Guam [Territory]

States - Big Screen

"Where America's Day Begins": Each day begins with new job opportunities for people with disabilities.

2018 State Population.
0.9%
Change from
2017 to 2018
165,768
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
6,809

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 162,951 164,281 165,768
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 1,624 1,645

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 614 403
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,222 1,093
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 1,596 1,093
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.50% 36.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.90% N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.50% N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 98.80% N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 12 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 45 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,274 N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2016
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 143
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. N/A

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
32
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 7 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 6 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 12 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 6 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,269 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1 1 0
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 538 389 299
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 45.47% 44.21%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 4.89% 3.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.06% 11.00%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 90.77% 85.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 4.60% 23.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 49.43% 66.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 55.17% 68.12%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 44.83% 43.48%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~Program and Virtual One Stop System (in collaboration with the Guam DOL), Self-Employment and Entrepreneuralship Conference (in collaboration with the UOG Guam Small Business Development Center (SBDC).

Off island Training: National Leadership Rehabilitation Institute (NRLI), Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), etc. Technical Assistance Training in vocational counseling, assessment, and job development strategies which were provided by the San Diego State University Interwork Institute.

Guam DVR has provided support for staff to attend a WIOA Workshop Training for Island VR Programs that was conducted by the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) in Hawaii from March 13-17, 2017. Training topics focused on the background on WIOA, purpose, important changes, youth services in WIOA, pre-employment transition services, required and authorized services, allowable costs, potentially eligible youth, challenges and opportunities experienced by VR programs, subminimum wage employment and Section 511 of the Rehab Act, supported employment, customized employment, integration of VR in the Workforce Development System, and the common performance measures. (Page 178) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The Guam Workforce Development Board (GWDB) remains engaged in workforce development for both employers and job seekers, to ensure that those who come through the American Job Center (AJC) have a better chance at improving their quality of life and standard of living. With today’s technology and a knowledge-based economy, implementing WIOA and a job-driven one-stop delivery system is a high priority to assist job seekers access employment opportunities and help employers find qualified workers, to remain a leader in today’s global competitive economy. T

he board created a more integrated, effective job-driven workforce investment system with the one-stop delivery system involving its partners, the power of HireGuam.com, the Virtual One Stop (VOS) case management system, aligned with key elements of job-driven employment and training programs. Initiatives of a job-driven vision include the following key elements:

1. Employer engagement
2. Leveraging of resources
3. Data-informed decision-making
4. Work-based training opportunities
5. Career pathways
6. Outcomes measures
7. Programs improvement
8. Elimination of barriers to employment (Page 10) Title I

The anticipated expansion and improvement of the Guam AJC infrastructure, which links all the WIOA tittles, provide the core support for aligning program and service delivery specific to disabilities plans of work and initiatives. Expanding of program services and improvement of platform systems enables and delivers the interest and intended VR goal areas. Leveraging and increased use of the Guam American Job Center and HIRE GUAM system

3.1.1 Supporting joint VR program strategies and actions for implementation
3.1.2 Providing easy access to information for all VR stakeholders, AJC Partners, and collaborators/cooperators.
3.1.3 VR Employment Initiative
3.1.3.1 Self Employment Support
3.1.3.2 Work Experience Opportunities
3.1.4 Supported Employment Initiatives
3.1.4.1 Equitable Access Initiative

SRCG3.2 VR Performance and Accountability Measures and Governance (SRC-VR G3-PA-5) (Page 163) Title I

Under the Goal 1- Service Delivery: The Guam Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) will provide high quality services to all eligible individuals to assist them in obtaining employment consistent with their career goals and provide support and guidance through each step.

Strategies to Improve VR service delivery include leveraging and increased use of the Guam American Job Center and HIRE GUAM system.
Enhance and improve the efficiency and effectives of the VR service delivery system.
Develop new CRPs and/or enhance delivery of CRP service.
Increase supported employment services to clients and increase CRP vendors service providers Guam is currently lacking local capacity for specialized positions, such as Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, Speech and Language Pathologist, Autism Specialist, etc. (Page 189) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~At the AJC, staff continually receive emphasis on career coaching, or guidance and planning for their clients. Participants are to receive clear Individual Employment Plans (IEP), tied to their interest, skill level and job opportunities. The IEPs map out the individuals' career plans, including related training and work experience opportunities, to help improve outcomes of participants. Partners are to work together aligning efforts, with the utility of the Virtual Onestop System (hireguam.com).

The skilled and technical sciences and the business, marketing, and management industries are projected to experience the most dynamic demand growth. The government and its partners plans to continue engaging research and systematic outreach to industry and business stakeholders to create a community-wide understanding of the need and importance specific career and educational requirements to improve productivity and employability of local and regional workers. This information will be used to review training programs and guide workers on specific career paths. (Page 18) Title IV

Guam DVR supports the recommended goals and priorities that are listed above which are consistent with the recommendations that were identified earlier and will continue to collaborate with the SRC in implementing these goals, priorities, and work areas. (Page 164) Title IV

State Entities: A. Guam Dept. of Education (DOE): Assignment and participation of DVR Staff in IEP/Transition Services meetings including membership in the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD) B. Guam Dept. of Administration (DOA) Human Resources Office: Development of SOPs for the compliance and implementation of the 2% law regarding the hiring of Individuals with significant disabilities within the Government of Guam C. Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center: Two way referrals for mental health counseling services and employment services D. Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) - Bureau of Management Support - Works Program Section: Development of a Memorandum of Agreement/Understanding to allow mutual clientele to develop work skills and work experiences (Page 165) Title IV

Educational brochures regarding the provision of Guam DVR’s Transition/Pre—employment Services will be developed and disseminated to students with disabilities, parents, school officials, and during community outreach events.

Guam DVR Counseling Staff are assigned to each of the Public Schools to serve as a liaison to Education Officials and to conduct VR Program Orientation presentations to Students, Teachers, and their Parents and participate in regularly scheduled IEP Meetings.

Guam DVR Staff will continue to serve as an active member of the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD). (Page 167) Title IV

VR Counselors are assigned to each of the local High Schools and collaboratively participates in providing input towards the development and implementation of the student’s IEP (Page 168) Title IV

It is mutually understood that Guam DOE/SpEd will be responsible for covering the financial costs of the educational and pre-employment related services identified in the IEP for the student until they graduate out of High School. In the best interest of the student, all known assistive technology device(s) provided for the student’s use by Guam DOE during the student’s senior year shall be considered as a possible AT need essential for employment outcome. Once the student is declared eligible for VR services and existing AT device is determined essential by the VRC for an employment outcome, Guam DVR shall purchase the AT device(s) so that when the student exits Guam DOE, the Guam DVR purchased AT device(s) can be retained and continually utilized by the student. (Page 168) Title IV

The VRCs will attend monthly meetings with the Transition Team to identify potential students for which their presence in the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) is determined beneficial.
Students not identified for a VRCs presence in the IEP may request their presence. VRCs will participate in the IEPs for the identified students. Guam DVR will accept referrals from parents, students, desiring VR services after their attendance at a DVR orientation presentation.

Guam DVR will schedule referred students for an appointment for an initial interview at which they may apply for VR Services.

Guam DVR will make a determination of eligibility for VR services within sixty days of the student/parent’s and VRC’s signing of the application during (or after) the initial interview.

Guam DVR will collaboratively develop with Guam DOE an Individualized Transition Plan (ITP) within the student’s IEP for each VR eligible student to identify transition services needed. (Page 169) Title IV

Guam DVR will be working collaboratively with Guam DOE/SpEd to address these concerns and to incorporate pre-employment transition services within the IEP and transition process.

Guam DVR will also be working collaboratively with the Guam DOL-AJC to develop apprenticeship and internship programs for transition age youth in the high schools. (Page 182) Title IV

If a student is in a transition plan and prior to transitioning to VR services, the team involved in the student’s IEP and transition plan will ensure that services that had been identified by Guam’s DOE/SpEd are provided to the fullest extent possible and to allow the student to have utmost informed choice in their employment goals based on their skills, abilities, and interest.
Guam DVR will provide support to students whose vocational goals require them to pursue an academic or vocational training program at postsecondary educational institutions such as the Guam Community College (GCC) or the University of Guam (UOG).

Workshop presentations will be conducted at the various high school and college campuses. (Page 189) Title IV

Guam DVR will work with Guam DOE/SpEd to identify individuals and youth with the most significant disabilities through the IEP and transition process
The quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services will be based on the Client’s informed choice and specific need for certain services such as Job Coaching, Personal Care Assistance, Mobility Orientation Training, etc.

Guam DVR will also conduct a thorough assessment of the need for AT and other services

2. THE TIMING OF TRANSITION TO EXTENDED SERVICES.

The timing of transition to extended services is handle on a case by case basis but generally would occur after the individual or youth with disabilities exceeds the 18 month period of receiving supported employment services Under the VRWA 600 Governance & Policies, the Guam VR and SRC will jointly review and update the existing policies as needed and will update the current case services manual. (Page 195) Title IV

An IEP is required for all customers accessing Training Services. The IEP will be used to inform training needs, as well as to verify whether or not customers have the skills to be successful in training prior to enrollment into the training program. (Page 220) Title IV

 

Career Pathways

~~Guam Community College (GCC) handles the Title II program,  and is collaborating with the Guam AJC team to register shared participants requiring education, in-class or work-based training and employment. Career counselors have participated in the Workforce Development Specialist training, ensuring a standardized approach with the Guam AJC team efforts (who received the same training). Counselors assist the adult education participants, and are being trained on the shared case management system of hireguam.com (VOS). This allows the counselors to work with case managers at the AJC to ensure that students’ career pathways match the individual employment plan that is identified on the shared case management system. In addition, GCC receives funding from the Guam Department of Labor to support apprenticeship training needs.

The Guam AJC is working with the college to further develop new and innovative pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs that are more responsive to industry. In addition, GCC provides the Guam Department of Education (GDOE) with secondary Career and Technical Education programs and the AJC has provided Classroom to Career activities (work experience opportunities for high school students). As such, together they are building clearer on-ramps to career pathways that match Guam’s workforce development needs. The Guam Workforce Development Board (GWDB) engages members of these organizations to achieve the combined state plan goals.

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation’s case management staff have also undergone the Workforce Development Specialist training ensuring a standardized approach with the efforts of the Guam AJC team who received the same training. Several meetings between the AJC and DVR case managers have been conducted to discuss streamlining of services, as well as to train on the usage of the VOS or common case management system. (Pages 31-32) Title I

The GWDB currently offers a suite of incentives to employers. These include On the Job Training (OJT) subsidies paid to registered and approved businesses to encourage work experience. Direct subsidies ofup to 50% of the cost of wages participant employed will be paid to the employer for a period of up to six months. The Preferred Worker Program (PWP) also offers subsidies to employers that hire veterans or the physically and mentally challenged. In addition, the GWDB is working with Guam’s congressional representative to obtain WOTC authorization for Guam.

Finally, Guam has one of the most successful apprenticeship programs in the region. Currently, more than 400 Guam workers across a broad spectrum of industries are employed as registered apprentices. The program pays employers up to 50% of the cost of participant wages, supervisor wages, and the cost of training to in the form of tax credits against Business Privilege Tax assessments. The training curriculum must be certified and approved prior to allowing the incentive. It is important to recognize that the Guam Department of Labor has received the extraordinary authority to grant apprenticeship program qualification which has dramatically decreased the amount of time required for businesses to obtain apprenticeship certification. (Page 51-52) Title I

112. Dr. Shirley “Sam” Mabini, Director - Guam Department of Labor (GDOL)
113. Mary Okada, Ph.D., President - Guam Community College (GCC)
114. Robert Underwood, Ph.D., President (Designee - Peter R. Barcinas, Program Leader) - University of Guam (UOG)
115. Benito Servino, Director - Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities (DISID)/Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR)
116. Jon Fernandez, Superintendent (Designee: Frank Leon Guerrero, Project Director - Career Pathway, Division of Curriculum & Instruction) - Guam Department of Education (GDOE) (Page 84) Title I

Describe how the State will establish and operate programs under section 225 of WIOA for corrections education and education of other institutionalized individuals, including how it will fund, in accordance with the requirements of title II, subtitle C, any of the following academic programs for:
o Adult education and literacy activities;
o Special education, as determined by the eligible agency;
o Secondary school credit;
o Integrated education and training;
o Career pathways;
o Concurrent enrollment;
o Peer tutoring; and
o Transition to re-entry initiatives and other post release services with the goal of reducing recidivism. Each eligible agency using funds provided under Programs for Corrections Education and Other Institutionalized Individuals to carry out a program for criminal offenders within a correctional institution must give priority to serving individuals who are likely to leave the correctional institution within 5 years of participation in the program. (Page 145) Title IV

Guam DVR has collaborated with our local Department of Agriculture and the Farm to Table NPO to provide training and placement services for our VR Clients. Guam DVR has provided technical assistance support to ensure that the local Dept. of Agriculture Office complies with the Programmatic Access requirements under the ADA and that physical barrier are eliminated. Renovations have recently been completed with two accessible parking stalls provided, lowered customer service counters, accessible route of travel, accessible toilet facilities and provision of levered door handles.

The Dept. of Agriculture has also provided OJT and hired a former transition student with autism that was certified by Guam DVR under the 2% GovGuam recruitment and hiring law
Guam DVR Staff has collaborated with the Guam Department of Education-Special Education Division to schedule and provide autism awareness training for all the employees and newly hired staff at the Guam Department of Agriculture. (Page 166) Title IV

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(3)). Describe the manner in which the designated State agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit VR service providers.
Outreach presentations have been conducted with various local NPOs that are members of the “Puyuta” Umbrella NPO organization on Guam to solicit their collaborative assistance in providing fee proposals for various VR related services to our Clients.

Cooperative agreements have been established with Faith-based organizations such as Oasis Empowerment Center for Job Coaching Services, with Veterans services providers such as WestCare Inc., FlameTree Freedom Center for OJT and Web Page Design Trainings.

Guam DVR has established agreements with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) to provide specific vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 170) Title IV

The Territory of Guam does not require licensure requirements for Rehabilitation Counselors; however, Guam DVR has adopted the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) academic requirements as the standard.

The Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) requires Guam DVR to establish personnel standards that assure personnel are adequately prepared and trained. Strategies in development by Guam DVR to ensure the training, recruiting and hiring of personnel include: Attendance at local job/career fairs; Formation of an in-house training and staff development team; Offering graduate internship opportunities; Supporting rehabilitation counseling as an employment goal for clients; Supporting staff to obtain the academic requirements by CRC; Providing CRC accredited training to maintain CRC recertification and to provide for general staff development by utilizing in-house and web based training whenever possible; Utilizing the training resources and support of the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE); Presentations to graduate level counseling students at local university; and the development of a career advancement system that integrates educational and credentialing required and measures knowledge and skills in hiring and promotional consideration. This system is consistent with the national certification of rehabilitation counselors. (Page 176) Title IV

 

Apprenticeship

Work-based learning opportunities offered by the AJC are marketed by both CTS and BSR staff. Staff pursues opportunities with employers and make appropriate referrals for work-ready participants. The GWDB coordinates work-based learning opportunities across partner agencies to ensure maximization of employer contact and avoid business-contact fatigue. The GWDB researches opportunities and develops relationships with local businesses and partners (including registered apprenticeship programs and training providers) to make these training models available to participants. In accordance with standards described under Career Services above, feedback mechanisms between Training Services and placement functions are in place to ensure that the training being provided is meeting the needs of business. (Page 58) Title I

Guam’s work-based training models include on-the-job training, transitional jobs, and customized training as part of its training strategy. These models ensure high quality training for both participants and employers. Guam’s priority with work-based training has been placed with our Employers who hire foreign workers to fill their skilled job vacancies. Guam has entered into agreements with the H-2B employers to train local workers utilizing the work-based training model. The participating businesses will provide on-the-job training for selected unskilled workers, with the goal of providing employment upon the successful completion of training. The Guam Workforce Development Board’s vision in preparing our workforce for suitable jobs is to align participant’s Individual Employment Plan (IEP) to the model or learning continuum overarching strategy of the Apprenticeship Program. The learning continuum will be the standard for all IEP’s developed by AJC staff. (Page 110) Title I

The Request for Proposal for Youth Services will include the partnership of Guam Community College which handles the Title II Adult Education and Family Literacy Act. This will ensure continuity of service of existing best practices, and introduce innovative approaches to deliver the 14 elements below.

218. Tutoring, study skills training, instruction, and evidence-based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent (including a recognized certificate of attendance or similar document for individuals with disabilities) or for a recognized postsecondary credential;

219. Alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate;

220. Paid and unpaid work experiences that have as a component academic and occupational education, which may include a. summer employment opportunities and other employment opportunities available throughout the school year; b. pre-apprenticeship programs; c. internships and job shadowing; and d. on-the-job training opportunities;

221. Occupational skill training, which may include priority consideration for training programs that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials that are aligned with in-demand industry sectors or occupations in the local area;

222. Education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster;

223. Leadership development opportunities, which may include community service and peer-centered activities encouraging responsibility and other positive social and civic behaviors, as appropriate;

224. Supportive services;

225. Adult mentoring for the period of participation and a subsequent period, for a total of not less than 12 months;

226. Follow-up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as appropriate;

227. Comprehensive guidance and counseling, which may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling and referral, as appropriate;

228. Financial literacy education;

229. Entrepreneurial skills training; (Page 114) Title I

There is a need to establish community rehabilitation programs on Guam due to the lack of existing programs and specialist such as Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, Speech and Language Pathologist, Autism Specialist, etc. It is very difficult to recruit these Specialist due to the competitive salaries that exist in the mainland and the high cost of living on Guam. The lack of training for local CRPs is a critical factor and Guam DVR is currently working with the Guam Community College and the University of Guam to develop new curriculum programs and certificates to help build the capacity of the local CRPs. To work with CRPS to establish CARF standards and to access and utilize the various Technical Assistance Centers The review process of the Guam State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) in compiling input during the various planning sessions hosted by the SRC Council and during the SRC’s quarter meetings. SRC cumulative discussions and recommendations include feedback gleaned by SRC Services standing committee. The committee and workgroup members continue to review reports and offer their input and endorsement. (Page 181) Title IV

Though the Community-based education program (CBE) provides opportunities for work exploration, employers still have a need to receive training on how to effectively communicate and provide reasonable accommodations or AT for individuals with disabilities. Guam DVR will be working collaboratively with Guam DOE/SpEd to address these concerns and to incorporate pre-employment transition services within the IEP and transition process. Guam DVR will also be working collaboratively with the Guam DOL-AJC to develop apprenticeship and internship programs for transition age youth in the high schools. (Page 182) Title IV

Internship and apprenticeship programs will be established for our VR Clients. Staff development opportunities will be afforded to our VR Staff. Public Transportation issues will be addressed. Formal linkage agreements will be established with core partners and DOE/SpEd. Self-Advocacy and Independent Living Trainings will be provided for VR Clients. Multi-Marketing and Outreach strategies will be developed to promote the availability of VR services. Identification and establishment of new Community Rehab Providers will be provided for VR Clients. Fostering relationships with Employer representatives from the Federal Government, Local government, Federal Contractors, and the Private Sector to recruit and hire VR Clients. (Page 188) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer/ Business

~~Off island Training: National Leadership Rehabilitation Institute (NRLI), Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), etc. Technical Assistance Training in vocational counseling, assessment, and job development strategies which were provided by the San Diego State University Interwork Institute.

Guam DVR has provided support for staff to attend a WIOA Workshop Training for Island VR Programs that was conducted by the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) in Hawaii from March 13-17, 2017. Training topics focused on the background on WIOA, purpose, important changes, youth services in WIOA, pre-employment transition services, required and authorized services, allowable costs, potentially eligible youth, challenges and opportunities experienced by VR programs, subminimum wage employment and Section 511 of the Rehab Act, supported employment, customized employment, integration of VR in the Workforce Development System, and the common performance measures. (Page 178) Title IV

Training Services are developed resulting from Business Services assessment of needs, including GWDB direction (ex: LMI analysis, business stakeholder feedback, etc.). Partners are aware of the Eligible Training Providers are vetted through the GWDB policies, informed by Business Services as they analyze and inform on employment and training needs. This ensures a better fit between clients’ interests and skills and business hiring needs. Individuals determined to be in need of training to obtain or retain employment that leads to economic self-sufficiency or wages comparable to or higher than wages from previous employment may be eligible to receive Training Services. The GWDB may also prioritize training connected to sectors and target populations as part of the local plan, and will create opportunities for remediation.

The workforce system is expected to increase investment in certifications that help people get jobs, and support the development and documentation of functional skills. AJC staff is expected to build these types of tools into the menus of available training services and activities.

An IEP is required for all customers accessing Training Services. The IEP will be used to inform training needs, as well as to verify whether or not customers have the skills to be successful in training prior to enrollment into the training program. (Page 220) Title IV

 

 

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

One of the major difficulties and challenges is the general inadequate resources available and material and service needs. Cost of conducting business on Guam can be a challenge. Upgrades are needed, to include: certified case managers/case management certification standards, improvements needed for ADA compliance (i.e. with the VOS), public transportation services, and access to social services (adult/child care, mental health, medical services). Improvements are also needed in cross-training on federal programs and case managements requirements, and in awareness and knowledge of the changes being created by WIOA. A stronger regional approach to workforce development is necessary. These changes will be difficulties in that adapting to change might be affected by transitioning and aging workforce development staff, the latter of which has no succession plan.

Other difficulties include a lack of a workforce development brand, lack of public awareness of the AJC program, lack of financial contributions by program partners, and inadequate interagency coordination. Any of these could be affected by Guam’s isolation and distance from the United States, or past restrictions or compliance to program rules/regs. Further difficulties include recent implementation of the VOS, thus needing increased awareness and knowledge of the VOS and its benefits, limited access at times for updated information sets necessary for workforce development planning (employment, economic-development information). Improvement is needed to share funding to achieve the strategy. (Page 32-33) Title I

Flexibility is a key concept shaping the vision statement. Employers/investors, existing and future members of the workforce, and service providers will all benefit from the service delivery system, but will have different definitions of “success.” While the WIOA service delivery system will be used as a standard reference for different programs, it also needs to be open enough to adapt to - and in some cases, predict - the changes in workforce demand, environment, and technology. The use of the term “access” serves as a reminder for the need for accessibility, which is one of the key cornerstones of the project.

For all target audiences to be able to get a hold of the resources they need, the AJC needs to be reachable not only through physical means (i.e. location and ADA compliance), but also through technological means. This involves an online system, website, and other potential avenues such as a smart phone app and other apps available through the use of technology and information systems. The WIOA service delivery system aims to facilitate a robust economy by fostering a skilled workforce which meets Guam’s changing industry needs. When crafting a vision statement for this system, these factors are to be taken into consideration. (Page 36) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities.

Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Guam is committed to ensuring both physical and programmatic accessibility to the One-Stop delivery system by ensuring compliance with WIOA Section 188 and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). (Page 99) Title I

The Flame Tree Freedom Center, a local NPO, has collaborated with NEXGEN and ADZTECH to submit a contractual bid proposal with the Government of Guam for the design/development, redesign and support of websites and mobile apps. Flame Tree has collaborated with Guam DVR to identify Clients that would be interested in participating in a Work Exploration, On-the-Job Training, and Job Placement Opportunity with their company as a result of this State Contracting Program which requires that the majority of the work be done by qualified individuals with disabilities.

Flame Tree Freedom Center has re-designed and updated the Guam DVR website to ensure compliance with Section 508 accessibility requirements. (Pages 166-167) Title IV

The oneGuam DVR’s Staff cited above has not yet taken the CRC exam, but plans on taking it during FY 2018-2019 due to family priorities and commits. One other Guam DVR staff who has earned a degree in Psychology is planning on taking a Counseling Course at the University of Guam. All Guam DVR Staff have been offered an opportunity to register and attend Quarterly course offerings through the Department of Administration (DOA) Training and Development Branch that includes: Customer Service, Systems of Care, Compliance of the 2% Hiring Law for people with Severe Disabilities, Sexual Harassment Awareness and Sensitivity, Employee Grievance and Adverse Action Procedures, Work Planning and Performance Evaluations, Stress Management Training, E.EO. Training, Time Management, and Procurement Training, to mention a few. (Page 175) Title IV

Guam DVR will assign and station VR Counselors to the American Job Center to provide information to prospective applicants that may be interested in applying and receiving VR services at the Center. As a Core Partner, Guam DVR will contribute towards the resource sharing cost at the AJC for the use of office space, internet access, utilities, utilization of vocational assessment software such as the Work Keys, and to access to the online “Hire Guam VOS” web resource for job seekers and employers. Guam DVR will work collaboratively with the Guam DOL/AJC to provide staff with disability awareness training and technical assistance to comply with the Section 188 equal access and reasonable accommodations requirements under WIOA. (Page 191) Title IV

Vets

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

An assessment of Guam’s workforce development, education and training activities was conducted, and findings are presented in the following sections. Core and partner program leaders have been meeting since the inception of WIOA, discussing the integration of services and innovative opportunities to better serve respective and shared customers (ex: AJC clients that access services from DVR or GCC’s Adult Ed and Family Literacy Programs).

Business needs for workforce development are priority with the GWDB. Through the GWDB Committee meetings held monthly, current education and training activities tied to workforce development are continuously reviewed with plans for upgrade or changes to meet new performance outcomes. An Eligible Training Providers List approved by the GWDB provides the array of training and education services available. This will be updated based on workforce development needs. (Page 29-30) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series).

Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes:

A. HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG

The AJC will utilize the employer pool from the Wagner-Peyser Program and look for untapped labor pools amongst the following Industries: Art, entertainment, and recreation, accommodation and food service; Educational services; Health care and social assistance; Retail Trade; and construction. The AJC is postured in the community as a pipeline for employer recruitment. (Page 204-205) Title IV

Veteran hiring will be promoted using OJT opportunities, new VEVRRA requirements for federal contractors, internships, and federal agency direct hiring authority. The AJC will become proactive in working with employers on behalf of veterans and the will designate employment services in Wagner-Peyser programs to promote veteran employment. This designee will work closely with the local community and business development entities to ensure that new employers become aware of the services provided by the AJC.

