Idaho

States - Big Screen

The Employment First movement is perpetual in Idaho, where anybody with the will to work is never stuck being a "couch potato."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Idaho’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.24%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,654,930
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
15.46%
Change from
2014 to 2015
117,837
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
14.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
45,124
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.28%
Change from
2014 to 2015
38.29%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.17%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.63%

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 1,612,136 1,634,464 1,654,930
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 105,862 99,623 117,837
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 38,884 38,629 45,124
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 632,558 644,653 646,788
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 36.73% 38.78% 38.29%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.21% 75.73% 76.63%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.10% 4.80% 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.30% 20.60% 20.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.70% 14.80% 14.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 111,162 108,194 117,929
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 97,668 96,586 107,110
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 190,875 187,488 208,520
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 2,050 1,037 467
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 14,299 15,657 18,462
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,587 3,749 4,086
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,416 1,665 1,154
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 5,332 6,274 7,444
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 3,350 4,020 3,368

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,547 1,668 1,767
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.40% 5.70% 6.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 43,423 43,820 44,090

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,218 1,360 1,489
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,421 2,414 2,626
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 9,277 11,628 12,057
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.10% 11.70% 12.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 8.10% 3.50% 3.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 0.40% 0.20%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 9.50% 5.00% 4.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 32.00% 19.80% 18.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 493 436 440
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 34 44 31
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 573 613 581
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,936 2,448 2,336

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 14,064 11,705 6,263
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 41 31 33
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 30 25 31
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 73.00% 81.00% 94.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.88 1.55 1.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,397
3,862
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 18 24 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 437 506 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 606 637 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 666 709 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,185 1,412 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 485 574 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.20% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,275 1,754 1,733
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 63,228 64,310 65,287
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 134 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2009 2012 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,633,000 $1,058,000 $1,124,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $15,880,000 $9,260,000 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $9,392,000 $17,283
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 5.00% 3.00% 6.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 5,274 2,384 2,375
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,891 2,145 1,598
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 20.40 12.40 12.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.40% 60.12% 60.85%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.40% 10.83% 10.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.20% 1.21% 1.19%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 22.60% 55.00% 67.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). N/A 18.22% 13.70%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 44.50% 41.30% 41.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 68.10% 61.94% 54.81%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). N/A 23.08% 27.41%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 826,034
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,049
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 47,881
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 585,721
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 633,602
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 176
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 606
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 782
AbilityOne wages (products). $296,602
AbilityOne wages (services). $8,126,422

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 11 8 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 8 11
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 343 395
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 343 395

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~Average Earnings performance measure dropped from 112% to 91%. Average second and third quarter salaries in PY 14 were $6,597. The drop in average salaries is affected by the number of hours participants are willing to work after transition. Traditionally, participants are at the retirement age and may not want to work a full time schedule when transitioned to employment. ICOA will improve this performance by targeting jobs that provide a higher hourly wage and provide participants with professional skills trainings to match higher paying job positions.
The “Most In Need” performance measure dropped from 2.58 to 2.51 average employment barriers per participant. ICOA and Experience Works recently implemented a process to prioritize and enroll participants with higher employment barriers. As positions open on the program, the sub grantee will prioritize participants with barriers to employment first. Experience Works will also, ensure priority of service is given to veterans and ensure positions are filled in rural areas where employment opportunities are limited. (Page 141)

Customized Employment

~~No specific disability related information found.

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 162)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Youth with disabilities are a priority group for the WIOA Title I Youth program and are also the target group for the state’s current Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. The state has made significant efforts to ensure that services to youth with disabilities are provided in the same capacity as those without disabilities and the needs of this population are properly addressed. WIOA Youth program staff are trained by or partnered with DEI staff for service provision. Regional business specialists and other WIOA partner staff providing services to employers develop key relationships with businesses to provide opportunities for work-based activities for youth with disabilities. Strong partnerships with the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired and Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and the Blind are utilized to develop and undertake activities as diverse as Ropes courses for teamwork and leadership development to week-long work readiness camps that help these youth achieve success by building their confidence, self-esteem and job seeking skills. (Page 201-202)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~The Division’s transition coordinator has been traveling across the state to create awareness of the changes in the VR program and to market PETS pilot programs. These activities consist of a series of face to face meetings in communities across Idaho including key stakeholder engagement through a series of regional special educator meetings, presentations at statewide administrator meetings, presentation at Tools for Life to parents, students and educators, outreach to Idaho Parents Unlimited, outreach to the Idaho Interagency Council on Secondary Transition, and ongoing discussions with the Idaho State Department of Education. (Page 277)
IDVR maintains the two primary innovation and expansion activities, supporting the activities of both the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the State Independent Living Council (SILC). Additionally, FFY 2016 will see a substantial increase in innovation pilot projects to support transition services and will monitor these pilot programs for model fidelity and outcome. The Division will work closely with the SRC to identify further innovation and expansion activities which align with the goals and priorities outlined in WIOA. To this end, IDVR has set aside one FTE to hire a Business Relations Liaison to help meet this new emphasis in WIOA and has engaged, in part with the Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center to help inform the competencies required by this position. The Division hopes to proceed after the ‘effectiveness in serving employers’ is defined by the US Departments of Education and Labor. IDVR will coordinate business outreach efforts with the Idaho Department of Labor. (Page 303)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

~~The IDVR and the Commission provide services such as counseling and guidance, assessment, vocational training, post-secondary education, transportation, personal assistance services, and job placement. Through customer informed choice and in partnership with their VR counselor, individuals with disabilities are able to create an individualized plan for employment, maximize their potential, and reach the goal of competitive integrated employment. Service identification is determined through a comprehensive assessment of the individual needs and interests based upon vocational goal selection. Comparable benefits are sought prior to the expenditure of program funds for nonexempt services.  (Page 55)
• In addition to internal training, IDVR will develop training in concert with workforce partners to cross-educate program staff on the benefits and services provided by all partners. The Division will coordinate disability specific training initiatives for non-Title IV programs with the Commission.
• The Division will continue its collaboration with the Commission in serving individuals with multiple disabilities when applicable.  (Page 92)
Partner-provided services are also accessed to meet specific One-Stop customer needs. Braille, tape or large print of written information are available through the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired or a directory of Sign Language and Oral Interpreters is available through the Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Other non-required partner services are also common points of One-Stop referral such as those provided by DisAbility Rights Idaho, which operates the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program in the state and provides counseling to customers on how employment affects Social Security benefits. (Page 164)
Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 269)
There is a strong correlation between those individuals requiring supported employment (SE) services and presumptively eligible participants in the VR program. To approximate the potential need for SE services, the Division will utilize counts of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries.
Individuals who qualify for SSI/SSDI are by law presumptively eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation services. The United States Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as of December 2012 the number of Idahoans age 18-64 who received SSDI was 42,382. SSI benefits were received by 19,933 individuals while 6,668 people concurrently received SSI and SSDI during the same period. These 62,315 individuals represent 6.6% of all working age Idahoans. (Page 290)
WIPA referrals, one of IDVR’s benchmarks to meet this priority realized a year over year increase of 40% from FFY 2014-2015. A second benchmark, Social Security reimbursements to VR is difficult to compare due to large fluctuations in the dates cost reimbursements are processed. SSA has developed a new processing system and hopes to phase-in all programs soon. This will make for a more legitimate benchmark as SSA will conduct payment requests in a timelier manner.
IDVR’s primary WIPA partner, Disability Rights of Idaho (DRI) did not reapply to administer WIPA in Idaho, consequently we have fewer in state resources to draw from for benefits planning. Montana State University - Billings is now the lead agency for WIPA referrals. DRI has agreed to provide information on Idaho’s context to MSU. In the Treasure Valley, Living Independence Network Corporation (LINC) provides benefits counseling in their designated geographical locale. (Page 311)
2. IDVR’s primary WIPA partner, Disability Rights of Idaho (DRI) did not reapply to administer WIPA in Idaho, consequently we have fewer in state resources to draw from for benefits planning.
3. There is general consensus in the Planning and Evaluation Unit that while the CSS process needs to be revisited, the capacity to do so has been lacking.
4. A second benchmark, to increase the number of different occupational areas hiring IDVR customers has been determined to be an insufficient measure to address the objective. This indicator is not sensitive to, nor does it measure meaningful engagement with Idaho’s employers. The Division feels new Section 116 performance measure provide far more relevant indicators to gauge performance toward this goal (e.g. employer services indicator and measureable skills gains). (Page 313)
(1) Increase Independence and Employment Outcomes through quality rehabilitation services. ICBVI will implement the following strategies:
• Work with Transition youth at the start of high school to foster the development of ongoing transition planning and services specifically connecting School Districts throughout the State;
• ICBVI will meet or exceed the required federal indicators;
• Emphasize the use of work incentives from Social Security Administration that promotes the transition of dependence on benefits to the independence of part or full time employment;
• Provide ongoing staff training to insure qualified professional staff knowledgeable in blindness, visual impairments as well as secondary disabilities, counseling techniques, vocational rehabilitation, community and secondary transition;
• •Conduct Assistive Technology Assessments where needed. (Page 352) 

School to Work Transition

~~The Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Correction. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 97)
Coordination of service provision will take place at the local area level. Local agreements will be established among One-Stop partners that promote communication and include arrangements for cost sharing to enable the full utilization of external funding sources. The Division will support informational training on programs. The Division will continue to support coordination and co-location with external plan agencies such as the Division of Behavioral Health, the Idaho Department of Correction and our school to work transition partners. (Page 100)
It is worth contrasting the services in the regions of the state covered by the cooperative agreements versus those not covered. Any individual school district may participate in the arrangement. IDVR counselors are either located in high schools or travel to those high school participating in the project. This increases accessibility to the students eligible and/or potentially eligible for IDVR services. Counselors maintain a dedicated caseload of transitioning students and youth with disabilities until case closure. Dedicated school to work counselors collocated in schools creates closer working relationships with school personnel, provides for more timely referrals, better support throughout the rehabilitation process, and the expertise that comes with specialization. The arrangement has proved important in developing an excellent working relationship between IDVR staff and school districts across the state. (Page 270)
ICBVI VR Counselors and Administrative Office staff coordinates with education officials to work with blind and visually impaired students transitioning from the K-12 school system. VR counselors regularly meet with the Special Education teachers, teachers of the visually impaired, school counselors, school nurses and other personnel involved in school work transition. Students can be referred to ICBVI at age 14. A transition Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is developed to assist the student with their successful transition from school to work (Page 334)
1. To continue serving school districts across the state. All Idaho school districts are served through each regional office. ICBVI does not maintain any cooperative agreements with school districts specific to the funding of school to work transition counselors. (Page 337)
The Interagency Task Force on Transition from School to Work; Transition and Assistive Technology School to Work Conference: Tools for Life; Independent Living Conference; Training Conferences provided by the Association for the Education (AER) and Rehabilitation for the Blind and Visually Impaired; Collaborative training with the Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and Blind. (Page 346)
ICBVI is committed to working collaboratively with the IESDB, IDVR, and all regional school districts to identify all eligible (or potentially eligible) secondary students in the state of Idaho. Furthermore, ICBVI is committed to reaching out to rural communities in this effort. ICBVI currently has two summer programs that are targeted towards high school students:
1. School to Work Experience Program (SWEP) and,
2. College Days. Curriculum in both of these programs is being reviewed and modified, as appropriate, to ensure they meet all of the criteria of PETS under WIOA. Additionally, both of these programs will be expanded to include more participants. (Page 358)
Goal 1 - Increase Independence and Employment Outcomes through Quality Rehabilitation Services.
• Passed Standards and Indicators for FFY 2015;
• The ICBVI’s Assistive Technologist continues to maintain consistent monthly contact providing direct client assessments. Continued e-mail/telephone consultation with Teachers of the Visually Impaired (TVI);
• Continued training of VR staff in order to provide needed services to clients with benefits;
• Regional meetings which include VR staff from both agencies, and School District staff, which are held every other year, last one was completed in September 2013. (Page 360)
 

Data Collection

~~The postsecondary institutions expressed interest in continuing to provide occupational skills training under WIOA, but faced challenges in implementing the new WIOA performance reporting for ETPs. In particular the workforce training programs, preferred by employers, did not collect the level of student information required for WIOA reporting. The stakeholder group met for over a year to write policy and develop technical solutions. Most importantly, this group generated buy-in for the much resisted data collection required. (Page 106)
As specified in Section (II)(b)(6) of this State Combined Plan, Idaho will continue to use these existing systems as the core infrastructure for our data collection and reporting processes under WIOA. Please refer to that section for more information regarding our plans for linking and integrating these systems. (Page 112)
This plan will allow core programs to update their data collection processes as needed to be WIOA compliant by July 1, 2016. It will also allow programs to begin updating their individual MIS systems as soon as possible, while taking steps toward fuller integration over the long term. Because an integrated system will not be in place on July 1, 2016, each program will be collecting data in different systems and we will use an ad-hoc data sharing process for exporting, sharing, matching, and importing data during the first, and possibly the second year. The core programs currently have data sharing processes and agreements in place under WIA, and these will be updated in Year One to align with WIOA data elements. (Page156)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

~~IDVR has hired a Transition Coordinator with extensive experience and an established network across Idaho public K-12 education system. The Transition Coordinator can provide PETS related training and technical assistance customized for Idaho businesses and coordinate with the Business Relations Liaison to ensure relevant and meaningful interventions are tailored to the needs of businesses, and to address all employer concerns regarding the provision of PETS and work based learning experiences. Employer needs will help inform alignment between PETS and the career pathways/sector strategy outlined in the strategic elements section of Idaho’s combined state plan. ( Page 280)

Employment Networks

~~Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 269)
IDVR does not establish cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers. Services are purchased on a fee–for–service basis. IDVR does have cooperative agreements with several non–profit CRPs for the coordination of services provided by Employment Networks for individuals who are Social Security beneficiaries who are Ticket holders. These cooperative agreements describe the coordination between both agencies. (Page 278)
 

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Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/05/2017

~~" This year’s conference will focus on bringing the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 07/28/2017

~~“The Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services is the largest regional conference in Idaho focusing on providing quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support people with disabilities and mental illness. We bring together over 700 attendees each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NEW - Proposed Adult Developmental Disabilities Waiver Renewal - 04/26/2017

~~“This renewal application revises the reimbursement methodology (Appendix I-2-a) for residential habilitation services, environmental accessibility adaptations, and specialized medical equipment and supplies. Additionally, this renewal application makes the following minor changes to the approved waiver: 1. Updates the Public Input summary, Contact Persons, and Attachments #1 and #2 in the Main Application; 2. Designates the Division of Medicaid as the Medical Assistance Unit in Appendix A-1; 3. Revises the Administrative Authority Performance Measure in Appendix A; 4. Updates projections for unduplicated number of participants in Appendix B-3-a; 5. Updates projections for goals for participant direction in Appendix E-1-n; 6. Updates the description of the opportunity for public comment in process to establish new provider rates in Appendix I-2-a; 7. Updates utilization and expenditure projections in Appendix J; and 8. Corrects typographical errors throughout the waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Idaho Medicaid at a Glance” - 12/01/2016

~~“Under Idaho’s Home and Community-Based Waivers, qualifying Medicaid participants may receive an array of services to:•Prevent unnecessary institutional placement;•Provide for the greatest degree of independence possible;•Enhance the quality of life;•Encourage individual choice; and•Achieve and maintain community integration.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2016

“In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday. This chapter includes The steps required to complete an IEP Transition Plan. Transition Planning at 14 Beginning when the child is age 14 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must address (within the applicable parts of the IEP) the courses he or she needs to take to reach his or her post-school goals. A statement of transition services needs must also be included in each of the child's subsequent IEPs. Transition Planning at 16 Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho State Transition Plan - 07/29/2016

Coming Into Compliance with HCBS Setting Requirements: Public Notice and Request for Comment The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in t he Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915 (k) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver. Copies of the waivers can be viewed at www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Idaho Senate Bill 1268 “Relating to the Council on Developmental Disabilities; Amending Section 267-6704, Idaho Code, To Revise Provisions Regarding Council Membership and to Make Technical Corrections” - 07/01/2016

“67-6704.COMPOSITION.(1) The council shall consist of twenty-three 23) members to be appointed by the governor, at least sixty percent (60%)of whom shall be individuals with developmental disabilities, parents or Guardians of children with developmental disabilities, or immediate relatives or guardians of adults with mentally impairing developmental disabilities who cannot advocate for themselves. These members shall not represent any other category of membership. (2) At least five (5) of the members shall Be persons with a developmental disability, and at least seven (7) of the members shall be parents or guardians of children with a developmental disability”

Systems
  • Other

Idaho HB 476 - 03/18/2014

“Idaho Code 56-255 (3) (e) (ii) describes Medicaid services for people with developmental disabilities. The total amount of Medicaid developmental disability services a person can receive is limited by an individual budget amount, determined by a formula based on individual assessments. In 2011, H 260 added language to this Section which limited individual budget modifications to only those services needed to protect the health or safety of the person. One unintended consequence of this change was that it prohibited budget modifications that would allow the person to obtain or maintain employment. Medicaid can pay for Community Supported Employment (CSE) services or specialized training and support for a person with a developmental disability in a job setting. The effect of this limitation was to reduce the number of people getting on-the-job training and support, from 275 participants in 2010, to 182 participants in 2013. This bill would allow people with developmental disabilities to modify their individual budgets by adding Community Supported Employment services to their plan, when these services are needed to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2016

“In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday. This chapter includes The steps required to complete an IEP Transition Plan. Transition Planning at 14 Beginning when the child is age 14 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must address (within the applicable parts of the IEP) the courses he or she needs to take to reach his or her post-school goals. A statement of transition services needs must also be included in each of the child's subsequent IEPs. Transition Planning at 16 Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Commission on Aging “No Wrong Door” - 04/21/2015

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Extended Employment Services provide Community Supported Employment (CSE), long-term on-the-job supports in integrated settings for people who have developmental disabilities, mental illness, serious emotional disturbance and traumatic brain injury. EES also provides Work Services composed of non-work and training towards employment in segregated settings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Strategic Plan 2016-2019 Idaho “No Wrong Door”

~~“Idaho’s Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC) provides Idahoans the opportunity toaccess an array of public and private long-term care services and supports (LTSS), through single access points. LTSS information can be accessed through Idaho 211 Careline, Senior Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA), Area Agencies on Aging (AAA’s), Centers for Independent Living (CIL’s) and the Live Better Idaho website.In 2014, the Administration for Community Living (ACL), in collaboration with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), awarded the Idaho Commission on Aging (ICOA) a planning grant to develop and implement a single statewide No Wrong Door System (NWD System). Key functions of the NWD System are Governance and Administration, Public Outreach and Links to Key Referral Sources, Person Centered Counseling and Streamlined Access to Public Programs. The intent is to make it easier for people of all ages, abilities and income levels to learn about and access the services they may need.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare “Developmental Disabilities”

“The Department of Health and Welfare can help provide a number of services to assist adults and children with developmental disabilities. Some of these services include: physical and occupational therapy, housing and living supports, chore services, employment support, environmental modifications, home delivered meals, nursing services, respite care, habilitative supports, family education, crisis intervention, and in-school supports, to name a few.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities “2016 Work Plan”

Objective 1.3– Employment First Create more opportunities for people with developmental disabilities to have jobs in the community that are integrated, inclusive, and pay more than minimum wage by working with partners on a statewide employment first project that includes educating communities, training staff, and writing at least one state policy by September 2016 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment. FY 2016 Activities •Convene Employment First Consortium, support workgroups •Utilize opportunities for technical assistance from national experts through the Employment Learning Community, ODEP Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Project, and other resources •With key partners, draft recommendations for adding employment service options under the Idaho Medicaid program in line with HCBS rules •Build public awareness and support for Employment First message •Promote Idaho Disability Employment Awareness Month activities including Take Your Legislator to Work and post awareness information •Support employment planning training opportunities for transition- age youth and families •Review research reports and state system data related to employment services •Monitor employment related policies and program changes •Participate in project-relevant councils, committees, and workgroups

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and Idaho State Rehabilitation Council Services to Students and Youth with Disabilities (2016 Annual Report)

~~“Pending final regulations of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, the agency heeded encouragement from federal partners to step back and re-envision how business is conducted. Where some other states have struggled to implement the significant structural and process changes required, Idaho viewed it as a challenge to overcome and acted accordingly.

