partners and stakeholders to coordinate services and resources at the local level through its One–Stop system. (Page 84)
 

DEI/DRC

~~Jobs Corps Job Corps is a national, federally funded educational and vocational training program administered by USDOL that helps low income youth (ages16–24) gain workplace skills, train for high–demand occupations, and become independent and self–sufficient. With centers in Hartford and New Haven, more than 400 students enroll each year to earn a high school diploma or GED, learn a trade, obtain third party certifications and receive assistance finding a job. CTDOL has an assigned staff member who provides on–site support to the Hartford and New Haven Job Corp Centers. Transforming System Capacity Disability Employment Initiative In October 2013 Connecticut was one of eight states to receive a grant through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). CTDOL’s Office of Workforce Competitiveness (OWC) administers the three–year $3,058,706 award from USDOL’ s Employment and Training Administration and Office of Disability Employment Policy. Broad objectives are to provide additional education, training and employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, and to expand the workforce system’s capacity to serve eligible beneficiaries in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program. The initiative features strong partnerships and collaboration among key agencies; service coordination through an Integrated Resource Team; integrated services and resources, including blended, braided and leveraged funding and resources; and, innovative asset development strategies. Services are offered in two of Connecticut’s workforce regions. Two participating WDBs employ Disability Resource Coordinators to implement project activities and coordinate services. Integrated Resource Teams address individual needs and provide increased support for jobseekers with disabilities. Partners include CTDOL’s Office for Veterans Workforce Development and the Departments of Rehabilitative Services, Labor, Education, Mental Health and Addiction Services, Social Services, Transportation, and various other public and private sector representatives. ( Page 48)
DEI efforts focus on:
• Promoting inclusiveness of individuals with disabilities to enhance competitive advantage
• Organizing business–to–business forums to share strategies on recruiting, hiring and retaining people with disabilities ( Page 48)
• Re–imagine delivery of customer services to individual jobseekers and workers in the American Job Center One–Stop system. Develop and implement streamlined service flow with efficiently aligned and integrated processes implemented by coordinated service teams representing the full range of contributions from system partners and stakeholders, consistent with principles and criteria developed by the WIOA Transition Service Design and Delivery Work Group. Build on lessons learned from implementation of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) and Secure Jobs pilots as models for innovative and effective multi–partner service coordination. (Page 64)
In October 2013, Connecticut was one of eight states to receive a grant under USDOL’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). Awarded to OWC, the three–year $3,058,706 grant promotes strategic approaches to enhance employment services for individuals with disabilities served by the public workforce investment system. (All of page 120)
 

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~Transform System Capacity:
• Re–imagine delivery of customer services to individual jobseekers and workers in the American Job Center One–Stop system. Develop and implement streamlined service flow with efficiently aligned and integrated processes implemented by coordinated service teams representing the full range of contributions from system partners and stakeholders, consistent with principles and criteria developed by the WIOA Transition Service Design and Delivery Work Group. Build on lessons learned from implementation of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) and Secure Jobs pilots as models for innovative and effective multi–partner service coordination. (Page 64)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Short-term pre-vocational services, including development of learning skills, communication skills, interviewing skills, punctuality, personal maintenance skills, and professional conduct, to prepare individuals for unsubsidized employment or training;
g.   Work Experience/Internships;
h.   Adult Basic Education/Financial Literacy Services. (Page 209)
10. Comprehensive guidance and counseling, including drug and alcohol abuse counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the individual youth;
11. Financial literacy education;
12. Entrepreneurial skills training;
13. Services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area*, such as career awareness, career counseling, and career exploration services; and
14. Activities that help youth prepare for and transition to post-secondary education and training. WIOA Regs. 20 CFR Part 681.460 (Page 211)
Along with the strategies mentioned above to address goals and ways to overcome barriers to equitable access to VR services, BRS also anticipates using innovation and expansion (I&E) funds in FFY 2017 to support the State Rehabilitation Council, the State Independent Living Council, and to continue Individualized Financial Capability Coaching, a project to increase financial literacy and capability for people with disabilities. Other proposals will be assessed upon submission and considered based on the alignment with the state’s goals and priorities. (Page 422)
Measures of success will be based on a consumer’s improved financial literacy and his/her ability to budget a household, create realistic goals, understand credit scores (and demonstrate actions to maintain or improve them), increase self–sufficiency, obtain employment/increase wages, and go off of SSDI and/or SSI benefits. The number of new checking, savings or equivalent accounts that are opened will also be counted. (Page 429)
 