The AJC will advocate on behalf of veterans with business and industry and develop such programs as the newly expanded Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) that provides tax credits to employers who hire eligible veterans, including many of our target populations. The newly expanded WOTC is just one of the ways that the AJC intends to promote the hiring and retention of veterans. (Page 205) Title IV

Veteran training will be promoted through the following programs: apprenticeship training programs, partnerships with community colleges, VA programs like Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) and Veterans Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E), and all WIOA programs. (Page 205) Title IV

Mental Health

~~One of the major difficulties and challenges is the general inadequate resources available and material and service needs. Cost of conducting business on Guam can be a challenge. Upgrades are needed, to include: certified case managers/case management certification standards, improvements needed for ADA compliance (i.e. with the VOS), public transportation services, and access to social services (adult/child care, mental health, medical services). Improvements are also needed in cross-training on federal programs and case managements requirements, and in awareness and knowledge of the changes being created by WIOA. (Pages 32-33) Title I

GCC will continue to maintain partnerships with entities that provide services to eligible individuals. They include:
Agency for Human Resources Development | Catholic Social Service | Department of Corrections | Department of Education Head Start | Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities | Department of Labor | Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse | Department of Public Health and Human Services | Department of Youth Affairs | Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority | Guam Judicial Branch | Guam’s Mayors’ Council | Guam Public Library | University of Guam

These partnerships generally have clientele who desire to participate in adult education. GCC enters into Memoranda of Agreement (MOA) to provide instructors, curriculum, assessment, and instructional supplies and equipment to conduct classes at sites chosen by the partner. (Page 142) Title I

• State Entities:

A. Guam Dept. of Education (DOE): Assignment and participation of DVR Staff in IEP/Transition Services meetings including membership in the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD)

B. Guam Dept. of Administration (DOA) Human Resources Office: Development of SOPs for the compliance and implementation of the 2% law regarding the hiring of Individuals with significant disabilities within the Government of Guam

C. Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center: Two way referrals for mental health counseling services and employment services

D. Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) - Bureau of Management Support - Works Program Section: Development of a Memorandum of Agreement/Understanding to allow mutual clientele to develop work skills and work experiences

• Local Entities and NPOs:

A. Guam Trades Academy: Referrals for Vocational Training Services especially in the Construction Trades

B. Oasis Empowerment, Inc.: Referrals for Job Coaching/Employment Training Services

C. Flame Tree Freedom Center: Referrals for Job Exploration, Job Training and Job Placement Services

D. I-CAN and PARE Inc.: Referrals for Job Training and Placement in the Military installations under the Ability One Program

E. Catholic Social Services (CSS): Referrals for Community Habilitation Program Services and Emergency Housing Assistance

F. Discover Abilities: Referrals for Job Coaching Services

G. EDR Enterprise, Inc.: Referrals for Job Coaching, Work Exploration, On-The-Job Training, Job Placement

H. AmeriCorps Program: Disability Awareness and Emergency/Natural Disaster Preparedness Trainings

I. Veterans Affairs Office: Referrals for Training and Employment Services J. WestCare Inc.: Information & Referral for Housing Assistance and Counseling Services. (Page 165) Title IV

Guam DVR is collaborating with the Guam Dept. of Youth Affairs (DYA) to conduct Outreach and provide transition services to out of school youth. Guam DVR is currently an active member of the Youth Affairs Subcommittee under the Guam Workforce Development Board. Guam DVR also collaborates with representatives from our local juvenile justice system at the Guam Superior Court and child welfare agencies at the Dept. of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS). Guam DVR also participates in the Guam Systems of Care Council to support the development and implementation of Guam’s first Child Mental Health Initiative Cooperative Agreement known as “I’Famagu’ on—ta” (Our Children, ages 5-21) under the Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center (GBHWC) for children with behavioral disorders. (Page 166) Title IV

 Guam DVR works collaboratively with the Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center (GBHWC) and is represented in the Mental Health Planning Council. Client referrals for employment services are often received from staff at the GBHWC.

Referrals for Mental Health services are sent to GBHWC by DISID’s DVR and DSS program staff.

DISID participates as an active member of GBHWC’s I’Fuma Guonta (our children) Systems of Care Council to address issues affecting children with behavioral disorders.
DISID provides opportunities for GBHWC Clients to access and utilize the DSS Assistive Technology Computer lab to conduct job search activities and to learn how to use MS Word to develop and update their resumes.

Guam DVR staff have been participating as an official member of the Guam Mental Health Planning Council (GMHPC). The organization has been actively meeting and is focusing on updating their bylaws and establishing new committees. Guam DVR has encouraged the Chairperson of the GMHPC to apply as an official member of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) so that there is greater representation of individuals with mental health conditions within these two councils. (Page 173) Title IV

There is a great need for Autism Specialist on Guam to help with early identification, assessments, treatment, and education regarding the need for adequate supported employment services and extended services for this targeted population.

There is also a great need for Clinical Psychologist to assist Individuals with Mental Health conditions to cope with the stress and anxieties in the workplace. (Page 179) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020
Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Executive Order Number 2020-02 Relative to the Establishment of the Youth Advisory Council - 01/08/2020

“There is hereby established the Governor’s Youth Advisory Council, which shall be overseen by the Office of the Governor. The Council will make recommendations to the Governor on issues presented by the Governor to the youth of the island and of which they are uniquely positioned to address, including, but not limited to civic engagement, education and youth violence.

The Council shall consist of student body presidents, or their designees, from every high school, college, and university domiciled in Guam, all of whom shall be appointed by the Governor.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Bill No. 128-35 (LS) Public Law 35-39: An Act to Amend Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Supporting the Administration of Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program and Extending the Tax Credit Sunset Provision of Said Progra - 10/14/2019

“Therefore, it is the intent of I Liheslaturan Guahan to extend the tax credit sunset provision for the GRAP [Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program] for an additional period of five (5) years, and to further support the Department of Labor in administering this program by establishing a two and one-half percent (2.5%) administration fee for the participants availing themselves of the GRAP tax credits by amending Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Apprenticeship

Bill No. 136-35 (COR) Public Law 35-38: An Act to Amend § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Responsibly Raising the Minimum Wage - 10/14/2019

“Section 1. § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated is hereby amended to read:

§ 3105. Minimum Wage.

Every employer shall pay each person employed by him wages at a rate not less than Eight Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($8.25) per hour, effective January 1, 2015; not less than Eight Dollars Seventy-Five Cents ($8.75) per hour, effective March 1, 2020; and not less than Nine Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($9.25) per hour, effective March 1, 2021.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

VERONA RESORT AND SPA TO PAY $16,000 TO SETTLE EEOC PREGNANCY AND DISABILITY SUIT - 05/13/2019

~~“The EEOC filed suit (EEOC v. Polaris Guam LLC, dba Verona Resort and Spa, Case No. 1:17-CV-00090) after first attempting to reach a prelitigation settlement through its voluntary conciliation process.

According to the four-year consent decree, approved by the U.S. Court for Guam, Verona will provide $15,871.56, plus applicable interest, in damages to the former front desk clerk. Verona is required to designate an equal employment opportunity (EEO) monitor to ensure the company’s compliance with Title VII, ADA, and anti-retaliation policies and procedures; establish a complaint process and impartial investigations, along with a centralized tracking system for discrimination and retaliation complaints and provisions holding employees accountable; provide annual training on pregnancy and disability discrimination, as well as retaliation, especially for those involved at the management level to educate them on their rights and responsibilities with the goal of preventing and deterring any discriminatory practices in the future. The court will maintain jurisdiction over this case for the term of the consent decree.”

Systems
  • Other

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 04/23/2019

~~“Public Law 113-128, known as the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), was signed by President Obama on July 22, 2014 and is the first legislative reform to the public workforce system in 15 years. WIOA is designed to improve the coordination of employment and training services across federal agencies, strengthen collaboration with state and local partners, and provide Americans with increased access to training, education and other support to succeed in the job market and in their careers. The enactment of WIOA provides opportunity for reforms to ensure the American Job Center (AJC) system is job-driven – responding to the needs of business owners and preparing job seekers for occupations that are available now and in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Guam differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

 Guam became a territory in 1950 and its Medicaid program was established in 1975. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital currently servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the Guam Medicaid program. Guam’s Medicaid program does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan; the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $268,343,113 in Medicaid funding to Guam.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Guam, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Guam’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

Guam was awarded $24,436,001 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. Guam must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Labor Clinic for Businesses: Disability Law in the Workplace - 01/01/2019

~~“Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019Time: 9:00am to 12:00pmLocation: 710 West Marine Corps Drive, Suite 301 Bell Tower Plaza,Hagatna, Guam 96910

Workshop Content: Understanding American’s with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) purpose to protect people with disabilities from discrimination in employment. Learn what defines a “covered entity”, “reasonable accommodations”, “qualified employee with disability” and more. Discover resources available to assist employers with providing reasonable accommodations for job seekers and employees.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Guam Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 01/01/2019

~~“What is CAP?The Client Assistance Program (CAP) is an advocacy program established under Section 112 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Each State and Territory of the United States has CAP to help individuals with disabilities get the services they need from program funded under the Act.

What CAP can do:    Advise and inform individuals of all services and benefits available to them through programs authorized under the Act including vocational rehabilitation, independent living, supported employment and other similar rehabilitation services.    Assist and advocate for individuals in their relationships with programs providing services under the Act.    Inform individuals with disabilities of the services and benefits available to them under the Act and under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~~“Welcome to the Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities

DISID was established in 1997 under Guam P.L 24-16 to improve services for persons with disabilities by creating and establishing a designated agency (DISID) as the single point of entry agency that provides, promotes and ensures a full continuum of lifelong programs and services that allows for independence, productivity and inclusion of people with disabilities into the community. DISID does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, and age in the delivery of services to program participants and beneficiaries, employees, applicants and others”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Bill No. 128-35 (LS) Public Law 35-39: An Act to Amend Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Supporting the Administration of Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program and Extending the Tax Credit Sunset Provision of Said Progra - 10/14/2019

“Therefore, it is the intent of I Liheslaturan Guahan to extend the tax credit sunset provision for the GRAP [Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program] for an additional period of five (5) years, and to further support the Department of Labor in administering this program by establishing a two and one-half percent (2.5%) administration fee for the participants availing themselves of the GRAP tax credits by amending Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Apprenticeship

Bill No. 136-35 (COR) Public Law 35-38: An Act to Amend § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Responsibly Raising the Minimum Wage - 10/14/2019

“Section 1. § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated is hereby amended to read:

§ 3105. Minimum Wage.

Every employer shall pay each person employed by him wages at a rate not less than Eight Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($8.25) per hour, effective January 1, 2015; not less than Eight Dollars Seventy-Five Cents ($8.75) per hour, effective March 1, 2020; and not less than Nine Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($9.25) per hour, effective March 1, 2021.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order Number 2020-02 Relative to the Establishment of the Youth Advisory Council - 01/08/2020

“There is hereby established the Governor’s Youth Advisory Council, which shall be overseen by the Office of the Governor. The Council will make recommendations to the Governor on issues presented by the Governor to the youth of the island and of which they are uniquely positioned to address, including, but not limited to civic engagement, education and youth violence.

The Council shall consist of student body presidents, or their designees, from every high school, college, and university domiciled in Guam, all of whom shall be appointed by the Governor.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 04/23/2019

~~“Public Law 113-128, known as the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), was signed by President Obama on July 22, 2014 and is the first legislative reform to the public workforce system in 15 years. WIOA is designed to improve the coordination of employment and training services across federal agencies, strengthen collaboration with state and local partners, and provide Americans with increased access to training, education and other support to succeed in the job market and in their careers. The enactment of WIOA provides opportunity for reforms to ensure the American Job Center (AJC) system is job-driven – responding to the needs of business owners and preparing job seekers for occupations that are available now and in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Guam Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 01/01/2019

~~“What is CAP?The Client Assistance Program (CAP) is an advocacy program established under Section 112 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Each State and Territory of the United States has CAP to help individuals with disabilities get the services they need from program funded under the Act.

What CAP can do:    Advise and inform individuals of all services and benefits available to them through programs authorized under the Act including vocational rehabilitation, independent living, supported employment and other similar rehabilitation services.    Assist and advocate for individuals in their relationships with programs providing services under the Act.    Inform individuals with disabilities of the services and benefits available to them under the Act and under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~~“Welcome to the Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities

DISID was established in 1997 under Guam P.L 24-16 to improve services for persons with disabilities by creating and establishing a designated agency (DISID) as the single point of entry agency that provides, promotes and ensures a full continuum of lifelong programs and services that allows for independence, productivity and inclusion of people with disabilities into the community. DISID does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, and age in the delivery of services to program participants and beneficiaries, employees, applicants and others”

Systems
  • Other

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR): Provides vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services to eligible individuals with disabilities and serves as the designated state unit to administer the State Plan for Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Independent Living Services and Independent Living for the Older Blind. DVR provides administrative support and works collaboratively with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the State Independent Living Council (SILC) in implementing these State Plans.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists are onsite to provide intensive services to veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE).Eligibility

Listed are identified as SBE’s for eligibility for DVOP services:

    – Service- connected disability creating a barrier to employment (30% or greater)    – *Homeless Veterans and those who are at risk of becoming homeless    –  Recently separated service member who has been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months    – An offender who is currently incarcerated or has been released from  incarceration    – No High School diploma or GED    – Low Income level (less than $13,200/Year)    – 18 – 24 years of age    –  ** Transitioning Service members    –  Wounded Warrior in military treatment centers and their family caregivers”

Systems
  • Other

Hire Guam - 01/01/2019

~~This page has a collection of links to services for job seekers, employers, and  youth, and Vocational Rehabilitation.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

American Job Center Guam - 01/01/2019

~~“With nearly 2,500 delivery points nationwide, American Job Centers, also known as One-Stop Career Centers, provide a vast network to address the human resource and employment needs of both jobseekers and business in every community.  The Employment and Training Administration provides funding through State Workforce Boards for American Job Centers, which are operated by community colleges, community-based organizations, and government agencies. The Guam American Job Center is located in Hagatna.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Guam for 2017-2019 - 04/10/2017

~~“The Guam SILC (Statewide Independent Living Council) will promote the availability of the CIL application for non-profit organizations on Guam and will support the application of a qualified and established local non-profit organizations(s) to apply for the Centers for Independent Living Grant upon announcement of grant funding availability by ACL (Administration for Community Living)”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Labor Clinic for Businesses: Disability Law in the Workplace - 01/01/2019

~~“Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019Time: 9:00am to 12:00pmLocation: 710 West Marine Corps Drive, Suite 301 Bell Tower Plaza,Hagatna, Guam 96910

Workshop Content: Understanding American’s with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) purpose to protect people with disabilities from discrimination in employment. Learn what defines a “covered entity”, “reasonable accommodations”, “qualified employee with disability” and more. Discover resources available to assist employers with providing reasonable accommodations for job seekers and employees.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

VERONA RESORT AND SPA TO PAY $16,000 TO SETTLE EEOC PREGNANCY AND DISABILITY SUIT - 05/13/2019

~~“The EEOC filed suit (EEOC v. Polaris Guam LLC, dba Verona Resort and Spa, Case No. 1:17-CV-00090) after first attempting to reach a prelitigation settlement through its voluntary conciliation process.

According to the four-year consent decree, approved by the U.S. Court for Guam, Verona will provide $15,871.56, plus applicable interest, in damages to the former front desk clerk. Verona is required to designate an equal employment opportunity (EEO) monitor to ensure the company’s compliance with Title VII, ADA, and anti-retaliation policies and procedures; establish a complaint process and impartial investigations, along with a centralized tracking system for discrimination and retaliation complaints and provisions holding employees accountable; provide annual training on pregnancy and disability discrimination, as well as retaliation, especially for those involved at the management level to educate them on their rights and responsibilities with the goal of preventing and deterring any discriminatory practices in the future. The court will maintain jurisdiction over this case for the term of the consent decree.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Guam differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

 Guam became a territory in 1950 and its Medicaid program was established in 1975. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital currently servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the Guam Medicaid program. Guam’s Medicaid program does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan; the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $268,343,113 in Medicaid funding to Guam.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Guam, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Guam’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

Guam was awarded $24,436,001 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. Guam must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

"Where America's Day Begins": Each day begins with new job opportunities for people with disabilities.

2018 State Population.
0.9%
Change from
2017 to 2018
165,768
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
6,809

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 162,951 164,281 165,768
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 1,624 1,645

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 614 403
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,222 1,093
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 1,596 1,093
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.50% 36.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.90% N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.50% N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 98.80% N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 12 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 45 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,274 N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2016
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 143
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. N/A

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
32
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 7 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 6 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 12 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 6 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,269 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1 1 0
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 538 389 299
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 45.47% 44.21%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 4.89% 3.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.06% 11.00%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 90.77% 85.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 4.60% 23.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 49.43% 66.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 55.17% 68.12%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 44.83% 43.48%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~Program and Virtual One Stop System (in collaboration with the Guam DOL), Self-Employment and Entrepreneuralship Conference (in collaboration with the UOG Guam Small Business Development Center (SBDC).

Off island Training: National Leadership Rehabilitation Institute (NRLI), Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), etc. Technical Assistance Training in vocational counseling, assessment, and job development strategies which were provided by the San Diego State University Interwork Institute.

Guam DVR has provided support for staff to attend a WIOA Workshop Training for Island VR Programs that was conducted by the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) in Hawaii from March 13-17, 2017. Training topics focused on the background on WIOA, purpose, important changes, youth services in WIOA, pre-employment transition services, required and authorized services, allowable costs, potentially eligible youth, challenges and opportunities experienced by VR programs, subminimum wage employment and Section 511 of the Rehab Act, supported employment, customized employment, integration of VR in the Workforce Development System, and the common performance measures. (Page 178) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The Guam Workforce Development Board (GWDB) remains engaged in workforce development for both employers and job seekers, to ensure that those who come through the American Job Center (AJC) have a better chance at improving their quality of life and standard of living. With today’s technology and a knowledge-based economy, implementing WIOA and a job-driven one-stop delivery system is a high priority to assist job seekers access employment opportunities and help employers find qualified workers, to remain a leader in today’s global competitive economy. T

he board created a more integrated, effective job-driven workforce investment system with the one-stop delivery system involving its partners, the power of HireGuam.com, the Virtual One Stop (VOS) case management system, aligned with key elements of job-driven employment and training programs. Initiatives of a job-driven vision include the following key elements:

1. Employer engagement
2. Leveraging of resources
3. Data-informed decision-making
4. Work-based training opportunities
5. Career pathways
6. Outcomes measures
7. Programs improvement
8. Elimination of barriers to employment (Page 10) Title I

The anticipated expansion and improvement of the Guam AJC infrastructure, which links all the WIOA tittles, provide the core support for aligning program and service delivery specific to disabilities plans of work and initiatives. Expanding of program services and improvement of platform systems enables and delivers the interest and intended VR goal areas. Leveraging and increased use of the Guam American Job Center and HIRE GUAM system

3.1.1 Supporting joint VR program strategies and actions for implementation
3.1.2 Providing easy access to information for all VR stakeholders, AJC Partners, and collaborators/cooperators.
3.1.3 VR Employment Initiative
3.1.3.1 Self Employment Support
3.1.3.2 Work Experience Opportunities
3.1.4 Supported Employment Initiatives
3.1.4.1 Equitable Access Initiative

SRCG3.2 VR Performance and Accountability Measures and Governance (SRC-VR G3-PA-5) (Page 163) Title I

Under the Goal 1- Service Delivery: The Guam Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) will provide high quality services to all eligible individuals to assist them in obtaining employment consistent with their career goals and provide support and guidance through each step.

Strategies to Improve VR service delivery include leveraging and increased use of the Guam American Job Center and HIRE GUAM system.
Enhance and improve the efficiency and effectives of the VR service delivery system.
Develop new CRPs and/or enhance delivery of CRP service.
Increase supported employment services to clients and increase CRP vendors service providers Guam is currently lacking local capacity for specialized positions, such as Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, Speech and Language Pathologist, Autism Specialist, etc. (Page 189) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~At the AJC, staff continually receive emphasis on career coaching, or guidance and planning for their clients. Participants are to receive clear Individual Employment Plans (IEP), tied to their interest, skill level and job opportunities. The IEPs map out the individuals' career plans, including related training and work experience opportunities, to help improve outcomes of participants. Partners are to work together aligning efforts, with the utility of the Virtual Onestop System (hireguam.com).

The skilled and technical sciences and the business, marketing, and management industries are projected to experience the most dynamic demand growth. The government and its partners plans to continue engaging research and systematic outreach to industry and business stakeholders to create a community-wide understanding of the need and importance specific career and educational requirements to improve productivity and employability of local and regional workers. This information will be used to review training programs and guide workers on specific career paths. (Page 18) Title IV

Guam DVR supports the recommended goals and priorities that are listed above which are consistent with the recommendations that were identified earlier and will continue to collaborate with the SRC in implementing these goals, priorities, and work areas. (Page 164) Title IV

State Entities: A. Guam Dept. of Education (DOE): Assignment and participation of DVR Staff in IEP/Transition Services meetings including membership in the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD) B. Guam Dept. of Administration (DOA) Human Resources Office: Development of SOPs for the compliance and implementation of the 2% law regarding the hiring of Individuals with significant disabilities within the Government of Guam C. Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center: Two way referrals for mental health counseling services and employment services D. Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) - Bureau of Management Support - Works Program Section: Development of a Memorandum of Agreement/Understanding to allow mutual clientele to develop work skills and work experiences (Page 165) Title IV

Educational brochures regarding the provision of Guam DVR’s Transition/Pre—employment Services will be developed and disseminated to students with disabilities, parents, school officials, and during community outreach events.

Guam DVR Counseling Staff are assigned to each of the Public Schools to serve as a liaison to Education Officials and to conduct VR Program Orientation presentations to Students, Teachers, and their Parents and participate in regularly scheduled IEP Meetings.

Guam DVR Staff will continue to serve as an active member of the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD). (Page 167) Title IV

VR Counselors are assigned to each of the local High Schools and collaboratively participates in providing input towards the development and implementation of the student’s IEP (Page 168) Title IV

It is mutually understood that Guam DOE/SpEd will be responsible for covering the financial costs of the educational and pre-employment related services identified in the IEP for the student until they graduate out of High School. In the best interest of the student, all known assistive technology device(s) provided for the student’s use by Guam DOE during the student’s senior year shall be considered as a possible AT need essential for employment outcome. Once the student is declared eligible for VR services and existing AT device is determined essential by the VRC for an employment outcome, Guam DVR shall purchase the AT device(s) so that when the student exits Guam DOE, the Guam DVR purchased AT device(s) can be retained and continually utilized by the student. (Page 168) Title IV

The VRCs will attend monthly meetings with the Transition Team to identify potential students for which their presence in the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) is determined beneficial.
Students not identified for a VRCs presence in the IEP may request their presence. VRCs will participate in the IEPs for the identified students. Guam DVR will accept referrals from parents, students, desiring VR services after their attendance at a DVR orientation presentation.

Guam DVR will schedule referred students for an appointment for an initial interview at which they may apply for VR Services.

Guam DVR will make a determination of eligibility for VR services within sixty days of the student/parent’s and VRC’s signing of the application during (or after) the initial interview.

Guam DVR will collaboratively develop with Guam DOE an Individualized Transition Plan (ITP) within the student’s IEP for each VR eligible student to identify transition services needed. (Page 169) Title IV

Guam DVR will be working collaboratively with Guam DOE/SpEd to address these concerns and to incorporate pre-employment transition services within the IEP and transition process.

Guam DVR will also be working collaboratively with the Guam DOL-AJC to develop apprenticeship and internship programs for transition age youth in the high schools. (Page 182) Title IV

If a student is in a transition plan and prior to transitioning to VR services, the team involved in the student’s IEP and transition plan will ensure that services that had been identified by Guam’s DOE/SpEd are provided to the fullest extent possible and to allow the student to have utmost informed choice in their employment goals based on their skills, abilities, and interest.
Guam DVR will provide support to students whose vocational goals require them to pursue an academic or vocational training program at postsecondary educational institutions such as the Guam Community College (GCC) or the University of Guam (UOG).

Workshop presentations will be conducted at the various high school and college campuses. (Page 189) Title IV

Guam DVR will work with Guam DOE/SpEd to identify individuals and youth with the most significant disabilities through the IEP and transition process
The quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services will be based on the Client’s informed choice and specific need for certain services such as Job Coaching, Personal Care Assistance, Mobility Orientation Training, etc.

Guam DVR will also conduct a thorough assessment of the need for AT and other services

2. THE TIMING OF TRANSITION TO EXTENDED SERVICES.

The timing of transition to extended services is handle on a case by case basis but generally would occur after the individual or youth with disabilities exceeds the 18 month period of receiving supported employment services Under the VRWA 600 Governance & Policies, the Guam VR and SRC will jointly review and update the existing policies as needed and will update the current case services manual. (Page 195) Title IV

An IEP is required for all customers accessing Training Services. The IEP will be used to inform training needs, as well as to verify whether or not customers have the skills to be successful in training prior to enrollment into the training program. (Page 220) Title IV

 

Career Pathways

~~Guam Community College (GCC) handles the Title II program,  and is collaborating with the Guam AJC team to register shared participants requiring education, in-class or work-based training and employment. Career counselors have participated in the Workforce Development Specialist training, ensuring a standardized approach with the Guam AJC team efforts (who received the same training). Counselors assist the adult education participants, and are being trained on the shared case management system of hireguam.com (VOS). This allows the counselors to work with case managers at the AJC to ensure that students’ career pathways match the individual employment plan that is identified on the shared case management system. In addition, GCC receives funding from the Guam Department of Labor to support apprenticeship training needs.

The Guam AJC is working with the college to further develop new and innovative pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs that are more responsive to industry. In addition, GCC provides the Guam Department of Education (GDOE) with secondary Career and Technical Education programs and the AJC has provided Classroom to Career activities (work experience opportunities for high school students). As such, together they are building clearer on-ramps to career pathways that match Guam’s workforce development needs. The Guam Workforce Development Board (GWDB) engages members of these organizations to achieve the combined state plan goals.

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation’s case management staff have also undergone the Workforce Development Specialist training ensuring a standardized approach with the efforts of the Guam AJC team who received the same training. Several meetings between the AJC and DVR case managers have been conducted to discuss streamlining of services, as well as to train on the usage of the VOS or common case management system. (Pages 31-32) Title I

The GWDB currently offers a suite of incentives to employers. These include On the Job Training (OJT) subsidies paid to registered and approved businesses to encourage work experience. Direct subsidies ofup to 50% of the cost of wages participant employed will be paid to the employer for a period of up to six months. The Preferred Worker Program (PWP) also offers subsidies to employers that hire veterans or the physically and mentally challenged. In addition, the GWDB is working with Guam’s congressional representative to obtain WOTC authorization for Guam.