A completely new program of pre-employment transition services for students, the revamp of traditional youth and adult activities to accommodate that change, increased engagement of the business community, and the alignment of shared plans and outcome measures with other workforce agencies would each be difficult to accomplish, let alone all at the same time. Through exceptional effort, the staff succeeded and results of that accomplishment are evident in the facts, figures and success stories displayed on the following calendar pages.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired: VR 2016 State Plan

ICBVI’s Vocational Rehabilitation plan is outlined and includes details about cooperative agreements and partnerships with other agencies and employers as well as provisions for supported employment services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Partners in Policymaking 2016

Idaho Partners in Policymaking is an innovative leadership development program for adults with developmental disabilities and parents of children with disabilities. Partners receive information, training, resources, and skill building so they may have the best possible life experiences for themselves and for their children. Partners in Policymaking was created in 1986 by Colleen Wieck, Executive Director of the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities. The program was developed specifically to teach people with disabilities and families of young children with disabilities to: Work on long-term change. Become active partners with policymakers who will shape policies that impact people with disabilities and families. Understand possibilities and how to create them.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Consortium for Idahoans with Disabilities

The mission of CID is “to protect, promote and advance the rights and interests of people with disabilities of all ages in Idaho in a manner consistent with the following principles:    1. CID will promote and protect the rights of people with disabilities to meaningful personal choice and self determination.    2. CID will promote the right to independence and self sufficiency for people with disabilities.    3. CID will promote the right to inclusive, adapted, accessible services, residences, education, health care and employment for people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho State Rehabilitation Council

“Working on behalf of Idahoans with disabilities, the Idaho State Rehabilitation Council endeavors to provide consumers, service providers and others the opportunity to participate in constructive dialogue and public input to continually improve the quality of Vocational Rehabilitation services to residents of Idaho. The Idaho State Rehabilitation Council monitors the policies and practices of the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Council can make recommendations to IDVR about eligibility, the scope and effectiveness of services provided and functions performed that affect the ability of individuals with disabilities to achieve rehabilitation goals.   The Council prepares and submits an annual report on the status of Vocational Rehabilitation programs in Idaho, and makes that report available to the public.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Cooperative Services Agreement: DoE, VR & Blind and Visually Impaired

“This Cooperative Services Agreement has been developed with multiple purposes in mind. First, this agreement is intended to provide a coordinated, comprehensive system focusing on youth with disabilities as they transition from secondary to post-school activities. Beyond that, the information contained in this agreement serves to provide guidance to the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI), and the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE) regarding roles and responsibilities around issues related to transition.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Employment First Consortium

“The Idaho Employment First Consortium was established and is supported by the Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities for the purpose of improving how employment services and systems work in Idaho so that people with developmental disabilities are able to reach their career goals. It includes representatives from state agencies, advocacy organizations, service providers, parents, and self-advocates. Seventeen Consortium members met for the first time in April 2012 and continue to meet monthly on an ongoing basis. The group has adopted an Employment First message with defined common values and a vision for our state: ‘All Idahoans with disabilities have the right and responsibility to work and contribute to their community.’

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2013

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2013, Idaho was awarded a Round 4 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This will end in 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Idaho Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration is a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Demonstration designed to help states try new ways of delivering Medicaid services. The Demonstration is designed to help people to move, also called transition, from an institution into home- and community-based living settings, such as a home or an apartment. In Idaho, the Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration is known as Idaho Home Choice.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/05/2017

~~" This year’s conference will focus on bringing the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 07/28/2017

~~“The Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services is the largest regional conference in Idaho focusing on providing quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support people with disabilities and mental illness. We bring together over 700 attendees each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Parents Unlimited “What is Parents Unlimited?” - 07/18/2016

Founded in 1985, Idaho Parents Unlimited, Inc. (IPUL) is a statewide organization which houses the Idaho Parent Training and Information Center, the Family to Family Health Information Center, Idaho Family Voices, and VSA Idaho, the State Organization on Arts and Disability. The Parent Training and Information Center ensures that parents of children with disabilities receive training and information on their rights, responsibilities, and protections under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in order to develop the skills necessary to cooperatively and effectively participate in planning and decision making relating to early intervention, educational, and transitional services.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Training Clearinghouse - Transition to Work for Youth with Significant Disabilities - 08/31/2015

“This is an online course using the Idaho Training Clearinghouse Learning Management System at the Center on Disabilities and Human Development at the University of Idaho. They are not face to face classes.” The course was available from August 31 to December 7, 2015. 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

ID Department of Labor: Job Hunting Guide for People with Disabilities

“This book can help Idahoans with disabilities: understand their strengths and knowledge concerning work, organize their job search, Identify potential work areas, prepare for job interview questions, understand their rights and protection under the ADA, and locate agencies and governmental programs to assist them. This book can help Idaho employers: ensure equality of opportunity for individuals with disabilities, understand the rights and protections granted to individuals with disabilities under the ADA, and understand and be reassured that individuals with disabilities are capable workers."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Idaho "Able to Work" Project

This portal of employment information for employment seekers, business, and service providers seeks to promote more and better employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Idaho.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Bureau of Facility Standards - Employment Definitions for People with Disabilities

These slides serve as an overview of Idaho's regulatory definitions of types of employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

ID Council on DD: "Discovering Personal Genius" Training

Training on Discovering Personal Genius, an employment planning tool and model for individual employment evaluation that results in a comprehensive vocational profile. Discovering Personal Genius uses a person-centered community-based observation and trial in real-time community activities to determine the strengths, skills, and interests of the person. It also includes exploration through informational interviews of potential employers in the community.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NEW - Proposed Adult Developmental Disabilities Waiver Renewal - 04/26/2017

~~“This renewal application revises the reimbursement methodology (Appendix I-2-a) for residential habilitation services, environmental accessibility adaptations, and specialized medical equipment and supplies. Additionally, this renewal application makes the following minor changes to the approved waiver: 1. Updates the Public Input summary, Contact Persons, and Attachments #1 and #2 in the Main Application; 2. Designates the Division of Medicaid as the Medical Assistance Unit in Appendix A-1; 3. Revises the Administrative Authority Performance Measure in Appendix A; 4. Updates projections for unduplicated number of participants in Appendix B-3-a; 5. Updates projections for goals for participant direction in Appendix E-1-n; 6. Updates the description of the opportunity for public comment in process to establish new provider rates in Appendix I-2-a; 7. Updates utilization and expenditure projections in Appendix J; and 8. Corrects typographical errors throughout the waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Idaho Medicaid at a Glance” - 12/01/2016

~~“Under Idaho’s Home and Community-Based Waivers, qualifying Medicaid participants may receive an array of services to:•Prevent unnecessary institutional placement;•Provide for the greatest degree of independence possible;•Enhance the quality of life;•Encourage individual choice; and•Achieve and maintain community integration.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho State Transition Plan - 07/29/2016

Coming Into Compliance with HCBS Setting Requirements: Public Notice and Request for Comment The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in t he Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915 (k) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver. Copies of the waivers can be viewed at www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov

Systems
  • Other

“HCBS Rules” - 07/01/2016

The Medicaid HCBS rules are contained in the Medicaid Enhanced rules in IDAPA 16.03.10 and the Consumer-Directed Services rules in IDAPA 16.03.13 which are published on the Idaho Department of Administration Website. A direct link to these two sections of rules is posted on this page, under the “What’s New” section. The Medicaid HCBS rules implement requirements to ensure that individuals receiving Medicaid Home and Community Based Services are integrated in and supported to gain full access to their community.

Systems
  • Other

Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services Waiver - 07/01/2016

“The purpose of this amendment to Idaho's Act Early Waiver is: 1. To conduct a thorough review of waiver language to ensure it is consistent with current operational practices, including service plan development and complaint/critical incident systems, and to ensure alignment with recent Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) changes in response to the Home and Community-Based Services Final Rule. 2. To align DD waiver performance measures with the updated CMS sub-assurances and to ensure performance measures reflect current data source and sampling practices. The Department is also taking this opportunity to ensure that performance measures aligned across Idaho's HCBS waivers.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) HCBS Waiver: ID Developmental Disabilities (Amendment # ID.0076.R05.02) - 07/01/2014

“In March 2014, the Idaho Legislature passed House Bill 476 which amended Section 56-255 of Idaho Code. Revisions to Idaho Code direct the state to allow Developmental Disability budget modifications only when needed to obtain or maintain employment or when health and safety issues are identified. Budget modifications for either of these reasons must meet criteria as defined in Department rule. This amendment adds the ability for the state to allow budget modifications when the modification is needed for the participant to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho HCBS State Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

“The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in the Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915(k) Home and Community‐Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver.” “The following Transition Plan sets forth the actions Idaho will take to operate all applicable HCBS programs in compliance with the final rules.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

ID Aged & Disabled Waiver (1076.R05.00) - 10/01/2012

"Provides adult day care, attendant care, day hab, homemaker, residential hab, respite, supported employment, adult residential care, chore, companion services, consultation, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations, home delivered meals, nonmedical transportation, PERS, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age and individuals w/PD ages 18-64."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

ID Developmental Disabilities Waiver (0076.R05.00) - 10/01/2012

This waiver  "Provides residential hab, respite, supported employment, specialized medical equipment and supplies, community support, FMS, support broker, adult day care, behavior consultation/crisis management, chore, dental, environmental accessibility adaptation, home delivered meals, PERS, skilled nursing, non-medical transportation for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 18 - no max age."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The Employment First movement is perpetual in Idaho, where anybody with the will to work is never stuck being a "couch potato."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Idaho’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.24%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,654,930
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
15.46%
Change from
2014 to 2015
117,837
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
14.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
45,124
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.28%
Change from
2014 to 2015
38.29%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.17%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.63%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 1,612,136 1,634,464 1,654,930
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 105,862 99,623 117,837
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 38,884 38,629 45,124
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 632,558 644,653 646,788
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 36.73% 38.78% 38.29%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.21% 75.73% 76.63%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.10% 4.80% 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.30% 20.60% 20.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.70% 14.80% 14.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 111,162 108,194 117,929
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 97,668 96,586 107,110
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 190,875 187,488 208,520
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 2,050 1,037 467
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 14,299 15,657 18,462
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,587 3,749 4,086
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,416 1,665 1,154
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 5,332 6,274 7,444
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 3,350 4,020 3,368

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,547 1,668 1,767
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.40% 5.70% 6.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 43,423 43,820 44,090

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,218 1,360 1,489
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,421 2,414 2,626
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 9,277 11,628 12,057
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.10% 11.70% 12.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 8.10% 3.50% 3.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 0.40% 0.20%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 9.50% 5.00% 4.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 32.00% 19.80% 18.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 493 436 440
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 34 44 31
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 573 613 581
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,936 2,448 2,336

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 14,064 11,705 6,263
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 41 31 33
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 30 25 31
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 73.00% 81.00% 94.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.88 1.55 1.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,397
3,862
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 18 24 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 437 506 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 606 637 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 666 709 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,185 1,412 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 485 574 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.20% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,275 1,754 1,733
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 63,228 64,310 65,287
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 134 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2009 2012 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,633,000 $1,058,000 $1,124,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $15,880,000 $9,260,000 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $9,392,000 $17,283
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 5.00% 3.00% 6.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 5,274 2,384 2,375
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,891 2,145 1,598
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 20.40 12.40 12.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.40% 60.12% 60.85%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.40% 10.83% 10.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.20% 1.21% 1.19%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 22.60% 55.00% 67.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). N/A 18.22% 13.70%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 44.50% 41.30% 41.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 68.10% 61.94% 54.81%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). N/A 23.08% 27.41%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 826,034
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,049
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 47,881
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 585,721
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 633,602
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 176
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 606
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 782
AbilityOne wages (products). $296,602
AbilityOne wages (services). $8,126,422

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 11 8 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 8 11
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 343 395
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 343 395

 

WIOA Proflie

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~Average Earnings performance measure dropped from 112% to 91%. Average second and third quarter salaries in PY 14 were $6,597. The drop in average salaries is affected by the number of hours participants are willing to work after transition. Traditionally, participants are at the retirement age and may not want to work a full time schedule when transitioned to employment. ICOA will improve this performance by targeting jobs that provide a higher hourly wage and provide participants with professional skills trainings to match higher paying job positions.
The “Most In Need” performance measure dropped from 2.58 to 2.51 average employment barriers per participant. ICOA and Experience Works recently implemented a process to prioritize and enroll participants with higher employment barriers. As positions open on the program, the sub grantee will prioritize participants with barriers to employment first. Experience Works will also, ensure priority of service is given to veterans and ensure positions are filled in rural areas where employment opportunities are limited. (Page 141)

Customized Employment

~~No specific disability related information found.

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 162)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Youth with disabilities are a priority group for the WIOA Title I Youth program and are also the target group for the state’s current Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. The state has made significant efforts to ensure that services to youth with disabilities are provided in the same capacity as those without disabilities and the needs of this population are properly addressed. WIOA Youth program staff are trained by or partnered with DEI staff for service provision. Regional business specialists and other WIOA partner staff providing services to employers develop key relationships with businesses to provide opportunities for work-based activities for youth with disabilities. Strong partnerships with the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired and Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and the Blind are utilized to develop and undertake activities as diverse as Ropes courses for teamwork and leadership development to week-long work readiness camps that help these youth achieve success by building their confidence, self-esteem and job seeking skills. (Page 201-202)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~The Division’s transition coordinator has been traveling across the state to create awareness of the changes in the VR program and to market PETS pilot programs. These activities consist of a series of face to face meetings in communities across Idaho including key stakeholder engagement through a series of regional special educator meetings, presentations at statewide administrator meetings, presentation at Tools for Life to parents, students and educators, outreach to Idaho Parents Unlimited, outreach to the Idaho Interagency Council on Secondary Transition, and ongoing discussions with the Idaho State Department of Education. (Page 277)
IDVR maintains the two primary innovation and expansion activities, supporting the activities of both the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the State Independent Living Council (SILC). Additionally, FFY 2016 will see a substantial increase in innovation pilot projects to support transition services and will monitor these pilot programs for model fidelity and outcome. The Division will work closely with the SRC to identify further innovation and expansion activities which align with the goals and priorities outlined in WIOA. To this end, IDVR has set aside one FTE to hire a Business Relations Liaison to help meet this new emphasis in WIOA and has engaged, in part with the Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center to help inform the competencies required by this position. The Division hopes to proceed after the ‘effectiveness in serving employers’ is defined by the US Departments of Education and Labor. IDVR will coordinate business outreach efforts with the Idaho Department of Labor. (Page 303)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