School to Work Transition

~~Regular payments from railroad retirement, strike benefits from union funds, worker’s compensation, and training stipends;
4.   Alimony;
5.   Military family allotments or other regular support from an absent family member or someone not living in the household;
6.   Pensions whether private, government employee (including Military retirement pay);
7.   Regular insurance or annuity payments other than Supplemental Security Income disability (SSI) or veterans’ disability;
8.   College or university grants, fellowships, and assistantships;
9.   Net gambling or lottery winnings;
10.   Social Security Disability Insurance payments (SSDI)
•    Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) pays benefits to individuals that have worked in the past, paid Social Security taxes, and are currently unable to work for a year or more because of a disability. SSDI is considered income replacement and must be included in family income (All of page 204)
12.   Tribal Government Payments (i.e., Per Capita Payments, Lease Payments, Individual Indian Money (IIM);
13.   Old age and survivors insurance benefits received under section 202 of the Social Security Act (42 USC 402).
• Old age and survivors insurance benefits include: Social Security Survivor Benefits – these are benefits paid to people up to age 18 who have had a parent die and the parent paid wages into the system; and
• Social Security Retirement Benefits – these are benefits that are paid to people who reached their social security age and have wages paid in the system. (Page 205)

Career Pathways

~~DORS: Partner Alignment with Educational Institutions Both Vocational Rehabilitation Programs at DORS are actively involved in a variety of transition school–to–work initiatives, with extensive collaboration and coordination at the administrative and service delivery levels of the organization. Through a cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education, the roles and responsibilities of the VR programs and the public educational system are clearly defined, including financial responsibilities and coordination of services and staff training. Representatives from both VR programs serve on an interagency transition task force and appointed representatives from the Connecticut State Department of Education serves on the State Rehabilitation Council to BESB and to BRS. VR program information is presented at in–service training programs for public school teachers and guidance counselors on issues affecting students who have disabilities. (Page 90)
Prior to initiation of pre–employment transition efforts, BRS had liaison counselors assigned to each high school to work directly with students and collaborate with education administrators to sign a referral protocol yearly. With implementation of WIOA, 10 VR counselors have been assigned to work exclusively with students with disabilities. (Page 397)
The Vocational Rehabilitation Program at the Bureau of Education and Services for the Blind is actively involved in a variety of transition school–to–work initiatives, with extensive collaboration and coordination at the administrative and service delivery levels of the organization. (Page 447)
Through a cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education, the roles and responsibilities of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program and the public educational system are clearly defined. This includes financial responsibilities as well as coordination of services and staff training. To facilitate this coordination, the Transition School to Work Coordinator from BESB serves on an interagency transition task force and there is an appointed representative from the State Department of Education serving on the State Rehabilitation Council to BESB. (Page 449)

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Connecticut Employment and Training Commission (CETC – the State Workforce Board), the State agencies responsible for administration of the core WIOA programs encompassed by this Unified State Plan (Connecticut Department of Labor (CTDOL), Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE), and Department of Rehabilitation Services (DORS)), the Connecticut Department of Social Services (CTDSS) and the five Workforce Development Boards – propose and will support a set of broadly–conceived strategies intended to achieve the vision and goals outlined above. These strategies will serve as a framework for Connecticut’s implementation efforts, with corresponding detailed State and local implementing actions to be developed.
(1)  Describe the strategies the State will implement, including industry or sector partnerships related to in–demand industry sectors and occupations and career pathways, as required by WIOA section 101(d)(3)(B), (D). “Career pathway” is defined at WIOA section 3(7). “In– demand industry sector or occupation” is defined at WIOA section 3(23). (Page 61)
With representatives of secondary and postsecondary education programs, lead efforts to develop and implement career pathways within the local area by aligning the employment, training, education, and supportive services that are needed by adults and youth, particularly individuals with barriers to employment. (Page 139)
 