Finally, Guam has one of the most successful apprenticeship programs in the region. Currently, more than 400 Guam workers across a broad spectrum of industries are employed as registered apprentices. The program pays employers up to 50% of the cost of participant wages, supervisor wages, and the cost of training to in the form of tax credits against Business Privilege Tax assessments. The training curriculum must be certified and approved prior to allowing the incentive. It is important to recognize that the Guam Department of Labor has received the extraordinary authority to grant apprenticeship program qualification which has dramatically decreased the amount of time required for businesses to obtain apprenticeship certification. (Page 51-52) Title I

112. Dr. Shirley “Sam” Mabini, Director - Guam Department of Labor (GDOL)
113. Mary Okada, Ph.D., President - Guam Community College (GCC)
114. Robert Underwood, Ph.D., President (Designee - Peter R. Barcinas, Program Leader) - University of Guam (UOG)
115. Benito Servino, Director - Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities (DISID)/Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR)
116. Jon Fernandez, Superintendent (Designee: Frank Leon Guerrero, Project Director - Career Pathway, Division of Curriculum & Instruction) - Guam Department of Education (GDOE) (Page 84) Title I

Describe how the State will establish and operate programs under section 225 of WIOA for corrections education and education of other institutionalized individuals, including how it will fund, in accordance with the requirements of title II, subtitle C, any of the following academic programs for:
o Adult education and literacy activities;
o Special education, as determined by the eligible agency;
o Secondary school credit;
o Integrated education and training;
o Career pathways;
o Concurrent enrollment;
o Peer tutoring; and
o Transition to re-entry initiatives and other post release services with the goal of reducing recidivism. Each eligible agency using funds provided under Programs for Corrections Education and Other Institutionalized Individuals to carry out a program for criminal offenders within a correctional institution must give priority to serving individuals who are likely to leave the correctional institution within 5 years of participation in the program. (Page 145) Title IV

Guam DVR has collaborated with our local Department of Agriculture and the Farm to Table NPO to provide training and placement services for our VR Clients. Guam DVR has provided technical assistance support to ensure that the local Dept. of Agriculture Office complies with the Programmatic Access requirements under the ADA and that physical barrier are eliminated. Renovations have recently been completed with two accessible parking stalls provided, lowered customer service counters, accessible route of travel, accessible toilet facilities and provision of levered door handles.

The Dept. of Agriculture has also provided OJT and hired a former transition student with autism that was certified by Guam DVR under the 2% GovGuam recruitment and hiring law
Guam DVR Staff has collaborated with the Guam Department of Education-Special Education Division to schedule and provide autism awareness training for all the employees and newly hired staff at the Guam Department of Agriculture. (Page 166) Title IV

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(3)). Describe the manner in which the designated State agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit VR service providers.
Outreach presentations have been conducted with various local NPOs that are members of the “Puyuta” Umbrella NPO organization on Guam to solicit their collaborative assistance in providing fee proposals for various VR related services to our Clients.

Cooperative agreements have been established with Faith-based organizations such as Oasis Empowerment Center for Job Coaching Services, with Veterans services providers such as WestCare Inc., FlameTree Freedom Center for OJT and Web Page Design Trainings.

Guam DVR has established agreements with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) to provide specific vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 170) Title IV

The Territory of Guam does not require licensure requirements for Rehabilitation Counselors; however, Guam DVR has adopted the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) academic requirements as the standard.

The Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) requires Guam DVR to establish personnel standards that assure personnel are adequately prepared and trained. Strategies in development by Guam DVR to ensure the training, recruiting and hiring of personnel include: Attendance at local job/career fairs; Formation of an in-house training and staff development team; Offering graduate internship opportunities; Supporting rehabilitation counseling as an employment goal for clients; Supporting staff to obtain the academic requirements by CRC; Providing CRC accredited training to maintain CRC recertification and to provide for general staff development by utilizing in-house and web based training whenever possible; Utilizing the training resources and support of the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE); Presentations to graduate level counseling students at local university; and the development of a career advancement system that integrates educational and credentialing required and measures knowledge and skills in hiring and promotional consideration. This system is consistent with the national certification of rehabilitation counselors. (Page 176) Title IV

 

Apprenticeship

Work-based learning opportunities offered by the AJC are marketed by both CTS and BSR staff. Staff pursues opportunities with employers and make appropriate referrals for work-ready participants. The GWDB coordinates work-based learning opportunities across partner agencies to ensure maximization of employer contact and avoid business-contact fatigue. The GWDB researches opportunities and develops relationships with local businesses and partners (including registered apprenticeship programs and training providers) to make these training models available to participants. In accordance with standards described under Career Services above, feedback mechanisms between Training Services and placement functions are in place to ensure that the training being provided is meeting the needs of business. (Page 58) Title I

Guam’s work-based training models include on-the-job training, transitional jobs, and customized training as part of its training strategy. These models ensure high quality training for both participants and employers. Guam’s priority with work-based training has been placed with our Employers who hire foreign workers to fill their skilled job vacancies. Guam has entered into agreements with the H-2B employers to train local workers utilizing the work-based training model. The participating businesses will provide on-the-job training for selected unskilled workers, with the goal of providing employment upon the successful completion of training. The Guam Workforce Development Board’s vision in preparing our workforce for suitable jobs is to align participant’s Individual Employment Plan (IEP) to the model or learning continuum overarching strategy of the Apprenticeship Program. The learning continuum will be the standard for all IEP’s developed by AJC staff. (Page 110) Title I

The Request for Proposal for Youth Services will include the partnership of Guam Community College which handles the Title II Adult Education and Family Literacy Act. This will ensure continuity of service of existing best practices, and introduce innovative approaches to deliver the 14 elements below.

218. Tutoring, study skills training, instruction, and evidence-based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent (including a recognized certificate of attendance or similar document for individuals with disabilities) or for a recognized postsecondary credential;

219. Alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate;

220. Paid and unpaid work experiences that have as a component academic and occupational education, which may include a. summer employment opportunities and other employment opportunities available throughout the school year; b. pre-apprenticeship programs; c. internships and job shadowing; and d. on-the-job training opportunities;

221. Occupational skill training, which may include priority consideration for training programs that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials that are aligned with in-demand industry sectors or occupations in the local area;

222. Education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster;

223. Leadership development opportunities, which may include community service and peer-centered activities encouraging responsibility and other positive social and civic behaviors, as appropriate;

224. Supportive services;

225. Adult mentoring for the period of participation and a subsequent period, for a total of not less than 12 months;

226. Follow-up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as appropriate;

227. Comprehensive guidance and counseling, which may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling and referral, as appropriate;

228. Financial literacy education;

229. Entrepreneurial skills training; (Page 114) Title I

There is a need to establish community rehabilitation programs on Guam due to the lack of existing programs and specialist such as Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, Speech and Language Pathologist, Autism Specialist, etc. It is very difficult to recruit these Specialist due to the competitive salaries that exist in the mainland and the high cost of living on Guam. The lack of training for local CRPs is a critical factor and Guam DVR is currently working with the Guam Community College and the University of Guam to develop new curriculum programs and certificates to help build the capacity of the local CRPs. To work with CRPS to establish CARF standards and to access and utilize the various Technical Assistance Centers The review process of the Guam State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) in compiling input during the various planning sessions hosted by the SRC Council and during the SRC’s quarter meetings. SRC cumulative discussions and recommendations include feedback gleaned by SRC Services standing committee. The committee and workgroup members continue to review reports and offer their input and endorsement. (Page 181) Title IV

Though the Community-based education program (CBE) provides opportunities for work exploration, employers still have a need to receive training on how to effectively communicate and provide reasonable accommodations or AT for individuals with disabilities. Guam DVR will be working collaboratively with Guam DOE/SpEd to address these concerns and to incorporate pre-employment transition services within the IEP and transition process. Guam DVR will also be working collaboratively with the Guam DOL-AJC to develop apprenticeship and internship programs for transition age youth in the high schools. (Page 182) Title IV

Internship and apprenticeship programs will be established for our VR Clients. Staff development opportunities will be afforded to our VR Staff. Public Transportation issues will be addressed. Formal linkage agreements will be established with core partners and DOE/SpEd. Self-Advocacy and Independent Living Trainings will be provided for VR Clients. Multi-Marketing and Outreach strategies will be developed to promote the availability of VR services. Identification and establishment of new Community Rehab Providers will be provided for VR Clients. Fostering relationships with Employer representatives from the Federal Government, Local government, Federal Contractors, and the Private Sector to recruit and hire VR Clients. (Page 188) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer/ Business

~~Off island Training: National Leadership Rehabilitation Institute (NRLI), Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), etc. Technical Assistance Training in vocational counseling, assessment, and job development strategies which were provided by the San Diego State University Interwork Institute.

Guam DVR has provided support for staff to attend a WIOA Workshop Training for Island VR Programs that was conducted by the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) in Hawaii from March 13-17, 2017. Training topics focused on the background on WIOA, purpose, important changes, youth services in WIOA, pre-employment transition services, required and authorized services, allowable costs, potentially eligible youth, challenges and opportunities experienced by VR programs, subminimum wage employment and Section 511 of the Rehab Act, supported employment, customized employment, integration of VR in the Workforce Development System, and the common performance measures. (Page 178) Title IV

Training Services are developed resulting from Business Services assessment of needs, including GWDB direction (ex: LMI analysis, business stakeholder feedback, etc.). Partners are aware of the Eligible Training Providers are vetted through the GWDB policies, informed by Business Services as they analyze and inform on employment and training needs. This ensures a better fit between clients’ interests and skills and business hiring needs. Individuals determined to be in need of training to obtain or retain employment that leads to economic self-sufficiency or wages comparable to or higher than wages from previous employment may be eligible to receive Training Services. The GWDB may also prioritize training connected to sectors and target populations as part of the local plan, and will create opportunities for remediation.

The workforce system is expected to increase investment in certifications that help people get jobs, and support the development and documentation of functional skills. AJC staff is expected to build these types of tools into the menus of available training services and activities.

An IEP is required for all customers accessing Training Services. The IEP will be used to inform training needs, as well as to verify whether or not customers have the skills to be successful in training prior to enrollment into the training program. (Page 220) Title IV

 

 

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

One of the major difficulties and challenges is the general inadequate resources available and material and service needs. Cost of conducting business on Guam can be a challenge. Upgrades are needed, to include: certified case managers/case management certification standards, improvements needed for ADA compliance (i.e. with the VOS), public transportation services, and access to social services (adult/child care, mental health, medical services). Improvements are also needed in cross-training on federal programs and case managements requirements, and in awareness and knowledge of the changes being created by WIOA. A stronger regional approach to workforce development is necessary. These changes will be difficulties in that adapting to change might be affected by transitioning and aging workforce development staff, the latter of which has no succession plan.

Other difficulties include a lack of a workforce development brand, lack of public awareness of the AJC program, lack of financial contributions by program partners, and inadequate interagency coordination. Any of these could be affected by Guam’s isolation and distance from the United States, or past restrictions or compliance to program rules/regs. Further difficulties include recent implementation of the VOS, thus needing increased awareness and knowledge of the VOS and its benefits, limited access at times for updated information sets necessary for workforce development planning (employment, economic-development information). Improvement is needed to share funding to achieve the strategy. (Page 32-33) Title I

Flexibility is a key concept shaping the vision statement. Employers/investors, existing and future members of the workforce, and service providers will all benefit from the service delivery system, but will have different definitions of “success.” While the WIOA service delivery system will be used as a standard reference for different programs, it also needs to be open enough to adapt to - and in some cases, predict - the changes in workforce demand, environment, and technology. The use of the term “access” serves as a reminder for the need for accessibility, which is one of the key cornerstones of the project.

For all target audiences to be able to get a hold of the resources they need, the AJC needs to be reachable not only through physical means (i.e. location and ADA compliance), but also through technological means. This involves an online system, website, and other potential avenues such as a smart phone app and other apps available through the use of technology and information systems. The WIOA service delivery system aims to facilitate a robust economy by fostering a skilled workforce which meets Guam’s changing industry needs. When crafting a vision statement for this system, these factors are to be taken into consideration. (Page 36) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities.

Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Guam is committed to ensuring both physical and programmatic accessibility to the One-Stop delivery system by ensuring compliance with WIOA Section 188 and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). (Page 99) Title I

The Flame Tree Freedom Center, a local NPO, has collaborated with NEXGEN and ADZTECH to submit a contractual bid proposal with the Government of Guam for the design/development, redesign and support of websites and mobile apps. Flame Tree has collaborated with Guam DVR to identify Clients that would be interested in participating in a Work Exploration, On-the-Job Training, and Job Placement Opportunity with their company as a result of this State Contracting Program which requires that the majority of the work be done by qualified individuals with disabilities.

Flame Tree Freedom Center has re-designed and updated the Guam DVR website to ensure compliance with Section 508 accessibility requirements. (Pages 166-167) Title IV

The oneGuam DVR’s Staff cited above has not yet taken the CRC exam, but plans on taking it during FY 2018-2019 due to family priorities and commits. One other Guam DVR staff who has earned a degree in Psychology is planning on taking a Counseling Course at the University of Guam. All Guam DVR Staff have been offered an opportunity to register and attend Quarterly course offerings through the Department of Administration (DOA) Training and Development Branch that includes: Customer Service, Systems of Care, Compliance of the 2% Hiring Law for people with Severe Disabilities, Sexual Harassment Awareness and Sensitivity, Employee Grievance and Adverse Action Procedures, Work Planning and Performance Evaluations, Stress Management Training, E.EO. Training, Time Management, and Procurement Training, to mention a few. (Page 175) Title IV

Guam DVR will assign and station VR Counselors to the American Job Center to provide information to prospective applicants that may be interested in applying and receiving VR services at the Center. As a Core Partner, Guam DVR will contribute towards the resource sharing cost at the AJC for the use of office space, internet access, utilities, utilization of vocational assessment software such as the Work Keys, and to access to the online “Hire Guam VOS” web resource for job seekers and employers. Guam DVR will work collaboratively with the Guam DOL/AJC to provide staff with disability awareness training and technical assistance to comply with the Section 188 equal access and reasonable accommodations requirements under WIOA. (Page 191) Title IV

Vets

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

An assessment of Guam’s workforce development, education and training activities was conducted, and findings are presented in the following sections. Core and partner program leaders have been meeting since the inception of WIOA, discussing the integration of services and innovative opportunities to better serve respective and shared customers (ex: AJC clients that access services from DVR or GCC’s Adult Ed and Family Literacy Programs).

Business needs for workforce development are priority with the GWDB. Through the GWDB Committee meetings held monthly, current education and training activities tied to workforce development are continuously reviewed with plans for upgrade or changes to meet new performance outcomes. An Eligible Training Providers List approved by the GWDB provides the array of training and education services available. This will be updated based on workforce development needs. (Page 29-30) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series).

Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes:

A. HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG

The AJC will utilize the employer pool from the Wagner-Peyser Program and look for untapped labor pools amongst the following Industries: Art, entertainment, and recreation, accommodation and food service; Educational services; Health care and social assistance; Retail Trade; and construction. The AJC is postured in the community as a pipeline for employer recruitment. (Page 204-205) Title IV

Veteran hiring will be promoted using OJT opportunities, new VEVRRA requirements for federal contractors, internships, and federal agency direct hiring authority. The AJC will become proactive in working with employers on behalf of veterans and the will designate employment services in Wagner-Peyser programs to promote veteran employment. This designee will work closely with the local community and business development entities to ensure that new employers become aware of the services provided by the AJC.

The AJC will advocate on behalf of veterans with business and industry and develop such programs as the newly expanded Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) that provides tax credits to employers who hire eligible veterans, including many of our target populations. The newly expanded WOTC is just one of the ways that the AJC intends to promote the hiring and retention of veterans. (Page 205) Title IV

Veteran training will be promoted through the following programs: apprenticeship training programs, partnerships with community colleges, VA programs like Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) and Veterans Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E), and all WIOA programs. (Page 205) Title IV

Mental Health

~~One of the major difficulties and challenges is the general inadequate resources available and material and service needs. Cost of conducting business on Guam can be a challenge. Upgrades are needed, to include: certified case managers/case management certification standards, improvements needed for ADA compliance (i.e. with the VOS), public transportation services, and access to social services (adult/child care, mental health, medical services). Improvements are also needed in cross-training on federal programs and case managements requirements, and in awareness and knowledge of the changes being created by WIOA. (Pages 32-33) Title I

GCC will continue to maintain partnerships with entities that provide services to eligible individuals. They include:
Agency for Human Resources Development | Catholic Social Service | Department of Corrections | Department of Education Head Start | Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities | Department of Labor | Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse | Department of Public Health and Human Services | Department of Youth Affairs | Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority | Guam Judicial Branch | Guam’s Mayors’ Council | Guam Public Library | University of Guam

These partnerships generally have clientele who desire to participate in adult education. GCC enters into Memoranda of Agreement (MOA) to provide instructors, curriculum, assessment, and instructional supplies and equipment to conduct classes at sites chosen by the partner. (Page 142) Title I

• State Entities:

A. Guam Dept. of Education (DOE): Assignment and participation of DVR Staff in IEP/Transition Services meetings including membership in the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD)

B. Guam Dept. of Administration (DOA) Human Resources Office: Development of SOPs for the compliance and implementation of the 2% law regarding the hiring of Individuals with significant disabilities within the Government of Guam

C. Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center: Two way referrals for mental health counseling services and employment services

D. Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) - Bureau of Management Support - Works Program Section: Development of a Memorandum of Agreement/Understanding to allow mutual clientele to develop work skills and work experiences

• Local Entities and NPOs:

A. Guam Trades Academy: Referrals for Vocational Training Services especially in the Construction Trades

B. Oasis Empowerment, Inc.: Referrals for Job Coaching/Employment Training Services

C. Flame Tree Freedom Center: Referrals for Job Exploration, Job Training and Job Placement Services

D. I-CAN and PARE Inc.: Referrals for Job Training and Placement in the Military installations under the Ability One Program

E. Catholic Social Services (CSS): Referrals for Community Habilitation Program Services and Emergency Housing Assistance

F. Discover Abilities: Referrals for Job Coaching Services

G. EDR Enterprise, Inc.: Referrals for Job Coaching, Work Exploration, On-The-Job Training, Job Placement

H. AmeriCorps Program: Disability Awareness and Emergency/Natural Disaster Preparedness Trainings

I. Veterans Affairs Office: Referrals for Training and Employment Services J. WestCare Inc.: Information & Referral for Housing Assistance and Counseling Services. (Page 165) Title IV

Guam DVR is collaborating with the Guam Dept. of Youth Affairs (DYA) to conduct Outreach and provide transition services to out of school youth. Guam DVR is currently an active member of the Youth Affairs Subcommittee under the Guam Workforce Development Board. Guam DVR also collaborates with representatives from our local juvenile justice system at the Guam Superior Court and child welfare agencies at the Dept. of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS). Guam DVR also participates in the Guam Systems of Care Council to support the development and implementation of Guam’s first Child Mental Health Initiative Cooperative Agreement known as “I’Famagu’ on—ta” (Our Children, ages 5-21) under the Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center (GBHWC) for children with behavioral disorders. (Page 166) Title IV

 Guam DVR works collaboratively with the Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center (GBHWC) and is represented in the Mental Health Planning Council. Client referrals for employment services are often received from staff at the GBHWC.

Referrals for Mental Health services are sent to GBHWC by DISID’s DVR and DSS program staff.

DISID participates as an active member of GBHWC’s I’Fuma Guonta (our children) Systems of Care Council to address issues affecting children with behavioral disorders.
DISID provides opportunities for GBHWC Clients to access and utilize the DSS Assistive Technology Computer lab to conduct job search activities and to learn how to use MS Word to develop and update their resumes.

Guam DVR staff have been participating as an official member of the Guam Mental Health Planning Council (GMHPC). The organization has been actively meeting and is focusing on updating their bylaws and establishing new committees. Guam DVR has encouraged the Chairperson of the GMHPC to apply as an official member of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) so that there is greater representation of individuals with mental health conditions within these two councils. (Page 173) Title IV

There is a great need for Autism Specialist on Guam to help with early identification, assessments, treatment, and education regarding the need for adequate supported employment services and extended services for this targeted population.

There is also a great need for Clinical Psychologist to assist Individuals with Mental Health conditions to cope with the stress and anxieties in the workplace. (Page 179) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Executive Order Number 2020-02 Relative to the Establishment of the Youth Advisory Council - 01/08/2020

“There is hereby established the Governor’s Youth Advisory Council, which shall be overseen by the Office of the Governor. The Council will make recommendations to the Governor on issues presented by the Governor to the youth of the island and of which they are uniquely positioned to address, including, but not limited to civic engagement, education and youth violence.

The Council shall consist of student body presidents, or their designees, from every high school, college, and university domiciled in Guam, all of whom shall be appointed by the Governor.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Bill No. 128-35 (LS) Public Law 35-39: An Act to Amend Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Supporting the Administration of Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program and Extending the Tax Credit Sunset Provision of Said Progra - 10/14/2019

“Therefore, it is the intent of I Liheslaturan Guahan to extend the tax credit sunset provision for the GRAP [Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program] for an additional period of five (5) years, and to further support the Department of Labor in administering this program by establishing a two and one-half percent (2.5%) administration fee for the participants availing themselves of the GRAP tax credits by amending Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Apprenticeship

Bill No. 136-35 (COR) Public Law 35-38: An Act to Amend § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Responsibly Raising the Minimum Wage - 10/14/2019

“Section 1. § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated is hereby amended to read:

§ 3105. Minimum Wage.

Every employer shall pay each person employed by him wages at a rate not less than Eight Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($8.25) per hour, effective January 1, 2015; not less than Eight Dollars Seventy-Five Cents ($8.75) per hour, effective March 1, 2020; and not less than Nine Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($9.25) per hour, effective March 1, 2021.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

VERONA RESORT AND SPA TO PAY $16,000 TO SETTLE EEOC PREGNANCY AND DISABILITY SUIT - 05/13/2019

~~“The EEOC filed suit (EEOC v. Polaris Guam LLC, dba Verona Resort and Spa, Case No. 1:17-CV-00090) after first attempting to reach a prelitigation settlement through its voluntary conciliation process.

According to the four-year consent decree, approved by the U.S. Court for Guam, Verona will provide $15,871.56, plus applicable interest, in damages to the former front desk clerk. Verona is required to designate an equal employment opportunity (EEO) monitor to ensure the company’s compliance with Title VII, ADA, and anti-retaliation policies and procedures; establish a complaint process and impartial investigations, along with a centralized tracking system for discrimination and retaliation complaints and provisions holding employees accountable; provide annual training on pregnancy and disability discrimination, as well as retaliation, especially for those involved at the management level to educate them on their rights and responsibilities with the goal of preventing and deterring any discriminatory practices in the future. The court will maintain jurisdiction over this case for the term of the consent decree.”

Systems
  • Other

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 04/23/2019

~~“Public Law 113-128, known as the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), was signed by President Obama on July 22, 2014 and is the first legislative reform to the public workforce system in 15 years. WIOA is designed to improve the coordination of employment and training services across federal agencies, strengthen collaboration with state and local partners, and provide Americans with increased access to training, education and other support to succeed in the job market and in their careers. The enactment of WIOA provides opportunity for reforms to ensure the American Job Center (AJC) system is job-driven – responding to the needs of business owners and preparing job seekers for occupations that are available now and in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Guam differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

 Guam became a territory in 1950 and its Medicaid program was established in 1975. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital currently servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the Guam Medicaid program. Guam’s Medicaid program does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan; the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $268,343,113 in Medicaid funding to Guam.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Guam, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Guam’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

Guam was awarded $24,436,001 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. Guam must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Labor Clinic for Businesses: Disability Law in the Workplace - 01/01/2019

~~“Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019Time: 9:00am to 12:00pmLocation: 710 West Marine Corps Drive, Suite 301 Bell Tower Plaza,Hagatna, Guam 96910

Workshop Content: Understanding American’s with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) purpose to protect people with disabilities from discrimination in employment. Learn what defines a “covered entity”, “reasonable accommodations”, “qualified employee with disability” and more. Discover resources available to assist employers with providing reasonable accommodations for job seekers and employees.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Guam Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 01/01/2019

~~“What is CAP?The Client Assistance Program (CAP) is an advocacy program established under Section 112 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Each State and Territory of the United States has CAP to help individuals with disabilities get the services they need from program funded under the Act.

What CAP can do:    Advise and inform individuals of all services and benefits available to them through programs authorized under the Act including vocational rehabilitation, independent living, supported employment and other similar rehabilitation services.    Assist and advocate for individuals in their relationships with programs providing services under the Act.    Inform individuals with disabilities of the services and benefits available to them under the Act and under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~~“Welcome to the Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities

DISID was established in 1997 under Guam P.L 24-16 to improve services for persons with disabilities by creating and establishing a designated agency (DISID) as the single point of entry agency that provides, promotes and ensures a full continuum of lifelong programs and services that allows for independence, productivity and inclusion of people with disabilities into the community. DISID does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, and age in the delivery of services to program participants and beneficiaries, employees, applicants and others”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Bill No. 128-35 (LS) Public Law 35-39: An Act to Amend Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Supporting the Administration of Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program and Extending the Tax Credit Sunset Provision of Said Progra - 10/14/2019

“Therefore, it is the intent of I Liheslaturan Guahan to extend the tax credit sunset provision for the GRAP [Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program] for an additional period of five (5) years, and to further support the Department of Labor in administering this program by establishing a two and one-half percent (2.5%) administration fee for the participants availing themselves of the GRAP tax credits by amending Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Apprenticeship

Bill No. 136-35 (COR) Public Law 35-38: An Act to Amend § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Responsibly Raising the Minimum Wage - 10/14/2019

“Section 1. § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated is hereby amended to read:

§ 3105. Minimum Wage.