~~The IDVR and the Commission provide services such as counseling and guidance, assessment, vocational training, post-secondary education, transportation, personal assistance services, and job placement. Through customer informed choice and in partnership with their VR counselor, individuals with disabilities are able to create an individualized plan for employment, maximize their potential, and reach the goal of competitive integrated employment. Service identification is determined through a comprehensive assessment of the individual needs and interests based upon vocational goal selection. Comparable benefits are sought prior to the expenditure of program funds for nonexempt services.  (Page 55)
• In addition to internal training, IDVR will develop training in concert with workforce partners to cross-educate program staff on the benefits and services provided by all partners. The Division will coordinate disability specific training initiatives for non-Title IV programs with the Commission.
• The Division will continue its collaboration with the Commission in serving individuals with multiple disabilities when applicable.  (Page 92)
Partner-provided services are also accessed to meet specific One-Stop customer needs. Braille, tape or large print of written information are available through the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired or a directory of Sign Language and Oral Interpreters is available through the Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Other non-required partner services are also common points of One-Stop referral such as those provided by DisAbility Rights Idaho, which operates the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program in the state and provides counseling to customers on how employment affects Social Security benefits. (Page 164)
Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 269)
There is a strong correlation between those individuals requiring supported employment (SE) services and presumptively eligible participants in the VR program. To approximate the potential need for SE services, the Division will utilize counts of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries.
Individuals who qualify for SSI/SSDI are by law presumptively eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation services. The United States Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as of December 2012 the number of Idahoans age 18-64 who received SSDI was 42,382. SSI benefits were received by 19,933 individuals while 6,668 people concurrently received SSI and SSDI during the same period. These 62,315 individuals represent 6.6% of all working age Idahoans. (Page 290)
WIPA referrals, one of IDVR’s benchmarks to meet this priority realized a year over year increase of 40% from FFY 2014-2015. A second benchmark, Social Security reimbursements to VR is difficult to compare due to large fluctuations in the dates cost reimbursements are processed. SSA has developed a new processing system and hopes to phase-in all programs soon. This will make for a more legitimate benchmark as SSA will conduct payment requests in a timelier manner.
IDVR’s primary WIPA partner, Disability Rights of Idaho (DRI) did not reapply to administer WIPA in Idaho, consequently we have fewer in state resources to draw from for benefits planning. Montana State University - Billings is now the lead agency for WIPA referrals. DRI has agreed to provide information on Idaho’s context to MSU. In the Treasure Valley, Living Independence Network Corporation (LINC) provides benefits counseling in their designated geographical locale. (Page 311)
2. IDVR’s primary WIPA partner, Disability Rights of Idaho (DRI) did not reapply to administer WIPA in Idaho, consequently we have fewer in state resources to draw from for benefits planning.
3. There is general consensus in the Planning and Evaluation Unit that while the CSS process needs to be revisited, the capacity to do so has been lacking.
4. A second benchmark, to increase the number of different occupational areas hiring IDVR customers has been determined to be an insufficient measure to address the objective. This indicator is not sensitive to, nor does it measure meaningful engagement with Idaho’s employers. The Division feels new Section 116 performance measure provide far more relevant indicators to gauge performance toward this goal (e.g. employer services indicator and measureable skills gains). (Page 313)
(1) Increase Independence and Employment Outcomes through quality rehabilitation services. ICBVI will implement the following strategies:
• Work with Transition youth at the start of high school to foster the development of ongoing transition planning and services specifically connecting School Districts throughout the State;
• ICBVI will meet or exceed the required federal indicators;
• Emphasize the use of work incentives from Social Security Administration that promotes the transition of dependence on benefits to the independence of part or full time employment;
• Provide ongoing staff training to insure qualified professional staff knowledgeable in blindness, visual impairments as well as secondary disabilities, counseling techniques, vocational rehabilitation, community and secondary transition;
• •Conduct Assistive Technology Assessments where needed. (Page 352) 

School to Work Transition

~~The Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Correction. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 97)
Coordination of service provision will take place at the local area level. Local agreements will be established among One-Stop partners that promote communication and include arrangements for cost sharing to enable the full utilization of external funding sources. The Division will support informational training on programs. The Division will continue to support coordination and co-location with external plan agencies such as the Division of Behavioral Health, the Idaho Department of Correction and our school to work transition partners. (Page 100)
It is worth contrasting the services in the regions of the state covered by the cooperative agreements versus those not covered. Any individual school district may participate in the arrangement. IDVR counselors are either located in high schools or travel to those high school participating in the project. This increases accessibility to the students eligible and/or potentially eligible for IDVR services. Counselors maintain a dedicated caseload of transitioning students and youth with disabilities until case closure. Dedicated school to work counselors collocated in schools creates closer working relationships with school personnel, provides for more timely referrals, better support throughout the rehabilitation process, and the expertise that comes with specialization. The arrangement has proved important in developing an excellent working relationship between IDVR staff and school districts across the state. (Page 270)
ICBVI VR Counselors and Administrative Office staff coordinates with education officials to work with blind and visually impaired students transitioning from the K-12 school system. VR counselors regularly meet with the Special Education teachers, teachers of the visually impaired, school counselors, school nurses and other personnel involved in school work transition. Students can be referred to ICBVI at age 14. A transition Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is developed to assist the student with their successful transition from school to work (Page 334)
1. To continue serving school districts across the state. All Idaho school districts are served through each regional office. ICBVI does not maintain any cooperative agreements with school districts specific to the funding of school to work transition counselors. (Page 337)
The Interagency Task Force on Transition from School to Work; Transition and Assistive Technology School to Work Conference: Tools for Life; Independent Living Conference; Training Conferences provided by the Association for the Education (AER) and Rehabilitation for the Blind and Visually Impaired; Collaborative training with the Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and Blind. (Page 346)
ICBVI is committed to working collaboratively with the IESDB, IDVR, and all regional school districts to identify all eligible (or potentially eligible) secondary students in the state of Idaho. Furthermore, ICBVI is committed to reaching out to rural communities in this effort. ICBVI currently has two summer programs that are targeted towards high school students:
1. School to Work Experience Program (SWEP) and,
2. College Days. Curriculum in both of these programs is being reviewed and modified, as appropriate, to ensure they meet all of the criteria of PETS under WIOA. Additionally, both of these programs will be expanded to include more participants. (Page 358)
Goal 1 - Increase Independence and Employment Outcomes through Quality Rehabilitation Services.
• Passed Standards and Indicators for FFY 2015;
• The ICBVI’s Assistive Technologist continues to maintain consistent monthly contact providing direct client assessments. Continued e-mail/telephone consultation with Teachers of the Visually Impaired (TVI);
• Continued training of VR staff in order to provide needed services to clients with benefits;
• Regional meetings which include VR staff from both agencies, and School District staff, which are held every other year, last one was completed in September 2013. (Page 360)
 

Data Collection

~~The postsecondary institutions expressed interest in continuing to provide occupational skills training under WIOA, but faced challenges in implementing the new WIOA performance reporting for ETPs. In particular the workforce training programs, preferred by employers, did not collect the level of student information required for WIOA reporting. The stakeholder group met for over a year to write policy and develop technical solutions. Most importantly, this group generated buy-in for the much resisted data collection required. (Page 106)
As specified in Section (II)(b)(6) of this State Combined Plan, Idaho will continue to use these existing systems as the core infrastructure for our data collection and reporting processes under WIOA. Please refer to that section for more information regarding our plans for linking and integrating these systems. (Page 112)
This plan will allow core programs to update their data collection processes as needed to be WIOA compliant by July 1, 2016. It will also allow programs to begin updating their individual MIS systems as soon as possible, while taking steps toward fuller integration over the long term. Because an integrated system will not be in place on July 1, 2016, each program will be collecting data in different systems and we will use an ad-hoc data sharing process for exporting, sharing, matching, and importing data during the first, and possibly the second year. The core programs currently have data sharing processes and agreements in place under WIA, and these will be updated in Year One to align with WIOA data elements. (Page156)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

~~IDVR has hired a Transition Coordinator with extensive experience and an established network across Idaho public K-12 education system. The Transition Coordinator can provide PETS related training and technical assistance customized for Idaho businesses and coordinate with the Business Relations Liaison to ensure relevant and meaningful interventions are tailored to the needs of businesses, and to address all employer concerns regarding the provision of PETS and work based learning experiences. Employer needs will help inform alignment between PETS and the career pathways/sector strategy outlined in the strategic elements section of Idaho’s combined state plan. ( Page 280)

Employment Networks

~~Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 269)
IDVR does not establish cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers. Services are purchased on a fee–for–service basis. IDVR does have cooperative agreements with several non–profit CRPs for the coordination of services provided by Employment Networks for individuals who are Social Security beneficiaries who are Ticket holders. These cooperative agreements describe the coordination between both agencies. (Page 278)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 40

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/05/2017

~~" This year’s conference will focus on bringing the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 07/28/2017

~~“The Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services is the largest regional conference in Idaho focusing on providing quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support people with disabilities and mental illness. We bring together over 700 attendees each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NEW - Proposed Adult Developmental Disabilities Waiver Renewal - 04/26/2017

~~“This renewal application revises the reimbursement methodology (Appendix I-2-a) for residential habilitation services, environmental accessibility adaptations, and specialized medical equipment and supplies. Additionally, this renewal application makes the following minor changes to the approved waiver: 1. Updates the Public Input summary, Contact Persons, and Attachments #1 and #2 in the Main Application; 2. Designates the Division of Medicaid as the Medical Assistance Unit in Appendix A-1; 3. Revises the Administrative Authority Performance Measure in Appendix A; 4. Updates projections for unduplicated number of participants in Appendix B-3-a; 5. Updates projections for goals for participant direction in Appendix E-1-n; 6. Updates the description of the opportunity for public comment in process to establish new provider rates in Appendix I-2-a; 7. Updates utilization and expenditure projections in Appendix J; and 8. Corrects typographical errors throughout the waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Idaho Medicaid at a Glance” - 12/01/2016

~~“Under Idaho’s Home and Community-Based Waivers, qualifying Medicaid participants may receive an array of services to:•Prevent unnecessary institutional placement;•Provide for the greatest degree of independence possible;•Enhance the quality of life;•Encourage individual choice; and•Achieve and maintain community integration.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2016

“In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday. This chapter includes The steps required to complete an IEP Transition Plan. Transition Planning at 14 Beginning when the child is age 14 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must address (within the applicable parts of the IEP) the courses he or she needs to take to reach his or her post-school goals. A statement of transition services needs must also be included in each of the child's subsequent IEPs. Transition Planning at 16 Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho State Transition Plan - 07/29/2016

Coming Into Compliance with HCBS Setting Requirements: Public Notice and Request for Comment The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in t he Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915 (k) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver. Copies of the waivers can be viewed at www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Idaho Senate Bill 1268 “Relating to the Council on Developmental Disabilities; Amending Section 267-6704, Idaho Code, To Revise Provisions Regarding Council Membership and to Make Technical Corrections” - 07/01/2016

“67-6704.COMPOSITION.(1) The council shall consist of twenty-three 23) members to be appointed by the governor, at least sixty percent (60%)of whom shall be individuals with developmental disabilities, parents or Guardians of children with developmental disabilities, or immediate relatives or guardians of adults with mentally impairing developmental disabilities who cannot advocate for themselves. These members shall not represent any other category of membership. (2) At least five (5) of the members shall Be persons with a developmental disability, and at least seven (7) of the members shall be parents or guardians of children with a developmental disability”

Systems
  • Other

Idaho HB 476 - 03/18/2014

“Idaho Code 56-255 (3) (e) (ii) describes Medicaid services for people with developmental disabilities. The total amount of Medicaid developmental disability services a person can receive is limited by an individual budget amount, determined by a formula based on individual assessments. In 2011, H 260 added language to this Section which limited individual budget modifications to only those services needed to protect the health or safety of the person. One unintended consequence of this change was that it prohibited budget modifications that would allow the person to obtain or maintain employment. Medicaid can pay for Community Supported Employment (CSE) services or specialized training and support for a person with a developmental disability in a job setting. The effect of this limitation was to reduce the number of people getting on-the-job training and support, from 275 participants in 2010, to 182 participants in 2013. This bill would allow people with developmental disabilities to modify their individual budgets by adding Community Supported Employment services to their plan, when these services are needed to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2016

“In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday. This chapter includes The steps required to complete an IEP Transition Plan. Transition Planning at 14 Beginning when the child is age 14 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must address (within the applicable parts of the IEP) the courses he or she needs to take to reach his or her post-school goals. A statement of transition services needs must also be included in each of the child's subsequent IEPs. Transition Planning at 16 Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Commission on Aging “No Wrong Door” - 04/21/2015

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Extended Employment Services provide Community Supported Employment (CSE), long-term on-the-job supports in integrated settings for people who have developmental disabilities, mental illness, serious emotional disturbance and traumatic brain injury. EES also provides Work Services composed of non-work and training towards employment in segregated settings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Strategic Plan 2016-2019 Idaho “No Wrong Door”

~~“Idaho’s Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC) provides Idahoans the opportunity toaccess an array of public and private long-term care services and supports (LTSS), through single access points. LTSS information can be accessed through Idaho 211 Careline, Senior Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA), Area Agencies on Aging (AAA’s), Centers for Independent Living (CIL’s) and the Live Better Idaho website.In 2014, the Administration for Community Living (ACL), in collaboration with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), awarded the Idaho Commission on Aging (ICOA) a planning grant to develop and implement a single statewide No Wrong Door System (NWD System). Key functions of the NWD System are Governance and Administration, Public Outreach and Links to Key Referral Sources, Person Centered Counseling and Streamlined Access to Public Programs. The intent is to make it easier for people of all ages, abilities and income levels to learn about and access the services they may need.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare “Developmental Disabilities”

“The Department of Health and Welfare can help provide a number of services to assist adults and children with developmental disabilities. Some of these services include: physical and occupational therapy, housing and living supports, chore services, employment support, environmental modifications, home delivered meals, nursing services, respite care, habilitative supports, family education, crisis intervention, and in-school supports, to name a few.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities “2016 Work Plan”

Objective 1.3– Employment First Create more opportunities for people with developmental disabilities to have jobs in the community that are integrated, inclusive, and pay more than minimum wage by working with partners on a statewide employment first project that includes educating communities, training staff, and writing at least one state policy by September 2016 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment. FY 2016 Activities •Convene Employment First Consortium, support workgroups •Utilize opportunities for technical assistance from national experts through the Employment Learning Community, ODEP Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Project, and other resources •With key partners, draft recommendations for adding employment service options under the Idaho Medicaid program in line with HCBS rules •Build public awareness and support for Employment First message •Promote Idaho Disability Employment Awareness Month activities including Take Your Legislator to Work and post awareness information •Support employment planning training opportunities for transition- age youth and families •Review research reports and state system data related to employment services •Monitor employment related policies and program changes •Participate in project-relevant councils, committees, and workgroups

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and Idaho State Rehabilitation Council Services to Students and Youth with Disabilities (2016 Annual Report)

~~“Pending final regulations of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, the agency heeded encouragement from federal partners to step back and re-envision how business is conducted. Where some other states have struggled to implement the significant structural and process changes required, Idaho viewed it as a challenge to overcome and acted accordingly.

A completely new program of pre-employment transition services for students, the revamp of traditional youth and adult activities to accommodate that change, increased engagement of the business community, and the alignment of shared plans and outcome measures with other workforce agencies would each be difficult to accomplish, let alone all at the same time. Through exceptional effort, the staff succeeded and results of that accomplishment are evident in the facts, figures and success stories displayed on the following calendar pages.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired: VR 2016 State Plan

ICBVI’s Vocational Rehabilitation plan is outlined and includes details about cooperative agreements and partnerships with other agencies and employers as well as provisions for supported employment services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Partners in Policymaking 2016

Idaho Partners in Policymaking is an innovative leadership development program for adults with developmental disabilities and parents of children with disabilities. Partners receive information, training, resources, and skill building so they may have the best possible life experiences for themselves and for their children. Partners in Policymaking was created in 1986 by Colleen Wieck, Executive Director of the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities. The program was developed specifically to teach people with disabilities and families of young children with disabilities to: Work on long-term change. Become active partners with policymakers who will shape policies that impact people with disabilities and families. Understand possibilities and how to create them.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Consortium for Idahoans with Disabilities

The mission of CID is “to protect, promote and advance the rights and interests of people with disabilities of all ages in Idaho in a manner consistent with the following principles:    1. CID will promote and protect the rights of people with disabilities to meaningful personal choice and self determination.    2. CID will promote the right to independence and self sufficiency for people with disabilities.    3. CID will promote the right to inclusive, adapted, accessible services, residences, education, health care and employment for people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho State Rehabilitation Council

“Working on behalf of Idahoans with disabilities, the Idaho State Rehabilitation Council endeavors to provide consumers, service providers and others the opportunity to participate in constructive dialogue and public input to continually improve the quality of Vocational Rehabilitation services to residents of Idaho. The Idaho State Rehabilitation Council monitors the policies and practices of the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Council can make recommendations to IDVR about eligibility, the scope and effectiveness of services provided and functions performed that affect the ability of individuals with disabilities to achieve rehabilitation goals.   The Council prepares and submits an annual report on the status of Vocational Rehabilitation programs in Idaho, and makes that report available to the public.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Cooperative Services Agreement: DoE, VR & Blind and Visually Impaired

“This Cooperative Services Agreement has been developed with multiple purposes in mind. First, this agreement is intended to provide a coordinated, comprehensive system focusing on youth with disabilities as they transition from secondary to post-school activities. Beyond that, the information contained in this agreement serves to provide guidance to the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI), and the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE) regarding roles and responsibilities around issues related to transition.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Employment First Consortium

“The Idaho Employment First Consortium was established and is supported by the Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities for the purpose of improving how employment services and systems work in Idaho so that people with developmental disabilities are able to reach their career goals. It includes representatives from state agencies, advocacy organizations, service providers, parents, and self-advocates. Seventeen Consortium members met for the first time in April 2012 and continue to meet monthly on an ongoing basis. The group has adopted an Employment First message with defined common values and a vision for our state: ‘All Idahoans with disabilities have the right and responsibility to work and contribute to their community.’