Employer Engagement

~~As required by DEI, two local WDBs – Northwest Regional Workforce Investment Board and Capital Workforce Partners (North Central area) – became active Employment Networks (ENs) in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program, thereby expanding the Connecticut workforce system’s capacity to serve eligible beneficiaries. DEI also requires the State’s participation in an evaluation process to measure the project’s impact on outcomes for jobseekers with disabilities.  (Page 120)

511

~~Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) DORS has a contract with a software provider to maintain a case management system for the vocational rehabilitation programs. This system runs locally on servers housed within DORS and contains case information relevant to individual consumers and reportable data. The vendor has maintained an active relationship with the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) who governs data collection for public vocational rehabilitation programs. Modifications to the system are currently being planned to manage the upcoming changes in data collection required by WIOA. RSA data elements will be adjusted to be compatible with the WIOA–Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) document. (Page 97)
Measure: Documentation of Vocational Rehabilitation staff participation in statewide meeting regarding the development of a common–front end data collection system. (Page 480)
 

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 119)
(3)  A standing committee to provide information and to assist with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, including issues relating to compliance with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding providing programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the one-stop delivery system, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing supports for or accommodations to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. (Page 137)
(o) Develop a budget for the activities of the Local WDB, with approval of the chief elected official and consistent with the local plan and the duties of the Local WDB.
(p) Assess, on an annual basis, the physical and programmatic accessibility of all one- stop centers in the local area, in accordance with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.). (Page 141)
(ii) How the Local WDB will facilitate access to services provided through the one-stop delivery system, including in remote areas, through the use of technology and other means;
(iii) How entities within the one-stop delivery system, including one-stop operators and the one-stop partners, will comply with WIOA sec. 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities; and
(iv) The roles and resource contributions of the one-stop partners; (Page 145)
2.   WIOA funds may not be used for employment in the construction, operation, or maintenance of any part of any facility that is used or will be used for sectarian instruction or as a place for religious worship with the exception of maintenance of facilities that are not primarily used for instruction or for worship and are operated by organizations providing services to WIOA participants. WIOA Sec. 188(a)(3); 20 CFR Part 683.255; 29 CFR Part 2, subpart D, and 29 CFR Part 37.6(f)(1) (Reference TEGL 1-05 dated July 6, 2005)  (Page 150)
O.   Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity. 1. All eligible service and training providers receiving WIOA Title IB funds must comply fully with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA Section 188 and Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination Regulations at 29 CFR Part 37. 2. (Page 151)
4.   Provider agreements will contain assurance language that it will comply with Equal Opportunity requirements of Section 188 of the Act, 29 CFR Part 37, and 1604, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and all other applicable equal opportunity laws and regulations. The assurance may be incorporated by reference. (Page 152)
5.   Discriminatory discharge prohibited. No person, organization or agency may discharge, or in any other manner discriminate or retaliate against any person, or deny to any person a benefit to which that person is entitled under the provisions of the Act because such person has filed any complaint, instituted or caused to be instituted any proceeding under or related to the Act, has testified or is about to testify in any such proceeding or investigation, or has provided information or assisted in an investigation. WIOA Sec. 181, 188; 29 CFR Part 37; MCA 9-2-303(b) (Page 152)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 51 - 60 of 68

Connecticut Medicaid State Plan Amendments

A Medicaid and CHIP state plan is an agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs…When a state is planning to make a change to its program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. States also submit SPAs to request permissible program changes, make corrections, or update their Medicaid or CHIP state plan with new information   This webpage includes Medicaid State Plan amendments for the state of Connecticut  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plans

~~The Connecticut Medicaid state plan is an agreement between the state and the Federal government describing how Connecticut administers its Medicaid program. The plan details how the state will follow Federal rules and guidelines.  It also gives details on how the state may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