Every employer shall pay each person employed by him wages at a rate not less than Eight Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($8.25) per hour, effective January 1, 2015; not less than Eight Dollars Seventy-Five Cents ($8.75) per hour, effective March 1, 2020; and not less than Nine Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($9.25) per hour, effective March 1, 2021.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order Number 2020-02 Relative to the Establishment of the Youth Advisory Council - 01/08/2020

“There is hereby established the Governor’s Youth Advisory Council, which shall be overseen by the Office of the Governor. The Council will make recommendations to the Governor on issues presented by the Governor to the youth of the island and of which they are uniquely positioned to address, including, but not limited to civic engagement, education and youth violence.

The Council shall consist of student body presidents, or their designees, from every high school, college, and university domiciled in Guam, all of whom shall be appointed by the Governor.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 04/23/2019

~~“Public Law 113-128, known as the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), was signed by President Obama on July 22, 2014 and is the first legislative reform to the public workforce system in 15 years. WIOA is designed to improve the coordination of employment and training services across federal agencies, strengthen collaboration with state and local partners, and provide Americans with increased access to training, education and other support to succeed in the job market and in their careers. The enactment of WIOA provides opportunity for reforms to ensure the American Job Center (AJC) system is job-driven – responding to the needs of business owners and preparing job seekers for occupations that are available now and in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Guam Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 01/01/2019

~~“What is CAP?The Client Assistance Program (CAP) is an advocacy program established under Section 112 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Each State and Territory of the United States has CAP to help individuals with disabilities get the services they need from program funded under the Act.

What CAP can do:    Advise and inform individuals of all services and benefits available to them through programs authorized under the Act including vocational rehabilitation, independent living, supported employment and other similar rehabilitation services.    Assist and advocate for individuals in their relationships with programs providing services under the Act.    Inform individuals with disabilities of the services and benefits available to them under the Act and under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~~“Welcome to the Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities

DISID was established in 1997 under Guam P.L 24-16 to improve services for persons with disabilities by creating and establishing a designated agency (DISID) as the single point of entry agency that provides, promotes and ensures a full continuum of lifelong programs and services that allows for independence, productivity and inclusion of people with disabilities into the community. DISID does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, and age in the delivery of services to program participants and beneficiaries, employees, applicants and others”

Systems
  • Other

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR): Provides vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services to eligible individuals with disabilities and serves as the designated state unit to administer the State Plan for Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Independent Living Services and Independent Living for the Older Blind. DVR provides administrative support and works collaboratively with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the State Independent Living Council (SILC) in implementing these State Plans.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists are onsite to provide intensive services to veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE).Eligibility

Listed are identified as SBE’s for eligibility for DVOP services:

    – Service- connected disability creating a barrier to employment (30% or greater)    – *Homeless Veterans and those who are at risk of becoming homeless    –  Recently separated service member who has been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months    – An offender who is currently incarcerated or has been released from  incarceration    – No High School diploma or GED    – Low Income level (less than $13,200/Year)    – 18 – 24 years of age    –  ** Transitioning Service members    –  Wounded Warrior in military treatment centers and their family caregivers”

Systems
  • Other

Hire Guam - 01/01/2019

~~This page has a collection of links to services for job seekers, employers, and  youth, and Vocational Rehabilitation.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

American Job Center Guam - 01/01/2019

~~“With nearly 2,500 delivery points nationwide, American Job Centers, also known as One-Stop Career Centers, provide a vast network to address the human resource and employment needs of both jobseekers and business in every community.  The Employment and Training Administration provides funding through State Workforce Boards for American Job Centers, which are operated by community colleges, community-based organizations, and government agencies. The Guam American Job Center is located in Hagatna.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Guam for 2017-2019 - 04/10/2017

~~“The Guam SILC (Statewide Independent Living Council) will promote the availability of the CIL application for non-profit organizations on Guam and will support the application of a qualified and established local non-profit organizations(s) to apply for the Centers for Independent Living Grant upon announcement of grant funding availability by ACL (Administration for Community Living)”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Labor Clinic for Businesses: Disability Law in the Workplace - 01/01/2019

~~“Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019Time: 9:00am to 12:00pmLocation: 710 West Marine Corps Drive, Suite 301 Bell Tower Plaza,Hagatna, Guam 96910

Workshop Content: Understanding American’s with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) purpose to protect people with disabilities from discrimination in employment. Learn what defines a “covered entity”, “reasonable accommodations”, “qualified employee with disability” and more. Discover resources available to assist employers with providing reasonable accommodations for job seekers and employees.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

VERONA RESORT AND SPA TO PAY $16,000 TO SETTLE EEOC PREGNANCY AND DISABILITY SUIT - 05/13/2019

~~“The EEOC filed suit (EEOC v. Polaris Guam LLC, dba Verona Resort and Spa, Case No. 1:17-CV-00090) after first attempting to reach a prelitigation settlement through its voluntary conciliation process.

According to the four-year consent decree, approved by the U.S. Court for Guam, Verona will provide $15,871.56, plus applicable interest, in damages to the former front desk clerk. Verona is required to designate an equal employment opportunity (EEO) monitor to ensure the company’s compliance with Title VII, ADA, and anti-retaliation policies and procedures; establish a complaint process and impartial investigations, along with a centralized tracking system for discrimination and retaliation complaints and provisions holding employees accountable; provide annual training on pregnancy and disability discrimination, as well as retaliation, especially for those involved at the management level to educate them on their rights and responsibilities with the goal of preventing and deterring any discriminatory practices in the future. The court will maintain jurisdiction over this case for the term of the consent decree.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Guam differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

 Guam became a territory in 1950 and its Medicaid program was established in 1975. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital currently servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the Guam Medicaid program. Guam’s Medicaid program does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan; the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $268,343,113 in Medicaid funding to Guam.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Guam, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Guam’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

Guam was awarded $24,436,001 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. Guam must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

"Where America's Day Begins": Each day begins with new job opportunities for people with disabilities.

2018 State Population.
0.9%
Change from
2017 to 2018
165,768
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
6,809

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 162,951 164,281 165,768
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 1,624 1,645

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 614 403
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,222 1,093
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 1,596 1,093
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.50% 36.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.90% N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.50% N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 98.80% N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 12 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 45 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,274 N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2016
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 143
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. N/A

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
32
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 7 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 6 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 12 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 6 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,269 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1 1 0
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 538 389 299
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 45.47% 44.21%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 4.89% 3.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.06% 11.00%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 90.77% 85.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 4.60% 23.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 49.43% 66.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 55.17% 68.12%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 44.83% 43.48%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~Program and Virtual One Stop System (in collaboration with the Guam DOL), Self-Employment and Entrepreneuralship Conference (in collaboration with the UOG Guam Small Business Development Center (SBDC).

Off island Training: National Leadership Rehabilitation Institute (NRLI), Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), etc. Technical Assistance Training in vocational counseling, assessment, and job development strategies which were provided by the San Diego State University Interwork Institute.

Guam DVR has provided support for staff to attend a WIOA Workshop Training for Island VR Programs that was conducted by the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) in Hawaii from March 13-17, 2017. Training topics focused on the background on WIOA, purpose, important changes, youth services in WIOA, pre-employment transition services, required and authorized services, allowable costs, potentially eligible youth, challenges and opportunities experienced by VR programs, subminimum wage employment and Section 511 of the Rehab Act, supported employment, customized employment, integration of VR in the Workforce Development System, and the common performance measures. (Page 178) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The Guam Workforce Development Board (GWDB) remains engaged in workforce development for both employers and job seekers, to ensure that those who come through the American Job Center (AJC) have a better chance at improving their quality of life and standard of living. With today’s technology and a knowledge-based economy, implementing WIOA and a job-driven one-stop delivery system is a high priority to assist job seekers access employment opportunities and help employers find qualified workers, to remain a leader in today’s global competitive economy. T

he board created a more integrated, effective job-driven workforce investment system with the one-stop delivery system involving its partners, the power of HireGuam.com, the Virtual One Stop (VOS) case management system, aligned with key elements of job-driven employment and training programs. Initiatives of a job-driven vision include the following key elements:

1. Employer engagement
2. Leveraging of resources
3. Data-informed decision-making
4. Work-based training opportunities
5. Career pathways
6. Outcomes measures
7. Programs improvement
8. Elimination of barriers to employment (Page 10) Title I

The anticipated expansion and improvement of the Guam AJC infrastructure, which links all the WIOA tittles, provide the core support for aligning program and service delivery specific to disabilities plans of work and initiatives. Expanding of program services and improvement of platform systems enables and delivers the interest and intended VR goal areas. Leveraging and increased use of the Guam American Job Center and HIRE GUAM system

3.1.1 Supporting joint VR program strategies and actions for implementation
3.1.2 Providing easy access to information for all VR stakeholders, AJC Partners, and collaborators/cooperators.
3.1.3 VR Employment Initiative
3.1.3.1 Self Employment Support
3.1.3.2 Work Experience Opportunities
3.1.4 Supported Employment Initiatives
3.1.4.1 Equitable Access Initiative

SRCG3.2 VR Performance and Accountability Measures and Governance (SRC-VR G3-PA-5) (Page 163) Title I

Under the Goal 1- Service Delivery: The Guam Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) will provide high quality services to all eligible individuals to assist them in obtaining employment consistent with their career goals and provide support and guidance through each step.

Strategies to Improve VR service delivery include leveraging and increased use of the Guam American Job Center and HIRE GUAM system.
Enhance and improve the efficiency and effectives of the VR service delivery system.
Develop new CRPs and/or enhance delivery of CRP service.
Increase supported employment services to clients and increase CRP vendors service providers Guam is currently lacking local capacity for specialized positions, such as Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, Speech and Language Pathologist, Autism Specialist, etc. (Page 189) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~At the AJC, staff continually receive emphasis on career coaching, or guidance and planning for their clients. Participants are to receive clear Individual Employment Plans (IEP), tied to their interest, skill level and job opportunities. The IEPs map out the individuals' career plans, including related training and work experience opportunities, to help improve outcomes of participants. Partners are to work together aligning efforts, with the utility of the Virtual Onestop System (hireguam.com).

The skilled and technical sciences and the business, marketing, and management industries are projected to experience the most dynamic demand growth. The government and its partners plans to continue engaging research and systematic outreach to industry and business stakeholders to create a community-wide understanding of the need and importance specific career and educational requirements to improve productivity and employability of local and regional workers. This information will be used to review training programs and guide workers on specific career paths. (Page 18) Title IV

Guam DVR supports the recommended goals and priorities that are listed above which are consistent with the recommendations that were identified earlier and will continue to collaborate with the SRC in implementing these goals, priorities, and work areas. (Page 164) Title IV

State Entities: A. Guam Dept. of Education (DOE): Assignment and participation of DVR Staff in IEP/Transition Services meetings including membership in the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD) B. Guam Dept. of Administration (DOA) Human Resources Office: Development of SOPs for the compliance and implementation of the 2% law regarding the hiring of Individuals with significant disabilities within the Government of Guam C. Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center: Two way referrals for mental health counseling services and employment services D. Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) - Bureau of Management Support - Works Program Section: Development of a Memorandum of Agreement/Understanding to allow mutual clientele to develop work skills and work experiences (Page 165) Title IV

Educational brochures regarding the provision of Guam DVR’s Transition/Pre—employment Services will be developed and disseminated to students with disabilities, parents, school officials, and during community outreach events.

Guam DVR Counseling Staff are assigned to each of the Public Schools to serve as a liaison to Education Officials and to conduct VR Program Orientation presentations to Students, Teachers, and their Parents and participate in regularly scheduled IEP Meetings.

Guam DVR Staff will continue to serve as an active member of the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD). (Page 167) Title IV

VR Counselors are assigned to each of the local High Schools and collaboratively participates in providing input towards the development and implementation of the student’s IEP (Page 168) Title IV

It is mutually understood that Guam DOE/SpEd will be responsible for covering the financial costs of the educational and pre-employment related services identified in the IEP for the student until they graduate out of High School. In the best interest of the student, all known assistive technology device(s) provided for the student’s use by Guam DOE during the student’s senior year shall be considered as a possible AT need essential for employment outcome. Once the student is declared eligible for VR services and existing AT device is determined essential by the VRC for an employment outcome, Guam DVR shall purchase the AT device(s) so that when the student exits Guam DOE, the Guam DVR purchased AT device(s) can be retained and continually utilized by the student. (Page 168) Title IV

The VRCs will attend monthly meetings with the Transition Team to identify potential students for which their presence in the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) is determined beneficial.
Students not identified for a VRCs presence in the IEP may request their presence. VRCs will participate in the IEPs for the identified students. Guam DVR will accept referrals from parents, students, desiring VR services after their attendance at a DVR orientation presentation.

Guam DVR will schedule referred students for an appointment for an initial interview at which they may apply for VR Services.

Guam DVR will make a determination of eligibility for VR services within sixty days of the student/parent’s and VRC’s signing of the application during (or after) the initial interview.

Guam DVR will collaboratively develop with Guam DOE an Individualized Transition Plan (ITP) within the student’s IEP for each VR eligible student to identify transition services needed. (Page 169) Title IV

Guam DVR will be working collaboratively with Guam DOE/SpEd to address these concerns and to incorporate pre-employment transition services within the IEP and transition process.

Guam DVR will also be working collaboratively with the Guam DOL-AJC to develop apprenticeship and internship programs for transition age youth in the high schools. (Page 182) Title IV

If a student is in a transition plan and prior to transitioning to VR services, the team involved in the student’s IEP and transition plan will ensure that services that had been identified by Guam’s DOE/SpEd are provided to the fullest extent possible and to allow the student to have utmost informed choice in their employment goals based on their skills, abilities, and interest.
Guam DVR will provide support to students whose vocational goals require them to pursue an academic or vocational training program at postsecondary educational institutions such as the Guam Community College (GCC) or the University of Guam (UOG).

Workshop presentations will be conducted at the various high school and college campuses. (Page 189) Title IV

Guam DVR will work with Guam DOE/SpEd to identify individuals and youth with the most significant disabilities through the IEP and transition process
The quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services will be based on the Client’s informed choice and specific need for certain services such as Job Coaching, Personal Care Assistance, Mobility Orientation Training, etc.

Guam DVR will also conduct a thorough assessment of the need for AT and other services

2. THE TIMING OF TRANSITION TO EXTENDED SERVICES.

The timing of transition to extended services is handle on a case by case basis but generally would occur after the individual or youth with disabilities exceeds the 18 month period of receiving supported employment services Under the VRWA 600 Governance & Policies, the Guam VR and SRC will jointly review and update the existing policies as needed and will update the current case services manual. (Page 195) Title IV

An IEP is required for all customers accessing Training Services. The IEP will be used to inform training needs, as well as to verify whether or not customers have the skills to be successful in training prior to enrollment into the training program. (Page 220) Title IV

 

Career Pathways

~~Guam Community College (GCC) handles the Title II program,  and is collaborating with the Guam AJC team to register shared participants requiring education, in-class or work-based training and employment. Career counselors have participated in the Workforce Development Specialist training, ensuring a standardized approach with the Guam AJC team efforts (who received the same training). Counselors assist the adult education participants, and are being trained on the shared case management system of hireguam.com (VOS). This allows the counselors to work with case managers at the AJC to ensure that students’ career pathways match the individual employment plan that is identified on the shared case management system. In addition, GCC receives funding from the Guam Department of Labor to support apprenticeship training needs.

The Guam AJC is working with the college to further develop new and innovative pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs that are more responsive to industry. In addition, GCC provides the Guam Department of Education (GDOE) with secondary Career and Technical Education programs and the AJC has provided Classroom to Career activities (work experience opportunities for high school students). As such, together they are building clearer on-ramps to career pathways that match Guam’s workforce development needs. The Guam Workforce Development Board (GWDB) engages members of these organizations to achieve the combined state plan goals.

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation’s case management staff have also undergone the Workforce Development Specialist training ensuring a standardized approach with the efforts of the Guam AJC team who received the same training. Several meetings between the AJC and DVR case managers have been conducted to discuss streamlining of services, as well as to train on the usage of the VOS or common case management system. (Pages 31-32) Title I

The GWDB currently offers a suite of incentives to employers. These include On the Job Training (OJT) subsidies paid to registered and approved businesses to encourage work experience. Direct subsidies ofup to 50% of the cost of wages participant employed will be paid to the employer for a period of up to six months. The Preferred Worker Program (PWP) also offers subsidies to employers that hire veterans or the physically and mentally challenged. In addition, the GWDB is working with Guam’s congressional representative to obtain WOTC authorization for Guam.

Finally, Guam has one of the most successful apprenticeship programs in the region. Currently, more than 400 Guam workers across a broad spectrum of industries are employed as registered apprentices. The program pays employers up to 50% of the cost of participant wages, supervisor wages, and the cost of training to in the form of tax credits against Business Privilege Tax assessments. The training curriculum must be certified and approved prior to allowing the incentive. It is important to recognize that the Guam Department of Labor has received the extraordinary authority to grant apprenticeship program qualification which has dramatically decreased the amount of time required for businesses to obtain apprenticeship certification. (Page 51-52) Title I

112. Dr. Shirley “Sam” Mabini, Director - Guam Department of Labor (GDOL)
113. Mary Okada, Ph.D., President - Guam Community College (GCC)
114. Robert Underwood, Ph.D., President (Designee - Peter R. Barcinas, Program Leader) - University of Guam (UOG)
115. Benito Servino, Director - Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities (DISID)/Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR)
116. Jon Fernandez, Superintendent (Designee: Frank Leon Guerrero, Project Director - Career Pathway, Division of Curriculum & Instruction) - Guam Department of Education (GDOE) (Page 84) Title I

Describe how the State will establish and operate programs under section 225 of WIOA for corrections education and education of other institutionalized individuals, including how it will fund, in accordance with the requirements of title II, subtitle C, any of the following academic programs for:
o Adult education and literacy activities;
o Special education, as determined by the eligible agency;
o Secondary school credit;
o Integrated education and training;
o Career pathways;
o Concurrent enrollment;
o Peer tutoring; and
o Transition to re-entry initiatives and other post release services with the goal of reducing recidivism. Each eligible agency using funds provided under Programs for Corrections Education and Other Institutionalized Individuals to carry out a program for criminal offenders within a correctional institution must give priority to serving individuals who are likely to leave the correctional institution within 5 years of participation in the program. (Page 145) Title IV

Guam DVR has collaborated with our local Department of Agriculture and the Farm to Table NPO to provide training and placement services for our VR Clients. Guam DVR has provided technical assistance support to ensure that the local Dept. of Agriculture Office complies with the Programmatic Access requirements under the ADA and that physical barrier are eliminated. Renovations have recently been completed with two accessible parking stalls provided, lowered customer service counters, accessible route of travel, accessible toilet facilities and provision of levered door handles.

The Dept. of Agriculture has also provided OJT and hired a former transition student with autism that was certified by Guam DVR under the 2% GovGuam recruitment and hiring law
Guam DVR Staff has collaborated with the Guam Department of Education-Special Education Division to schedule and provide autism awareness training for all the employees and newly hired staff at the Guam Department of Agriculture. (Page 166) Title IV

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(3)). Describe the manner in which the designated State agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit VR service providers.
Outreach presentations have been conducted with various local NPOs that are members of the “Puyuta” Umbrella NPO organization on Guam to solicit their collaborative assistance in providing fee proposals for various VR related services to our Clients.

Cooperative agreements have been established with Faith-based organizations such as Oasis Empowerment Center for Job Coaching Services, with Veterans services providers such as WestCare Inc., FlameTree Freedom Center for OJT and Web Page Design Trainings.

Guam DVR has established agreements with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) to provide specific vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 170) Title IV

The Territory of Guam does not require licensure requirements for Rehabilitation Counselors; however, Guam DVR has adopted the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) academic requirements as the standard.

The Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) requires Guam DVR to establish personnel standards that assure personnel are adequately prepared and trained. Strategies in development by Guam DVR to ensure the training, recruiting and hiring of personnel include: Attendance at local job/career fairs; Formation of an in-house training and staff development team; Offering graduate internship opportunities; Supporting rehabilitation counseling as an employment goal for clients; Supporting staff to obtain the academic requirements by CRC; Providing CRC accredited training to maintain CRC recertification and to provide for general staff development by utilizing in-house and web based training whenever possible; Utilizing the training resources and support of the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE); Presentations to graduate level counseling students at local university; and the development of a career advancement system that integrates educational and credentialing required and measures knowledge and skills in hiring and promotional consideration. This system is consistent with the national certification of rehabilitation counselors. (Page 176) Title IV

 

Apprenticeship

Work-based learning opportunities offered by the AJC are marketed by both CTS and BSR staff. Staff pursues opportunities with employers and make appropriate referrals for work-ready participants. The GWDB coordinates work-based learning opportunities across partner agencies to ensure maximization of employer contact and avoid business-contact fatigue. The GWDB researches opportunities and develops relationships with local businesses and partners (including registered apprenticeship programs and training providers) to make these training models available to participants. In accordance with standards described under Career Services above, feedback mechanisms between Training Services and placement functions are in place to ensure that the training being provided is meeting the needs of business. (Page 58) Title I

Guam’s work-based training models include on-the-job training, transitional jobs, and customized training as part of its training strategy. These models ensure high quality training for both participants and employers. Guam’s priority with work-based training has been placed with our Employers who hire foreign workers to fill their skilled job vacancies. Guam has entered into agreements with the H-2B employers to train local workers utilizing the work-based training model. The participating businesses will provide on-the-job training for selected unskilled workers, with the goal of providing employment upon the successful completion of training. The Guam Workforce Development Board’s vision in preparing our workforce for suitable jobs is to align participant’s Individual Employment Plan (IEP) to the model or learning continuum overarching strategy of the Apprenticeship Program. The learning continuum will be the standard for all IEP’s developed by AJC staff. (Page 110) Title I

The Request for Proposal for Youth Services will include the partnership of Guam Community College which handles the Title II Adult Education and Family Literacy Act. This will ensure continuity of service of existing best practices, and introduce innovative approaches to deliver the 14 elements below.

218. Tutoring, study skills training, instruction, and evidence-based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent (including a recognized certificate of attendance or similar document for individuals with disabilities) or for a recognized postsecondary credential;

219. Alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate;

220. Paid and unpaid work experiences that have as a component academic and occupational education, which may include a. summer employment opportunities and other employment opportunities available throughout the school year; b. pre-apprenticeship programs; c. internships and job shadowing; and d. on-the-job training opportunities;

221. Occupational skill training, which may include priority consideration for training programs that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials that are aligned with in-demand industry sectors or occupations in the local area;

222. Education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster;

223. Leadership development opportunities, which may include community service and peer-centered activities encouraging responsibility and other positive social and civic behaviors, as appropriate;

224. Supportive services;

225. Adult mentoring for the period of participation and a subsequent period, for a total of not less than 12 months;

226. Follow-up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as appropriate;

227. Comprehensive guidance and counseling, which may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling and referral, as appropriate;

228. Financial literacy education;

229. Entrepreneurial skills training; (Page 114) Title I

There is a need to establish community rehabilitation programs on Guam due to the lack of existing programs and specialist such as Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, Speech and Language Pathologist, Autism Specialist, etc. It is very difficult to recruit these Specialist due to the competitive salaries that exist in the mainland and the high cost of living on Guam. The lack of training for local CRPs is a critical factor and Guam DVR is currently working with the Guam Community College and the University of Guam to develop new curriculum programs and certificates to help build the capacity of the local CRPs. To work with CRPS to establish CARF standards and to access and utilize the various Technical Assistance Centers The review process of the Guam State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) in compiling input during the various planning sessions hosted by the SRC Council and during the SRC’s quarter meetings. SRC cumulative discussions and recommendations include feedback gleaned by SRC Services standing committee. The committee and workgroup members continue to review reports and offer their input and endorsement. (Page 181) Title IV

Though the Community-based education program (CBE) provides opportunities for work exploration, employers still have a need to receive training on how to effectively communicate and provide reasonable accommodations or AT for individuals with disabilities. Guam DVR will be working collaboratively with Guam DOE/SpEd to address these concerns and to incorporate pre-employment transition services within the IEP and transition process. Guam DVR will also be working collaboratively with the Guam DOL-AJC to develop apprenticeship and internship programs for transition age youth in the high schools. (Page 182) Title IV

Internship and apprenticeship programs will be established for our VR Clients. Staff development opportunities will be afforded to our VR Staff. Public Transportation issues will be addressed. Formal linkage agreements will be established with core partners and DOE/SpEd. Self-Advocacy and Independent Living Trainings will be provided for VR Clients. Multi-Marketing and Outreach strategies will be developed to promote the availability of VR services. Identification and establishment of new Community Rehab Providers will be provided for VR Clients. Fostering relationships with Employer representatives from the Federal Government, Local government, Federal Contractors, and the Private Sector to recruit and hire VR Clients. (Page 188) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer/ Business

~~Off island Training: National Leadership Rehabilitation Institute (NRLI), Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), etc. Technical Assistance Training in vocational counseling, assessment, and job development strategies which were provided by the San Diego State University Interwork Institute.

Guam DVR has provided support for staff to attend a WIOA Workshop Training for Island VR Programs that was conducted by the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) in Hawaii from March 13-17, 2017. Training topics focused on the background on WIOA, purpose, important changes, youth services in WIOA, pre-employment transition services, required and authorized services, allowable costs, potentially eligible youth, challenges and opportunities experienced by VR programs, subminimum wage employment and Section 511 of the Rehab Act, supported employment, customized employment, integration of VR in the Workforce Development System, and the common performance measures. (Page 178) Title IV

Training Services are developed resulting from Business Services assessment of needs, including GWDB direction (ex: LMI analysis, business stakeholder feedback, etc.). Partners are aware of the Eligible Training Providers are vetted through the GWDB policies, informed by Business Services as they analyze and inform on employment and training needs. This ensures a better fit between clients’ interests and skills and business hiring needs. Individuals determined to be in need of training to obtain or retain employment that leads to economic self-sufficiency or wages comparable to or higher than wages from previous employment may be eligible to receive Training Services. The GWDB may also prioritize training connected to sectors and target populations as part of the local plan, and will create opportunities for remediation.

The workforce system is expected to increase investment in certifications that help people get jobs, and support the development and documentation of functional skills. AJC staff is expected to build these types of tools into the menus of available training services and activities.