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2013

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2013, Idaho was awarded a Round 4 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This will end in 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Idaho Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration is a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Demonstration designed to help states try new ways of delivering Medicaid services. The Demonstration is designed to help people to move, also called transition, from an institution into home- and community-based living settings, such as a home or an apartment. In Idaho, the Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration is known as Idaho Home Choice.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/05/2017

~~" This year’s conference will focus on bringing the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 07/28/2017

~~“The Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services is the largest regional conference in Idaho focusing on providing quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support people with disabilities and mental illness. We bring together over 700 attendees each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Parents Unlimited “What is Parents Unlimited?” - 07/18/2016

Founded in 1985, Idaho Parents Unlimited, Inc. (IPUL) is a statewide organization which houses the Idaho Parent Training and Information Center, the Family to Family Health Information Center, Idaho Family Voices, and VSA Idaho, the State Organization on Arts and Disability. The Parent Training and Information Center ensures that parents of children with disabilities receive training and information on their rights, responsibilities, and protections under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in order to develop the skills necessary to cooperatively and effectively participate in planning and decision making relating to early intervention, educational, and transitional services.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Training Clearinghouse - Transition to Work for Youth with Significant Disabilities - 08/31/2015

“This is an online course using the Idaho Training Clearinghouse Learning Management System at the Center on Disabilities and Human Development at the University of Idaho. They are not face to face classes.” The course was available from August 31 to December 7, 2015. 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

ID Department of Labor: Job Hunting Guide for People with Disabilities

“This book can help Idahoans with disabilities: understand their strengths and knowledge concerning work, organize their job search, Identify potential work areas, prepare for job interview questions, understand their rights and protection under the ADA, and locate agencies and governmental programs to assist them. This book can help Idaho employers: ensure equality of opportunity for individuals with disabilities, understand the rights and protections granted to individuals with disabilities under the ADA, and understand and be reassured that individuals with disabilities are capable workers."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Idaho "Able to Work" Project

This portal of employment information for employment seekers, business, and service providers seeks to promote more and better employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Idaho.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Bureau of Facility Standards - Employment Definitions for People with Disabilities

These slides serve as an overview of Idaho's regulatory definitions of types of employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

ID Council on DD: "Discovering Personal Genius" Training

Training on Discovering Personal Genius, an employment planning tool and model for individual employment evaluation that results in a comprehensive vocational profile. Discovering Personal Genius uses a person-centered community-based observation and trial in real-time community activities to determine the strengths, skills, and interests of the person. It also includes exploration through informational interviews of potential employers in the community.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NEW - Proposed Adult Developmental Disabilities Waiver Renewal - 04/26/2017

~~“This renewal application revises the reimbursement methodology (Appendix I-2-a) for residential habilitation services, environmental accessibility adaptations, and specialized medical equipment and supplies. Additionally, this renewal application makes the following minor changes to the approved waiver: 1. Updates the Public Input summary, Contact Persons, and Attachments #1 and #2 in the Main Application; 2. Designates the Division of Medicaid as the Medical Assistance Unit in Appendix A-1; 3. Revises the Administrative Authority Performance Measure in Appendix A; 4. Updates projections for unduplicated number of participants in Appendix B-3-a; 5. Updates projections for goals for participant direction in Appendix E-1-n; 6. Updates the description of the opportunity for public comment in process to establish new provider rates in Appendix I-2-a; 7. Updates utilization and expenditure projections in Appendix J; and 8. Corrects typographical errors throughout the waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Idaho Medicaid at a Glance” - 12/01/2016

~~“Under Idaho’s Home and Community-Based Waivers, qualifying Medicaid participants may receive an array of services to:•Prevent unnecessary institutional placement;•Provide for the greatest degree of independence possible;•Enhance the quality of life;•Encourage individual choice; and•Achieve and maintain community integration.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho State Transition Plan - 07/29/2016

Coming Into Compliance with HCBS Setting Requirements: Public Notice and Request for Comment The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in t he Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915 (k) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver. Copies of the waivers can be viewed at www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov

Systems
  • Other

“HCBS Rules” - 07/01/2016

The Medicaid HCBS rules are contained in the Medicaid Enhanced rules in IDAPA 16.03.10 and the Consumer-Directed Services rules in IDAPA 16.03.13 which are published on the Idaho Department of Administration Website. A direct link to these two sections of rules is posted on this page, under the “What’s New” section. The Medicaid HCBS rules implement requirements to ensure that individuals receiving Medicaid Home and Community Based Services are integrated in and supported to gain full access to their community.

Systems
  • Other

Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services Waiver - 07/01/2016

“The purpose of this amendment to Idaho's Act Early Waiver is: 1. To conduct a thorough review of waiver language to ensure it is consistent with current operational practices, including service plan development and complaint/critical incident systems, and to ensure alignment with recent Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) changes in response to the Home and Community-Based Services Final Rule. 2. To align DD waiver performance measures with the updated CMS sub-assurances and to ensure performance measures reflect current data source and sampling practices. The Department is also taking this opportunity to ensure that performance measures aligned across Idaho's HCBS waivers.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) HCBS Waiver: ID Developmental Disabilities (Amendment # ID.0076.R05.02) - 07/01/2014

“In March 2014, the Idaho Legislature passed House Bill 476 which amended Section 56-255 of Idaho Code. Revisions to Idaho Code direct the state to allow Developmental Disability budget modifications only when needed to obtain or maintain employment or when health and safety issues are identified. Budget modifications for either of these reasons must meet criteria as defined in Department rule. This amendment adds the ability for the state to allow budget modifications when the modification is needed for the participant to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho HCBS State Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

“The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in the Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915(k) Home and Community‐Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver.” “The following Transition Plan sets forth the actions Idaho will take to operate all applicable HCBS programs in compliance with the final rules.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

ID Aged & Disabled Waiver (1076.R05.00) - 10/01/2012

"Provides adult day care, attendant care, day hab, homemaker, residential hab, respite, supported employment, adult residential care, chore, companion services, consultation, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations, home delivered meals, nonmedical transportation, PERS, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age and individuals w/PD ages 18-64."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

ID Developmental Disabilities Waiver (0076.R05.00) - 10/01/2012

This waiver  "Provides residential hab, respite, supported employment, specialized medical equipment and supplies, community support, FMS, support broker, adult day care, behavior consultation/crisis management, chore, dental, environmental accessibility adaptation, home delivered meals, PERS, skilled nursing, non-medical transportation for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 18 - no max age."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The Employment First movement is perpetual in Idaho, where anybody with the will to work is never stuck being a "couch potato."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Idaho’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.24%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,654,930
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
15.46%
Change from
2014 to 2015
117,837
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
14.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
45,124
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.28%
Change from
2014 to 2015
38.29%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.17%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.63%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 1,612,136 1,634,464 1,654,930
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 105,862 99,623 117,837
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 38,884 38,629 45,124
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 632,558 644,653 646,788
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 36.73% 38.78% 38.29%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.21% 75.73% 76.63%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.10% 4.80% 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.30% 20.60% 20.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.70% 14.80% 14.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 111,162 108,194 117,929
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 97,668 96,586 107,110
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 190,875 187,488 208,520
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 2,050 1,037 467
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 14,299 15,657 18,462
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,587 3,749 4,086
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,416 1,665 1,154
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 5,332 6,274 7,444
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 3,350 4,020 3,368

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,547 1,668 1,767
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.40% 5.70% 6.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 43,423 43,820 44,090

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,218 1,360 1,489
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,421 2,414 2,626
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 9,277 11,628 12,057
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.10% 11.70% 12.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 8.10% 3.50% 3.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 0.40% 0.20%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 9.50% 5.00% 4.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 32.00% 19.80% 18.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 493 436 440
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 34 44 31
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 573 613 581
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,936 2,448 2,336

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 14,064 11,705 6,263
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 41 31 33
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 30 25 31
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 73.00% 81.00% 94.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.88 1.55 1.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,397
3,862
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 18 24 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 437 506 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 606 637 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 666 709 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,185 1,412 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 485 574 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.20% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,275 1,754 1,733
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 63,228 64,310 65,287
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 134 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2009 2012 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,633,000 $1,058,000 $1,124,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $15,880,000 $9,260,000 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $9,392,000 $17,283
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 5.00% 3.00% 6.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 5,274 2,384 2,375
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,891 2,145 1,598
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 20.40 12.40 12.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.40% 60.12% 60.85%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.40% 10.83% 10.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.20% 1.21% 1.19%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 22.60% 55.00% 67.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). N/A 18.22% 13.70%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 44.50% 41.30% 41.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 68.10% 61.94% 54.81%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). N/A 23.08% 27.41%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 826,034
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,049
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 47,881
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 585,721
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 633,602
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 176
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 606
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 782
AbilityOne wages (products). $296,602
AbilityOne wages (services). $8,126,422

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 11 8 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 8 11
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 343 395
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 343 395

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~Average Earnings performance measure dropped from 112% to 91%. Average second and third quarter salaries in PY 14 were $6,597. The drop in average salaries is affected by the number of hours participants are willing to work after transition. Traditionally, participants are at the retirement age and may not want to work a full time schedule when transitioned to employment. ICOA will improve this performance by targeting jobs that provide a higher hourly wage and provide participants with professional skills trainings to match higher paying job positions.
The “Most In Need” performance measure dropped from 2.58 to 2.51 average employment barriers per participant. ICOA and Experience Works recently implemented a process to prioritize and enroll participants with higher employment barriers. As positions open on the program, the sub grantee will prioritize participants with barriers to employment first. Experience Works will also, ensure priority of service is given to veterans and ensure positions are filled in rural areas where employment opportunities are limited. (Page 141)

Customized Employment

~~No specific disability related information found.

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 162)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Youth with disabilities are a priority group for the WIOA Title I Youth program and are also the target group for the state’s current Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. The state has made significant efforts to ensure that services to youth with disabilities are provided in the same capacity as those without disabilities and the needs of this population are properly addressed. WIOA Youth program staff are trained by or partnered with DEI staff for service provision. Regional business specialists and other WIOA partner staff providing services to employers develop key relationships with businesses to provide opportunities for work-based activities for youth with disabilities. Strong partnerships with the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired and Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and the Blind are utilized to develop and undertake activities as diverse as Ropes courses for teamwork and leadership development to week-long work readiness camps that help these youth achieve success by building their confidence, self-esteem and job seeking skills. (Page 201-202)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~The Division’s transition coordinator has been traveling across the state to create awareness of the changes in the VR program and to market PETS pilot programs. These activities consist of a series of face to face meetings in communities across Idaho including key stakeholder engagement through a series of regional special educator meetings, presentations at statewide administrator meetings, presentation at Tools for Life to parents, students and educators, outreach to Idaho Parents Unlimited, outreach to the Idaho Interagency Council on Secondary Transition, and ongoing discussions with the Idaho State Department of Education. (Page 277)
IDVR maintains the two primary innovation and expansion activities, supporting the activities of both the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the State Independent Living Council (SILC). Additionally, FFY 2016 will see a substantial increase in innovation pilot projects to support transition services and will monitor these pilot programs for model fidelity and outcome. The Division will work closely with the SRC to identify further innovation and expansion activities which align with the goals and priorities outlined in WIOA. To this end, IDVR has set aside one FTE to hire a Business Relations Liaison to help meet this new emphasis in WIOA and has engaged, in part with the Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center to help inform the competencies required by this position. The Division hopes to proceed after the ‘effectiveness in serving employers’ is defined by the US Departments of Education and Labor. IDVR will coordinate business outreach efforts with the Idaho Department of Labor. (Page 303)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

~~The IDVR and the Commission provide services such as counseling and guidance, assessment, vocational training, post-secondary education, transportation, personal assistance services, and job placement. Through customer informed choice and in partnership with their VR counselor, individuals with disabilities are able to create an individualized plan for employment, maximize their potential, and reach the goal of competitive integrated employment. Service identification is determined through a comprehensive assessment of the individual needs and interests based upon vocational goal selection. Comparable benefits are sought prior to the expenditure of program funds for nonexempt services.  (Page 55)
• In addition to internal training, IDVR will develop training in concert with workforce partners to cross-educate program staff on the benefits and services provided by all partners. The Division will coordinate disability specific training initiatives for non-Title IV programs with the Commission.
• The Division will continue its collaboration with the Commission in serving individuals with multiple disabilities when applicable.  (Page 92)
Partner-provided services are also accessed to meet specific One-Stop customer needs. Braille, tape or large print of written information are available through the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired or a directory of Sign Language and Oral Interpreters is available through the Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Other non-required partner services are also common points of One-Stop referral such as those provided by DisAbility Rights Idaho, which operates the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program in the state and provides counseling to customers on how employment affects Social Security benefits. (Page 164)
Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 269)
There is a strong correlation between those individuals requiring supported employment (SE) services and presumptively eligible participants in the VR program. To approximate the potential need for SE services, the Division will utilize counts of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries.
Individuals who qualify for SSI/SSDI are by law presumptively eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation services. The United States Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as of December 2012 the number of Idahoans age 18-64 who received SSDI was 42,382. SSI benefits were received by 19,933 individuals while 6,668 people concurrently received SSI and SSDI during the same period. These 62,315 individuals represent 6.6% of all working age Idahoans. (Page 290)
WIPA referrals, one of IDVR’s benchmarks to meet this priority realized a year over year increase of 40% from FFY 2014-2015. A second benchmark, Social Security reimbursements to VR is difficult to compare due to large fluctuations in the dates cost reimbursements are processed. SSA has developed a new processing system and hopes to phase-in all programs soon. This will make for a more legitimate benchmark as SSA will conduct payment requests in a timelier manner.
IDVR’s primary WIPA partner, Disability Rights of Idaho (DRI) did not reapply to administer WIPA in Idaho, consequently we have fewer in state resources to draw from for benefits planning. Montana State University - Billings is now the lead agency for WIPA referrals. DRI has agreed to provide information on Idaho’s context to MSU. In the Treasure Valley, Living Independence Network Corporation (LINC) provides benefits counseling in their designated geographical locale. (Page 311)
2. IDVR’s primary WIPA partner, Disability Rights of Idaho (DRI) did not reapply to administer WIPA in Idaho, consequently we have fewer in state resources to draw from for benefits planning.
3. There is general consensus in the Planning and Evaluation Unit that while the CSS process needs to be revisited, the capacity to do so has been lacking.
4. A second benchmark, to increase the number of different occupational areas hiring IDVR customers has been determined to be an insufficient measure to address the objective. This indicator is not sensitive to, nor does it measure meaningful engagement with Idaho’s employers. The Division feels new Section 116 performance measure provide far more relevant indicators to gauge performance toward this goal (e.g. employer services indicator and measureable skills gains). (Page 313)
(1) Increase Independence and Employment Outcomes through quality rehabilitation services. ICBVI will implement the following strategies:
• Work with Transition youth at the start of high school to foster the development of ongoing transition planning and services specifically connecting School Districts throughout the State;
• ICBVI will meet or exceed the required federal indicators;
• Emphasize the use of work incentives from Social Security Administration that promotes the transition of dependence on benefits to the independence of part or full time employment;
• Provide ongoing staff training to insure qualified professional staff knowledgeable in blindness, visual impairments as well as secondary disabilities, counseling techniques, vocational rehabilitation, community and secondary transition;
• •Conduct Assistive Technology Assessments where needed. (Page 352) 

School to Work Transition

~~The Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Correction. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 97)
Coordination of service provision will take place at the local area level. Local agreements will be established among One-Stop partners that promote communication and include arrangements for cost sharing to enable the full utilization of external funding sources. The Division will support informational training on programs. The Division will continue to support coordination and co-location with external plan agencies such as the Division of Behavioral Health, the Idaho Department of Correction and our school to work transition partners. (Page 100)
It is worth contrasting the services in the regions of the state covered by the cooperative agreements versus those not covered. Any individual school district may participate in the arrangement. IDVR counselors are either located in high schools or travel to those high school participating in the project. This increases accessibility to the students eligible and/or potentially eligible for IDVR services. Counselors maintain a dedicated caseload of transitioning students and youth with disabilities until case closure. Dedicated school to work counselors collocated in schools creates closer working relationships with school personnel, provides for more timely referrals, better support throughout the rehabilitation process, and the expertise that comes with specialization. The arrangement has proved important in developing an excellent working relationship between IDVR staff and school districts across the state. (Page 270)
ICBVI VR Counselors and Administrative Office staff coordinates with education officials to work with blind and visually impaired students transitioning from the K-12 school system. VR counselors regularly meet with the Special Education teachers, teachers of the visually impaired, school counselors, school nurses and other personnel involved in school work transition. Students can be referred to ICBVI at age 14. A transition Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is developed to assist the student with their successful transition from school to work (Page 334)
1. To continue serving school districts across the state. All Idaho school districts are served through each regional office. ICBVI does not maintain any cooperative agreements with school districts specific to the funding of school to work transition counselors. (Page 337)
The Interagency Task Force on Transition from School to Work; Transition and Assistive Technology School to Work Conference: Tools for Life; Independent Living Conference; Training Conferences provided by the Association for the Education (AER) and Rehabilitation for the Blind and Visually Impaired; Collaborative training with the Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and Blind. (Page 346)
ICBVI is committed to working collaboratively with the IESDB, IDVR, and all regional school districts to identify all eligible (or potentially eligible) secondary students in the state of Idaho. Furthermore, ICBVI is committed to reaching out to rural communities in this effort. ICBVI currently has two summer programs that are targeted towards high school students:
1. School to Work Experience Program (SWEP) and,
2. College Days. Curriculum in both of these programs is being reviewed and modified, as appropriate, to ensure they meet all of the criteria of PETS under WIOA. Additionally, both of these programs will be expanded to include more participants. (Page 358)
Goal 1 - Increase Independence and Employment Outcomes through Quality Rehabilitation Services.
• Passed Standards and Indicators for FFY 2015;
• The ICBVI’s Assistive Technologist continues to maintain consistent monthly contact providing direct client assessments. Continued e-mail/telephone consultation with Teachers of the Visually Impaired (TVI);
• Continued training of VR staff in order to provide needed services to clients with benefits;
• Regional meetings which include VR staff from both agencies, and School District staff, which are held every other year, last one was completed in September 2013. (Page 360)
 

Data Collection

~~The postsecondary institutions expressed interest in continuing to provide occupational skills training under WIOA, but faced challenges in implementing the new WIOA performance reporting for ETPs. In particular the workforce training programs, preferred by employers, did not collect the level of student information required for WIOA reporting. The stakeholder group met for over a year to write policy and develop technical solutions. Most importantly, this group generated buy-in for the much resisted data collection required. (Page 106)
As specified in Section (II)(b)(6) of this State Combined Plan, Idaho will continue to use these existing systems as the core infrastructure for our data collection and reporting processes under WIOA. Please refer to that section for more information regarding our plans for linking and integrating these systems. (Page 112)
This plan will allow core programs to update their data collection processes as needed to be WIOA compliant by July 1, 2016. It will also allow programs to begin updating their individual MIS systems as soon as possible, while taking steps toward fuller integration over the long term. Because an integrated system will not be in place on July 1, 2016, each program will be collecting data in different systems and we will use an ad-hoc data sharing process for exporting, sharing, matching, and importing data during the first, and possibly the second year. The core programs currently have data sharing processes and agreements in place under WIA, and these will be updated in Year One to align with WIOA data elements. (Page156)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

~~IDVR has hired a Transition Coordinator with extensive experience and an established network across Idaho public K-12 education system. The Transition Coordinator can provide PETS related training and technical assistance customized for Idaho businesses and coordinate with the Business Relations Liaison to ensure relevant and meaningful interventions are tailored to the needs of businesses, and to address all employer concerns regarding the provision of PETS and work based learning experiences. Employer needs will help inform alignment between PETS and the career pathways/sector strategy outlined in the strategic elements section of Idaho’s combined state plan. ( Page 280)