“To request a copy of the SPA from DSS or to send comments about the SPA, please email: Public.Comment.DSS@ct.gov or write: Department of Social Services, Medical Policy Unit, 55 Farmington Avenue, 9th Floor, Hartford, CT 06105 (Phone: 860-424-5067)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut SAMHSA/CMHS Employment Development Initiative: Fiscal Year 2011 & 2012 Projects

This initiative provided training and technical assistance for entrepreneurs with psychiatric disorders to start a small business. “This project demonstrated that entrepreneurship is indeed a viable option for persons in recovery. The Business Advisors from the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) observed that the business plans submitted by the individuals in this program were stronger and demonstrated more commitment than those of the general population. All of the persons receiving mini-grants as well as the majority of persons who were not were encouraged by their Business Advisors to continue working on their business plans, which the Advisors felt had real potential to succeed with additional effort.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

CT Balancing Incentive Payment Project

“The State of Connecticut’s Department of Social Services, Division of Health Services (DHS), with the Legislative and stakeholder support, seeks approval for application to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for participation in the Balancing Incentive Payment Program (BIP). The $72,780,505 enhanced federal medical assistance received will be used to expand community long-term services and supports (LTSS) and develop infrastructure necessary to support uniform access and a more streamlined process for persons seeking community LTSS. Ultimately, the goal of Connecticut’s BIP project is to remove policy, procedure and access barriers that prevent persons from receiving equitable community LTSS and that lead to unnecessary institutionalization.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Connecticut State Rehabilitation Council (SRC)

“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is an important partner with the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) to help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. BRS administers the Title I Vocational Rehabilitation and Title VI Supported Employment programs of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, that mandates employment services for people with disabilities. This act is the federal law that requires each designated state agency (BRS in Connecticut) to work closely with its SRC in developing the State Plan, strategic plans, reports, and state goals and priorities and in conducting needs assessment and evaluations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Role of the Connecticut Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

“The Governor’s Committee shall be composed of people with disabilities; agency representatives, including a representative of the State Job Service, the Division of Rehabilitation Services, the Veterans Employment and training Service and the United States Department of Veterans Affairs; representatives of employers, representatives of organized labor and other interested persons.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Connecticut Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

The Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities’ (GCEPD) mission is to “promote the employment of people with disabilities; produce and provide an environment that strives to include and integrate people with disabilities into the workforce; [and] promote and establish initiatives designed to highlight the benefits of employing people with disabilities.”   GCEPD’s initiatives include “[providing] education and awareness on the benefits of hiring qualified candidates with disabilities; [promoting and supporting] the activities of local communities throughout the state to enhance the employment of persons with disabilities; [and maintaining] a website of disability resources for both employers and job seekers.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Southwest Connecticut Workforce Investment Board: 2012-2016 Local Plan

"The WorkPlace helps people prepare for careers and strengthens the workforce for employers. We are a progressive, socially enterprising operation that is driven by innovation an entrepreneurial spirit. As Southwestern Connecticut’s Regional Workforce Development Board, we administer workforce development funds and coordinate providers of job training and education programs that meet the needs of residents and employers in the Southwestern Connecticut Region.

The WorkPlace administers job training and preparation funds allocated by state and federal agencies. We operate CTWorks Career Centers in Bridgeport, Stamford and Derby, CT. These centers provide programs and services to job seekers including career counseling, job search assistance, skills assessment and occupational training. Customers using the centers have access to computers, internet, telephones, copy machines as well as printed materials to help them search for a job."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

CT General Statutes within the Jurisdiction of the CT Department of Labor

Updated through 2012 June Spec. Sess. These General Statues are applicable to the performance of the Connecticut Department of Labor. They define the various types of services that will be available through the state Department of Labor, and the American Job Centers. Under the section on the "Mortgage Crisis Job Training Program," Customized Employment is listed as a service to be provided: "The WorkPlace, Inc. and Capital Workforce Partners shall manage such teams. The teams, in cooperation with the regional workforce development boards and the one-stop centers, shall ensure the provision of rapid, customized employment services, job training, repair training and job placement assistance to borrowers who are unemployed, underemployed or in need of a second job. The WorkPlace, Inc. shall arrange for the provision of financial literacy and credit counseling for participants in the program with the Connecticut Housing Finance Authority."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Connecticut Small Contractor Set Aside Program (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann 4a-60g)