An IEP is required for all customers accessing Training Services. The IEP will be used to inform training needs, as well as to verify whether or not customers have the skills to be successful in training prior to enrollment into the training program. (Page 220) Title IV

 

 

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

One of the major difficulties and challenges is the general inadequate resources available and material and service needs. Cost of conducting business on Guam can be a challenge. Upgrades are needed, to include: certified case managers/case management certification standards, improvements needed for ADA compliance (i.e. with the VOS), public transportation services, and access to social services (adult/child care, mental health, medical services). Improvements are also needed in cross-training on federal programs and case managements requirements, and in awareness and knowledge of the changes being created by WIOA. A stronger regional approach to workforce development is necessary. These changes will be difficulties in that adapting to change might be affected by transitioning and aging workforce development staff, the latter of which has no succession plan.

Other difficulties include a lack of a workforce development brand, lack of public awareness of the AJC program, lack of financial contributions by program partners, and inadequate interagency coordination. Any of these could be affected by Guam’s isolation and distance from the United States, or past restrictions or compliance to program rules/regs. Further difficulties include recent implementation of the VOS, thus needing increased awareness and knowledge of the VOS and its benefits, limited access at times for updated information sets necessary for workforce development planning (employment, economic-development information). Improvement is needed to share funding to achieve the strategy. (Page 32-33) Title I

Flexibility is a key concept shaping the vision statement. Employers/investors, existing and future members of the workforce, and service providers will all benefit from the service delivery system, but will have different definitions of “success.” While the WIOA service delivery system will be used as a standard reference for different programs, it also needs to be open enough to adapt to - and in some cases, predict - the changes in workforce demand, environment, and technology. The use of the term “access” serves as a reminder for the need for accessibility, which is one of the key cornerstones of the project.

For all target audiences to be able to get a hold of the resources they need, the AJC needs to be reachable not only through physical means (i.e. location and ADA compliance), but also through technological means. This involves an online system, website, and other potential avenues such as a smart phone app and other apps available through the use of technology and information systems. The WIOA service delivery system aims to facilitate a robust economy by fostering a skilled workforce which meets Guam’s changing industry needs. When crafting a vision statement for this system, these factors are to be taken into consideration. (Page 36) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities.

Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Guam is committed to ensuring both physical and programmatic accessibility to the One-Stop delivery system by ensuring compliance with WIOA Section 188 and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). (Page 99) Title I

The Flame Tree Freedom Center, a local NPO, has collaborated with NEXGEN and ADZTECH to submit a contractual bid proposal with the Government of Guam for the design/development, redesign and support of websites and mobile apps. Flame Tree has collaborated with Guam DVR to identify Clients that would be interested in participating in a Work Exploration, On-the-Job Training, and Job Placement Opportunity with their company as a result of this State Contracting Program which requires that the majority of the work be done by qualified individuals with disabilities.

Flame Tree Freedom Center has re-designed and updated the Guam DVR website to ensure compliance with Section 508 accessibility requirements. (Pages 166-167) Title IV

The oneGuam DVR’s Staff cited above has not yet taken the CRC exam, but plans on taking it during FY 2018-2019 due to family priorities and commits. One other Guam DVR staff who has earned a degree in Psychology is planning on taking a Counseling Course at the University of Guam. All Guam DVR Staff have been offered an opportunity to register and attend Quarterly course offerings through the Department of Administration (DOA) Training and Development Branch that includes: Customer Service, Systems of Care, Compliance of the 2% Hiring Law for people with Severe Disabilities, Sexual Harassment Awareness and Sensitivity, Employee Grievance and Adverse Action Procedures, Work Planning and Performance Evaluations, Stress Management Training, E.EO. Training, Time Management, and Procurement Training, to mention a few. (Page 175) Title IV

Guam DVR will assign and station VR Counselors to the American Job Center to provide information to prospective applicants that may be interested in applying and receiving VR services at the Center. As a Core Partner, Guam DVR will contribute towards the resource sharing cost at the AJC for the use of office space, internet access, utilities, utilization of vocational assessment software such as the Work Keys, and to access to the online “Hire Guam VOS” web resource for job seekers and employers. Guam DVR will work collaboratively with the Guam DOL/AJC to provide staff with disability awareness training and technical assistance to comply with the Section 188 equal access and reasonable accommodations requirements under WIOA. (Page 191) Title IV

Vets

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

An assessment of Guam’s workforce development, education and training activities was conducted, and findings are presented in the following sections. Core and partner program leaders have been meeting since the inception of WIOA, discussing the integration of services and innovative opportunities to better serve respective and shared customers (ex: AJC clients that access services from DVR or GCC’s Adult Ed and Family Literacy Programs).

Business needs for workforce development are priority with the GWDB. Through the GWDB Committee meetings held monthly, current education and training activities tied to workforce development are continuously reviewed with plans for upgrade or changes to meet new performance outcomes. An Eligible Training Providers List approved by the GWDB provides the array of training and education services available. This will be updated based on workforce development needs. (Page 29-30) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series).

Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes:

A. HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG

The AJC will utilize the employer pool from the Wagner-Peyser Program and look for untapped labor pools amongst the following Industries: Art, entertainment, and recreation, accommodation and food service; Educational services; Health care and social assistance; Retail Trade; and construction. The AJC is postured in the community as a pipeline for employer recruitment. (Page 204-205) Title IV

Veteran hiring will be promoted using OJT opportunities, new VEVRRA requirements for federal contractors, internships, and federal agency direct hiring authority. The AJC will become proactive in working with employers on behalf of veterans and the will designate employment services in Wagner-Peyser programs to promote veteran employment. This designee will work closely with the local community and business development entities to ensure that new employers become aware of the services provided by the AJC.

The AJC will advocate on behalf of veterans with business and industry and develop such programs as the newly expanded Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) that provides tax credits to employers who hire eligible veterans, including many of our target populations. The newly expanded WOTC is just one of the ways that the AJC intends to promote the hiring and retention of veterans. (Page 205) Title IV

Veteran training will be promoted through the following programs: apprenticeship training programs, partnerships with community colleges, VA programs like Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) and Veterans Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E), and all WIOA programs. (Page 205) Title IV

Mental Health

~~One of the major difficulties and challenges is the general inadequate resources available and material and service needs. Cost of conducting business on Guam can be a challenge. Upgrades are needed, to include: certified case managers/case management certification standards, improvements needed for ADA compliance (i.e. with the VOS), public transportation services, and access to social services (adult/child care, mental health, medical services). Improvements are also needed in cross-training on federal programs and case managements requirements, and in awareness and knowledge of the changes being created by WIOA. (Pages 32-33) Title I

GCC will continue to maintain partnerships with entities that provide services to eligible individuals. They include:
Agency for Human Resources Development | Catholic Social Service | Department of Corrections | Department of Education Head Start | Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities | Department of Labor | Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse | Department of Public Health and Human Services | Department of Youth Affairs | Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority | Guam Judicial Branch | Guam’s Mayors’ Council | Guam Public Library | University of Guam

These partnerships generally have clientele who desire to participate in adult education. GCC enters into Memoranda of Agreement (MOA) to provide instructors, curriculum, assessment, and instructional supplies and equipment to conduct classes at sites chosen by the partner. (Page 142) Title I

• State Entities:

A. Guam Dept. of Education (DOE): Assignment and participation of DVR Staff in IEP/Transition Services meetings including membership in the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD)

B. Guam Dept. of Administration (DOA) Human Resources Office: Development of SOPs for the compliance and implementation of the 2% law regarding the hiring of Individuals with significant disabilities within the Government of Guam

C. Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center: Two way referrals for mental health counseling services and employment services

D. Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) - Bureau of Management Support - Works Program Section: Development of a Memorandum of Agreement/Understanding to allow mutual clientele to develop work skills and work experiences

• Local Entities and NPOs:

A. Guam Trades Academy: Referrals for Vocational Training Services especially in the Construction Trades

B. Oasis Empowerment, Inc.: Referrals for Job Coaching/Employment Training Services

C. Flame Tree Freedom Center: Referrals for Job Exploration, Job Training and Job Placement Services

D. I-CAN and PARE Inc.: Referrals for Job Training and Placement in the Military installations under the Ability One Program

E. Catholic Social Services (CSS): Referrals for Community Habilitation Program Services and Emergency Housing Assistance

F. Discover Abilities: Referrals for Job Coaching Services

G. EDR Enterprise, Inc.: Referrals for Job Coaching, Work Exploration, On-The-Job Training, Job Placement

H. AmeriCorps Program: Disability Awareness and Emergency/Natural Disaster Preparedness Trainings

I. Veterans Affairs Office: Referrals for Training and Employment Services J. WestCare Inc.: Information & Referral for Housing Assistance and Counseling Services. (Page 165) Title IV

Guam DVR is collaborating with the Guam Dept. of Youth Affairs (DYA) to conduct Outreach and provide transition services to out of school youth. Guam DVR is currently an active member of the Youth Affairs Subcommittee under the Guam Workforce Development Board. Guam DVR also collaborates with representatives from our local juvenile justice system at the Guam Superior Court and child welfare agencies at the Dept. of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS). Guam DVR also participates in the Guam Systems of Care Council to support the development and implementation of Guam’s first Child Mental Health Initiative Cooperative Agreement known as “I’Famagu’ on—ta” (Our Children, ages 5-21) under the Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center (GBHWC) for children with behavioral disorders. (Page 166) Title IV

 Guam DVR works collaboratively with the Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center (GBHWC) and is represented in the Mental Health Planning Council. Client referrals for employment services are often received from staff at the GBHWC.

Referrals for Mental Health services are sent to GBHWC by DISID’s DVR and DSS program staff.

DISID participates as an active member of GBHWC’s I’Fuma Guonta (our children) Systems of Care Council to address issues affecting children with behavioral disorders.
DISID provides opportunities for GBHWC Clients to access and utilize the DSS Assistive Technology Computer lab to conduct job search activities and to learn how to use MS Word to develop and update their resumes.

Guam DVR staff have been participating as an official member of the Guam Mental Health Planning Council (GMHPC). The organization has been actively meeting and is focusing on updating their bylaws and establishing new committees. Guam DVR has encouraged the Chairperson of the GMHPC to apply as an official member of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) so that there is greater representation of individuals with mental health conditions within these two councils. (Page 173) Title IV

There is a great need for Autism Specialist on Guam to help with early identification, assessments, treatment, and education regarding the need for adequate supported employment services and extended services for this targeted population.

There is also a great need for Clinical Psychologist to assist Individuals with Mental Health conditions to cope with the stress and anxieties in the workplace. (Page 179) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Executive Order Number 2020-02 Relative to the Establishment of the Youth Advisory Council - 01/08/2020

“There is hereby established the Governor’s Youth Advisory Council, which shall be overseen by the Office of the Governor. The Council will make recommendations to the Governor on issues presented by the Governor to the youth of the island and of which they are uniquely positioned to address, including, but not limited to civic engagement, education and youth violence.

The Council shall consist of student body presidents, or their designees, from every high school, college, and university domiciled in Guam, all of whom shall be appointed by the Governor.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Bill No. 128-35 (LS) Public Law 35-39: An Act to Amend Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Supporting the Administration of Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program and Extending the Tax Credit Sunset Provision of Said Progra - 10/14/2019

“Therefore, it is the intent of I Liheslaturan Guahan to extend the tax credit sunset provision for the GRAP [Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program] for an additional period of five (5) years, and to further support the Department of Labor in administering this program by establishing a two and one-half percent (2.5%) administration fee for the participants availing themselves of the GRAP tax credits by amending Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Apprenticeship

Bill No. 136-35 (COR) Public Law 35-38: An Act to Amend § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Responsibly Raising the Minimum Wage - 10/14/2019

“Section 1. § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated is hereby amended to read:

§ 3105. Minimum Wage.

Every employer shall pay each person employed by him wages at a rate not less than Eight Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($8.25) per hour, effective January 1, 2015; not less than Eight Dollars Seventy-Five Cents ($8.75) per hour, effective March 1, 2020; and not less than Nine Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($9.25) per hour, effective March 1, 2021.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

VERONA RESORT AND SPA TO PAY $16,000 TO SETTLE EEOC PREGNANCY AND DISABILITY SUIT - 05/13/2019

~~“The EEOC filed suit (EEOC v. Polaris Guam LLC, dba Verona Resort and Spa, Case No. 1:17-CV-00090) after first attempting to reach a prelitigation settlement through its voluntary conciliation process.

According to the four-year consent decree, approved by the U.S. Court for Guam, Verona will provide $15,871.56, plus applicable interest, in damages to the former front desk clerk. Verona is required to designate an equal employment opportunity (EEO) monitor to ensure the company’s compliance with Title VII, ADA, and anti-retaliation policies and procedures; establish a complaint process and impartial investigations, along with a centralized tracking system for discrimination and retaliation complaints and provisions holding employees accountable; provide annual training on pregnancy and disability discrimination, as well as retaliation, especially for those involved at the management level to educate them on their rights and responsibilities with the goal of preventing and deterring any discriminatory practices in the future. The court will maintain jurisdiction over this case for the term of the consent decree.”

Systems
  • Other

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 04/23/2019

~~“Public Law 113-128, known as the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), was signed by President Obama on July 22, 2014 and is the first legislative reform to the public workforce system in 15 years. WIOA is designed to improve the coordination of employment and training services across federal agencies, strengthen collaboration with state and local partners, and provide Americans with increased access to training, education and other support to succeed in the job market and in their careers. The enactment of WIOA provides opportunity for reforms to ensure the American Job Center (AJC) system is job-driven – responding to the needs of business owners and preparing job seekers for occupations that are available now and in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Guam differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

 Guam became a territory in 1950 and its Medicaid program was established in 1975. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital currently servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the Guam Medicaid program. Guam’s Medicaid program does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan; the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $268,343,113 in Medicaid funding to Guam.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Guam, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Guam’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

Guam was awarded $24,436,001 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. Guam must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Labor Clinic for Businesses: Disability Law in the Workplace - 01/01/2019

~~“Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019Time: 9:00am to 12:00pmLocation: 710 West Marine Corps Drive, Suite 301 Bell Tower Plaza,Hagatna, Guam 96910

Workshop Content: Understanding American’s with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) purpose to protect people with disabilities from discrimination in employment. Learn what defines a “covered entity”, “reasonable accommodations”, “qualified employee with disability” and more. Discover resources available to assist employers with providing reasonable accommodations for job seekers and employees.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Guam Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 01/01/2019

~~“What is CAP?The Client Assistance Program (CAP) is an advocacy program established under Section 112 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Each State and Territory of the United States has CAP to help individuals with disabilities get the services they need from program funded under the Act.

What CAP can do:    Advise and inform individuals of all services and benefits available to them through programs authorized under the Act including vocational rehabilitation, independent living, supported employment and other similar rehabilitation services.    Assist and advocate for individuals in their relationships with programs providing services under the Act.    Inform individuals with disabilities of the services and benefits available to them under the Act and under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~~“Welcome to the Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities

DISID was established in 1997 under Guam P.L 24-16 to improve services for persons with disabilities by creating and establishing a designated agency (DISID) as the single point of entry agency that provides, promotes and ensures a full continuum of lifelong programs and services that allows for independence, productivity and inclusion of people with disabilities into the community. DISID does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, and age in the delivery of services to program participants and beneficiaries, employees, applicants and others”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Bill No. 128-35 (LS) Public Law 35-39: An Act to Amend Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Supporting the Administration of Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program and Extending the Tax Credit Sunset Provision of Said Progra - 10/14/2019

“Therefore, it is the intent of I Liheslaturan Guahan to extend the tax credit sunset provision for the GRAP [Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program] for an additional period of five (5) years, and to further support the Department of Labor in administering this program by establishing a two and one-half percent (2.5%) administration fee for the participants availing themselves of the GRAP tax credits by amending Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Apprenticeship

Bill No. 136-35 (COR) Public Law 35-38: An Act to Amend § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Responsibly Raising the Minimum Wage - 10/14/2019

“Section 1. § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated is hereby amended to read:

§ 3105. Minimum Wage.

Every employer shall pay each person employed by him wages at a rate not less than Eight Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($8.25) per hour, effective January 1, 2015; not less than Eight Dollars Seventy-Five Cents ($8.75) per hour, effective March 1, 2020; and not less than Nine Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($9.25) per hour, effective March 1, 2021.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order Number 2020-02 Relative to the Establishment of the Youth Advisory Council - 01/08/2020

“There is hereby established the Governor’s Youth Advisory Council, which shall be overseen by the Office of the Governor. The Council will make recommendations to the Governor on issues presented by the Governor to the youth of the island and of which they are uniquely positioned to address, including, but not limited to civic engagement, education and youth violence.

The Council shall consist of student body presidents, or their designees, from every high school, college, and university domiciled in Guam, all of whom shall be appointed by the Governor.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 04/23/2019

~~“Public Law 113-128, known as the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), was signed by President Obama on July 22, 2014 and is the first legislative reform to the public workforce system in 15 years. WIOA is designed to improve the coordination of employment and training services across federal agencies, strengthen collaboration with state and local partners, and provide Americans with increased access to training, education and other support to succeed in the job market and in their careers. The enactment of WIOA provides opportunity for reforms to ensure the American Job Center (AJC) system is job-driven – responding to the needs of business owners and preparing job seekers for occupations that are available now and in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Guam Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 01/01/2019

~~“What is CAP?The Client Assistance Program (CAP) is an advocacy program established under Section 112 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Each State and Territory of the United States has CAP to help individuals with disabilities get the services they need from program funded under the Act.

What CAP can do:    Advise and inform individuals of all services and benefits available to them through programs authorized under the Act including vocational rehabilitation, independent living, supported employment and other similar rehabilitation services.    Assist and advocate for individuals in their relationships with programs providing services under the Act.    Inform individuals with disabilities of the services and benefits available to them under the Act and under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~~“Welcome to the Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities

DISID was established in 1997 under Guam P.L 24-16 to improve services for persons with disabilities by creating and establishing a designated agency (DISID) as the single point of entry agency that provides, promotes and ensures a full continuum of lifelong programs and services that allows for independence, productivity and inclusion of people with disabilities into the community. DISID does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, and age in the delivery of services to program participants and beneficiaries, employees, applicants and others”

Systems
  • Other

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR): Provides vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services to eligible individuals with disabilities and serves as the designated state unit to administer the State Plan for Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Independent Living Services and Independent Living for the Older Blind. DVR provides administrative support and works collaboratively with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the State Independent Living Council (SILC) in implementing these State Plans.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists are onsite to provide intensive services to veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE).Eligibility

Listed are identified as SBE’s for eligibility for DVOP services:

    – Service- connected disability creating a barrier to employment (30% or greater)    – *Homeless Veterans and those who are at risk of becoming homeless    –  Recently separated service member who has been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months    – An offender who is currently incarcerated or has been released from  incarceration    – No High School diploma or GED    – Low Income level (less than $13,200/Year)    – 18 – 24 years of age    –  ** Transitioning Service members    –  Wounded Warrior in military treatment centers and their family caregivers”

Systems
  • Other

Hire Guam - 01/01/2019

~~This page has a collection of links to services for job seekers, employers, and  youth, and Vocational Rehabilitation.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

American Job Center Guam - 01/01/2019

~~“With nearly 2,500 delivery points nationwide, American Job Centers, also known as One-Stop Career Centers, provide a vast network to address the human resource and employment needs of both jobseekers and business in every community.  The Employment and Training Administration provides funding through State Workforce Boards for American Job Centers, which are operated by community colleges, community-based organizations, and government agencies. The Guam American Job Center is located in Hagatna.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Guam for 2017-2019 - 04/10/2017

~~“The Guam SILC (Statewide Independent Living Council) will promote the availability of the CIL application for non-profit organizations on Guam and will support the application of a qualified and established local non-profit organizations(s) to apply for the Centers for Independent Living Grant upon announcement of grant funding availability by ACL (Administration for Community Living)”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Labor Clinic for Businesses: Disability Law in the Workplace - 01/01/2019

~~“Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019Time: 9:00am to 12:00pmLocation: 710 West Marine Corps Drive, Suite 301 Bell Tower Plaza,Hagatna, Guam 96910

Workshop Content: Understanding American’s with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) purpose to protect people with disabilities from discrimination in employment. Learn what defines a “covered entity”, “reasonable accommodations”, “qualified employee with disability” and more. Discover resources available to assist employers with providing reasonable accommodations for job seekers and employees.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

VERONA RESORT AND SPA TO PAY $16,000 TO SETTLE EEOC PREGNANCY AND DISABILITY SUIT - 05/13/2019

~~“The EEOC filed suit (EEOC v. Polaris Guam LLC, dba Verona Resort and Spa, Case No. 1:17-CV-00090) after first attempting to reach a prelitigation settlement through its voluntary conciliation process.

According to the four-year consent decree, approved by the U.S. Court for Guam, Verona will provide $15,871.56, plus applicable interest, in damages to the former front desk clerk. Verona is required to designate an equal employment opportunity (EEO) monitor to ensure the company’s compliance with Title VII, ADA, and anti-retaliation policies and procedures; establish a complaint process and impartial investigations, along with a centralized tracking system for discrimination and retaliation complaints and provisions holding employees accountable; provide annual training on pregnancy and disability discrimination, as well as retaliation, especially for those involved at the management level to educate them on their rights and responsibilities with the goal of preventing and deterring any discriminatory practices in the future. The court will maintain jurisdiction over this case for the term of the consent decree.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Guam differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

 Guam became a territory in 1950 and its Medicaid program was established in 1975. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital currently servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the Guam Medicaid program. Guam’s Medicaid program does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan; the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $268,343,113 in Medicaid funding to Guam.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Guam, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Guam’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

Guam was awarded $24,436,001 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. Guam must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phablet

Snapshot

"Where America's Day Begins": Each day begins with new job opportunities for people with disabilities.

2018 State Population.
0.9%
Change from
2017 to 2018
165,768
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
6,809

State Data

General

2018
Population. 165,768
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 1,645

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 403
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,093
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 1,093
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 36.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2016
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 143
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. N/A

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 0
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 299
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 44.21%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 3.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 11.00%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 85.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 23.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 68.12%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 43.48%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~Program and Virtual One Stop System (in collaboration with the Guam DOL), Self-Employment and Entrepreneuralship Conference (in collaboration with the UOG Guam Small Business Development Center (SBDC).

Off island Training: National Leadership Rehabilitation Institute (NRLI), Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), etc. Technical Assistance Training in vocational counseling, assessment, and job development strategies which were provided by the San Diego State University Interwork Institute.

Guam DVR has provided support for staff to attend a WIOA Workshop Training for Island VR Programs that was conducted by the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) in Hawaii from March 13-17, 2017. Training topics focused on the background on WIOA, purpose, important changes, youth services in WIOA, pre-employment transition services, required and authorized services, allowable costs, potentially eligible youth, challenges and opportunities experienced by VR programs, subminimum wage employment and Section 511 of the Rehab Act, supported employment, customized employment, integration of VR in the Workforce Development System, and the common performance measures. (Page 178) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The Guam Workforce Development Board (GWDB) remains engaged in workforce development for both employers and job seekers, to ensure that those who come through the American Job Center (AJC) have a better chance at improving their quality of life and standard of living. With today’s technology and a knowledge-based economy, implementing WIOA and a job-driven one-stop delivery system is a high priority to assist job seekers access employment opportunities and help employers find qualified workers, to remain a leader in today’s global competitive economy. T

he board created a more integrated, effective job-driven workforce investment system with the one-stop delivery system involving its partners, the power of HireGuam.com, the Virtual One Stop (VOS) case management system, aligned with key elements of job-driven employment and training programs. Initiatives of a job-driven vision include the following key elements:

1. Employer engagement
2. Leveraging of resources
3. Data-informed decision-making
4. Work-based training opportunities
5. Career pathways
6. Outcomes measures
7. Programs improvement
8. Elimination of barriers to employment (Page 10) Title I

The anticipated expansion and improvement of the Guam AJC infrastructure, which links all the WIOA tittles, provide the core support for aligning program and service delivery specific to disabilities plans of work and initiatives. Expanding of program services and improvement of platform systems enables and delivers the interest and intended VR goal areas. Leveraging and increased use of the Guam American Job Center and HIRE GUAM system

3.1.1 Supporting joint VR program strategies and actions for implementation
3.1.2 Providing easy access to information for all VR stakeholders, AJC Partners, and collaborators/cooperators.
3.1.3 VR Employment Initiative
3.1.3.1 Self Employment Support
3.1.3.2 Work Experience Opportunities
3.1.4 Supported Employment Initiatives
3.1.4.1 Equitable Access Initiative

SRCG3.2 VR Performance and Accountability Measures and Governance (SRC-VR G3-PA-5) (Page 163) Title I

Under the Goal 1- Service Delivery: The Guam Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) will provide high quality services to all eligible individuals to assist them in obtaining employment consistent with their career goals and provide support and guidance through each step.

Strategies to Improve VR service delivery include leveraging and increased use of the Guam American Job Center and HIRE GUAM system.
Enhance and improve the efficiency and effectives of the VR service delivery system.
Develop new CRPs and/or enhance delivery of CRP service.
Increase supported employment services to clients and increase CRP vendors service providers Guam is currently lacking local capacity for specialized positions, such as Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, Speech and Language Pathologist, Autism Specialist, etc. (Page 189) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~At the AJC, staff continually receive emphasis on career coaching, or guidance and planning for their clients. Participants are to receive clear Individual Employment Plans (IEP), tied to their interest, skill level and job opportunities. The IEPs map out the individuals' career plans, including related training and work experience opportunities, to help improve outcomes of participants. Partners are to work together aligning efforts, with the utility of the Virtual Onestop System (hireguam.com).

The skilled and technical sciences and the business, marketing, and management industries are projected to experience the most dynamic demand growth. The government and its partners plans to continue engaging research and systematic outreach to industry and business stakeholders to create a community-wide understanding of the need and importance specific career and educational requirements to improve productivity and employability of local and regional workers. This information will be used to review training programs and guide workers on specific career paths. (Page 18) Title IV

Guam DVR supports the recommended goals and priorities that are listed above which are consistent with the recommendations that were identified earlier and will continue to collaborate with the SRC in implementing these goals, priorities, and work areas. (Page 164) Title IV

State Entities: A. Guam Dept. of Education (DOE): Assignment and participation of DVR Staff in IEP/Transition Services meetings including membership in the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD) B. Guam Dept. of Administration (DOA) Human Resources Office: Development of SOPs for the compliance and implementation of the 2% law regarding the hiring of Individuals with significant disabilities within the Government of Guam C. Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center: Two way referrals for mental health counseling services and employment services D. Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) - Bureau of Management Support - Works Program Section: Development of a Memorandum of Agreement/Understanding to allow mutual clientele to develop work skills and work experiences (Page 165) Title IV

Educational brochures regarding the provision of Guam DVR’s Transition/Pre—employment Services will be developed and disseminated to students with disabilities, parents, school officials, and during community outreach events.