Employment Networks

~~Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 269)
IDVR does not establish cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers. Services are purchased on a fee–for–service basis. IDVR does have cooperative agreements with several non–profit CRPs for the coordination of services provided by Employment Networks for individuals who are Social Security beneficiaries who are Ticket holders. These cooperative agreements describe the coordination between both agencies. (Page 278)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 40

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/05/2017

~~" This year’s conference will focus on bringing the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 07/28/2017

~~“The Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services is the largest regional conference in Idaho focusing on providing quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support people with disabilities and mental illness. We bring together over 700 attendees each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NEW - Proposed Adult Developmental Disabilities Waiver Renewal - 04/26/2017

~~“This renewal application revises the reimbursement methodology (Appendix I-2-a) for residential habilitation services, environmental accessibility adaptations, and specialized medical equipment and supplies. Additionally, this renewal application makes the following minor changes to the approved waiver: 1. Updates the Public Input summary, Contact Persons, and Attachments #1 and #2 in the Main Application; 2. Designates the Division of Medicaid as the Medical Assistance Unit in Appendix A-1; 3. Revises the Administrative Authority Performance Measure in Appendix A; 4. Updates projections for unduplicated number of participants in Appendix B-3-a; 5. Updates projections for goals for participant direction in Appendix E-1-n; 6. Updates the description of the opportunity for public comment in process to establish new provider rates in Appendix I-2-a; 7. Updates utilization and expenditure projections in Appendix J; and 8. Corrects typographical errors throughout the waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Idaho Medicaid at a Glance” - 12/01/2016

~~“Under Idaho’s Home and Community-Based Waivers, qualifying Medicaid participants may receive an array of services to:•Prevent unnecessary institutional placement;•Provide for the greatest degree of independence possible;•Enhance the quality of life;•Encourage individual choice; and•Achieve and maintain community integration.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2016

“In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday. This chapter includes The steps required to complete an IEP Transition Plan. Transition Planning at 14 Beginning when the child is age 14 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must address (within the applicable parts of the IEP) the courses he or she needs to take to reach his or her post-school goals. A statement of transition services needs must also be included in each of the child's subsequent IEPs. Transition Planning at 16 Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho State Transition Plan - 07/29/2016

Coming Into Compliance with HCBS Setting Requirements: Public Notice and Request for Comment The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in t he Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915 (k) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver. Copies of the waivers can be viewed at www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Idaho Senate Bill 1268 “Relating to the Council on Developmental Disabilities; Amending Section 267-6704, Idaho Code, To Revise Provisions Regarding Council Membership and to Make Technical Corrections” - 07/01/2016

“67-6704.COMPOSITION.(1) The council shall consist of twenty-three 23) members to be appointed by the governor, at least sixty percent (60%)of whom shall be individuals with developmental disabilities, parents or Guardians of children with developmental disabilities, or immediate relatives or guardians of adults with mentally impairing developmental disabilities who cannot advocate for themselves. These members shall not represent any other category of membership. (2) At least five (5) of the members shall Be persons with a developmental disability, and at least seven (7) of the members shall be parents or guardians of children with a developmental disability”

Systems
  • Other

Idaho HB 476 - 03/18/2014

“Idaho Code 56-255 (3) (e) (ii) describes Medicaid services for people with developmental disabilities. The total amount of Medicaid developmental disability services a person can receive is limited by an individual budget amount, determined by a formula based on individual assessments. In 2011, H 260 added language to this Section which limited individual budget modifications to only those services needed to protect the health or safety of the person. One unintended consequence of this change was that it prohibited budget modifications that would allow the person to obtain or maintain employment. Medicaid can pay for Community Supported Employment (CSE) services or specialized training and support for a person with a developmental disability in a job setting. The effect of this limitation was to reduce the number of people getting on-the-job training and support, from 275 participants in 2010, to 182 participants in 2013. This bill would allow people with developmental disabilities to modify their individual budgets by adding Community Supported Employment services to their plan, when these services are needed to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2016

“In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday. This chapter includes The steps required to complete an IEP Transition Plan. Transition Planning at 14 Beginning when the child is age 14 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must address (within the applicable parts of the IEP) the courses he or she needs to take to reach his or her post-school goals. A statement of transition services needs must also be included in each of the child's subsequent IEPs. Transition Planning at 16 Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Commission on Aging “No Wrong Door” - 04/21/2015

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Extended Employment Services provide Community Supported Employment (CSE), long-term on-the-job supports in integrated settings for people who have developmental disabilities, mental illness, serious emotional disturbance and traumatic brain injury. EES also provides Work Services composed of non-work and training towards employment in segregated settings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Strategic Plan 2016-2019 Idaho “No Wrong Door”

~~“Idaho’s Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC) provides Idahoans the opportunity toaccess an array of public and private long-term care services and supports (LTSS), through single access points. LTSS information can be accessed through Idaho 211 Careline, Senior Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA), Area Agencies on Aging (AAA’s), Centers for Independent Living (CIL’s) and the Live Better Idaho website.In 2014, the Administration for Community Living (ACL), in collaboration with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), awarded the Idaho Commission on Aging (ICOA) a planning grant to develop and implement a single statewide No Wrong Door System (NWD System). Key functions of the NWD System are Governance and Administration, Public Outreach and Links to Key Referral Sources, Person Centered Counseling and Streamlined Access to Public Programs. The intent is to make it easier for people of all ages, abilities and income levels to learn about and access the services they may need.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare “Developmental Disabilities”

“The Department of Health and Welfare can help provide a number of services to assist adults and children with developmental disabilities. Some of these services include: physical and occupational therapy, housing and living supports, chore services, employment support, environmental modifications, home delivered meals, nursing services, respite care, habilitative supports, family education, crisis intervention, and in-school supports, to name a few.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities “2016 Work Plan”

Objective 1.3– Employment First Create more opportunities for people with developmental disabilities to have jobs in the community that are integrated, inclusive, and pay more than minimum wage by working with partners on a statewide employment first project that includes educating communities, training staff, and writing at least one state policy by September 2016 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment. FY 2016 Activities •Convene Employment First Consortium, support workgroups •Utilize opportunities for technical assistance from national experts through the Employment Learning Community, ODEP Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Project, and other resources •With key partners, draft recommendations for adding employment service options under the Idaho Medicaid program in line with HCBS rules •Build public awareness and support for Employment First message •Promote Idaho Disability Employment Awareness Month activities including Take Your Legislator to Work and post awareness information •Support employment planning training opportunities for transition- age youth and families •Review research reports and state system data related to employment services •Monitor employment related policies and program changes •Participate in project-relevant councils, committees, and workgroups

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and Idaho State Rehabilitation Council Services to Students and Youth with Disabilities (2016 Annual Report)

~~“Pending final regulations of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, the agency heeded encouragement from federal partners to step back and re-envision how business is conducted. Where some other states have struggled to implement the significant structural and process changes required, Idaho viewed it as a challenge to overcome and acted accordingly.

A completely new program of pre-employment transition services for students, the revamp of traditional youth and adult activities to accommodate that change, increased engagement of the business community, and the alignment of shared plans and outcome measures with other workforce agencies would each be difficult to accomplish, let alone all at the same time. Through exceptional effort, the staff succeeded and results of that accomplishment are evident in the facts, figures and success stories displayed on the following calendar pages.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired: VR 2016 State Plan

ICBVI’s Vocational Rehabilitation plan is outlined and includes details about cooperative agreements and partnerships with other agencies and employers as well as provisions for supported employment services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Partners in Policymaking 2016

Idaho Partners in Policymaking is an innovative leadership development program for adults with developmental disabilities and parents of children with disabilities. Partners receive information, training, resources, and skill building so they may have the best possible life experiences for themselves and for their children. Partners in Policymaking was created in 1986 by Colleen Wieck, Executive Director of the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities. The program was developed specifically to teach people with disabilities and families of young children with disabilities to: Work on long-term change. Become active partners with policymakers who will shape policies that impact people with disabilities and families. Understand possibilities and how to create them.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Consortium for Idahoans with Disabilities

The mission of CID is “to protect, promote and advance the rights and interests of people with disabilities of all ages in Idaho in a manner consistent with the following principles:    1. CID will promote and protect the rights of people with disabilities to meaningful personal choice and self determination.    2. CID will promote the right to independence and self sufficiency for people with disabilities.    3. CID will promote the right to inclusive, adapted, accessible services, residences, education, health care and employment for people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho State Rehabilitation Council

“Working on behalf of Idahoans with disabilities, the Idaho State Rehabilitation Council endeavors to provide consumers, service providers and others the opportunity to participate in constructive dialogue and public input to continually improve the quality of Vocational Rehabilitation services to residents of Idaho. The Idaho State Rehabilitation Council monitors the policies and practices of the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Council can make recommendations to IDVR about eligibility, the scope and effectiveness of services provided and functions performed that affect the ability of individuals with disabilities to achieve rehabilitation goals.   The Council prepares and submits an annual report on the status of Vocational Rehabilitation programs in Idaho, and makes that report available to the public.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Cooperative Services Agreement: DoE, VR & Blind and Visually Impaired

“This Cooperative Services Agreement has been developed with multiple purposes in mind. First, this agreement is intended to provide a coordinated, comprehensive system focusing on youth with disabilities as they transition from secondary to post-school activities. Beyond that, the information contained in this agreement serves to provide guidance to the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI), and the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE) regarding roles and responsibilities around issues related to transition.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Employment First Consortium

“The Idaho Employment First Consortium was established and is supported by the Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities for the purpose of improving how employment services and systems work in Idaho so that people with developmental disabilities are able to reach their career goals. It includes representatives from state agencies, advocacy organizations, service providers, parents, and self-advocates. Seventeen Consortium members met for the first time in April 2012 and continue to meet monthly on an ongoing basis. The group has adopted an Employment First message with defined common values and a vision for our state: ‘All Idahoans with disabilities have the right and responsibility to work and contribute to their community.’

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2013

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2013, Idaho was awarded a Round 4 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This will end in 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Idaho Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration is a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Demonstration designed to help states try new ways of delivering Medicaid services. The Demonstration is designed to help people to move, also called transition, from an institution into home- and community-based living settings, such as a home or an apartment. In Idaho, the Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration is known as Idaho Home Choice.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/05/2017

~~" This year’s conference will focus on bringing the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 07/28/2017

~~“The Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services is the largest regional conference in Idaho focusing on providing quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support people with disabilities and mental illness. We bring together over 700 attendees each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Parents Unlimited “What is Parents Unlimited?” - 07/18/2016

Founded in 1985, Idaho Parents Unlimited, Inc. (IPUL) is a statewide organization which houses the Idaho Parent Training and Information Center, the Family to Family Health Information Center, Idaho Family Voices, and VSA Idaho, the State Organization on Arts and Disability. The Parent Training and Information Center ensures that parents of children with disabilities receive training and information on their rights, responsibilities, and protections under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in order to develop the skills necessary to cooperatively and effectively participate in planning and decision making relating to early intervention, educational, and transitional services.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Training Clearinghouse - Transition to Work for Youth with Significant Disabilities - 08/31/2015

“This is an online course using the Idaho Training Clearinghouse Learning Management System at the Center on Disabilities and Human Development at the University of Idaho. They are not face to face classes.” The course was available from August 31 to December 7, 2015. 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

ID Department of Labor: Job Hunting Guide for People with Disabilities

“This book can help Idahoans with disabilities: understand their strengths and knowledge concerning work, organize their job search, Identify potential work areas, prepare for job interview questions, understand their rights and protection under the ADA, and locate agencies and governmental programs to assist them. This book can help Idaho employers: ensure equality of opportunity for individuals with disabilities, understand the rights and protections granted to individuals with disabilities under the ADA, and understand and be reassured that individuals with disabilities are capable workers."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Idaho "Able to Work" Project

This portal of employment information for employment seekers, business, and service providers seeks to promote more and better employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Idaho.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Bureau of Facility Standards - Employment Definitions for People with Disabilities

These slides serve as an overview of Idaho's regulatory definitions of types of employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

ID Council on DD: "Discovering Personal Genius" Training

Training on Discovering Personal Genius, an employment planning tool and model for individual employment evaluation that results in a comprehensive vocational profile. Discovering Personal Genius uses a person-centered community-based observation and trial in real-time community activities to determine the strengths, skills, and interests of the person. It also includes exploration through informational interviews of potential employers in the community.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NEW - Proposed Adult Developmental Disabilities Waiver Renewal - 04/26/2017

~~“This renewal application revises the reimbursement methodology (Appendix I-2-a) for residential habilitation services, environmental accessibility adaptations, and specialized medical equipment and supplies. Additionally, this renewal application makes the following minor changes to the approved waiver: 1. Updates the Public Input summary, Contact Persons, and Attachments #1 and #2 in the Main Application; 2. Designates the Division of Medicaid as the Medical Assistance Unit in Appendix A-1; 3. Revises the Administrative Authority Performance Measure in Appendix A; 4. Updates projections for unduplicated number of participants in Appendix B-3-a; 5. Updates projections for goals for participant direction in Appendix E-1-n; 6. Updates the description of the opportunity for public comment in process to establish new provider rates in Appendix I-2-a; 7. Updates utilization and expenditure projections in Appendix J; and 8. Corrects typographical errors throughout the waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Idaho Medicaid at a Glance” - 12/01/2016

~~“Under Idaho’s Home and Community-Based Waivers, qualifying Medicaid participants may receive an array of services to:•Prevent unnecessary institutional placement;•Provide for the greatest degree of independence possible;•Enhance the quality of life;•Encourage individual choice; and•Achieve and maintain community integration.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho State Transition Plan - 07/29/2016

Coming Into Compliance with HCBS Setting Requirements: Public Notice and Request for Comment The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in t he Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915 (k) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver. Copies of the waivers can be viewed at www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov

Systems
  • Other

“HCBS Rules” - 07/01/2016

The Medicaid HCBS rules are contained in the Medicaid Enhanced rules in IDAPA 16.03.10 and the Consumer-Directed Services rules in IDAPA 16.03.13 which are published on the Idaho Department of Administration Website. A direct link to these two sections of rules is posted on this page, under the “What’s New” section. The Medicaid HCBS rules implement requirements to ensure that individuals receiving Medicaid Home and Community Based Services are integrated in and supported to gain full access to their community.

Systems
  • Other

Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services Waiver - 07/01/2016

“The purpose of this amendment to Idaho's Act Early Waiver is: 1. To conduct a thorough review of waiver language to ensure it is consistent with current operational practices, including service plan development and complaint/critical incident systems, and to ensure alignment with recent Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) changes in response to the Home and Community-Based Services Final Rule. 2. To align DD waiver performance measures with the updated CMS sub-assurances and to ensure performance measures reflect current data source and sampling practices. The Department is also taking this opportunity to ensure that performance measures aligned across Idaho's HCBS waivers.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) HCBS Waiver: ID Developmental Disabilities (Amendment # ID.0076.R05.02) - 07/01/2014

“In March 2014, the Idaho Legislature passed House Bill 476 which amended Section 56-255 of Idaho Code. Revisions to Idaho Code direct the state to allow Developmental Disability budget modifications only when needed to obtain or maintain employment or when health and safety issues are identified. Budget modifications for either of these reasons must meet criteria as defined in Department rule. This amendment adds the ability for the state to allow budget modifications when the modification is needed for the participant to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho HCBS State Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

“The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in the Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915(k) Home and Community‐Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver.” “The following Transition Plan sets forth the actions Idaho will take to operate all applicable HCBS programs in compliance with the final rules.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

ID Aged & Disabled Waiver (1076.R05.00) - 10/01/2012

"Provides adult day care, attendant care, day hab, homemaker, residential hab, respite, supported employment, adult residential care, chore, companion services, consultation, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations, home delivered meals, nonmedical transportation, PERS, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age and individuals w/PD ages 18-64."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

ID Developmental Disabilities Waiver (0076.R05.00) - 10/01/2012

This waiver  "Provides residential hab, respite, supported employment, specialized medical equipment and supplies, community support, FMS, support broker, adult day care, behavior consultation/crisis management, chore, dental, environmental accessibility adaptation, home delivered meals, PERS, skilled nursing, non-medical transportation for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 18 - no max age."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The Employment First movement is perpetual in Idaho, where anybody with the will to work is never stuck being a "couch potato."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Idaho’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.24%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,654,930
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
15.46%
Change from
2014 to 2015
117,837
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
14.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
45,124
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.28%
Change from
2014 to 2015
38.29%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.17%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.63%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 1,654,930
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 117,837
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 45,124
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 646,788
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 38.29%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.63%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 117,929
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 107,110
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 208,520
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 467
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 18,462
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,086
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,154
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 7,444
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 3,368

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,767
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 44,090

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,489
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,626
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 12,057
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 12.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 18.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 440
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 31
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 581
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 2,336

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,263
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 33
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 31
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 94.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,733
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 65,287
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,124,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $17,283
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 6.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,375
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,598
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 12.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.85%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.19%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 67.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 13.70%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 41.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 54.81%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 27.41%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 826,034
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,049
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 47,881
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 585,721
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 633,602
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 176
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 606
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 782
AbilityOne wages (products). $296,602
AbilityOne wages (services). $8,126,422

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 11
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 395
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 395

 

WIOA Proflie

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~Average Earnings performance measure dropped from 112% to 91%. Average second and third quarter salaries in PY 14 were $6,597. The drop in average salaries is affected by the number of hours participants are willing to work after transition. Traditionally, participants are at the retirement age and may not want to work a full time schedule when transitioned to employment. ICOA will improve this performance by targeting jobs that provide a higher hourly wage and provide participants with professional skills trainings to match higher paying job positions.
The “Most In Need” performance measure dropped from 2.58 to 2.51 average employment barriers per participant. ICOA and Experience Works recently implemented a process to prioritize and enroll participants with higher employment barriers. As positions open on the program, the sub grantee will prioritize participants with barriers to employment first. Experience Works will also, ensure priority of service is given to veterans and ensure positions are filled in rural areas where employment opportunities are limited. (Page 141)

Customized Employment

~~No specific disability related information found.