Statute requiring state agencies and political subdivisions of the state to set aside at least 25 percent of their budgets each fiscal year for small contractors.  This requirement is limited to those agencies and subdivisions that have annual contracting budgets of more than $10,000.  Of this set-aside, 25 percent must be reserved for awards to minority business enterprises, including disability-owned businesses. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

H.B. No. 5253 AN ACT EXPANDING ACCESS TO THE MONEY FOLLOWS THE PERSON DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AND REPEALING OBSOLETE STATUTES - 06/06/2018

~~“The Commissioner of Social Services, pursuant to Section 6071 of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, shall submit an application to the Secretary of Health and Human Services to establish a Money Follows the Person demonstration project. Such project shall [serve not more than five thousand persons and shall] be designed to achieve the objectives set forth in Section 6071(a) of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. Services available under the demonstration project shall include,but need not be limited to, personal care assistance services. The commissioner may apply for a Medicaid research and demonstration waiver under Section 1115 of the Social Security Act, if such waiver is necessary to implement the demonstration project. The commissioner may, if necessary, modify any existing Medicaid home or community based waiver if such modification is required to implement the demonstration project”.“

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Senate Bill No. 502 May Special Session, Public Act No. 16-3AN ACT CONCERNING REVENUE AND OTHER ITEMS TO IMPLEMENT THE BUDGET FOR THE BIENNIUM ENDING JUNE 30, 2017. - 07/01/2016

“Sec. 60. Subsection (a) of section 17b-666 of the general statutes is repealed and the following is substituted in lieu thereof (Effective July 1, 2016): (a) The Department of Rehabilitation Services may receive state and federal funds to administer, within available appropriations, an employment opportunities program to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities who do not meet the eligibility requirements of supported employment programs administered by the Departments of Developmental Services, Social Services and Mental Health and Addiction Services. For the purposes of this section, "individuals with the most significant disabilities" means those individuals who (1) have serious employment limitations in a total of three or more functional areas including, but not limited to, mobility, communication, self-care, interpersonal skills, work tolerance or work skills, or (2) will require significant ongoing disability-related services on the job in order to maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Connecticut HB 6738 - 06/03/2015

"The State Treasurer shall establish a qualified ABLE program pursuant to the federal ABLE Act and sections 1 to 8, inclusive, of this act. Under the program: (A) The State Treasurer shall administer individual ABLE accounts to encourage and assist eligible individuals and their families in saving private funds to provide support for eligible individuals, and (B) a person may make contributions to an individual ABLE account to meet the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

CT General Statutes within the Jurisdiction of the CT Department of Labor

Updated through 2012 June Spec. Sess. These General Statues are applicable to the performance of the Connecticut Department of Labor. They define the various types of services that will be available through the state Department of Labor, and the American Job Centers. Under the section on the "Mortgage Crisis Job Training Program," Customized Employment is listed as a service to be provided: "The WorkPlace, Inc. and Capital Workforce Partners shall manage such teams. The teams, in cooperation with the regional workforce development boards and the one-stop centers, shall ensure the provision of rapid, customized employment services, job training, repair training and job placement assistance to borrowers who are unemployed, underemployed or in need of a second job. The WorkPlace, Inc. shall arrange for the provision of financial literacy and credit counseling for participants in the program with the Connecticut Housing Finance Authority."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Connecticut Small Contractor Set Aside Program (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann 4a-60g)

Statute requiring state agencies and political subdivisions of the state to set aside at least 25 percent of their budgets each fiscal year for small contractors.  This requirement is limited to those agencies and subdivisions that have annual contracting budgets of more than $10,000.  Of this set-aside, 25 percent must be reserved for awards to minority business enterprises, including disability-owned businesses. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Mental Health Supported Employment Services - 07/26/2017