Guam DVR Counseling Staff are assigned to each of the Public Schools to serve as a liaison to Education Officials and to conduct VR Program Orientation presentations to Students, Teachers, and their Parents and participate in regularly scheduled IEP Meetings.

Guam DVR Staff will continue to serve as an active member of the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD). (Page 167) Title IV

VR Counselors are assigned to each of the local High Schools and collaboratively participates in providing input towards the development and implementation of the student’s IEP (Page 168) Title IV

It is mutually understood that Guam DOE/SpEd will be responsible for covering the financial costs of the educational and pre-employment related services identified in the IEP for the student until they graduate out of High School. In the best interest of the student, all known assistive technology device(s) provided for the student’s use by Guam DOE during the student’s senior year shall be considered as a possible AT need essential for employment outcome. Once the student is declared eligible for VR services and existing AT device is determined essential by the VRC for an employment outcome, Guam DVR shall purchase the AT device(s) so that when the student exits Guam DOE, the Guam DVR purchased AT device(s) can be retained and continually utilized by the student. (Page 168) Title IV

The VRCs will attend monthly meetings with the Transition Team to identify potential students for which their presence in the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) is determined beneficial.
Students not identified for a VRCs presence in the IEP may request their presence. VRCs will participate in the IEPs for the identified students. Guam DVR will accept referrals from parents, students, desiring VR services after their attendance at a DVR orientation presentation.

Guam DVR will schedule referred students for an appointment for an initial interview at which they may apply for VR Services.

Guam DVR will make a determination of eligibility for VR services within sixty days of the student/parent’s and VRC’s signing of the application during (or after) the initial interview.

Guam DVR will collaboratively develop with Guam DOE an Individualized Transition Plan (ITP) within the student’s IEP for each VR eligible student to identify transition services needed. (Page 169) Title IV

Guam DVR will be working collaboratively with Guam DOE/SpEd to address these concerns and to incorporate pre-employment transition services within the IEP and transition process.

Guam DVR will also be working collaboratively with the Guam DOL-AJC to develop apprenticeship and internship programs for transition age youth in the high schools. (Page 182) Title IV

If a student is in a transition plan and prior to transitioning to VR services, the team involved in the student’s IEP and transition plan will ensure that services that had been identified by Guam’s DOE/SpEd are provided to the fullest extent possible and to allow the student to have utmost informed choice in their employment goals based on their skills, abilities, and interest.
Guam DVR will provide support to students whose vocational goals require them to pursue an academic or vocational training program at postsecondary educational institutions such as the Guam Community College (GCC) or the University of Guam (UOG).

Workshop presentations will be conducted at the various high school and college campuses. (Page 189) Title IV

Guam DVR will work with Guam DOE/SpEd to identify individuals and youth with the most significant disabilities through the IEP and transition process
The quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services will be based on the Client’s informed choice and specific need for certain services such as Job Coaching, Personal Care Assistance, Mobility Orientation Training, etc.

Guam DVR will also conduct a thorough assessment of the need for AT and other services

2. THE TIMING OF TRANSITION TO EXTENDED SERVICES.

The timing of transition to extended services is handle on a case by case basis but generally would occur after the individual or youth with disabilities exceeds the 18 month period of receiving supported employment services Under the VRWA 600 Governance & Policies, the Guam VR and SRC will jointly review and update the existing policies as needed and will update the current case services manual. (Page 195) Title IV

An IEP is required for all customers accessing Training Services. The IEP will be used to inform training needs, as well as to verify whether or not customers have the skills to be successful in training prior to enrollment into the training program. (Page 220) Title IV

 

Career Pathways

~~Guam Community College (GCC) handles the Title II program,  and is collaborating with the Guam AJC team to register shared participants requiring education, in-class or work-based training and employment. Career counselors have participated in the Workforce Development Specialist training, ensuring a standardized approach with the Guam AJC team efforts (who received the same training). Counselors assist the adult education participants, and are being trained on the shared case management system of hireguam.com (VOS). This allows the counselors to work with case managers at the AJC to ensure that students’ career pathways match the individual employment plan that is identified on the shared case management system. In addition, GCC receives funding from the Guam Department of Labor to support apprenticeship training needs.

The Guam AJC is working with the college to further develop new and innovative pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs that are more responsive to industry. In addition, GCC provides the Guam Department of Education (GDOE) with secondary Career and Technical Education programs and the AJC has provided Classroom to Career activities (work experience opportunities for high school students). As such, together they are building clearer on-ramps to career pathways that match Guam’s workforce development needs. The Guam Workforce Development Board (GWDB) engages members of these organizations to achieve the combined state plan goals.

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation’s case management staff have also undergone the Workforce Development Specialist training ensuring a standardized approach with the efforts of the Guam AJC team who received the same training. Several meetings between the AJC and DVR case managers have been conducted to discuss streamlining of services, as well as to train on the usage of the VOS or common case management system. (Pages 31-32) Title I

The GWDB currently offers a suite of incentives to employers. These include On the Job Training (OJT) subsidies paid to registered and approved businesses to encourage work experience. Direct subsidies ofup to 50% of the cost of wages participant employed will be paid to the employer for a period of up to six months. The Preferred Worker Program (PWP) also offers subsidies to employers that hire veterans or the physically and mentally challenged. In addition, the GWDB is working with Guam’s congressional representative to obtain WOTC authorization for Guam.

Finally, Guam has one of the most successful apprenticeship programs in the region. Currently, more than 400 Guam workers across a broad spectrum of industries are employed as registered apprentices. The program pays employers up to 50% of the cost of participant wages, supervisor wages, and the cost of training to in the form of tax credits against Business Privilege Tax assessments. The training curriculum must be certified and approved prior to allowing the incentive. It is important to recognize that the Guam Department of Labor has received the extraordinary authority to grant apprenticeship program qualification which has dramatically decreased the amount of time required for businesses to obtain apprenticeship certification. (Page 51-52) Title I

112. Dr. Shirley “Sam” Mabini, Director - Guam Department of Labor (GDOL)
113. Mary Okada, Ph.D., President - Guam Community College (GCC)
114. Robert Underwood, Ph.D., President (Designee - Peter R. Barcinas, Program Leader) - University of Guam (UOG)
115. Benito Servino, Director - Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities (DISID)/Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR)
116. Jon Fernandez, Superintendent (Designee: Frank Leon Guerrero, Project Director - Career Pathway, Division of Curriculum & Instruction) - Guam Department of Education (GDOE) (Page 84) Title I

Describe how the State will establish and operate programs under section 225 of WIOA for corrections education and education of other institutionalized individuals, including how it will fund, in accordance with the requirements of title II, subtitle C, any of the following academic programs for:
o Adult education and literacy activities;
o Special education, as determined by the eligible agency;
o Secondary school credit;
o Integrated education and training;
o Career pathways;
o Concurrent enrollment;
o Peer tutoring; and
o Transition to re-entry initiatives and other post release services with the goal of reducing recidivism. Each eligible agency using funds provided under Programs for Corrections Education and Other Institutionalized Individuals to carry out a program for criminal offenders within a correctional institution must give priority to serving individuals who are likely to leave the correctional institution within 5 years of participation in the program. (Page 145) Title IV

Guam DVR has collaborated with our local Department of Agriculture and the Farm to Table NPO to provide training and placement services for our VR Clients. Guam DVR has provided technical assistance support to ensure that the local Dept. of Agriculture Office complies with the Programmatic Access requirements under the ADA and that physical barrier are eliminated. Renovations have recently been completed with two accessible parking stalls provided, lowered customer service counters, accessible route of travel, accessible toilet facilities and provision of levered door handles.

The Dept. of Agriculture has also provided OJT and hired a former transition student with autism that was certified by Guam DVR under the 2% GovGuam recruitment and hiring law
Guam DVR Staff has collaborated with the Guam Department of Education-Special Education Division to schedule and provide autism awareness training for all the employees and newly hired staff at the Guam Department of Agriculture. (Page 166) Title IV

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(3)). Describe the manner in which the designated State agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit VR service providers.
Outreach presentations have been conducted with various local NPOs that are members of the “Puyuta” Umbrella NPO organization on Guam to solicit their collaborative assistance in providing fee proposals for various VR related services to our Clients.

Cooperative agreements have been established with Faith-based organizations such as Oasis Empowerment Center for Job Coaching Services, with Veterans services providers such as WestCare Inc., FlameTree Freedom Center for OJT and Web Page Design Trainings.

Guam DVR has established agreements with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) to provide specific vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 170) Title IV

The Territory of Guam does not require licensure requirements for Rehabilitation Counselors; however, Guam DVR has adopted the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) academic requirements as the standard.

The Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) requires Guam DVR to establish personnel standards that assure personnel are adequately prepared and trained. Strategies in development by Guam DVR to ensure the training, recruiting and hiring of personnel include: Attendance at local job/career fairs; Formation of an in-house training and staff development team; Offering graduate internship opportunities; Supporting rehabilitation counseling as an employment goal for clients; Supporting staff to obtain the academic requirements by CRC; Providing CRC accredited training to maintain CRC recertification and to provide for general staff development by utilizing in-house and web based training whenever possible; Utilizing the training resources and support of the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE); Presentations to graduate level counseling students at local university; and the development of a career advancement system that integrates educational and credentialing required and measures knowledge and skills in hiring and promotional consideration. This system is consistent with the national certification of rehabilitation counselors. (Page 176) Title IV

 

Apprenticeship

Work-based learning opportunities offered by the AJC are marketed by both CTS and BSR staff. Staff pursues opportunities with employers and make appropriate referrals for work-ready participants. The GWDB coordinates work-based learning opportunities across partner agencies to ensure maximization of employer contact and avoid business-contact fatigue. The GWDB researches opportunities and develops relationships with local businesses and partners (including registered apprenticeship programs and training providers) to make these training models available to participants. In accordance with standards described under Career Services above, feedback mechanisms between Training Services and placement functions are in place to ensure that the training being provided is meeting the needs of business. (Page 58) Title I

Guam’s work-based training models include on-the-job training, transitional jobs, and customized training as part of its training strategy. These models ensure high quality training for both participants and employers. Guam’s priority with work-based training has been placed with our Employers who hire foreign workers to fill their skilled job vacancies. Guam has entered into agreements with the H-2B employers to train local workers utilizing the work-based training model. The participating businesses will provide on-the-job training for selected unskilled workers, with the goal of providing employment upon the successful completion of training. The Guam Workforce Development Board’s vision in preparing our workforce for suitable jobs is to align participant’s Individual Employment Plan (IEP) to the model or learning continuum overarching strategy of the Apprenticeship Program. The learning continuum will be the standard for all IEP’s developed by AJC staff. (Page 110) Title I

The Request for Proposal for Youth Services will include the partnership of Guam Community College which handles the Title II Adult Education and Family Literacy Act. This will ensure continuity of service of existing best practices, and introduce innovative approaches to deliver the 14 elements below.

218. Tutoring, study skills training, instruction, and evidence-based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent (including a recognized certificate of attendance or similar document for individuals with disabilities) or for a recognized postsecondary credential;

219. Alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate;

220. Paid and unpaid work experiences that have as a component academic and occupational education, which may include a. summer employment opportunities and other employment opportunities available throughout the school year; b. pre-apprenticeship programs; c. internships and job shadowing; and d. on-the-job training opportunities;

221. Occupational skill training, which may include priority consideration for training programs that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials that are aligned with in-demand industry sectors or occupations in the local area;

222. Education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster;

223. Leadership development opportunities, which may include community service and peer-centered activities encouraging responsibility and other positive social and civic behaviors, as appropriate;

224. Supportive services;

225. Adult mentoring for the period of participation and a subsequent period, for a total of not less than 12 months;

226. Follow-up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as appropriate;

227. Comprehensive guidance and counseling, which may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling and referral, as appropriate;

228. Financial literacy education;

229. Entrepreneurial skills training; (Page 114) Title I

There is a need to establish community rehabilitation programs on Guam due to the lack of existing programs and specialist such as Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, Speech and Language Pathologist, Autism Specialist, etc. It is very difficult to recruit these Specialist due to the competitive salaries that exist in the mainland and the high cost of living on Guam. The lack of training for local CRPs is a critical factor and Guam DVR is currently working with the Guam Community College and the University of Guam to develop new curriculum programs and certificates to help build the capacity of the local CRPs. To work with CRPS to establish CARF standards and to access and utilize the various Technical Assistance Centers The review process of the Guam State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) in compiling input during the various planning sessions hosted by the SRC Council and during the SRC’s quarter meetings. SRC cumulative discussions and recommendations include feedback gleaned by SRC Services standing committee. The committee and workgroup members continue to review reports and offer their input and endorsement. (Page 181) Title IV

Though the Community-based education program (CBE) provides opportunities for work exploration, employers still have a need to receive training on how to effectively communicate and provide reasonable accommodations or AT for individuals with disabilities. Guam DVR will be working collaboratively with Guam DOE/SpEd to address these concerns and to incorporate pre-employment transition services within the IEP and transition process. Guam DVR will also be working collaboratively with the Guam DOL-AJC to develop apprenticeship and internship programs for transition age youth in the high schools. (Page 182) Title IV

Internship and apprenticeship programs will be established for our VR Clients. Staff development opportunities will be afforded to our VR Staff. Public Transportation issues will be addressed. Formal linkage agreements will be established with core partners and DOE/SpEd. Self-Advocacy and Independent Living Trainings will be provided for VR Clients. Multi-Marketing and Outreach strategies will be developed to promote the availability of VR services. Identification and establishment of new Community Rehab Providers will be provided for VR Clients. Fostering relationships with Employer representatives from the Federal Government, Local government, Federal Contractors, and the Private Sector to recruit and hire VR Clients. (Page 188) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer/ Business

~~Off island Training: National Leadership Rehabilitation Institute (NRLI), Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), etc. Technical Assistance Training in vocational counseling, assessment, and job development strategies which were provided by the San Diego State University Interwork Institute.

Guam DVR has provided support for staff to attend a WIOA Workshop Training for Island VR Programs that was conducted by the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) in Hawaii from March 13-17, 2017. Training topics focused on the background on WIOA, purpose, important changes, youth services in WIOA, pre-employment transition services, required and authorized services, allowable costs, potentially eligible youth, challenges and opportunities experienced by VR programs, subminimum wage employment and Section 511 of the Rehab Act, supported employment, customized employment, integration of VR in the Workforce Development System, and the common performance measures. (Page 178) Title IV

Training Services are developed resulting from Business Services assessment of needs, including GWDB direction (ex: LMI analysis, business stakeholder feedback, etc.). Partners are aware of the Eligible Training Providers are vetted through the GWDB policies, informed by Business Services as they analyze and inform on employment and training needs. This ensures a better fit between clients’ interests and skills and business hiring needs. Individuals determined to be in need of training to obtain or retain employment that leads to economic self-sufficiency or wages comparable to or higher than wages from previous employment may be eligible to receive Training Services. The GWDB may also prioritize training connected to sectors and target populations as part of the local plan, and will create opportunities for remediation.

The workforce system is expected to increase investment in certifications that help people get jobs, and support the development and documentation of functional skills. AJC staff is expected to build these types of tools into the menus of available training services and activities.

An IEP is required for all customers accessing Training Services. The IEP will be used to inform training needs, as well as to verify whether or not customers have the skills to be successful in training prior to enrollment into the training program. (Page 220) Title IV

 

 

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

One of the major difficulties and challenges is the general inadequate resources available and material and service needs. Cost of conducting business on Guam can be a challenge. Upgrades are needed, to include: certified case managers/case management certification standards, improvements needed for ADA compliance (i.e. with the VOS), public transportation services, and access to social services (adult/child care, mental health, medical services). Improvements are also needed in cross-training on federal programs and case managements requirements, and in awareness and knowledge of the changes being created by WIOA. A stronger regional approach to workforce development is necessary. These changes will be difficulties in that adapting to change might be affected by transitioning and aging workforce development staff, the latter of which has no succession plan.

Other difficulties include a lack of a workforce development brand, lack of public awareness of the AJC program, lack of financial contributions by program partners, and inadequate interagency coordination. Any of these could be affected by Guam’s isolation and distance from the United States, or past restrictions or compliance to program rules/regs. Further difficulties include recent implementation of the VOS, thus needing increased awareness and knowledge of the VOS and its benefits, limited access at times for updated information sets necessary for workforce development planning (employment, economic-development information). Improvement is needed to share funding to achieve the strategy. (Page 32-33) Title I

Flexibility is a key concept shaping the vision statement. Employers/investors, existing and future members of the workforce, and service providers will all benefit from the service delivery system, but will have different definitions of “success.” While the WIOA service delivery system will be used as a standard reference for different programs, it also needs to be open enough to adapt to - and in some cases, predict - the changes in workforce demand, environment, and technology. The use of the term “access” serves as a reminder for the need for accessibility, which is one of the key cornerstones of the project.

For all target audiences to be able to get a hold of the resources they need, the AJC needs to be reachable not only through physical means (i.e. location and ADA compliance), but also through technological means. This involves an online system, website, and other potential avenues such as a smart phone app and other apps available through the use of technology and information systems. The WIOA service delivery system aims to facilitate a robust economy by fostering a skilled workforce which meets Guam’s changing industry needs. When crafting a vision statement for this system, these factors are to be taken into consideration. (Page 36) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities.

Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Guam is committed to ensuring both physical and programmatic accessibility to the One-Stop delivery system by ensuring compliance with WIOA Section 188 and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). (Page 99) Title I

The Flame Tree Freedom Center, a local NPO, has collaborated with NEXGEN and ADZTECH to submit a contractual bid proposal with the Government of Guam for the design/development, redesign and support of websites and mobile apps. Flame Tree has collaborated with Guam DVR to identify Clients that would be interested in participating in a Work Exploration, On-the-Job Training, and Job Placement Opportunity with their company as a result of this State Contracting Program which requires that the majority of the work be done by qualified individuals with disabilities.

Flame Tree Freedom Center has re-designed and updated the Guam DVR website to ensure compliance with Section 508 accessibility requirements. (Pages 166-167) Title IV

The oneGuam DVR’s Staff cited above has not yet taken the CRC exam, but plans on taking it during FY 2018-2019 due to family priorities and commits. One other Guam DVR staff who has earned a degree in Psychology is planning on taking a Counseling Course at the University of Guam. All Guam DVR Staff have been offered an opportunity to register and attend Quarterly course offerings through the Department of Administration (DOA) Training and Development Branch that includes: Customer Service, Systems of Care, Compliance of the 2% Hiring Law for people with Severe Disabilities, Sexual Harassment Awareness and Sensitivity, Employee Grievance and Adverse Action Procedures, Work Planning and Performance Evaluations, Stress Management Training, E.EO. Training, Time Management, and Procurement Training, to mention a few. (Page 175) Title IV

Guam DVR will assign and station VR Counselors to the American Job Center to provide information to prospective applicants that may be interested in applying and receiving VR services at the Center. As a Core Partner, Guam DVR will contribute towards the resource sharing cost at the AJC for the use of office space, internet access, utilities, utilization of vocational assessment software such as the Work Keys, and to access to the online “Hire Guam VOS” web resource for job seekers and employers. Guam DVR will work collaboratively with the Guam DOL/AJC to provide staff with disability awareness training and technical assistance to comply with the Section 188 equal access and reasonable accommodations requirements under WIOA. (Page 191) Title IV

Vets

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

An assessment of Guam’s workforce development, education and training activities was conducted, and findings are presented in the following sections. Core and partner program leaders have been meeting since the inception of WIOA, discussing the integration of services and innovative opportunities to better serve respective and shared customers (ex: AJC clients that access services from DVR or GCC’s Adult Ed and Family Literacy Programs).

Business needs for workforce development are priority with the GWDB. Through the GWDB Committee meetings held monthly, current education and training activities tied to workforce development are continuously reviewed with plans for upgrade or changes to meet new performance outcomes. An Eligible Training Providers List approved by the GWDB provides the array of training and education services available. This will be updated based on workforce development needs. (Page 29-30) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series).

Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes:

A. HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG

The AJC will utilize the employer pool from the Wagner-Peyser Program and look for untapped labor pools amongst the following Industries: Art, entertainment, and recreation, accommodation and food service; Educational services; Health care and social assistance; Retail Trade; and construction. The AJC is postured in the community as a pipeline for employer recruitment. (Page 204-205) Title IV

Veteran hiring will be promoted using OJT opportunities, new VEVRRA requirements for federal contractors, internships, and federal agency direct hiring authority. The AJC will become proactive in working with employers on behalf of veterans and the will designate employment services in Wagner-Peyser programs to promote veteran employment. This designee will work closely with the local community and business development entities to ensure that new employers become aware of the services provided by the AJC.

The AJC will advocate on behalf of veterans with business and industry and develop such programs as the newly expanded Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) that provides tax credits to employers who hire eligible veterans, including many of our target populations. The newly expanded WOTC is just one of the ways that the AJC intends to promote the hiring and retention of veterans. (Page 205) Title IV

Veteran training will be promoted through the following programs: apprenticeship training programs, partnerships with community colleges, VA programs like Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) and Veterans Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E), and all WIOA programs. (Page 205) Title IV

Mental Health

~~One of the major difficulties and challenges is the general inadequate resources available and material and service needs. Cost of conducting business on Guam can be a challenge. Upgrades are needed, to include: certified case managers/case management certification standards, improvements needed for ADA compliance (i.e. with the VOS), public transportation services, and access to social services (adult/child care, mental health, medical services). Improvements are also needed in cross-training on federal programs and case managements requirements, and in awareness and knowledge of the changes being created by WIOA. (Pages 32-33) Title I

GCC will continue to maintain partnerships with entities that provide services to eligible individuals. They include:
Agency for Human Resources Development | Catholic Social Service | Department of Corrections | Department of Education Head Start | Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities | Department of Labor | Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse | Department of Public Health and Human Services | Department of Youth Affairs | Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority | Guam Judicial Branch | Guam’s Mayors’ Council | Guam Public Library | University of Guam

These partnerships generally have clientele who desire to participate in adult education. GCC enters into Memoranda of Agreement (MOA) to provide instructors, curriculum, assessment, and instructional supplies and equipment to conduct classes at sites chosen by the partner. (Page 142) Title I

• State Entities:

A. Guam Dept. of Education (DOE): Assignment and participation of DVR Staff in IEP/Transition Services meetings including membership in the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD)

B. Guam Dept. of Administration (DOA) Human Resources Office: Development of SOPs for the compliance and implementation of the 2% law regarding the hiring of Individuals with significant disabilities within the Government of Guam

C. Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center: Two way referrals for mental health counseling services and employment services

D. Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) - Bureau of Management Support - Works Program Section: Development of a Memorandum of Agreement/Understanding to allow mutual clientele to develop work skills and work experiences

• Local Entities and NPOs:

A. Guam Trades Academy: Referrals for Vocational Training Services especially in the Construction Trades

B. Oasis Empowerment, Inc.: Referrals for Job Coaching/Employment Training Services

C. Flame Tree Freedom Center: Referrals for Job Exploration, Job Training and Job Placement Services

D. I-CAN and PARE Inc.: Referrals for Job Training and Placement in the Military installations under the Ability One Program

E. Catholic Social Services (CSS): Referrals for Community Habilitation Program Services and Emergency Housing Assistance

F. Discover Abilities: Referrals for Job Coaching Services

G. EDR Enterprise, Inc.: Referrals for Job Coaching, Work Exploration, On-The-Job Training, Job Placement

H. AmeriCorps Program: Disability Awareness and Emergency/Natural Disaster Preparedness Trainings

I. Veterans Affairs Office: Referrals for Training and Employment Services J. WestCare Inc.: Information & Referral for Housing Assistance and Counseling Services. (Page 165) Title IV

Guam DVR is collaborating with the Guam Dept. of Youth Affairs (DYA) to conduct Outreach and provide transition services to out of school youth. Guam DVR is currently an active member of the Youth Affairs Subcommittee under the Guam Workforce Development Board. Guam DVR also collaborates with representatives from our local juvenile justice system at the Guam Superior Court and child welfare agencies at the Dept. of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS). Guam DVR also participates in the Guam Systems of Care Council to support the development and implementation of Guam’s first Child Mental Health Initiative Cooperative Agreement known as “I’Famagu’ on—ta” (Our Children, ages 5-21) under the Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center (GBHWC) for children with behavioral disorders. (Page 166) Title IV

 Guam DVR works collaboratively with the Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center (GBHWC) and is represented in the Mental Health Planning Council. Client referrals for employment services are often received from staff at the GBHWC.

Referrals for Mental Health services are sent to GBHWC by DISID’s DVR and DSS program staff.

DISID participates as an active member of GBHWC’s I’Fuma Guonta (our children) Systems of Care Council to address issues affecting children with behavioral disorders.
DISID provides opportunities for GBHWC Clients to access and utilize the DSS Assistive Technology Computer lab to conduct job search activities and to learn how to use MS Word to develop and update their resumes.

Guam DVR staff have been participating as an official member of the Guam Mental Health Planning Council (GMHPC). The organization has been actively meeting and is focusing on updating their bylaws and establishing new committees. Guam DVR has encouraged the Chairperson of the GMHPC to apply as an official member of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) so that there is greater representation of individuals with mental health conditions within these two councils. (Page 173) Title IV

There is a great need for Autism Specialist on Guam to help with early identification, assessments, treatment, and education regarding the need for adequate supported employment services and extended services for this targeted population.

There is also a great need for Clinical Psychologist to assist Individuals with Mental Health conditions to cope with the stress and anxieties in the workplace. (Page 179) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Executive Order Number 2020-02 Relative to the Establishment of the Youth Advisory Council - 01/08/2020

“There is hereby established the Governor’s Youth Advisory Council, which shall be overseen by the Office of the Governor. The Council will make recommendations to the Governor on issues presented by the Governor to the youth of the island and of which they are uniquely positioned to address, including, but not limited to civic engagement, education and youth violence.