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 162)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Youth with disabilities are a priority group for the WIOA Title I Youth program and are also the target group for the state’s current Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. The state has made significant efforts to ensure that services to youth with disabilities are provided in the same capacity as those without disabilities and the needs of this population are properly addressed. WIOA Youth program staff are trained by or partnered with DEI staff for service provision. Regional business specialists and other WIOA partner staff providing services to employers develop key relationships with businesses to provide opportunities for work-based activities for youth with disabilities. Strong partnerships with the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired and Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and the Blind are utilized to develop and undertake activities as diverse as Ropes courses for teamwork and leadership development to week-long work readiness camps that help these youth achieve success by building their confidence, self-esteem and job seeking skills. (Page 201-202)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~The Division’s transition coordinator has been traveling across the state to create awareness of the changes in the VR program and to market PETS pilot programs. These activities consist of a series of face to face meetings in communities across Idaho including key stakeholder engagement through a series of regional special educator meetings, presentations at statewide administrator meetings, presentation at Tools for Life to parents, students and educators, outreach to Idaho Parents Unlimited, outreach to the Idaho Interagency Council on Secondary Transition, and ongoing discussions with the Idaho State Department of Education. (Page 277)
IDVR maintains the two primary innovation and expansion activities, supporting the activities of both the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the State Independent Living Council (SILC). Additionally, FFY 2016 will see a substantial increase in innovation pilot projects to support transition services and will monitor these pilot programs for model fidelity and outcome. The Division will work closely with the SRC to identify further innovation and expansion activities which align with the goals and priorities outlined in WIOA. To this end, IDVR has set aside one FTE to hire a Business Relations Liaison to help meet this new emphasis in WIOA and has engaged, in part with the Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center to help inform the competencies required by this position. The Division hopes to proceed after the ‘effectiveness in serving employers’ is defined by the US Departments of Education and Labor. IDVR will coordinate business outreach efforts with the Idaho Department of Labor. (Page 303)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

~~The IDVR and the Commission provide services such as counseling and guidance, assessment, vocational training, post-secondary education, transportation, personal assistance services, and job placement. Through customer informed choice and in partnership with their VR counselor, individuals with disabilities are able to create an individualized plan for employment, maximize their potential, and reach the goal of competitive integrated employment. Service identification is determined through a comprehensive assessment of the individual needs and interests based upon vocational goal selection. Comparable benefits are sought prior to the expenditure of program funds for nonexempt services.  (Page 55)
• In addition to internal training, IDVR will develop training in concert with workforce partners to cross-educate program staff on the benefits and services provided by all partners. The Division will coordinate disability specific training initiatives for non-Title IV programs with the Commission.
• The Division will continue its collaboration with the Commission in serving individuals with multiple disabilities when applicable.  (Page 92)
Partner-provided services are also accessed to meet specific One-Stop customer needs. Braille, tape or large print of written information are available through the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired or a directory of Sign Language and Oral Interpreters is available through the Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Other non-required partner services are also common points of One-Stop referral such as those provided by DisAbility Rights Idaho, which operates the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program in the state and provides counseling to customers on how employment affects Social Security benefits. (Page 164)
Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 269)
There is a strong correlation between those individuals requiring supported employment (SE) services and presumptively eligible participants in the VR program. To approximate the potential need for SE services, the Division will utilize counts of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries.
Individuals who qualify for SSI/SSDI are by law presumptively eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation services. The United States Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as of December 2012 the number of Idahoans age 18-64 who received SSDI was 42,382. SSI benefits were received by 19,933 individuals while 6,668 people concurrently received SSI and SSDI during the same period. These 62,315 individuals represent 6.6% of all working age Idahoans. (Page 290)
WIPA referrals, one of IDVR’s benchmarks to meet this priority realized a year over year increase of 40% from FFY 2014-2015. A second benchmark, Social Security reimbursements to VR is difficult to compare due to large fluctuations in the dates cost reimbursements are processed. SSA has developed a new processing system and hopes to phase-in all programs soon. This will make for a more legitimate benchmark as SSA will conduct payment requests in a timelier manner.
IDVR’s primary WIPA partner, Disability Rights of Idaho (DRI) did not reapply to administer WIPA in Idaho, consequently we have fewer in state resources to draw from for benefits planning. Montana State University - Billings is now the lead agency for WIPA referrals. DRI has agreed to provide information on Idaho’s context to MSU. In the Treasure Valley, Living Independence Network Corporation (LINC) provides benefits counseling in their designated geographical locale. (Page 311)
2. IDVR’s primary WIPA partner, Disability Rights of Idaho (DRI) did not reapply to administer WIPA in Idaho, consequently we have fewer in state resources to draw from for benefits planning.
3. There is general consensus in the Planning and Evaluation Unit that while the CSS process needs to be revisited, the capacity to do so has been lacking.
4. A second benchmark, to increase the number of different occupational areas hiring IDVR customers has been determined to be an insufficient measure to address the objective. This indicator is not sensitive to, nor does it measure meaningful engagement with Idaho’s employers. The Division feels new Section 116 performance measure provide far more relevant indicators to gauge performance toward this goal (e.g. employer services indicator and measureable skills gains). (Page 313)
(1) Increase Independence and Employment Outcomes through quality rehabilitation services. ICBVI will implement the following strategies:
• Work with Transition youth at the start of high school to foster the development of ongoing transition planning and services specifically connecting School Districts throughout the State;
• ICBVI will meet or exceed the required federal indicators;
• Emphasize the use of work incentives from Social Security Administration that promotes the transition of dependence on benefits to the independence of part or full time employment;
• Provide ongoing staff training to insure qualified professional staff knowledgeable in blindness, visual impairments as well as secondary disabilities, counseling techniques, vocational rehabilitation, community and secondary transition;
• •Conduct Assistive Technology Assessments where needed. (Page 352) 

School to Work Transition

~~The Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Correction. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 97)
Coordination of service provision will take place at the local area level. Local agreements will be established among One-Stop partners that promote communication and include arrangements for cost sharing to enable the full utilization of external funding sources. The Division will support informational training on programs. The Division will continue to support coordination and co-location with external plan agencies such as the Division of Behavioral Health, the Idaho Department of Correction and our school to work transition partners. (Page 100)
It is worth contrasting the services in the regions of the state covered by the cooperative agreements versus those not covered. Any individual school district may participate in the arrangement. IDVR counselors are either located in high schools or travel to those high school participating in the project. This increases accessibility to the students eligible and/or potentially eligible for IDVR services. Counselors maintain a dedicated caseload of transitioning students and youth with disabilities until case closure. Dedicated school to work counselors collocated in schools creates closer working relationships with school personnel, provides for more timely referrals, better support throughout the rehabilitation process, and the expertise that comes with specialization. The arrangement has proved important in developing an excellent working relationship between IDVR staff and school districts across the state. (Page 270)
ICBVI VR Counselors and Administrative Office staff coordinates with education officials to work with blind and visually impaired students transitioning from the K-12 school system. VR counselors regularly meet with the Special Education teachers, teachers of the visually impaired, school counselors, school nurses and other personnel involved in school work transition. Students can be referred to ICBVI at age 14. A transition Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is developed to assist the student with their successful transition from school to work (Page 334)
1. To continue serving school districts across the state. All Idaho school districts are served through each regional office. ICBVI does not maintain any cooperative agreements with school districts specific to the funding of school to work transition counselors. (Page 337)
The Interagency Task Force on Transition from School to Work; Transition and Assistive Technology School to Work Conference: Tools for Life; Independent Living Conference; Training Conferences provided by the Association for the Education (AER) and Rehabilitation for the Blind and Visually Impaired; Collaborative training with the Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and Blind. (Page 346)
ICBVI is committed to working collaboratively with the IESDB, IDVR, and all regional school districts to identify all eligible (or potentially eligible) secondary students in the state of Idaho. Furthermore, ICBVI is committed to reaching out to rural communities in this effort. ICBVI currently has two summer programs that are targeted towards high school students:
1. School to Work Experience Program (SWEP) and,
2. College Days. Curriculum in both of these programs is being reviewed and modified, as appropriate, to ensure they meet all of the criteria of PETS under WIOA. Additionally, both of these programs will be expanded to include more participants. (Page 358)
Goal 1 - Increase Independence and Employment Outcomes through Quality Rehabilitation Services.
• Passed Standards and Indicators for FFY 2015;
• The ICBVI’s Assistive Technologist continues to maintain consistent monthly contact providing direct client assessments. Continued e-mail/telephone consultation with Teachers of the Visually Impaired (TVI);
• Continued training of VR staff in order to provide needed services to clients with benefits;
• Regional meetings which include VR staff from both agencies, and School District staff, which are held every other year, last one was completed in September 2013. (Page 360)
 

Data Collection

~~The postsecondary institutions expressed interest in continuing to provide occupational skills training under WIOA, but faced challenges in implementing the new WIOA performance reporting for ETPs. In particular the workforce training programs, preferred by employers, did not collect the level of student information required for WIOA reporting. The stakeholder group met for over a year to write policy and develop technical solutions. Most importantly, this group generated buy-in for the much resisted data collection required. (Page 106)
As specified in Section (II)(b)(6) of this State Combined Plan, Idaho will continue to use these existing systems as the core infrastructure for our data collection and reporting processes under WIOA. Please refer to that section for more information regarding our plans for linking and integrating these systems. (Page 112)
This plan will allow core programs to update their data collection processes as needed to be WIOA compliant by July 1, 2016. It will also allow programs to begin updating their individual MIS systems as soon as possible, while taking steps toward fuller integration over the long term. Because an integrated system will not be in place on July 1, 2016, each program will be collecting data in different systems and we will use an ad-hoc data sharing process for exporting, sharing, matching, and importing data during the first, and possibly the second year. The core programs currently have data sharing processes and agreements in place under WIA, and these will be updated in Year One to align with WIOA data elements. (Page156)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

~~IDVR has hired a Transition Coordinator with extensive experience and an established network across Idaho public K-12 education system. The Transition Coordinator can provide PETS related training and technical assistance customized for Idaho businesses and coordinate with the Business Relations Liaison to ensure relevant and meaningful interventions are tailored to the needs of businesses, and to address all employer concerns regarding the provision of PETS and work based learning experiences. Employer needs will help inform alignment between PETS and the career pathways/sector strategy outlined in the strategic elements section of Idaho’s combined state plan. ( Page 280)

Employment Networks

~~Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 269)
IDVR does not establish cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers. Services are purchased on a fee–for–service basis. IDVR does have cooperative agreements with several non–profit CRPs for the coordination of services provided by Employment Networks for individuals who are Social Security beneficiaries who are Ticket holders. These cooperative agreements describe the coordination between both agencies. (Page 278)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 40

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/05/2017

~~" This year’s conference will focus on bringing the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 07/28/2017

~~“The Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services is the largest regional conference in Idaho focusing on providing quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support people with disabilities and mental illness. We bring together over 700 attendees each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NEW - Proposed Adult Developmental Disabilities Waiver Renewal - 04/26/2017

~~“This renewal application revises the reimbursement methodology (Appendix I-2-a) for residential habilitation services, environmental accessibility adaptations, and specialized medical equipment and supplies. Additionally, this renewal application makes the following minor changes to the approved waiver: 1. Updates the Public Input summary, Contact Persons, and Attachments #1 and #2 in the Main Application; 2. Designates the Division of Medicaid as the Medical Assistance Unit in Appendix A-1; 3. Revises the Administrative Authority Performance Measure in Appendix A; 4. Updates projections for unduplicated number of participants in Appendix B-3-a; 5. Updates projections for goals for participant direction in Appendix E-1-n; 6. Updates the description of the opportunity for public comment in process to establish new provider rates in Appendix I-2-a; 7. Updates utilization and expenditure projections in Appendix J; and 8. Corrects typographical errors throughout the waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Idaho Medicaid at a Glance” - 12/01/2016

~~“Under Idaho’s Home and Community-Based Waivers, qualifying Medicaid participants may receive an array of services to:•Prevent unnecessary institutional placement;•Provide for the greatest degree of independence possible;•Enhance the quality of life;•Encourage individual choice; and•Achieve and maintain community integration.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2016

“In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday. This chapter includes The steps required to complete an IEP Transition Plan. Transition Planning at 14 Beginning when the child is age 14 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must address (within the applicable parts of the IEP) the courses he or she needs to take to reach his or her post-school goals. A statement of transition services needs must also be included in each of the child's subsequent IEPs. Transition Planning at 16 Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho State Transition Plan - 07/29/2016

Coming Into Compliance with HCBS Setting Requirements: Public Notice and Request for Comment The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in t he Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915 (k) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver. Copies of the waivers can be viewed at www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Idaho Senate Bill 1268 “Relating to the Council on Developmental Disabilities; Amending Section 267-6704, Idaho Code, To Revise Provisions Regarding Council Membership and to Make Technical Corrections” - 07/01/2016

“67-6704.COMPOSITION.(1) The council shall consist of twenty-three 23) members to be appointed by the governor, at least sixty percent (60%)of whom shall be individuals with developmental disabilities, parents or Guardians of children with developmental disabilities, or immediate relatives or guardians of adults with mentally impairing developmental disabilities who cannot advocate for themselves. These members shall not represent any other category of membership. (2) At least five (5) of the members shall Be persons with a developmental disability, and at least seven (7) of the members shall be parents or guardians of children with a developmental disability”

Systems
  • Other

Idaho HB 476 - 03/18/2014

“Idaho Code 56-255 (3) (e) (ii) describes Medicaid services for people with developmental disabilities. The total amount of Medicaid developmental disability services a person can receive is limited by an individual budget amount, determined by a formula based on individual assessments. In 2011, H 260 added language to this Section which limited individual budget modifications to only those services needed to protect the health or safety of the person. One unintended consequence of this change was that it prohibited budget modifications that would allow the person to obtain or maintain employment. Medicaid can pay for Community Supported Employment (CSE) services or specialized training and support for a person with a developmental disability in a job setting. The effect of this limitation was to reduce the number of people getting on-the-job training and support, from 275 participants in 2010, to 182 participants in 2013. This bill would allow people with developmental disabilities to modify their individual budgets by adding Community Supported Employment services to their plan, when these services are needed to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2016

“In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday. This chapter includes The steps required to complete an IEP Transition Plan. Transition Planning at 14 Beginning when the child is age 14 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must address (within the applicable parts of the IEP) the courses he or she needs to take to reach his or her post-school goals. A statement of transition services needs must also be included in each of the child's subsequent IEPs. Transition Planning at 16 Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Commission on Aging “No Wrong Door” - 04/21/2015

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Extended Employment Services provide Community Supported Employment (CSE), long-term on-the-job supports in integrated settings for people who have developmental disabilities, mental illness, serious emotional disturbance and traumatic brain injury. EES also provides Work Services composed of non-work and training towards employment in segregated settings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Strategic Plan 2016-2019 Idaho “No Wrong Door”

~~“Idaho’s Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC) provides Idahoans the opportunity toaccess an array of public and private long-term care services and supports (LTSS), through single access points. LTSS information can be accessed through Idaho 211 Careline, Senior Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA), Area Agencies on Aging (AAA’s), Centers for Independent Living (CIL’s) and the Live Better Idaho website.In 2014, the Administration for Community Living (ACL), in collaboration with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), awarded the Idaho Commission on Aging (ICOA) a planning grant to develop and implement a single statewide No Wrong Door System (NWD System). Key functions of the NWD System are Governance and Administration, Public Outreach and Links to Key Referral Sources, Person Centered Counseling and Streamlined Access to Public Programs. The intent is to make it easier for people of all ages, abilities and income levels to learn about and access the services they may need.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare “Developmental Disabilities”

“The Department of Health and Welfare can help provide a number of services to assist adults and children with developmental disabilities. Some of these services include: physical and occupational therapy, housing and living supports, chore services, employment support, environmental modifications, home delivered meals, nursing services, respite care, habilitative supports, family education, crisis intervention, and in-school supports, to name a few.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities “2016 Work Plan”

Objective 1.3– Employment First Create more opportunities for people with developmental disabilities to have jobs in the community that are integrated, inclusive, and pay more than minimum wage by working with partners on a statewide employment first project that includes educating communities, training staff, and writing at least one state policy by September 2016 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment. FY 2016 Activities •Convene Employment First Consortium, support workgroups •Utilize opportunities for technical assistance from national experts through the Employment Learning Community, ODEP Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Project, and other resources •With key partners, draft recommendations for adding employment service options under the Idaho Medicaid program in line with HCBS rules •Build public awareness and support for Employment First message •Promote Idaho Disability Employment Awareness Month activities including Take Your Legislator to Work and post awareness information •Support employment planning training opportunities for transition- age youth and families •Review research reports and state system data related to employment services •Monitor employment related policies and program changes •Participate in project-relevant councils, committees, and workgroups

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and Idaho State Rehabilitation Council Services to Students and Youth with Disabilities (2016 Annual Report)

~~“Pending final regulations of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, the agency heeded encouragement from federal partners to step back and re-envision how business is conducted. Where some other states have struggled to implement the significant structural and process changes required, Idaho viewed it as a challenge to overcome and acted accordingly.