~~“DMHAS continues to work closely with Individual Placement and Support (IPS) Employment Center at Rockville Institute to implement the SAMHSA-endorsed Evidence-based Supported Employment Practice (EBP) for persons with serious and persistent psychiatric disorders.  This includes embedding employment staff in clinical treatment teams to promote integration, where employment becomes “everyone’s business.”  Employment staff is responsible for helping people choose, find and keep “integrated competitive employment,” that is, jobs that are open for all to apply and pay competitive wages.  The EBP approach features non-exclusion from employment services based on diagnosis or symptomology, rapid job search for positions that match individual interests, strong relationship building with area employers, and customized follow-along supports on- and off-the-job for as long as needed (see link to IPS Works)”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

State Rehabilitation Report 2016 - 07/25/2017

~~Mission:“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) provides assessment, advice and recommendations to the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) and others regarding coordination and effectiveness of programs and strategies which promote  community-based competitive employment for persons with disabilities.GOALS:To assess the effectiveness and delivery of vocational services provided by BRS to individuals with disabilitiesTo improve the coordination of vocational services among BRS, state agencies and public and private entities for the benefit of BRS job seekers.To make recommendations to BRS, the Governor, the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) and others for developing and improving strategies for the employment of, and vocational services for individuals with disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

“Employment and Other Day Service Options” - 04/11/2017

~~“DDS Funded Day Services:SUPP0RTED EMPLOYMENT - These include supports to help individuals work as a paid employee in work settings that also employ people without disabilities. These services assist individuals find and apply for jobs, and offer job coaching support to people once work is secured. This service includes individual and group supported employment. This service is designed to provide support and supervision but is not intended to provide ongoing long term 1:1 support to help a person complete their work activities.GROUP EMPLOYMENT - These include sheltered workshops and day support options. These services are provided in a facility-based program that focuses on developing meaningful skills in the area of work, socialization and community participation.INDIVIDUAL DAY - This waiver service includes individually tailored supports that help consumers gain or maintain skills to participate more fully and productively in work, leisure or community activities. This may include the development of independent functioning skills, relationship skills, exploring job interests or retirement programs. It can also provide funds for staff supports for individuals who have their own businesses.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Council on Developmental Services Department of Developmental Services - 01/12/2017

~~The Council on Developmental Services was established to advise and consult on issues affecting the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) and its programs and services for Connecticut residents with intellectual disability and their families. In consultation with the Commissioner of Developmental Services, the Council recommends to the Governor and the Connecticut General Assembly legislation that would enhance and improve the quality of the programs and services provided by the department.  The Council, with input from the public, advocates for all persons with developmental and intellectual disabilities in Connecticut.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Connecticut State Department of Education “Transition Bill of Rights” - 05/04/2016

“This Transition Bill of Rights for parents of students receiving special education will help parents and students understand a student’s rights related to getting an education and other important issues regarding the transition to life after high school. School districts will provide this document annually at a planning and placement team meeting to all parents, guardians, and surrogate parents of students who are receiving special education services in Grades 6-12 as well as to students who are 18 years of age or older.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

IEP Manual and Forms - 12/01/2015

~~“The United States Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), has advised states that all IEPs written on or after July 1, 2005, must comply with the requirements of the 2004 Reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA). The position of the Connecticut State Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education, is that the January 2006 and February 2009 revised IEP forms serve a number of purposes. The first purpose is to help insure compliance with the statutory requirements of IDEA and State law. In addition, these forms assist as a data collection and student educational program-planning tool. Therefore, the State Department of Education has directed that all IEPs written for students in the State of Connecticut be completed on these forms.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Connecticut Unified State Plan 2017 –Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Services Portion

Goal 1: To implement the provisions of WIOA specific to the VR program. Priority areas: • pre-employment transition services • employer services • service delivery • performance accountability measures • subminimum wage