The Council shall consist of student body presidents, or their designees, from every high school, college, and university domiciled in Guam, all of whom shall be appointed by the Governor.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Bill No. 128-35 (LS) Public Law 35-39: An Act to Amend Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Supporting the Administration of Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program and Extending the Tax Credit Sunset Provision of Said Progra - 10/14/2019

“Therefore, it is the intent of I Liheslaturan Guahan to extend the tax credit sunset provision for the GRAP [Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program] for an additional period of five (5) years, and to further support the Department of Labor in administering this program by establishing a two and one-half percent (2.5%) administration fee for the participants availing themselves of the GRAP tax credits by amending Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Apprenticeship

Bill No. 136-35 (COR) Public Law 35-38: An Act to Amend § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Responsibly Raising the Minimum Wage - 10/14/2019

“Section 1. § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated is hereby amended to read:

§ 3105. Minimum Wage.

Every employer shall pay each person employed by him wages at a rate not less than Eight Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($8.25) per hour, effective January 1, 2015; not less than Eight Dollars Seventy-Five Cents ($8.75) per hour, effective March 1, 2020; and not less than Nine Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($9.25) per hour, effective March 1, 2021.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

VERONA RESORT AND SPA TO PAY $16,000 TO SETTLE EEOC PREGNANCY AND DISABILITY SUIT - 05/13/2019

~~“The EEOC filed suit (EEOC v. Polaris Guam LLC, dba Verona Resort and Spa, Case No. 1:17-CV-00090) after first attempting to reach a prelitigation settlement through its voluntary conciliation process.

According to the four-year consent decree, approved by the U.S. Court for Guam, Verona will provide $15,871.56, plus applicable interest, in damages to the former front desk clerk. Verona is required to designate an equal employment opportunity (EEO) monitor to ensure the company’s compliance with Title VII, ADA, and anti-retaliation policies and procedures; establish a complaint process and impartial investigations, along with a centralized tracking system for discrimination and retaliation complaints and provisions holding employees accountable; provide annual training on pregnancy and disability discrimination, as well as retaliation, especially for those involved at the management level to educate them on their rights and responsibilities with the goal of preventing and deterring any discriminatory practices in the future. The court will maintain jurisdiction over this case for the term of the consent decree.”

Systems
  • Other

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 04/23/2019

~~“Public Law 113-128, known as the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), was signed by President Obama on July 22, 2014 and is the first legislative reform to the public workforce system in 15 years. WIOA is designed to improve the coordination of employment and training services across federal agencies, strengthen collaboration with state and local partners, and provide Americans with increased access to training, education and other support to succeed in the job market and in their careers. The enactment of WIOA provides opportunity for reforms to ensure the American Job Center (AJC) system is job-driven – responding to the needs of business owners and preparing job seekers for occupations that are available now and in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Guam differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

 Guam became a territory in 1950 and its Medicaid program was established in 1975. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital currently servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the Guam Medicaid program. Guam’s Medicaid program does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan; the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $268,343,113 in Medicaid funding to Guam.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Guam, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Guam’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

Guam was awarded $24,436,001 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. Guam must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Labor Clinic for Businesses: Disability Law in the Workplace - 01/01/2019

~~“Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019Time: 9:00am to 12:00pmLocation: 710 West Marine Corps Drive, Suite 301 Bell Tower Plaza,Hagatna, Guam 96910

Workshop Content: Understanding American’s with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) purpose to protect people with disabilities from discrimination in employment. Learn what defines a “covered entity”, “reasonable accommodations”, “qualified employee with disability” and more. Discover resources available to assist employers with providing reasonable accommodations for job seekers and employees.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Guam Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 01/01/2019

~~“What is CAP?The Client Assistance Program (CAP) is an advocacy program established under Section 112 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Each State and Territory of the United States has CAP to help individuals with disabilities get the services they need from program funded under the Act.

What CAP can do:    Advise and inform individuals of all services and benefits available to them through programs authorized under the Act including vocational rehabilitation, independent living, supported employment and other similar rehabilitation services.    Assist and advocate for individuals in their relationships with programs providing services under the Act.    Inform individuals with disabilities of the services and benefits available to them under the Act and under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~~“Welcome to the Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities

DISID was established in 1997 under Guam P.L 24-16 to improve services for persons with disabilities by creating and establishing a designated agency (DISID) as the single point of entry agency that provides, promotes and ensures a full continuum of lifelong programs and services that allows for independence, productivity and inclusion of people with disabilities into the community. DISID does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, and age in the delivery of services to program participants and beneficiaries, employees, applicants and others”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Bill No. 128-35 (LS) Public Law 35-39: An Act to Amend Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Supporting the Administration of Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program and Extending the Tax Credit Sunset Provision of Said Progra - 10/14/2019

“Therefore, it is the intent of I Liheslaturan Guahan to extend the tax credit sunset provision for the GRAP [Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program] for an additional period of five (5) years, and to further support the Department of Labor in administering this program by establishing a two and one-half percent (2.5%) administration fee for the participants availing themselves of the GRAP tax credits by amending Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Apprenticeship

Bill No. 136-35 (COR) Public Law 35-38: An Act to Amend § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Responsibly Raising the Minimum Wage - 10/14/2019

“Section 1. § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated is hereby amended to read:

§ 3105. Minimum Wage.

Every employer shall pay each person employed by him wages at a rate not less than Eight Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($8.25) per hour, effective January 1, 2015; not less than Eight Dollars Seventy-Five Cents ($8.75) per hour, effective March 1, 2020; and not less than Nine Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($9.25) per hour, effective March 1, 2021.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order Number 2020-02 Relative to the Establishment of the Youth Advisory Council - 01/08/2020

“There is hereby established the Governor’s Youth Advisory Council, which shall be overseen by the Office of the Governor. The Council will make recommendations to the Governor on issues presented by the Governor to the youth of the island and of which they are uniquely positioned to address, including, but not limited to civic engagement, education and youth violence.

The Council shall consist of student body presidents, or their designees, from every high school, college, and university domiciled in Guam, all of whom shall be appointed by the Governor.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 04/23/2019

~~“Public Law 113-128, known as the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), was signed by President Obama on July 22, 2014 and is the first legislative reform to the public workforce system in 15 years. WIOA is designed to improve the coordination of employment and training services across federal agencies, strengthen collaboration with state and local partners, and provide Americans with increased access to training, education and other support to succeed in the job market and in their careers. The enactment of WIOA provides opportunity for reforms to ensure the American Job Center (AJC) system is job-driven – responding to the needs of business owners and preparing job seekers for occupations that are available now and in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Guam Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 01/01/2019

~~“What is CAP?The Client Assistance Program (CAP) is an advocacy program established under Section 112 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Each State and Territory of the United States has CAP to help individuals with disabilities get the services they need from program funded under the Act.

What CAP can do:    Advise and inform individuals of all services and benefits available to them through programs authorized under the Act including vocational rehabilitation, independent living, supported employment and other similar rehabilitation services.    Assist and advocate for individuals in their relationships with programs providing services under the Act.    Inform individuals with disabilities of the services and benefits available to them under the Act and under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~~“Welcome to the Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities

DISID was established in 1997 under Guam P.L 24-16 to improve services for persons with disabilities by creating and establishing a designated agency (DISID) as the single point of entry agency that provides, promotes and ensures a full continuum of lifelong programs and services that allows for independence, productivity and inclusion of people with disabilities into the community. DISID does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, and age in the delivery of services to program participants and beneficiaries, employees, applicants and others”

Systems
  • Other

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR): Provides vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services to eligible individuals with disabilities and serves as the designated state unit to administer the State Plan for Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Independent Living Services and Independent Living for the Older Blind. DVR provides administrative support and works collaboratively with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the State Independent Living Council (SILC) in implementing these State Plans.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists are onsite to provide intensive services to veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE).Eligibility

Listed are identified as SBE’s for eligibility for DVOP services:

    – Service- connected disability creating a barrier to employment (30% or greater)    – *Homeless Veterans and those who are at risk of becoming homeless    –  Recently separated service member who has been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months    – An offender who is currently incarcerated or has been released from  incarceration    – No High School diploma or GED    – Low Income level (less than $13,200/Year)    – 18 – 24 years of age    –  ** Transitioning Service members    –  Wounded Warrior in military treatment centers and their family caregivers”

Systems
  • Other

Hire Guam - 01/01/2019

~~This page has a collection of links to services for job seekers, employers, and  youth, and Vocational Rehabilitation.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

American Job Center Guam - 01/01/2019

~~“With nearly 2,500 delivery points nationwide, American Job Centers, also known as One-Stop Career Centers, provide a vast network to address the human resource and employment needs of both jobseekers and business in every community.  The Employment and Training Administration provides funding through State Workforce Boards for American Job Centers, which are operated by community colleges, community-based organizations, and government agencies. The Guam American Job Center is located in Hagatna.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Guam for 2017-2019 - 04/10/2017

~~“The Guam SILC (Statewide Independent Living Council) will promote the availability of the CIL application for non-profit organizations on Guam and will support the application of a qualified and established local non-profit organizations(s) to apply for the Centers for Independent Living Grant upon announcement of grant funding availability by ACL (Administration for Community Living)”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Labor Clinic for Businesses: Disability Law in the Workplace - 01/01/2019

~~“Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019Time: 9:00am to 12:00pmLocation: 710 West Marine Corps Drive, Suite 301 Bell Tower Plaza,Hagatna, Guam 96910

Workshop Content: Understanding American’s with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) purpose to protect people with disabilities from discrimination in employment. Learn what defines a “covered entity”, “reasonable accommodations”, “qualified employee with disability” and more. Discover resources available to assist employers with providing reasonable accommodations for job seekers and employees.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

VERONA RESORT AND SPA TO PAY $16,000 TO SETTLE EEOC PREGNANCY AND DISABILITY SUIT - 05/13/2019

~~“The EEOC filed suit (EEOC v. Polaris Guam LLC, dba Verona Resort and Spa, Case No. 1:17-CV-00090) after first attempting to reach a prelitigation settlement through its voluntary conciliation process.

According to the four-year consent decree, approved by the U.S. Court for Guam, Verona will provide $15,871.56, plus applicable interest, in damages to the former front desk clerk. Verona is required to designate an equal employment opportunity (EEO) monitor to ensure the company’s compliance with Title VII, ADA, and anti-retaliation policies and procedures; establish a complaint process and impartial investigations, along with a centralized tracking system for discrimination and retaliation complaints and provisions holding employees accountable; provide annual training on pregnancy and disability discrimination, as well as retaliation, especially for those involved at the management level to educate them on their rights and responsibilities with the goal of preventing and deterring any discriminatory practices in the future. The court will maintain jurisdiction over this case for the term of the consent decree.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Guam differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

 Guam became a territory in 1950 and its Medicaid program was established in 1975. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital currently servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the Guam Medicaid program. Guam’s Medicaid program does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan; the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $268,343,113 in Medicaid funding to Guam.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Guam, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Guam’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

Guam was awarded $24,436,001 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. Guam must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phone

Snapshot

"Where America's Day Begins": Each day begins with new job opportunities for people with disabilities.

2018 State Population.
0.9%
Change from
2017 to 2018
165,768
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
6,809

State Data

General

2018
Population. 165,768
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 1,645

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 403
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,093
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 1,093
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 36.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2016
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 143
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. N/A

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 0
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 299
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 44.21%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 3.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 11.00%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 85.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 23.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 68.12%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 43.48%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~Program and Virtual One Stop System (in collaboration with the Guam DOL), Self-Employment and Entrepreneuralship Conference (in collaboration with the UOG Guam Small Business Development Center (SBDC).

Off island Training: National Leadership Rehabilitation Institute (NRLI), Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), etc. Technical Assistance Training in vocational counseling, assessment, and job development strategies which were provided by the San Diego State University Interwork Institute.

Guam DVR has provided support for staff to attend a WIOA Workshop Training for Island VR Programs that was conducted by the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) in Hawaii from March 13-17, 2017. Training topics focused on the background on WIOA, purpose, important changes, youth services in WIOA, pre-employment transition services, required and authorized services, allowable costs, potentially eligible youth, challenges and opportunities experienced by VR programs, subminimum wage employment and Section 511 of the Rehab Act, supported employment, customized employment, integration of VR in the Workforce Development System, and the common performance measures. (Page 178) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The Guam Workforce Development Board (GWDB) remains engaged in workforce development for both employers and job seekers, to ensure that those who come through the American Job Center (AJC) have a better chance at improving their quality of life and standard of living. With today’s technology and a knowledge-based economy, implementing WIOA and a job-driven one-stop delivery system is a high priority to assist job seekers access employment opportunities and help employers find qualified workers, to remain a leader in today’s global competitive economy. T

he board created a more integrated, effective job-driven workforce investment system with the one-stop delivery system involving its partners, the power of HireGuam.com, the Virtual One Stop (VOS) case management system, aligned with key elements of job-driven employment and training programs. Initiatives of a job-driven vision include the following key elements:

1. Employer engagement
2. Leveraging of resources
3. Data-informed decision-making
4. Work-based training opportunities
5. Career pathways
6. Outcomes measures
7. Programs improvement
8. Elimination of barriers to employment (Page 10) Title I

The anticipated expansion and improvement of the Guam AJC infrastructure, which links all the WIOA tittles, provide the core support for aligning program and service delivery specific to disabilities plans of work and initiatives. Expanding of program services and improvement of platform systems enables and delivers the interest and intended VR goal areas. Leveraging and increased use of the Guam American Job Center and HIRE GUAM system

3.1.1 Supporting joint VR program strategies and actions for implementation
3.1.2 Providing easy access to information for all VR stakeholders, AJC Partners, and collaborators/cooperators.
3.1.3 VR Employment Initiative
3.1.3.1 Self Employment Support
3.1.3.2 Work Experience Opportunities
3.1.4 Supported Employment Initiatives
3.1.4.1 Equitable Access Initiative

SRCG3.2 VR Performance and Accountability Measures and Governance (SRC-VR G3-PA-5) (Page 163) Title I

Under the Goal 1- Service Delivery: The Guam Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) will provide high quality services to all eligible individuals to assist them in obtaining employment consistent with their career goals and provide support and guidance through each step.

Strategies to Improve VR service delivery include leveraging and increased use of the Guam American Job Center and HIRE GUAM system.
Enhance and improve the efficiency and effectives of the VR service delivery system.
Develop new CRPs and/or enhance delivery of CRP service.
Increase supported employment services to clients and increase CRP vendors service providers Guam is currently lacking local capacity for specialized positions, such as Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, Speech and Language Pathologist, Autism Specialist, etc. (Page 189) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~At the AJC, staff continually receive emphasis on career coaching, or guidance and planning for their clients. Participants are to receive clear Individual Employment Plans (IEP), tied to their interest, skill level and job opportunities. The IEPs map out the individuals' career plans, including related training and work experience opportunities, to help improve outcomes of participants. Partners are to work together aligning efforts, with the utility of the Virtual Onestop System (hireguam.com).

The skilled and technical sciences and the business, marketing, and management industries are projected to experience the most dynamic demand growth. The government and its partners plans to continue engaging research and systematic outreach to industry and business stakeholders to create a community-wide understanding of the need and importance specific career and educational requirements to improve productivity and employability of local and regional workers. This information will be used to review training programs and guide workers on specific career paths. (Page 18) Title IV

Guam DVR supports the recommended goals and priorities that are listed above which are consistent with the recommendations that were identified earlier and will continue to collaborate with the SRC in implementing these goals, priorities, and work areas. (Page 164) Title IV

State Entities: A. Guam Dept. of Education (DOE): Assignment and participation of DVR Staff in IEP/Transition Services meetings including membership in the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD) B. Guam Dept. of Administration (DOA) Human Resources Office: Development of SOPs for the compliance and implementation of the 2% law regarding the hiring of Individuals with significant disabilities within the Government of Guam C. Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center: Two way referrals for mental health counseling services and employment services D. Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) - Bureau of Management Support - Works Program Section: Development of a Memorandum of Agreement/Understanding to allow mutual clientele to develop work skills and work experiences (Page 165) Title IV

Educational brochures regarding the provision of Guam DVR’s Transition/Pre—employment Services will be developed and disseminated to students with disabilities, parents, school officials, and during community outreach events.

Guam DVR Counseling Staff are assigned to each of the Public Schools to serve as a liaison to Education Officials and to conduct VR Program Orientation presentations to Students, Teachers, and their Parents and participate in regularly scheduled IEP Meetings.

Guam DVR Staff will continue to serve as an active member of the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD). (Page 167) Title IV

VR Counselors are assigned to each of the local High Schools and collaboratively participates in providing input towards the development and implementation of the student’s IEP (Page 168) Title IV

It is mutually understood that Guam DOE/SpEd will be responsible for covering the financial costs of the educational and pre-employment related services identified in the IEP for the student until they graduate out of High School. In the best interest of the student, all known assistive technology device(s) provided for the student’s use by Guam DOE during the student’s senior year shall be considered as a possible AT need essential for employment outcome. Once the student is declared eligible for VR services and existing AT device is determined essential by the VRC for an employment outcome, Guam DVR shall purchase the AT device(s) so that when the student exits Guam DOE, the Guam DVR purchased AT device(s) can be retained and continually utilized by the student. (Page 168) Title IV

The VRCs will attend monthly meetings with the Transition Team to identify potential students for which their presence in the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) is determined beneficial.
Students not identified for a VRCs presence in the IEP may request their presence. VRCs will participate in the IEPs for the identified students. Guam DVR will accept referrals from parents, students, desiring VR services after their attendance at a DVR orientation presentation.

Guam DVR will schedule referred students for an appointment for an initial interview at which they may apply for VR Services.

Guam DVR will make a determination of eligibility for VR services within sixty days of the student/parent’s and VRC’s signing of the application during (or after) the initial interview.

Guam DVR will collaboratively develop with Guam DOE an Individualized Transition Plan (ITP) within the student’s IEP for each VR eligible student to identify transition services needed. (Page 169) Title IV

Guam DVR will be working collaboratively with Guam DOE/SpEd to address these concerns and to incorporate pre-employment transition services within the IEP and transition process.

Guam DVR will also be working collaboratively with the Guam DOL-AJC to develop apprenticeship and internship programs for transition age youth in the high schools. (Page 182) Title IV

If a student is in a transition plan and prior to transitioning to VR services, the team involved in the student’s IEP and transition plan will ensure that services that had been identified by Guam’s DOE/SpEd are provided to the fullest extent possible and to allow the student to have utmost informed choice in their employment goals based on their skills, abilities, and interest.
Guam DVR will provide support to students whose vocational goals require them to pursue an academic or vocational training program at postsecondary educational institutions such as the Guam Community College (GCC) or the University of Guam (UOG).

Workshop presentations will be conducted at the various high school and college campuses. (Page 189) Title IV

Guam DVR will work with Guam DOE/SpEd to identify individuals and youth with the most significant disabilities through the IEP and transition process
The quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services will be based on the Client’s informed choice and specific need for certain services such as Job Coaching, Personal Care Assistance, Mobility Orientation Training, etc.

Guam DVR will also conduct a thorough assessment of the need for AT and other services

2. THE TIMING OF TRANSITION TO EXTENDED SERVICES.

The timing of transition to extended services is handle on a case by case basis but generally would occur after the individual or youth with disabilities exceeds the 18 month period of receiving supported employment services Under the VRWA 600 Governance & Policies, the Guam VR and SRC will jointly review and update the existing policies as needed and will update the current case services manual. (Page 195) Title IV

An IEP is required for all customers accessing Training Services. The IEP will be used to inform training needs, as well as to verify whether or not customers have the skills to be successful in training prior to enrollment into the training program. (Page 220) Title IV

 

Career Pathways

~~Guam Community College (GCC) handles the Title II program,  and is collaborating with the Guam AJC team to register shared participants requiring education, in-class or work-based training and employment. Career counselors have participated in the Workforce Development Specialist training, ensuring a standardized approach with the Guam AJC team efforts (who received the same training). Counselors assist the adult education participants, and are being trained on the shared case management system of hireguam.com (VOS). This allows the counselors to work with case managers at the AJC to ensure that students’ career pathways match the individual employment plan that is identified on the shared case management system. In addition, GCC receives funding from the Guam Department of Labor to support apprenticeship training needs.

The Guam AJC is working with the college to further develop new and innovative pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs that are more responsive to industry. In addition, GCC provides the Guam Department of Education (GDOE) with secondary Career and Technical Education programs and the AJC has provided Classroom to Career activities (work experience opportunities for high school students). As such, together they are building clearer on-ramps to career pathways that match Guam’s workforce development needs. The Guam Workforce Development Board (GWDB) engages members of these organizations to achieve the combined state plan goals.

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation’s case management staff have also undergone the Workforce Development Specialist training ensuring a standardized approach with the efforts of the Guam AJC team who received the same training. Several meetings between the AJC and DVR case managers have been conducted to discuss streamlining of services, as well as to train on the usage of the VOS or common case management system. (Pages 31-32) Title I

The GWDB currently offers a suite of incentives to employers. These include On the Job Training (OJT) subsidies paid to registered and approved businesses to encourage work experience. Direct subsidies ofup to 50% of the cost of wages participant employed will be paid to the employer for a period of up to six months. The Preferred Worker Program (PWP) also offers subsidies to employers that hire veterans or the physically and mentally challenged. In addition, the GWDB is working with Guam’s congressional representative to obtain WOTC authorization for Guam.

Finally, Guam has one of the most successful apprenticeship programs in the region. Currently, more than 400 Guam workers across a broad spectrum of industries are employed as registered apprentices. The program pays employers up to 50% of the cost of participant wages, supervisor wages, and the cost of training to in the form of tax credits against Business Privilege Tax assessments. The training curriculum must be certified and approved prior to allowing the incentive. It is important to recognize that the Guam Department of Labor has received the extraordinary authority to grant apprenticeship program qualification which has dramatically decreased the amount of time required for businesses to obtain apprenticeship certification. (Page 51-52) Title I

112. Dr. Shirley “Sam” Mabini, Director - Guam Department of Labor (GDOL)
113. Mary Okada, Ph.D., President - Guam Community College (GCC)
114. Robert Underwood, Ph.D., President (Designee - Peter R. Barcinas, Program Leader) - University of Guam (UOG)
115. Benito Servino, Director - Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities (DISID)/Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR)
116. Jon Fernandez, Superintendent (Designee: Frank Leon Guerrero, Project Director - Career Pathway, Division of Curriculum & Instruction) - Guam Department of Education (GDOE) (Page 84) Title I

Describe how the State will establish and operate programs under section 225 of WIOA for corrections education and education of other institutionalized individuals, including how it will fund, in accordance with the requirements of title II, subtitle C, any of the following academic programs for:
o Adult education and literacy activities;
o Special education, as determined by the eligible agency;
o Secondary school credit;
o Integrated education and training;
o Career pathways;
o Concurrent enrollment;
o Peer tutoring; and
o Transition to re-entry initiatives and other post release services with the goal of reducing recidivism. Each eligible agency using funds provided under Programs for Corrections Education and Other Institutionalized Individuals to carry out a program for criminal offenders within a correctional institution must give priority to serving individuals who are likely to leave the correctional institution within 5 years of participation in the program. (Page 145) Title IV

Guam DVR has collaborated with our local Department of Agriculture and the Farm to Table NPO to provide training and placement services for our VR Clients. Guam DVR has provided technical assistance support to ensure that the local Dept. of Agriculture Office complies with the Programmatic Access requirements under the ADA and that physical barrier are eliminated. Renovations have recently been completed with two accessible parking stalls provided, lowered customer service counters, accessible route of travel, accessible toilet facilities and provision of levered door handles.

The Dept. of Agriculture has also provided OJT and hired a former transition student with autism that was certified by Guam DVR under the 2% GovGuam recruitment and hiring law
Guam DVR Staff has collaborated with the Guam Department of Education-Special Education Division to schedule and provide autism awareness training for all the employees and newly hired staff at the Guam Department of Agriculture. (Page 166) Title IV

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(3)). Describe the manner in which the designated State agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit VR service providers.
Outreach presentations have been conducted with various local NPOs that are members of the “Puyuta” Umbrella NPO organization on Guam to solicit their collaborative assistance in providing fee proposals for various VR related services to our Clients.

Cooperative agreements have been established with Faith-based organizations such as Oasis Empowerment Center for Job Coaching Services, with Veterans services providers such as WestCare Inc., FlameTree Freedom Center for OJT and Web Page Design Trainings.

Guam DVR has established agreements with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) to provide specific vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 170) Title IV

The Territory of Guam does not require licensure requirements for Rehabilitation Counselors; however, Guam DVR has adopted the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) academic requirements as the standard.

The Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) requires Guam DVR to establish personnel standards that assure personnel are adequately prepared and trained. Strategies in development by Guam DVR to ensure the training, recruiting and hiring of personnel include: Attendance at local job/career fairs; Formation of an in-house training and staff development team; Offering graduate internship opportunities; Supporting rehabilitation counseling as an employment goal for clients; Supporting staff to obtain the academic requirements by CRC; Providing CRC accredited training to maintain CRC recertification and to provide for general staff development by utilizing in-house and web based training whenever possible; Utilizing the training resources and support of the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE); Presentations to graduate level counseling students at local university; and the development of a career advancement system that integrates educational and credentialing required and measures knowledge and skills in hiring and promotional consideration. This system is consistent with the national certification of rehabilitation counselors. (Page 176) Title IV

 

Apprenticeship

Work-based learning opportunities offered by the AJC are marketed by both CTS and BSR staff. Staff pursues opportunities with employers and make appropriate referrals for work-ready participants. The GWDB coordinates work-based learning opportunities across partner agencies to ensure maximization of employer contact and avoid business-contact fatigue. The GWDB researches opportunities and develops relationships with local businesses and partners (including registered apprenticeship programs and training providers) to make these training models available to participants. In accordance with standards described under Career Services above, feedback mechanisms between Training Services and placement functions are in place to ensure that the training being provided is meeting the needs of business. (Page 58) Title I

Guam’s work-based training models include on-the-job training, transitional jobs, and customized training as part of its training strategy. These models ensure high quality training for both participants and employers. Guam’s priority with work-based training has been placed with our Employers who hire foreign workers to fill their skilled job vacancies. Guam has entered into agreements with the H-2B employers to train local workers utilizing the work-based training model. The participating businesses will provide on-the-job training for selected unskilled workers, with the goal of providing employment upon the successful completion of training. The Guam Workforce Development Board’s vision in preparing our workforce for suitable jobs is to align participant’s Individual Employment Plan (IEP) to the model or learning continuum overarching strategy of the Apprenticeship Program. The learning continuum will be the standard for all IEP’s developed by AJC staff. (Page 110) Title I

The Request for Proposal for Youth Services will include the partnership of Guam Community College which handles the Title II Adult Education and Family Literacy Act. This will ensure continuity of service of existing best practices, and introduce innovative approaches to deliver the 14 elements below.