A completely new program of pre-employment transition services for students, the revamp of traditional youth and adult activities to accommodate that change, increased engagement of the business community, and the alignment of shared plans and outcome measures with other workforce agencies would each be difficult to accomplish, let alone all at the same time. Through exceptional effort, the staff succeeded and results of that accomplishment are evident in the facts, figures and success stories displayed on the following calendar pages.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired: VR 2016 State Plan

ICBVI’s Vocational Rehabilitation plan is outlined and includes details about cooperative agreements and partnerships with other agencies and employers as well as provisions for supported employment services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Partners in Policymaking 2016

Idaho Partners in Policymaking is an innovative leadership development program for adults with developmental disabilities and parents of children with disabilities. Partners receive information, training, resources, and skill building so they may have the best possible life experiences for themselves and for their children. Partners in Policymaking was created in 1986 by Colleen Wieck, Executive Director of the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities. The program was developed specifically to teach people with disabilities and families of young children with disabilities to: Work on long-term change. Become active partners with policymakers who will shape policies that impact people with disabilities and families. Understand possibilities and how to create them.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Consortium for Idahoans with Disabilities

The mission of CID is “to protect, promote and advance the rights and interests of people with disabilities of all ages in Idaho in a manner consistent with the following principles:    1. CID will promote and protect the rights of people with disabilities to meaningful personal choice and self determination.    2. CID will promote the right to independence and self sufficiency for people with disabilities.    3. CID will promote the right to inclusive, adapted, accessible services, residences, education, health care and employment for people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho State Rehabilitation Council

“Working on behalf of Idahoans with disabilities, the Idaho State Rehabilitation Council endeavors to provide consumers, service providers and others the opportunity to participate in constructive dialogue and public input to continually improve the quality of Vocational Rehabilitation services to residents of Idaho. The Idaho State Rehabilitation Council monitors the policies and practices of the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Council can make recommendations to IDVR about eligibility, the scope and effectiveness of services provided and functions performed that affect the ability of individuals with disabilities to achieve rehabilitation goals.   The Council prepares and submits an annual report on the status of Vocational Rehabilitation programs in Idaho, and makes that report available to the public.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Cooperative Services Agreement: DoE, VR & Blind and Visually Impaired

“This Cooperative Services Agreement has been developed with multiple purposes in mind. First, this agreement is intended to provide a coordinated, comprehensive system focusing on youth with disabilities as they transition from secondary to post-school activities. Beyond that, the information contained in this agreement serves to provide guidance to the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI), and the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE) regarding roles and responsibilities around issues related to transition.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Employment First Consortium

“The Idaho Employment First Consortium was established and is supported by the Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities for the purpose of improving how employment services and systems work in Idaho so that people with developmental disabilities are able to reach their career goals. It includes representatives from state agencies, advocacy organizations, service providers, parents, and self-advocates. Seventeen Consortium members met for the first time in April 2012 and continue to meet monthly on an ongoing basis. The group has adopted an Employment First message with defined common values and a vision for our state: ‘All Idahoans with disabilities have the right and responsibility to work and contribute to their community.’

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2013

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2013, Idaho was awarded a Round 4 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This will end in 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Idaho Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration is a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Demonstration designed to help states try new ways of delivering Medicaid services. The Demonstration is designed to help people to move, also called transition, from an institution into home- and community-based living settings, such as a home or an apartment. In Idaho, the Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration is known as Idaho Home Choice.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/05/2017

~~" This year’s conference will focus on bringing the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 07/28/2017

~~“The Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services is the largest regional conference in Idaho focusing on providing quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support people with disabilities and mental illness. We bring together over 700 attendees each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Parents Unlimited “What is Parents Unlimited?” - 07/18/2016

Founded in 1985, Idaho Parents Unlimited, Inc. (IPUL) is a statewide organization which houses the Idaho Parent Training and Information Center, the Family to Family Health Information Center, Idaho Family Voices, and VSA Idaho, the State Organization on Arts and Disability. The Parent Training and Information Center ensures that parents of children with disabilities receive training and information on their rights, responsibilities, and protections under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in order to develop the skills necessary to cooperatively and effectively participate in planning and decision making relating to early intervention, educational, and transitional services.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Training Clearinghouse - Transition to Work for Youth with Significant Disabilities - 08/31/2015

“This is an online course using the Idaho Training Clearinghouse Learning Management System at the Center on Disabilities and Human Development at the University of Idaho. They are not face to face classes.” The course was available from August 31 to December 7, 2015. 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

ID Department of Labor: Job Hunting Guide for People with Disabilities

“This book can help Idahoans with disabilities: understand their strengths and knowledge concerning work, organize their job search, Identify potential work areas, prepare for job interview questions, understand their rights and protection under the ADA, and locate agencies and governmental programs to assist them. This book can help Idaho employers: ensure equality of opportunity for individuals with disabilities, understand the rights and protections granted to individuals with disabilities under the ADA, and understand and be reassured that individuals with disabilities are capable workers."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Idaho "Able to Work" Project

This portal of employment information for employment seekers, business, and service providers seeks to promote more and better employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Idaho.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Bureau of Facility Standards - Employment Definitions for People with Disabilities

These slides serve as an overview of Idaho's regulatory definitions of types of employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

ID Council on DD: "Discovering Personal Genius" Training

Training on Discovering Personal Genius, an employment planning tool and model for individual employment evaluation that results in a comprehensive vocational profile. Discovering Personal Genius uses a person-centered community-based observation and trial in real-time community activities to determine the strengths, skills, and interests of the person. It also includes exploration through informational interviews of potential employers in the community.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NEW - Proposed Adult Developmental Disabilities Waiver Renewal - 04/26/2017

~~“This renewal application revises the reimbursement methodology (Appendix I-2-a) for residential habilitation services, environmental accessibility adaptations, and specialized medical equipment and supplies. Additionally, this renewal application makes the following minor changes to the approved waiver: 1. Updates the Public Input summary, Contact Persons, and Attachments #1 and #2 in the Main Application; 2. Designates the Division of Medicaid as the Medical Assistance Unit in Appendix A-1; 3. Revises the Administrative Authority Performance Measure in Appendix A; 4. Updates projections for unduplicated number of participants in Appendix B-3-a; 5. Updates projections for goals for participant direction in Appendix E-1-n; 6. Updates the description of the opportunity for public comment in process to establish new provider rates in Appendix I-2-a; 7. Updates utilization and expenditure projections in Appendix J; and 8. Corrects typographical errors throughout the waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Idaho Medicaid at a Glance” - 12/01/2016

~~“Under Idaho’s Home and Community-Based Waivers, qualifying Medicaid participants may receive an array of services to:•Prevent unnecessary institutional placement;•Provide for the greatest degree of independence possible;•Enhance the quality of life;•Encourage individual choice; and•Achieve and maintain community integration.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho State Transition Plan - 07/29/2016

Coming Into Compliance with HCBS Setting Requirements: Public Notice and Request for Comment The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in t he Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915 (k) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver. Copies of the waivers can be viewed at www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov

Systems
  • Other

“HCBS Rules” - 07/01/2016

The Medicaid HCBS rules are contained in the Medicaid Enhanced rules in IDAPA 16.03.10 and the Consumer-Directed Services rules in IDAPA 16.03.13 which are published on the Idaho Department of Administration Website. A direct link to these two sections of rules is posted on this page, under the “What’s New” section. The Medicaid HCBS rules implement requirements to ensure that individuals receiving Medicaid Home and Community Based Services are integrated in and supported to gain full access to their community.

Systems
  • Other

Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services Waiver - 07/01/2016

“The purpose of this amendment to Idaho's Act Early Waiver is: 1. To conduct a thorough review of waiver language to ensure it is consistent with current operational practices, including service plan development and complaint/critical incident systems, and to ensure alignment with recent Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) changes in response to the Home and Community-Based Services Final Rule. 2. To align DD waiver performance measures with the updated CMS sub-assurances and to ensure performance measures reflect current data source and sampling practices. The Department is also taking this opportunity to ensure that performance measures aligned across Idaho's HCBS waivers.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) HCBS Waiver: ID Developmental Disabilities (Amendment # ID.0076.R05.02) - 07/01/2014

“In March 2014, the Idaho Legislature passed House Bill 476 which amended Section 56-255 of Idaho Code. Revisions to Idaho Code direct the state to allow Developmental Disability budget modifications only when needed to obtain or maintain employment or when health and safety issues are identified. Budget modifications for either of these reasons must meet criteria as defined in Department rule. This amendment adds the ability for the state to allow budget modifications when the modification is needed for the participant to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho HCBS State Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

“The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in the Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915(k) Home and Community‐Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver.” “The following Transition Plan sets forth the actions Idaho will take to operate all applicable HCBS programs in compliance with the final rules.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

ID Aged & Disabled Waiver (1076.R05.00) - 10/01/2012

"Provides adult day care, attendant care, day hab, homemaker, residential hab, respite, supported employment, adult residential care, chore, companion services, consultation, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations, home delivered meals, nonmedical transportation, PERS, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age and individuals w/PD ages 18-64."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

ID Developmental Disabilities Waiver (0076.R05.00) - 10/01/2012

This waiver  "Provides residential hab, respite, supported employment, specialized medical equipment and supplies, community support, FMS, support broker, adult day care, behavior consultation/crisis management, chore, dental, environmental accessibility adaptation, home delivered meals, PERS, skilled nursing, non-medical transportation for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 18 - no max age."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

The Employment First movement is perpetual in Idaho, where anybody with the will to work is never stuck being a "couch potato."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Idaho’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.24%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,654,930
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
15.46%
Change from
2014 to 2015
117,837
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
14.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
45,124
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.28%
Change from
2014 to 2015
38.29%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.17%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.63%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 1,654,930
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 117,837
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 45,124
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 646,788
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 38.29%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.63%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 117,929
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 107,110
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 208,520
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 467
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 18,462
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,086
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,154
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 7,444
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 3,368

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,767
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 44,090

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,489
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,626
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 12,057
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 12.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 18.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 440
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 31
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 581
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 2,336

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,263
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 33
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 31
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 94.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,733
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 65,287
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,124,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $17,283
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 6.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,375
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,598
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 12.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.85%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.19%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 67.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 13.70%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 41.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 54.81%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 27.41%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 826,034
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,049
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 47,881
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 585,721
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 633,602
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 176
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 606
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 782
AbilityOne wages (products). $296,602
AbilityOne wages (services). $8,126,422

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 11
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 395
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 395

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~Average Earnings performance measure dropped from 112% to 91%. Average second and third quarter salaries in PY 14 were $6,597. The drop in average salaries is affected by the number of hours participants are willing to work after transition. Traditionally, participants are at the retirement age and may not want to work a full time schedule when transitioned to employment. ICOA will improve this performance by targeting jobs that provide a higher hourly wage and provide participants with professional skills trainings to match higher paying job positions.
The “Most In Need” performance measure dropped from 2.58 to 2.51 average employment barriers per participant. ICOA and Experience Works recently implemented a process to prioritize and enroll participants with higher employment barriers. As positions open on the program, the sub grantee will prioritize participants with barriers to employment first. Experience Works will also, ensure priority of service is given to veterans and ensure positions are filled in rural areas where employment opportunities are limited. (Page 141)

Customized Employment

~~No specific disability related information found.

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 162)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Youth with disabilities are a priority group for the WIOA Title I Youth program and are also the target group for the state’s current Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. The state has made significant efforts to ensure that services to youth with disabilities are provided in the same capacity as those without disabilities and the needs of this population are properly addressed. WIOA Youth program staff are trained by or partnered with DEI staff for service provision. Regional business specialists and other WIOA partner staff providing services to employers develop key relationships with businesses to provide opportunities for work-based activities for youth with disabilities. Strong partnerships with the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired and Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and the Blind are utilized to develop and undertake activities as diverse as Ropes courses for teamwork and leadership development to week-long work readiness camps that help these youth achieve success by building their confidence, self-esteem and job seeking skills. (Page 201-202)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~The Division’s transition coordinator has been traveling across the state to create awareness of the changes in the VR program and to market PETS pilot programs. These activities consist of a series of face to face meetings in communities across Idaho including key stakeholder engagement through a series of regional special educator meetings, presentations at statewide administrator meetings, presentation at Tools for Life to parents, students and educators, outreach to Idaho Parents Unlimited, outreach to the Idaho Interagency Council on Secondary Transition, and ongoing discussions with the Idaho State Department of Education. (Page 277)
IDVR maintains the two primary innovation and expansion activities, supporting the activities of both the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the State Independent Living Council (SILC). Additionally, FFY 2016 will see a substantial increase in innovation pilot projects to support transition services and will monitor these pilot programs for model fidelity and outcome. The Division will work closely with the SRC to identify further innovation and expansion activities which align with the goals and priorities outlined in WIOA. To this end, IDVR has set aside one FTE to hire a Business Relations Liaison to help meet this new emphasis in WIOA and has engaged, in part with the Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center to help inform the competencies required by this position. The Division hopes to proceed after the ‘effectiveness in serving employers’ is defined by the US Departments of Education and Labor. IDVR will coordinate business outreach efforts with the Idaho Department of Labor. (Page 303)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

~~The IDVR and the Commission provide services such as counseling and guidance, assessment, vocational training, post-secondary education, transportation, personal assistance services, and job placement. Through customer informed choice and in partnership with their VR counselor, individuals with disabilities are able to create an individualized plan for employment, maximize their potential, and reach the goal of competitive integrated employment. Service identification is determined through a comprehensive assessment of the individual needs and interests based upon vocational goal selection. Comparable benefits are sought prior to the expenditure of program funds for nonexempt services.  (Page 55)
• In addition to internal training, IDVR will develop training in concert with workforce partners to cross-educate program staff on the benefits and services provided by all partners. The Division will coordinate disability specific training initiatives for non-Title IV programs with the Commission.
• The Division will continue its collaboration with the Commission in serving individuals with multiple disabilities when applicable.  (Page 92)
Partner-provided services are also accessed to meet specific One-Stop customer needs. Braille, tape or large print of written information are available through the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired or a directory of Sign Language and Oral Interpreters is available through the Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Other non-required partner services are also common points of One-Stop referral such as those provided by DisAbility Rights Idaho, which operates the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program in the state and provides counseling to customers on how employment affects Social Security benefits. (Page 164)
Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 269)
There is a strong correlation between those individuals requiring supported employment (SE) services and presumptively eligible participants in the VR program. To approximate the potential need for SE services, the Division will utilize counts of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries.
Individuals who qualify for SSI/SSDI are by law presumptively eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation services. The United States Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as of December 2012 the number of Idahoans age 18-64 who received SSDI was 42,382. SSI benefits were received by 19,933 individuals while 6,668 people concurrently received SSI and SSDI during the same period. These 62,315 individuals represent 6.6% of all working age Idahoans. (Page 290)
WIPA referrals, one of IDVR’s benchmarks to meet this priority realized a year over year increase of 40% from FFY 2014-2015. A second benchmark, Social Security reimbursements to VR is difficult to compare due to large fluctuations in the dates cost reimbursements are processed. SSA has developed a new processing system and hopes to phase-in all programs soon. This will make for a more legitimate benchmark as SSA will conduct payment requests in a timelier manner.
IDVR’s primary WIPA partner, Disability Rights of Idaho (DRI) did not reapply to administer WIPA in Idaho, consequently we have fewer in state resources to draw from for benefits planning. Montana State University - Billings is now the lead agency for WIPA referrals. DRI has agreed to provide information on Idaho’s context to MSU. In the Treasure Valley, Living Independence Network Corporation (LINC) provides benefits counseling in their designated geographical locale. (Page 311)
2. IDVR’s primary WIPA partner, Disability Rights of Idaho (DRI) did not reapply to administer WIPA in Idaho, consequently we have fewer in state resources to draw from for benefits planning.
3. There is general consensus in the Planning and Evaluation Unit that while the CSS process needs to be revisited, the capacity to do so has been lacking.
4. A second benchmark, to increase the number of different occupational areas hiring IDVR customers has been determined to be an insufficient measure to address the objective. This indicator is not sensitive to, nor does it measure meaningful engagement with Idaho’s employers. The Division feels new Section 116 performance measure provide far more relevant indicators to gauge performance toward this goal (e.g. employer services indicator and measureable skills gains). (Page 313)
(1) Increase Independence and Employment Outcomes through quality rehabilitation services. ICBVI will implement the following strategies:
• Work with Transition youth at the start of high school to foster the development of ongoing transition planning and services specifically connecting School Districts throughout the State;
• ICBVI will meet or exceed the required federal indicators;
• Emphasize the use of work incentives from Social Security Administration that promotes the transition of dependence on benefits to the independence of part or full time employment;
• Provide ongoing staff training to insure qualified professional staff knowledgeable in blindness, visual impairments as well as secondary disabilities, counseling techniques, vocational rehabilitation, community and secondary transition;
• •Conduct Assistive Technology Assessments where needed. (Page 352) 

School to Work Transition

~~The Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Correction. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 97)
Coordination of service provision will take place at the local area level. Local agreements will be established among One-Stop partners that promote communication and include arrangements for cost sharing to enable the full utilization of external funding sources. The Division will support informational training on programs. The Division will continue to support coordination and co-location with external plan agencies such as the Division of Behavioral Health, the Idaho Department of Correction and our school to work transition partners. (Page 100)
It is worth contrasting the services in the regions of the state covered by the cooperative agreements versus those not covered. Any individual school district may participate in the arrangement. IDVR counselors are either located in high schools or travel to those high school participating in the project. This increases accessibility to the students eligible and/or potentially eligible for IDVR services. Counselors maintain a dedicated caseload of transitioning students and youth with disabilities until case closure. Dedicated school to work counselors collocated in schools creates closer working relationships with school personnel, provides for more timely referrals, better support throughout the rehabilitation process, and the expertise that comes with specialization. The arrangement has proved important in developing an excellent working relationship between IDVR staff and school districts across the state. (Page 270)
ICBVI VR Counselors and Administrative Office staff coordinates with education officials to work with blind and visually impaired students transitioning from the K-12 school system. VR counselors regularly meet with the Special Education teachers, teachers of the visually impaired, school counselors, school nurses and other personnel involved in school work transition. Students can be referred to ICBVI at age 14. A transition Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is developed to assist the student with their successful transition from school to work (Page 334)
1. To continue serving school districts across the state. All Idaho school districts are served through each regional office. ICBVI does not maintain any cooperative agreements with school districts specific to the funding of school to work transition counselors. (Page 337)
The Interagency Task Force on Transition from School to Work; Transition and Assistive Technology School to Work Conference: Tools for Life; Independent Living Conference; Training Conferences provided by the Association for the Education (AER) and Rehabilitation for the Blind and Visually Impaired; Collaborative training with the Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and Blind. (Page 346)
ICBVI is committed to working collaboratively with the IESDB, IDVR, and all regional school districts to identify all eligible (or potentially eligible) secondary students in the state of Idaho. Furthermore, ICBVI is committed to reaching out to rural communities in this effort. ICBVI currently has two summer programs that are targeted towards high school students:
1. School to Work Experience Program (SWEP) and,
2. College Days. Curriculum in both of these programs is being reviewed and modified, as appropriate, to ensure they meet all of the criteria of PETS under WIOA. Additionally, both of these programs will be expanded to include more participants. (Page 358)
Goal 1 - Increase Independence and Employment Outcomes through Quality Rehabilitation Services.
• Passed Standards and Indicators for FFY 2015;
• The ICBVI’s Assistive Technologist continues to maintain consistent monthly contact providing direct client assessments. Continued e-mail/telephone consultation with Teachers of the Visually Impaired (TVI);
• Continued training of VR staff in order to provide needed services to clients with benefits;
• Regional meetings which include VR staff from both agencies, and School District staff, which are held every other year, last one was completed in September 2013. (Page 360)
 

Data Collection

~~The postsecondary institutions expressed interest in continuing to provide occupational skills training under WIOA, but faced challenges in implementing the new WIOA performance reporting for ETPs. In particular the workforce training programs, preferred by employers, did not collect the level of student information required for WIOA reporting. The stakeholder group met for over a year to write policy and develop technical solutions. Most importantly, this group generated buy-in for the much resisted data collection required. (Page 106)
As specified in Section (II)(b)(6) of this State Combined Plan, Idaho will continue to use these existing systems as the core infrastructure for our data collection and reporting processes under WIOA. Please refer to that section for more information regarding our plans for linking and integrating these systems. (Page 112)
This plan will allow core programs to update their data collection processes as needed to be WIOA compliant by July 1, 2016. It will also allow programs to begin updating their individual MIS systems as soon as possible, while taking steps toward fuller integration over the long term. Because an integrated system will not be in place on July 1, 2016, each program will be collecting data in different systems and we will use an ad-hoc data sharing process for exporting, sharing, matching, and importing data during the first, and possibly the second year. The core programs currently have data sharing processes and agreements in place under WIA, and these will be updated in Year One to align with WIOA data elements. (Page156)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

~~IDVR has hired a Transition Coordinator with extensive experience and an established network across Idaho public K-12 education system. The Transition Coordinator can provide PETS related training and technical assistance customized for Idaho businesses and coordinate with the Business Relations Liaison to ensure relevant and meaningful interventions are tailored to the needs of businesses, and to address all employer concerns regarding the provision of PETS and work based learning experiences. Employer needs will help inform alignment between PETS and the career pathways/sector strategy outlined in the strategic elements section of Idaho’s combined state plan. ( Page 280)

Employment Networks

~~Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 269)
IDVR does not establish cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers. Services are purchased on a fee–for–service basis. IDVR does have cooperative agreements with several non–profit CRPs for the coordination of services provided by Employment Networks for individuals who are Social Security beneficiaries who are Ticket holders. These cooperative agreements describe the coordination between both agencies. (Page 278)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 40

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/05/2017

~~" This year’s conference will focus on bringing the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 07/28/2017

~~“The Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services is the largest regional conference in Idaho focusing on providing quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support people with disabilities and mental illness. We bring together over 700 attendees each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NEW - Proposed Adult Developmental Disabilities Waiver Renewal - 04/26/2017

~~“This renewal application revises the reimbursement methodology (Appendix I-2-a) for residential habilitation services, environmental accessibility adaptations, and specialized medical equipment and supplies. Additionally, this renewal application makes the following minor changes to the approved waiver: 1. Updates the Public Input summary, Contact Persons, and Attachments #1 and #2 in the Main Application; 2. Designates the Division of Medicaid as the Medical Assistance Unit in Appendix A-1; 3. Revises the Administrative Authority Performance Measure in Appendix A; 4. Updates projections for unduplicated number of participants in Appendix B-3-a; 5. Updates projections for goals for participant direction in Appendix E-1-n; 6. Updates the description of the opportunity for public comment in process to establish new provider rates in Appendix I-2-a; 7. Updates utilization and expenditure projections in Appendix J; and 8. Corrects typographical errors throughout the waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Idaho Medicaid at a Glance” - 12/01/2016

~~“Under Idaho’s Home and Community-Based Waivers, qualifying Medicaid participants may receive an array of services to:•Prevent unnecessary institutional placement;•Provide for the greatest degree of independence possible;•Enhance the quality of life;•Encourage individual choice; and•Achieve and maintain community integration.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2016

“In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday. This chapter includes The steps required to complete an IEP Transition Plan. Transition Planning at 14 Beginning when the child is age 14 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must address (within the applicable parts of the IEP) the courses he or she needs to take to reach his or her post-school goals. A statement of transition services needs must also be included in each of the child's subsequent IEPs. Transition Planning at 16 Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho State Transition Plan - 07/29/2016

Coming Into Compliance with HCBS Setting Requirements: Public Notice and Request for Comment The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in t he Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915 (k) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver. Copies of the waivers can be viewed at www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Idaho Senate Bill 1268 “Relating to the Council on Developmental Disabilities; Amending Section 267-6704, Idaho Code, To Revise Provisions Regarding Council Membership and to Make Technical Corrections” - 07/01/2016

“67-6704.COMPOSITION.(1) The council shall consist of twenty-three 23) members to be appointed by the governor, at least sixty percent (60%)of whom shall be individuals with developmental disabilities, parents or Guardians of children with developmental disabilities, or immediate relatives or guardians of adults with mentally impairing developmental disabilities who cannot advocate for themselves. These members shall not represent any other category of membership. (2) At least five (5) of the members shall Be persons with a developmental disability, and at least seven (7) of the members shall be parents or guardians of children with a developmental disability”

Systems
  • Other

Idaho HB 476 - 03/18/2014

“Idaho Code 56-255 (3) (e) (ii) describes Medicaid services for people with developmental disabilities. The total amount of Medicaid developmental disability services a person can receive is limited by an individual budget amount, determined by a formula based on individual assessments. In 2011, H 260 added language to this Section which limited individual budget modifications to only those services needed to protect the health or safety of the person. One unintended consequence of this change was that it prohibited budget modifications that would allow the person to obtain or maintain employment. Medicaid can pay for Community Supported Employment (CSE) services or specialized training and support for a person with a developmental disability in a job setting. The effect of this limitation was to reduce the number of people getting on-the-job training and support, from 275 participants in 2010, to 182 participants in 2013. This bill would allow people with developmental disabilities to modify their individual budgets by adding Community Supported Employment services to their plan, when these services are needed to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2016

“In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday. This chapter includes The steps required to complete an IEP Transition Plan. Transition Planning at 14 Beginning when the child is age 14 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must address (within the applicable parts of the IEP) the courses he or she needs to take to reach his or her post-school goals. A statement of transition services needs must also be included in each of the child's subsequent IEPs. Transition Planning at 16 Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Commission on Aging “No Wrong Door” - 04/21/2015

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Extended Employment Services provide Community Supported Employment (CSE), long-term on-the-job supports in integrated settings for people who have developmental disabilities, mental illness, serious emotional disturbance and traumatic brain injury. EES also provides Work Services composed of non-work and training towards employment in segregated settings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Strategic Plan 2016-2019 Idaho “No Wrong Door”

~~“Idaho’s Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC) provides Idahoans the opportunity toaccess an array of public and private long-term care services and supports (LTSS), through single access points. LTSS information can be accessed through Idaho 211 Careline, Senior Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA), Area Agencies on Aging (AAA’s), Centers for Independent Living (CIL’s) and the Live Better Idaho website.In 2014, the Administration for Community Living (ACL), in collaboration with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), awarded the Idaho Commission on Aging (ICOA) a planning grant to develop and implement a single statewide No Wrong Door System (NWD System). Key functions of the NWD System are Governance and Administration, Public Outreach and Links to Key Referral Sources, Person Centered Counseling and Streamlined Access to Public Programs. The intent is to make it easier for people of all ages, abilities and income levels to learn about and access the services they may need.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare “Developmental Disabilities”

“The Department of Health and Welfare can help provide a number of services to assist adults and children with developmental disabilities. Some of these services include: physical and occupational therapy, housing and living supports, chore services, employment support, environmental modifications, home delivered meals, nursing services, respite care, habilitative supports, family education, crisis intervention, and in-school supports, to name a few.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities “2016 Work Plan”

Objective 1.3– Employment First Create more opportunities for people with developmental disabilities to have jobs in the community that are integrated, inclusive, and pay more than minimum wage by working with partners on a statewide employment first project that includes educating communities, training staff, and writing at least one state policy by September 2016 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment. FY 2016 Activities •Convene Employment First Consortium, support workgroups •Utilize opportunities for technical assistance from national experts through the Employment Learning Community, ODEP Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Project, and other resources •With key partners, draft recommendations for adding employment service options under the Idaho Medicaid program in line with HCBS rules •Build public awareness and support for Employment First message •Promote Idaho Disability Employment Awareness Month activities including Take Your Legislator to Work and post awareness information •Support employment planning training opportunities for transition- age youth and families •Review research reports and state system data related to employment services •Monitor employment related policies and program changes •Participate in project-relevant councils, committees, and workgroups

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and Idaho State Rehabilitation Council Services to Students and Youth with Disabilities (2016 Annual Report)

~~“Pending final regulations of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, the agency heeded encouragement from federal partners to step back and re-envision how business is conducted. Where some other states have struggled to implement the significant structural and process changes required, Idaho viewed it as a challenge to overcome and acted accordingly.

A completely new program of pre-employment transition services for students, the revamp of traditional youth and adult activities to accommodate that change, increased engagement of the business community, and the alignment of shared plans and outcome measures with other workforce agencies would each be difficult to accomplish, let alone all at the same time. Through exceptional effort, the staff succeeded and results of that accomplishment are evident in the facts, figures and success stories displayed on the following calendar pages.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired: VR 2016 State Plan

ICBVI’s Vocational Rehabilitation plan is outlined and includes details about cooperative agreements and partnerships with other agencies and employers as well as provisions for supported employment services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Partners in Policymaking 2016

Idaho Partners in Policymaking is an innovative leadership development program for adults with developmental disabilities and parents of children with disabilities. Partners receive information, training, resources, and skill building so they may have the best possible life experiences for themselves and for their children. Partners in Policymaking was created in 1986 by Colleen Wieck, Executive Director of the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities. The program was developed specifically to teach people with disabilities and families of young children with disabilities to: Work on long-term change. Become active partners with policymakers who will shape policies that impact people with disabilities and families. Understand possibilities and how to create them.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Consortium for Idahoans with Disabilities

The mission of CID is “to protect, promote and advance the rights and interests of people with disabilities of all ages in Idaho in a manner consistent with the following principles:    1. CID will promote and protect the rights of people with disabilities to meaningful personal choice and self determination.    2. CID will promote the right to independence and self sufficiency for people with disabilities.    3. CID will promote the right to inclusive, adapted, accessible services, residences, education, health care and employment for people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho State Rehabilitation Council

“Working on behalf of Idahoans with disabilities, the Idaho State Rehabilitation Council endeavors to provide consumers, service providers and others the opportunity to participate in constructive dialogue and public input to continually improve the quality of Vocational Rehabilitation services to residents of Idaho. The Idaho State Rehabilitation Council monitors the policies and practices of the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Council can make recommendations to IDVR about eligibility, the scope and effectiveness of services provided and functions performed that affect the ability of individuals with disabilities to achieve rehabilitation goals.   The Council prepares and submits an annual report on the status of Vocational Rehabilitation programs in Idaho, and makes that report available to the public.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Cooperative Services Agreement: DoE, VR & Blind and Visually Impaired

“This Cooperative Services Agreement has been developed with multiple purposes in mind. First, this agreement is intended to provide a coordinated, comprehensive system focusing on youth with disabilities as they transition from secondary to post-school activities. Beyond that, the information contained in this agreement serves to provide guidance to the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI), and the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE) regarding roles and responsibilities around issues related to transition.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Employment First Consortium

“The Idaho Employment First Consortium was established and is supported by the Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities for the purpose of improving how employment services and systems work in Idaho so that people with developmental disabilities are able to reach their career goals. It includes representatives from state agencies, advocacy organizations, service providers, parents, and self-advocates. Seventeen Consortium members met for the first time in April 2012 and continue to meet monthly on an ongoing basis. The group has adopted an Employment First message with defined common values and a vision for our state: ‘All Idahoans with disabilities have the right and responsibility to work and contribute to their community.’

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2013

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2013, Idaho was awarded a Round 4 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This will end in 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Idaho Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration is a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Demonstration designed to help states try new ways of delivering Medicaid services. The Demonstration is designed to help people to move, also called transition, from an institution into home- and community-based living settings, such as a home or an apartment. In Idaho, the Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration is known as Idaho Home Choice.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/05/2017

~~" This year’s conference will focus on bringing the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 07/28/2017

~~“The Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services is the largest regional conference in Idaho focusing on providing quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support people with disabilities and mental illness. We bring together over 700 attendees each year.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Parents Unlimited “What is Parents Unlimited?” - 07/18/2016

Founded in 1985, Idaho Parents Unlimited, Inc. (IPUL) is a statewide organization which houses the Idaho Parent Training and Information Center, the Family to Family Health Information Center, Idaho Family Voices, and VSA Idaho, the State Organization on Arts and Disability. The Parent Training and Information Center ensures that parents of children with disabilities receive training and information on their rights, responsibilities, and protections under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in order to develop the skills necessary to cooperatively and effectively participate in planning and decision making relating to early intervention, educational, and transitional services.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Training Clearinghouse - Transition to Work for Youth with Significant Disabilities - 08/31/2015

“This is an online course using the Idaho Training Clearinghouse Learning Management System at the Center on Disabilities and Human Development at the University of Idaho. They are not face to face classes.” The course was available from August 31 to December 7, 2015. 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

ID Department of Labor: Job Hunting Guide for People with Disabilities

“This book can help Idahoans with disabilities: understand their strengths and knowledge concerning work, organize their job search, Identify potential work areas, prepare for job interview questions, understand their rights and protection under the ADA, and locate agencies and governmental programs to assist them. This book can help Idaho employers: ensure equality of opportunity for individuals with disabilities, understand the rights and protections granted to individuals with disabilities under the ADA, and understand and be reassured that individuals with disabilities are capable workers."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Idaho "Able to Work" Project

This portal of employment information for employment seekers, business, and service providers seeks to promote more and better employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Idaho.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Idaho Bureau of Facility Standards - Employment Definitions for People with Disabilities

These slides serve as an overview of Idaho's regulatory definitions of types of employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

ID Council on DD: "Discovering Personal Genius" Training

Training on Discovering Personal Genius, an employment planning tool and model for individual employment evaluation that results in a comprehensive vocational profile. Discovering Personal Genius uses a person-centered community-based observation and trial in real-time community activities to determine the strengths, skills, and interests of the person. It also includes exploration through informational interviews of potential employers in the community.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NEW - Proposed Adult Developmental Disabilities Waiver Renewal - 04/26/2017

~~“This renewal application revises the reimbursement methodology (Appendix I-2-a) for residential habilitation services, environmental accessibility adaptations, and specialized medical equipment and supplies. Additionally, this renewal application makes the following minor changes to the approved waiver: 1. Updates the Public Input summary, Contact Persons, and Attachments #1 and #2 in the Main Application; 2. Designates the Division of Medicaid as the Medical Assistance Unit in Appendix A-1; 3. Revises the Administrative Authority Performance Measure in Appendix A; 4. Updates projections for unduplicated number of participants in Appendix B-3-a; 5. Updates projections for goals for participant direction in Appendix E-1-n; 6. Updates the description of the opportunity for public comment in process to establish new provider rates in Appendix I-2-a; 7. Updates utilization and expenditure projections in Appendix J; and 8. Corrects typographical errors throughout the waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Idaho Medicaid at a Glance” - 12/01/2016

~~“Under Idaho’s Home and Community-Based Waivers, qualifying Medicaid participants may receive an array of services to:•Prevent unnecessary institutional placement;•Provide for the greatest degree of independence possible;•Enhance the quality of life;•Encourage individual choice; and•Achieve and maintain community integration.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho State Transition Plan - 07/29/2016

Coming Into Compliance with HCBS Setting Requirements: Public Notice and Request for Comment The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in t he Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915 (k) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver. Copies of the waivers can be viewed at www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov

Systems
  • Other

“HCBS Rules” - 07/01/2016

The Medicaid HCBS rules are contained in the Medicaid Enhanced rules in IDAPA 16.03.10 and the Consumer-Directed Services rules in IDAPA 16.03.13 which are published on the Idaho Department of Administration Website. A direct link to these two sections of rules is posted on this page, under the “What’s New” section. The Medicaid HCBS rules implement requirements to ensure that individuals receiving Medicaid Home and Community Based Services are integrated in and supported to gain full access to their community.

Systems
  • Other

Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services Waiver - 07/01/2016

“The purpose of this amendment to Idaho's Act Early Waiver is: 1. To conduct a thorough review of waiver language to ensure it is consistent with current operational practices, including service plan development and complaint/critical incident systems, and to ensure alignment with recent Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) changes in response to the Home and Community-Based Services Final Rule. 2. To align DD waiver performance measures with the updated CMS sub-assurances and to ensure performance measures reflect current data source and sampling practices. The Department is also taking this opportunity to ensure that performance measures aligned across Idaho's HCBS waivers.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) HCBS Waiver: ID Developmental Disabilities (Amendment # ID.0076.R05.02) - 07/01/2014

“In March 2014, the Idaho Legislature passed House Bill 476 which amended Section 56-255 of Idaho Code. Revisions to Idaho Code direct the state to allow Developmental Disability budget modifications only when needed to obtain or maintain employment or when health and safety issues are identified. Budget modifications for either of these reasons must meet criteria as defined in Department rule. This amendment adds the ability for the state to allow budget modifications when the modification is needed for the participant to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho HCBS State Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

“The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations in the Federal Register on January 16, 2014, which became effective on March 17, 2014, implementing new requirements for Medicaid’s 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915(k) Home and Community‐Based Services (HCBS) waivers. These regulations require Idaho to submit a Transition Plan for all the state’s 1915(c) waiver and 1915(i) HCBS state plan programs. Idaho does not have a 1915(k) waiver.” “The following Transition Plan sets forth the actions Idaho will take to operate all applicable HCBS programs in compliance with the final rules.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

ID Aged & Disabled Waiver (1076.R05.00) - 10/01/2012

"Provides adult day care, attendant care, day hab, homemaker, residential hab, respite, supported employment, adult residential care, chore, companion services, consultation, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations, home delivered meals, nonmedical transportation, PERS, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age and individuals w/PD ages 18-64."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

ID Developmental Disabilities Waiver (0076.R05.00) - 10/01/2012

This waiver  "Provides residential hab, respite, supported employment, specialized medical equipment and supplies, community support, FMS, support broker, adult day care, behavior consultation/crisis management, chore, dental, environmental accessibility adaptation, home delivered meals, PERS, skilled nursing, non-medical transportation for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 18 - no max age."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)