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services

Employment Services Employment Services are integral to the DMHAS’ goal of offering a recovery-oriented system of care for persons in recovery who experience behavioral health conditions. One of the first significant steps to be taken in this direction is to ensure that all DMHAS consumers have both the necessary opportunities and supports to become involved in meaningful activities of their choice as well as to contribute to the broader community. Individuals with behavioral health conditions consistently express their desire for employment. From the recovery perspective, meaningful employment has been shown to promote recovery from psychiatric and addiction disorders and to facilitate improvements in diverse domains from symptom relief to successful community integration. Currently, DMHAS funds 36 agencies across Connecticut to provide a broad menu of employment and education services. While employment strategies must be tailored to meet individual needs, agencies generally offer a range of services including career planning, job search assistance, job placement, on- and off-the-job coaching, and career advancement services. Over 4000 persons per year are assisted in finding and keeping employment through the DMHAS system

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health

Connecticut Department of Developmental Services “Employment First Overview”

We Believe... -Everyone can work and there is a job for everyone. Our job is to be creative and persistent in providing supports that help people with intellectual disabilities to find, get and keep real pay. -Not working should be the exception. All individuals, schools, families and businesses must raise their expectations. -People will be hired because of their ability not because they have a disability. -Communities embrace people who contribute. -Everyone has something to contribute and needs to contribute. -People are healthier, safer and happiest with meaningful work. -True employment is not a social service. -Employment is a win/win for everybody.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Southwest Connecticut Workforce Investment Board: 2012-2016 Local Plan

"The WorkPlace helps people prepare for careers and strengthens the workforce for employers. We are a progressive, socially enterprising operation that is driven by innovation an entrepreneurial spirit. As Southwestern Connecticut’s Regional Workforce Development Board, we administer workforce development funds and coordinate providers of job training and education programs that meet the needs of residents and employers in the Southwestern Connecticut Region.

The WorkPlace administers job training and preparation funds allocated by state and federal agencies. We operate CTWorks Career Centers in Bridgeport, Stamford and Derby, CT. These centers provide programs and services to job seekers including career counseling, job search assistance, skills assessment and occupational training. Customers using the centers have access to computers, internet, telephones, copy machines as well as printed materials to help them search for a job."  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services Employer Partnerships

“The Bureau of Rehabilitation Services partners with employers of all sizes and across industries. These partnership arrangements include qualified candidate referrals and individualized on-the-job trainings as well as more formalized training and placement programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Connecticut Department of Rehabilitation Services, Bureau of Rehabilitation Services

“The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is an important partner with the Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS) to help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. BRS administers the Title I Vocational Rehabilitation and Title VI Supported Employment programs of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, that mandates employment services for people with disabilities. This act is the federal law that requires each designated state agency (BRS in Connecticut) to work closely with its SRC in developing the State Plan, strategic plans, reports, and state goals and priorities and in conducting needs assessment and evaluations.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Industry Specific Training and Placement Programs (ISTPP)

“Industry Specific Training and Placement Programs (ISTPP)  tuition-based workforce development programs designed to provide job seekers with disabilities the skills necessary for employment in a particular profession or type of business. In order to be most effective, ISTPPs are developed to address the employment needs within a local market or area and are reliant on essential partnerships with community/educational organizations and the targeted industry.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 11 - 11 of 11

Connecticut Connect-Ability

“Connect-Ability began in late 2005 with a federal grant to the State of Connecticut to identify and remove barriers to employment faced by people with disabilities. This five-year, multimillion dollar 'systems change grant' involved a detailed look at the State's employment and disability services infrastructure in order to identify problem areas and implement lasting solutions.

“Connect-Ability has two primary customers:

Employers of all sizes and in all industries who are seeking qualified workers People with disabilities of all ages who are seeking employment for the first time or who want a new challenge.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

26th Annual Conference on Serving Adults with Disabilities - 10/26/2018

~~“The Annual Conference on Serving Adults with Disabilities provides an excellent opportunity for participants to meet with a wide representation of experts and professionals, along with family and friends of individuals with disabilities, and to discuss current strategies and knowledge on the broad spectrum of disabilities.

Conference GoalTo share current knowledge and strategies and to provide answers, direction, and support to:•Adult education teachers•Workforce Practitioners•Employers•Counselors•Families, friends, and colleagues of individuals with disabilities”

Systems
  • Other

“The Impact of Proposed Budget Cuts on 403,370 adults and children with Disabilities in Connecticut” - 05/15/2017

~~“We build capacity: Through our Customized Employment project, we are training provider organizations the skills to identify and develop jobs for people with disabilities. Customized employment training is a defined rubric that has been shown to lead to real jobs for hard to place individuals. Working with Connecticut Legal Services, our Parents with Cognitive Limitations initiative has funded training for parents and court personnel, including judges, to address the unique issues that arise when these parents are involved with the courts. In addition, training was provided to DDS staff, self-advocates and medical personnel, including doctors. In all 330 people were trained in person, and additional individuals received training online.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Resources for Adult Services Providers - 05/11/2017

~~“Successful job development is often a complex set of strategies that requires skill and commitment on the part of the individual seeking a job, their support staff and members of their team.  Successful job developers use person-centered career planning to get to know their job seekers. They are knowledgeable about community resources and are also adept at recognizing and utilizing personal networks.  Customized Employment is a job development process that is a flexible blend of strategies, services and supports designed to increase employment options for job seekers with more complex needs.  Customized Employment is the voluntary negotiation of a personalized employment relationship between an individual and an employer that fulfills the business needs of the employer. This approach may include job carving, job creation, job sharing, self-employment and other types of entrepreneurial approaches.  Customized employment gives an advantage to the job seeker since that person will drive the employment process and uniquely fit a job position that meets their individual needs and interests.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

CT Mental Health Waiver (0653.R01.00) - 04/01/2012

This waiver "provides adult day health, community support, supported employment, assisted living, brief episodic stabilization, community living support, home accessibility adaptations, home delivered meals, non-medical transportation, overnight recovery assistant, peer supports, PERS, recovery assistant, specialized medical equipment, transitional case management for individuals w/mental illness ages 22 and older."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

CT Acquired Brain Injury Waiver (0302.R03.00) - 01/10/2012

Provides case management, homemaker, personal care, prevocational, respite, supported employment, ABI group day, chore, cognitive behavioral programs, community living support, companion, environmental accessibility adaptation, home delivered meals, independent living skill training, PERS, specialized medical equipment and supplies, substance abuse programs, transitional living, transportation, vehicle mods for individuals with brain injury ages 18 - no max age.

Expires 12/31/2016.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment First Overview - 12/01/2011

~~Connecticut Department of Developmental Services Employment First InitiativeReal Work for Real PayWe Believe...• Everyone can work and there is a job for everyone.  Our job is to be creative and persistent in providing supports that help people with intellectual disabilities to find, get and keep real pay.• Not working should be the exception.  All individuals, schools, families and businesses must raise their expectations.• People will be hired because of their ability not because they have a disability.• Communities embrace people who contribute.• Everyone has something to contribute and needs to contribute.• People are healthier, safer and happiest with meaningful work. • True employment is not a social service.• Employment is a win/win for everybody.

Systems
  • Other

CT Employment and Day Supports (0881.R01.00) - 04/01/2011

Provides adult day health, community based day support options, respite, supported employment, independent support broker, behavioral support, individual goods and services, individualized day support, interpreter, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation for individuals w/DD ages 18 - no max age and ID ages 3 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plan Amendments

A Medicaid and CHIP state plan is an agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs…When a state is planning to make a change to its program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. States also submit SPAs to request permissible program changes, make corrections, or update their Medicaid or CHIP state plan with new information   This webpage includes Medicaid State Plan amendments for the state of Connecticut  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Connecticut Medicaid State Plans

~~The Connecticut Medicaid state plan is an agreement between the state and the Federal government describing how Connecticut administers its Medicaid program. The plan details how the state will follow Federal rules and guidelines.  It also gives details on how the state may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

“To request a copy of the SPA from DSS or to send comments about the SPA, please email: Public.Comment.DSS@ct.gov or write: Department of Social Services, Medical Policy Unit, 55 Farmington Avenue, 9th Floor, Hartford, CT 06105 (Phone: 860-424-5067)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)