218. Tutoring, study skills training, instruction, and evidence-based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent (including a recognized certificate of attendance or similar document for individuals with disabilities) or for a recognized postsecondary credential;

219. Alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate;

220. Paid and unpaid work experiences that have as a component academic and occupational education, which may include a. summer employment opportunities and other employment opportunities available throughout the school year; b. pre-apprenticeship programs; c. internships and job shadowing; and d. on-the-job training opportunities;

221. Occupational skill training, which may include priority consideration for training programs that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials that are aligned with in-demand industry sectors or occupations in the local area;

222. Education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster;

223. Leadership development opportunities, which may include community service and peer-centered activities encouraging responsibility and other positive social and civic behaviors, as appropriate;

224. Supportive services;

225. Adult mentoring for the period of participation and a subsequent period, for a total of not less than 12 months;

226. Follow-up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as appropriate;

227. Comprehensive guidance and counseling, which may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling and referral, as appropriate;

228. Financial literacy education;

229. Entrepreneurial skills training; (Page 114) Title I

There is a need to establish community rehabilitation programs on Guam due to the lack of existing programs and specialist such as Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, Speech and Language Pathologist, Autism Specialist, etc. It is very difficult to recruit these Specialist due to the competitive salaries that exist in the mainland and the high cost of living on Guam. The lack of training for local CRPs is a critical factor and Guam DVR is currently working with the Guam Community College and the University of Guam to develop new curriculum programs and certificates to help build the capacity of the local CRPs. To work with CRPS to establish CARF standards and to access and utilize the various Technical Assistance Centers The review process of the Guam State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) in compiling input during the various planning sessions hosted by the SRC Council and during the SRC’s quarter meetings. SRC cumulative discussions and recommendations include feedback gleaned by SRC Services standing committee. The committee and workgroup members continue to review reports and offer their input and endorsement. (Page 181) Title IV

Though the Community-based education program (CBE) provides opportunities for work exploration, employers still have a need to receive training on how to effectively communicate and provide reasonable accommodations or AT for individuals with disabilities. Guam DVR will be working collaboratively with Guam DOE/SpEd to address these concerns and to incorporate pre-employment transition services within the IEP and transition process. Guam DVR will also be working collaboratively with the Guam DOL-AJC to develop apprenticeship and internship programs for transition age youth in the high schools. (Page 182) Title IV

Internship and apprenticeship programs will be established for our VR Clients. Staff development opportunities will be afforded to our VR Staff. Public Transportation issues will be addressed. Formal linkage agreements will be established with core partners and DOE/SpEd. Self-Advocacy and Independent Living Trainings will be provided for VR Clients. Multi-Marketing and Outreach strategies will be developed to promote the availability of VR services. Identification and establishment of new Community Rehab Providers will be provided for VR Clients. Fostering relationships with Employer representatives from the Federal Government, Local government, Federal Contractors, and the Private Sector to recruit and hire VR Clients. (Page 188) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer/ Business

~~Off island Training: National Leadership Rehabilitation Institute (NRLI), Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), etc. Technical Assistance Training in vocational counseling, assessment, and job development strategies which were provided by the San Diego State University Interwork Institute.

Guam DVR has provided support for staff to attend a WIOA Workshop Training for Island VR Programs that was conducted by the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) in Hawaii from March 13-17, 2017. Training topics focused on the background on WIOA, purpose, important changes, youth services in WIOA, pre-employment transition services, required and authorized services, allowable costs, potentially eligible youth, challenges and opportunities experienced by VR programs, subminimum wage employment and Section 511 of the Rehab Act, supported employment, customized employment, integration of VR in the Workforce Development System, and the common performance measures. (Page 178) Title IV

Training Services are developed resulting from Business Services assessment of needs, including GWDB direction (ex: LMI analysis, business stakeholder feedback, etc.). Partners are aware of the Eligible Training Providers are vetted through the GWDB policies, informed by Business Services as they analyze and inform on employment and training needs. This ensures a better fit between clients’ interests and skills and business hiring needs. Individuals determined to be in need of training to obtain or retain employment that leads to economic self-sufficiency or wages comparable to or higher than wages from previous employment may be eligible to receive Training Services. The GWDB may also prioritize training connected to sectors and target populations as part of the local plan, and will create opportunities for remediation.

The workforce system is expected to increase investment in certifications that help people get jobs, and support the development and documentation of functional skills. AJC staff is expected to build these types of tools into the menus of available training services and activities.

An IEP is required for all customers accessing Training Services. The IEP will be used to inform training needs, as well as to verify whether or not customers have the skills to be successful in training prior to enrollment into the training program. (Page 220) Title IV

 

 

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

One of the major difficulties and challenges is the general inadequate resources available and material and service needs. Cost of conducting business on Guam can be a challenge. Upgrades are needed, to include: certified case managers/case management certification standards, improvements needed for ADA compliance (i.e. with the VOS), public transportation services, and access to social services (adult/child care, mental health, medical services). Improvements are also needed in cross-training on federal programs and case managements requirements, and in awareness and knowledge of the changes being created by WIOA. A stronger regional approach to workforce development is necessary. These changes will be difficulties in that adapting to change might be affected by transitioning and aging workforce development staff, the latter of which has no succession plan.

Other difficulties include a lack of a workforce development brand, lack of public awareness of the AJC program, lack of financial contributions by program partners, and inadequate interagency coordination. Any of these could be affected by Guam’s isolation and distance from the United States, or past restrictions or compliance to program rules/regs. Further difficulties include recent implementation of the VOS, thus needing increased awareness and knowledge of the VOS and its benefits, limited access at times for updated information sets necessary for workforce development planning (employment, economic-development information). Improvement is needed to share funding to achieve the strategy. (Page 32-33) Title I

Flexibility is a key concept shaping the vision statement. Employers/investors, existing and future members of the workforce, and service providers will all benefit from the service delivery system, but will have different definitions of “success.” While the WIOA service delivery system will be used as a standard reference for different programs, it also needs to be open enough to adapt to - and in some cases, predict - the changes in workforce demand, environment, and technology. The use of the term “access” serves as a reminder for the need for accessibility, which is one of the key cornerstones of the project.

For all target audiences to be able to get a hold of the resources they need, the AJC needs to be reachable not only through physical means (i.e. location and ADA compliance), but also through technological means. This involves an online system, website, and other potential avenues such as a smart phone app and other apps available through the use of technology and information systems. The WIOA service delivery system aims to facilitate a robust economy by fostering a skilled workforce which meets Guam’s changing industry needs. When crafting a vision statement for this system, these factors are to be taken into consideration. (Page 36) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities.

Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Guam is committed to ensuring both physical and programmatic accessibility to the One-Stop delivery system by ensuring compliance with WIOA Section 188 and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). (Page 99) Title I

The Flame Tree Freedom Center, a local NPO, has collaborated with NEXGEN and ADZTECH to submit a contractual bid proposal with the Government of Guam for the design/development, redesign and support of websites and mobile apps. Flame Tree has collaborated with Guam DVR to identify Clients that would be interested in participating in a Work Exploration, On-the-Job Training, and Job Placement Opportunity with their company as a result of this State Contracting Program which requires that the majority of the work be done by qualified individuals with disabilities.

Flame Tree Freedom Center has re-designed and updated the Guam DVR website to ensure compliance with Section 508 accessibility requirements. (Pages 166-167) Title IV

The oneGuam DVR’s Staff cited above has not yet taken the CRC exam, but plans on taking it during FY 2018-2019 due to family priorities and commits. One other Guam DVR staff who has earned a degree in Psychology is planning on taking a Counseling Course at the University of Guam. All Guam DVR Staff have been offered an opportunity to register and attend Quarterly course offerings through the Department of Administration (DOA) Training and Development Branch that includes: Customer Service, Systems of Care, Compliance of the 2% Hiring Law for people with Severe Disabilities, Sexual Harassment Awareness and Sensitivity, Employee Grievance and Adverse Action Procedures, Work Planning and Performance Evaluations, Stress Management Training, E.EO. Training, Time Management, and Procurement Training, to mention a few. (Page 175) Title IV

Guam DVR will assign and station VR Counselors to the American Job Center to provide information to prospective applicants that may be interested in applying and receiving VR services at the Center. As a Core Partner, Guam DVR will contribute towards the resource sharing cost at the AJC for the use of office space, internet access, utilities, utilization of vocational assessment software such as the Work Keys, and to access to the online “Hire Guam VOS” web resource for job seekers and employers. Guam DVR will work collaboratively with the Guam DOL/AJC to provide staff with disability awareness training and technical assistance to comply with the Section 188 equal access and reasonable accommodations requirements under WIOA. (Page 191) Title IV

Vets

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

An assessment of Guam’s workforce development, education and training activities was conducted, and findings are presented in the following sections. Core and partner program leaders have been meeting since the inception of WIOA, discussing the integration of services and innovative opportunities to better serve respective and shared customers (ex: AJC clients that access services from DVR or GCC’s Adult Ed and Family Literacy Programs).

Business needs for workforce development are priority with the GWDB. Through the GWDB Committee meetings held monthly, current education and training activities tied to workforce development are continuously reviewed with plans for upgrade or changes to meet new performance outcomes. An Eligible Training Providers List approved by the GWDB provides the array of training and education services available. This will be updated based on workforce development needs. (Page 29-30) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series).

Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes:

A. HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG

The AJC will utilize the employer pool from the Wagner-Peyser Program and look for untapped labor pools amongst the following Industries: Art, entertainment, and recreation, accommodation and food service; Educational services; Health care and social assistance; Retail Trade; and construction. The AJC is postured in the community as a pipeline for employer recruitment. (Page 204-205) Title IV

Veteran hiring will be promoted using OJT opportunities, new VEVRRA requirements for federal contractors, internships, and federal agency direct hiring authority. The AJC will become proactive in working with employers on behalf of veterans and the will designate employment services in Wagner-Peyser programs to promote veteran employment. This designee will work closely with the local community and business development entities to ensure that new employers become aware of the services provided by the AJC.

The AJC will advocate on behalf of veterans with business and industry and develop such programs as the newly expanded Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) that provides tax credits to employers who hire eligible veterans, including many of our target populations. The newly expanded WOTC is just one of the ways that the AJC intends to promote the hiring and retention of veterans. (Page 205) Title IV

Veteran training will be promoted through the following programs: apprenticeship training programs, partnerships with community colleges, VA programs like Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) and Veterans Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E), and all WIOA programs. (Page 205) Title IV

Mental Health

~~One of the major difficulties and challenges is the general inadequate resources available and material and service needs. Cost of conducting business on Guam can be a challenge. Upgrades are needed, to include: certified case managers/case management certification standards, improvements needed for ADA compliance (i.e. with the VOS), public transportation services, and access to social services (adult/child care, mental health, medical services). Improvements are also needed in cross-training on federal programs and case managements requirements, and in awareness and knowledge of the changes being created by WIOA. (Pages 32-33) Title I

GCC will continue to maintain partnerships with entities that provide services to eligible individuals. They include:
Agency for Human Resources Development | Catholic Social Service | Department of Corrections | Department of Education Head Start | Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities | Department of Labor | Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse | Department of Public Health and Human Services | Department of Youth Affairs | Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority | Guam Judicial Branch | Guam’s Mayors’ Council | Guam Public Library | University of Guam

These partnerships generally have clientele who desire to participate in adult education. GCC enters into Memoranda of Agreement (MOA) to provide instructors, curriculum, assessment, and instructional supplies and equipment to conduct classes at sites chosen by the partner. (Page 142) Title I

• State Entities:

A. Guam Dept. of Education (DOE): Assignment and participation of DVR Staff in IEP/Transition Services meetings including membership in the Guam Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities (GAPSD)

B. Guam Dept. of Administration (DOA) Human Resources Office: Development of SOPs for the compliance and implementation of the 2% law regarding the hiring of Individuals with significant disabilities within the Government of Guam

C. Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center: Two way referrals for mental health counseling services and employment services

D. Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) - Bureau of Management Support - Works Program Section: Development of a Memorandum of Agreement/Understanding to allow mutual clientele to develop work skills and work experiences

• Local Entities and NPOs:

A. Guam Trades Academy: Referrals for Vocational Training Services especially in the Construction Trades

B. Oasis Empowerment, Inc.: Referrals for Job Coaching/Employment Training Services

C. Flame Tree Freedom Center: Referrals for Job Exploration, Job Training and Job Placement Services

D. I-CAN and PARE Inc.: Referrals for Job Training and Placement in the Military installations under the Ability One Program

E. Catholic Social Services (CSS): Referrals for Community Habilitation Program Services and Emergency Housing Assistance

F. Discover Abilities: Referrals for Job Coaching Services

G. EDR Enterprise, Inc.: Referrals for Job Coaching, Work Exploration, On-The-Job Training, Job Placement

H. AmeriCorps Program: Disability Awareness and Emergency/Natural Disaster Preparedness Trainings

I. Veterans Affairs Office: Referrals for Training and Employment Services J. WestCare Inc.: Information & Referral for Housing Assistance and Counseling Services. (Page 165) Title IV

Guam DVR is collaborating with the Guam Dept. of Youth Affairs (DYA) to conduct Outreach and provide transition services to out of school youth. Guam DVR is currently an active member of the Youth Affairs Subcommittee under the Guam Workforce Development Board. Guam DVR also collaborates with representatives from our local juvenile justice system at the Guam Superior Court and child welfare agencies at the Dept. of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS). Guam DVR also participates in the Guam Systems of Care Council to support the development and implementation of Guam’s first Child Mental Health Initiative Cooperative Agreement known as “I’Famagu’ on—ta” (Our Children, ages 5-21) under the Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center (GBHWC) for children with behavioral disorders. (Page 166) Title IV

 Guam DVR works collaboratively with the Guam Behavioral Health & Wellness Center (GBHWC) and is represented in the Mental Health Planning Council. Client referrals for employment services are often received from staff at the GBHWC.

Referrals for Mental Health services are sent to GBHWC by DISID’s DVR and DSS program staff.

DISID participates as an active member of GBHWC’s I’Fuma Guonta (our children) Systems of Care Council to address issues affecting children with behavioral disorders.
DISID provides opportunities for GBHWC Clients to access and utilize the DSS Assistive Technology Computer lab to conduct job search activities and to learn how to use MS Word to develop and update their resumes.

Guam DVR staff have been participating as an official member of the Guam Mental Health Planning Council (GMHPC). The organization has been actively meeting and is focusing on updating their bylaws and establishing new committees. Guam DVR has encouraged the Chairperson of the GMHPC to apply as an official member of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) so that there is greater representation of individuals with mental health conditions within these two councils. (Page 173) Title IV

There is a great need for Autism Specialist on Guam to help with early identification, assessments, treatment, and education regarding the need for adequate supported employment services and extended services for this targeted population.

There is also a great need for Clinical Psychologist to assist Individuals with Mental Health conditions to cope with the stress and anxieties in the workplace. (Page 179) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Executive Order Number 2020-02 Relative to the Establishment of the Youth Advisory Council - 01/08/2020

“There is hereby established the Governor’s Youth Advisory Council, which shall be overseen by the Office of the Governor. The Council will make recommendations to the Governor on issues presented by the Governor to the youth of the island and of which they are uniquely positioned to address, including, but not limited to civic engagement, education and youth violence.

The Council shall consist of student body presidents, or their designees, from every high school, college, and university domiciled in Guam, all of whom shall be appointed by the Governor.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Bill No. 128-35 (LS) Public Law 35-39: An Act to Amend Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Supporting the Administration of Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program and Extending the Tax Credit Sunset Provision of Said Progra - 10/14/2019

“Therefore, it is the intent of I Liheslaturan Guahan to extend the tax credit sunset provision for the GRAP [Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program] for an additional period of five (5) years, and to further support the Department of Labor in administering this program by establishing a two and one-half percent (2.5%) administration fee for the participants availing themselves of the GRAP tax credits by amending Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Apprenticeship

Bill No. 136-35 (COR) Public Law 35-38: An Act to Amend § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Responsibly Raising the Minimum Wage - 10/14/2019

“Section 1. § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated is hereby amended to read:

§ 3105. Minimum Wage.

Every employer shall pay each person employed by him wages at a rate not less than Eight Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($8.25) per hour, effective January 1, 2015; not less than Eight Dollars Seventy-Five Cents ($8.75) per hour, effective March 1, 2020; and not less than Nine Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($9.25) per hour, effective March 1, 2021.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

VERONA RESORT AND SPA TO PAY $16,000 TO SETTLE EEOC PREGNANCY AND DISABILITY SUIT - 05/13/2019

~~“The EEOC filed suit (EEOC v. Polaris Guam LLC, dba Verona Resort and Spa, Case No. 1:17-CV-00090) after first attempting to reach a prelitigation settlement through its voluntary conciliation process.

According to the four-year consent decree, approved by the U.S. Court for Guam, Verona will provide $15,871.56, plus applicable interest, in damages to the former front desk clerk. Verona is required to designate an equal employment opportunity (EEO) monitor to ensure the company’s compliance with Title VII, ADA, and anti-retaliation policies and procedures; establish a complaint process and impartial investigations, along with a centralized tracking system for discrimination and retaliation complaints and provisions holding employees accountable; provide annual training on pregnancy and disability discrimination, as well as retaliation, especially for those involved at the management level to educate them on their rights and responsibilities with the goal of preventing and deterring any discriminatory practices in the future. The court will maintain jurisdiction over this case for the term of the consent decree.”

Systems
  • Other

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 04/23/2019

~~“Public Law 113-128, known as the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), was signed by President Obama on July 22, 2014 and is the first legislative reform to the public workforce system in 15 years. WIOA is designed to improve the coordination of employment and training services across federal agencies, strengthen collaboration with state and local partners, and provide Americans with increased access to training, education and other support to succeed in the job market and in their careers. The enactment of WIOA provides opportunity for reforms to ensure the American Job Center (AJC) system is job-driven – responding to the needs of business owners and preparing job seekers for occupations that are available now and in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Guam differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

 Guam became a territory in 1950 and its Medicaid program was established in 1975. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital currently servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the Guam Medicaid program. Guam’s Medicaid program does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan; the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $268,343,113 in Medicaid funding to Guam.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Guam, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Guam’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

Guam was awarded $24,436,001 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. Guam must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Labor Clinic for Businesses: Disability Law in the Workplace - 01/01/2019

~~“Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019Time: 9:00am to 12:00pmLocation: 710 West Marine Corps Drive, Suite 301 Bell Tower Plaza,Hagatna, Guam 96910

Workshop Content: Understanding American’s with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) purpose to protect people with disabilities from discrimination in employment. Learn what defines a “covered entity”, “reasonable accommodations”, “qualified employee with disability” and more. Discover resources available to assist employers with providing reasonable accommodations for job seekers and employees.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Guam Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 01/01/2019

~~“What is CAP?The Client Assistance Program (CAP) is an advocacy program established under Section 112 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Each State and Territory of the United States has CAP to help individuals with disabilities get the services they need from program funded under the Act.

What CAP can do:    Advise and inform individuals of all services and benefits available to them through programs authorized under the Act including vocational rehabilitation, independent living, supported employment and other similar rehabilitation services.    Assist and advocate for individuals in their relationships with programs providing services under the Act.    Inform individuals with disabilities of the services and benefits available to them under the Act and under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~~“Welcome to the Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities

DISID was established in 1997 under Guam P.L 24-16 to improve services for persons with disabilities by creating and establishing a designated agency (DISID) as the single point of entry agency that provides, promotes and ensures a full continuum of lifelong programs and services that allows for independence, productivity and inclusion of people with disabilities into the community. DISID does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, and age in the delivery of services to program participants and beneficiaries, employees, applicants and others”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Bill No. 128-35 (LS) Public Law 35-39: An Act to Amend Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Supporting the Administration of Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program and Extending the Tax Credit Sunset Provision of Said Progra - 10/14/2019

“Therefore, it is the intent of I Liheslaturan Guahan to extend the tax credit sunset provision for the GRAP [Guam Registered Apprenticeship Program] for an additional period of five (5) years, and to further support the Department of Labor in administering this program by establishing a two and one-half percent (2.5%) administration fee for the participants availing themselves of the GRAP tax credits by amending Article 1 of Chapter 10, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Apprenticeship

Bill No. 136-35 (COR) Public Law 35-38: An Act to Amend § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Responsibly Raising the Minimum Wage - 10/14/2019

“Section 1. § 3105 of Article 1, Chapter 3, Title 22, Guam Code Annotated is hereby amended to read:

§ 3105. Minimum Wage.

Every employer shall pay each person employed by him wages at a rate not less than Eight Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($8.25) per hour, effective January 1, 2015; not less than Eight Dollars Seventy-Five Cents ($8.75) per hour, effective March 1, 2020; and not less than Nine Dollars and Twenty-Five Cents ($9.25) per hour, effective March 1, 2021.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order Number 2020-02 Relative to the Establishment of the Youth Advisory Council - 01/08/2020

“There is hereby established the Governor’s Youth Advisory Council, which shall be overseen by the Office of the Governor. The Council will make recommendations to the Governor on issues presented by the Governor to the youth of the island and of which they are uniquely positioned to address, including, but not limited to civic engagement, education and youth violence.

The Council shall consist of student body presidents, or their designees, from every high school, college, and university domiciled in Guam, all of whom shall be appointed by the Governor.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 04/23/2019

~~“Public Law 113-128, known as the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), was signed by President Obama on July 22, 2014 and is the first legislative reform to the public workforce system in 15 years. WIOA is designed to improve the coordination of employment and training services across federal agencies, strengthen collaboration with state and local partners, and provide Americans with increased access to training, education and other support to succeed in the job market and in their careers. The enactment of WIOA provides opportunity for reforms to ensure the American Job Center (AJC) system is job-driven – responding to the needs of business owners and preparing job seekers for occupations that are available now and in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Guam Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 01/01/2019

~~“What is CAP?The Client Assistance Program (CAP) is an advocacy program established under Section 112 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Each State and Territory of the United States has CAP to help individuals with disabilities get the services they need from program funded under the Act.

What CAP can do:    Advise and inform individuals of all services and benefits available to them through programs authorized under the Act including vocational rehabilitation, independent living, supported employment and other similar rehabilitation services.    Assist and advocate for individuals in their relationships with programs providing services under the Act.    Inform individuals with disabilities of the services and benefits available to them under the Act and under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities - 01/01/2019

~~“Welcome to the Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities

DISID was established in 1997 under Guam P.L 24-16 to improve services for persons with disabilities by creating and establishing a designated agency (DISID) as the single point of entry agency that provides, promotes and ensures a full continuum of lifelong programs and services that allows for independence, productivity and inclusion of people with disabilities into the community. DISID does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, and age in the delivery of services to program participants and beneficiaries, employees, applicants and others”

Systems
  • Other

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR): Provides vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services to eligible individuals with disabilities and serves as the designated state unit to administer the State Plan for Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Independent Living Services and Independent Living for the Older Blind. DVR provides administrative support and works collaboratively with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the State Independent Living Council (SILC) in implementing these State Plans.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists are onsite to provide intensive services to veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE).Eligibility

Listed are identified as SBE’s for eligibility for DVOP services:

    – Service- connected disability creating a barrier to employment (30% or greater)    – *Homeless Veterans and those who are at risk of becoming homeless    –  Recently separated service member who has been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months    – An offender who is currently incarcerated or has been released from  incarceration    – No High School diploma or GED    – Low Income level (less than $13,200/Year)    – 18 – 24 years of age    –  ** Transitioning Service members    –  Wounded Warrior in military treatment centers and their family caregivers”

Systems
  • Other

Hire Guam - 01/01/2019

~~This page has a collection of links to services for job seekers, employers, and  youth, and Vocational Rehabilitation.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

American Job Center Guam - 01/01/2019

~~“With nearly 2,500 delivery points nationwide, American Job Centers, also known as One-Stop Career Centers, provide a vast network to address the human resource and employment needs of both jobseekers and business in every community.  The Employment and Training Administration provides funding through State Workforce Boards for American Job Centers, which are operated by community colleges, community-based organizations, and government agencies. The Guam American Job Center is located in Hagatna.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Guam for 2017-2019 - 04/10/2017

~~“The Guam SILC (Statewide Independent Living Council) will promote the availability of the CIL application for non-profit organizations on Guam and will support the application of a qualified and established local non-profit organizations(s) to apply for the Centers for Independent Living Grant upon announcement of grant funding availability by ACL (Administration for Community Living)”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Labor Clinic for Businesses: Disability Law in the Workplace - 01/01/2019

~~“Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019Time: 9:00am to 12:00pmLocation: 710 West Marine Corps Drive, Suite 301 Bell Tower Plaza,Hagatna, Guam 96910

Workshop Content: Understanding American’s with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) purpose to protect people with disabilities from discrimination in employment. Learn what defines a “covered entity”, “reasonable accommodations”, “qualified employee with disability” and more. Discover resources available to assist employers with providing reasonable accommodations for job seekers and employees.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

VERONA RESORT AND SPA TO PAY $16,000 TO SETTLE EEOC PREGNANCY AND DISABILITY SUIT - 05/13/2019

~~“The EEOC filed suit (EEOC v. Polaris Guam LLC, dba Verona Resort and Spa, Case No. 1:17-CV-00090) after first attempting to reach a prelitigation settlement through its voluntary conciliation process.

According to the four-year consent decree, approved by the U.S. Court for Guam, Verona will provide $15,871.56, plus applicable interest, in damages to the former front desk clerk. Verona is required to designate an equal employment opportunity (EEO) monitor to ensure the company’s compliance with Title VII, ADA, and anti-retaliation policies and procedures; establish a complaint process and impartial investigations, along with a centralized tracking system for discrimination and retaliation complaints and provisions holding employees accountable; provide annual training on pregnancy and disability discrimination, as well as retaliation, especially for those involved at the management level to educate them on their rights and responsibilities with the goal of preventing and deterring any discriminatory practices in the future. The court will maintain jurisdiction over this case for the term of the consent decree.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Guam differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

 Guam became a territory in 1950 and its Medicaid program was established in 1975. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital currently servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the Guam Medicaid program. Guam’s Medicaid program does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan; the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $268,343,113 in Medicaid funding to Guam.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Guam, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Guam’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

Guam was awarded $24,436,001 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. Guam must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies