Kansas

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State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kansas' VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.26%
Change from
2014 to 2015
2,911,641
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.08%
Change from
2014 to 2015
184,791
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.25%
Change from
2014 to 2015
79,132
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.03%
Change from
2014 to 2015
42.82%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.16%
Change from
2014 to 2015
79.88%

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 2,893,957 2,904,021 2,911,641
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 178,125 192,334 184,791
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 74,268 76,562 79,132
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,225,917 1,222,393 1,229,527
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.69% 39.81% 42.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.98% 79.75% 79.88%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.30% 4.50% 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.40% 20.30% 19.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.30% 12.60% 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 173,213 178,052 184,846
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 177,555 188,341 180,957
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 302,912 314,790 317,198
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 23,196 25,710 24,705
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 20,329 24,289 24,638
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,429 4,248 3,650
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,257 4,614 4,082
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 11,506 12,425 11,428
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 4,383 4,154 4,705

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,827 3,913 3,987
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.40% 8.40% 8.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 75,521 75,123 74,677

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 9,957 9,160 9,806
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 30,415 28,503 29,223
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 33,801 31,705 32,407
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 29.50% 28.90% 30.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 16.30% 16.10% 13.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 41.20% 37.90% 31.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,382 1,367 1,315
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 3,505 3,231 2,968
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,001 3,726 4,008
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.02 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 117 100 67
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 61 58 40
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00% 58.00% 60.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.11 2.00 1.37

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,684
3,140
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 123 100 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 244 165 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 916 783 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 985 845 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,360 1,123 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 156 124 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 22.00% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,107 2,793 2,847
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 106,565 106,853 106,902
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 244 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $0 N/A $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 N/A $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 N/A $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 N/A $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 15.00% 13.00% 14.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,862 3,284 3,457
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,437 3,118 3,086
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,338 3,625 3,838
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 30.90 27.70 29.10

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 67.17% 68.61% 69.32%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 7.21% 6.93% 6.72%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.29% 2.30% 2.27%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.24% 97.51% 99.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 32.10% 33.33% 36.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.85% 60.61% 63.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.25% 73.59% 77.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 26.75% 27.27% 27.50%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 454,126
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 810
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 174,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 33,751
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 208,693
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 165
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 184
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,536,706
AbilityOne wages (services). $320,864

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 44 34 36
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 46 36 37
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 77 20 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,324 2,624 2,772
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 119 114 114
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3,520 2,758 2,886

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care.
• Through the Governor’s Sub-Cabinet on Disability, leadership among the Kansas Departments for Children and Families (DCF), Health and Environment, Commerce, Corrections and Aging and Disability Services focuses attention on implementing employment first strategies in state agencies and tracking baseline and performance data to effectively measure outcomes. Sub-Cabinet meetings are also an opportunity for open communications among these departments and advocacy and provider organizations working in the disability system.
• The DCF Secretary is participating on a Governor-directed strategic planning effort with a focus on workforce development. DCF is the designated state agency. (Page 209)
Ongoing communication and collaboration
KRS is in frequent contact with other agencies related to competitive, integrated employment of Kansans with disabilities. Some examples include participation on the:
• Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its vocational sub-committee.
• The KDADS strategic planning team to integrate mental health and substance use disorder services into a recovery oriented system of care.
• The Developmental Disabilities Council.
• The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.
• The Employment First Commission.
• Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (Pages 226)
 

Customized Employment

~~Training and education to learn new vocational skills.
• Rehabilitation technology, telecommunication aids and other adaptive devices.
• Job preparation and placement services.
• Job coaching.
• On-the-job training.
• Services to help students with disabilities get a job after finishing high school.
• Supported and customized employment for individuals who need intensive on-the-job training and ongoing support.
• Referral to other services.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 65)
Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) enters into provider agreements with a variety of community agencies for the provision of supported employment services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Through customized employment provider agreements, six key components or milestones are specified for supported employment services:
1. Creation of a job development action plan.
2. Placement.
3. Stabilization.
4. 45 days of continuous, successful employment.
5. Finalization of an extended ongoing service plan.
Direct hourly Job Coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Customized Employment milestones services descried above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements. (Page 220)
A bachelor’s degree in a field of study reasonably related to vocational rehabilitation, indicating a level of competency and skill demonstrating basic preparation in a field of study such as vocational rehabilitation counseling, social work, psychology, disability studies, business administration, human resources, special education, supported employment, customized employment, economics, or another field that reasonably prepares individuals to work with consumers and employers; and Demonstrated paid or unpaid experience, for not less than one year, consisting of—(Page 232)
The needs assessment revealed the need for job placement and other provider services with specialized expertise in competitive, integrated employment of people with disabilities. As a result, KRS will emphasize the development and maintenance of evidence-based and promising practices through the End-Dependence Kansas initiative. Direct service contracts will be used to promote the development and expansion of Individual Placement and Supports, Individualized Discovery/Customized Employment, and Progressive Employment. (Page 260)
Methods to expand and improve services
When considering opportunities to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, KRS emphasizes strategies that will address the needs of people with the most significant disabilities and people who have been unserved or under-served. Collaborative efforts with consumers, advisory councils, parent groups, advocacy organizations, community rehabilitation programs and other state agencies are undertaken to expand access to VR services and to promote supported employment, customized employment, Pre-Employment Transition Services and assistive technology services. Innovation and expansion activities are consistent with the findings of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment. Specifically, the following functions assist KRS is achieving its goals and priorities related to innovation and expansion: (Page 280)
Direct hourly job coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Supported Employment and Customized Employment milestones services described above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements.
After the time-limited VR services end, the supported employment service provider maintains extended ongoing services with the consumer or has identified a plan specifying how the community-service system will provide the extended ongoing supports the consumer needs to maintain employment. These extended services are not funded with VR dollars. To reinforce and maintain stability of the job placement, ongoing services include regular contact. (Page 295)
 

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~Not significantly increased the number of individuals with barriers to employment who receive training and other more intensive services
• Limited success with blending and braiding resources across multiple systems to meet the needs of job seekers and workers
• Varied success at meeting the workforce needs of all industry sectors, as well as in some geographic areas of the state (Page 22)
The primary role of LVER staff, at the Kansas AJCs, is to conduct outreach to employers in the area, to assist veterans in gaining employment. Additionally, LVERs promote, plan and participate in job fairs and seminars for employers. Furthermore, LVERs promote veterans as job ready candidates, who have highly marketable skills and experience. Kansas LVERs advocate for veterans by promoting employment and training opportunities, coordinating with other business outreach representatives in the AJC to facilitate and promote employment, workshops, job searches, establishing job groups in conjunction with employers, and leverage other employment opportunities for veterans. Kansas LVERs establish, maintain, and facilitate regular contact with federal contractors, unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations. Additionally our LVERs provides educational training to AJC staff, additional employer based training and other outreach services, in accordance with VPL 07-10 and VPL 03-14. The Department of Commerce ensures that there are no blending of roles, whereas LVERs provide monthly activity reports to the State Manager and are often consulted with by AJC supervisors about their activity. Furthermore, LVERs are encouraged to utilize referrals and other resources, such as the Department of Commerce/ KANVET Hire a Veteran Pledge program as a resource to locate veteran friendly businesses/ employers, who are seeking veterans first, to employ. (Page 314)
 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.
Each workforce partner and local area must comply with both program and physical accessibility requirements consistent with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, WIOA Section 188 and related federal guidance, and the Kansas Act against Discrimination. Policies will be established to assure compliance and equal access and usability for all Kansans, regardless of disability. The following key points, at a minimum, must be included in all program and local area accessibility policies. (Page 120)
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~• A workshop with a large hospital and health services company regarding its on-line application and screening processes. Participants were able to learn about how to more effectively use the on-line application process with VR consumers and the response time expectations of companies after vacant positions are posted. Similar workshops are pending with the Veterans’ Administration and an aircraft manufacturer.
• A major energy company is interested in creating a training program for transition youth.
• An ironworker trade union is interested in offering its apprenticeship program to youth with disabilities.
• A pilot project is pending with a major national on-line shopping company to use a preferred vendor as a single point of contact to hire workers with disabilities. A major hospital and a plastics manufacturing firm are also exploring similar inclusion programs.
• A national candy manufacturing company has a campaign to interest Kansas high school students in pursuing manufacturing work. They are interested in including transition-aged youth with disabilities in this initiative.
• Extensive outreach and communication are underway with federal contractors with 503 compliance requirements. (Page 224)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The KWSB is more than an advisory board to the Governor and staff on workforce policy issues. The Board ensures Kansas’ entire workforce system, covering many programs in multiple departments and agencies, meets employers’ needs for skilled workers and meets workers’ needs for career and economic advancement. The KWSB convenes State, regional and local workforce system partners to enhance the capacity and performance of the workforce system; align and improve the outcomes and effectiveness of public workforce investments and thereby promote economic growth. The board engages workforce system representatives including businesses, education, economic development, labor and other stakeholders to achieve the strategic and operational vision and goals of the State Plan as well as the purpose of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA). (Page 96)
Other evaluation and research functions implemented through core programs include:
• Implementing evidence-based employment practices for people with disabilities and ongoing fidelity research into the effectiveness of these practices.
• Using federal and state technical assistance resources, to the extent they are available, for evaluation and research functions.
• Using a research-to-practice approach by leveraging knowledge transfer from national resources including technical assistance centers funded by the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) with funding from the US Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, the National Skills Coalition, and other similar organizations that disseminate research-based information on improving service delivery.
• Dissemination of information concerning research-based best practices for service delivery, alignment, and policy development.  (Page 101)
 

Benefits

~~• Services are individualized to address each person’s unique strengths, impediments to employment and vocational goals. An individual plan for employment is jointly developed between each customer and the VR counselor to address specific barriers to employment, the vocational objective, and the services necessary to achieve that objective.
• VR counselors are highly trained to address the complex disability, employment and cultural issues that impact persons served, and to facilitate informed decision–making in partnership with their customers.
• 95% of persons rehabilitated into employment in FFY 2014 were persons with significant disabilities, meaning that they had multiple functional limitations in major life areas such as mobility, communications, self–care, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, work skills and self–direction.
• VR emphasizes the employment potential of youth with disabilities and the importance of them gaining an early attachment to work or postsecondary education resulting in employment. 21% of persons served in FFY 2014 were transition–aged youth with disabilities (21 years old or younger at the time of application). 23% of persons rehabilitated that year were youth.  (Page 65)
• Over the past ten years, approximately 75% of persons rehabilitated report their own earnings as their largest source of financial support, a significant milestone toward self–sufficiency and reduced reliance on public benefits.
• VR services are comprehensive and flexible in order to empower each customer to maximize employment.
• The End–Dependence Kansas initiative emphasizes the use of evidence–based practices throughout the VR service delivery system, including community–based service providers, to increase employment outcomes.
• Local areas should incorporate mitigating strategies, such as Earned Income Tax Credit program awareness, into their service strategies.
• State–level core partners should ensure that local partners are familiar with resources such as Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) benefits counselors, Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA), and other resources, and should develop strategies to share this information and/or train local area staff on an ongoing basis.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 65)
The VR program supports customers to pursue postsecondary education at all levels if necessary to achieve their vocational goals. VR assists customers to access comparable benefits, such as PELL Grants, to help pay for higher education before expending VR funds. Agreements between VR and all Kansas institutions of higher education specify cost sharing responsibilities related to the provision of auxiliary aids and services.
8. Schedule. Applicants must comply with the following timetable:
1. Provide required application forms and narratives to the Kansas Department of Commerce no later than 4:00 PM __________.
2. Pre-Bid Telephone Conference Call is scheduled for____. Call 1-866-XXX-XXXX.
3. Complete application packages must be emailed to:________.
4. Commerce will announce Grant Awards by __date_____(Page 135)
• Work Registration - RESEA participants must have a Plus account which includes a complete, up- to-date and active resume in KANSASWORKS (the state’s employment website). Staff will provide resume assistance if appropriate.
• Orientation to One-Stop services - An introduction to the workforce center that includes an overview of the programs and services available, and instruction on using self-help tools
• UI Eligibility Review - Potential eligibility issues are documented and referred to UI.
• Initial Assessment - Evaluation of the customer’s employment history, education, interests and skills resulting in the identification of employment goals, barriers to employment and the services needed to obtain his/her goals.
• Labor Market Information - Based on desired residential location and claimant’s employment history/interests
• Individual Employment Plan - In consultation with the claimant, a written Individual Employment Plan (IEP) matched to the claimant’s needs based on information gathered during the Initial Assessment is developed.
• Follow-up: Claimants must follow up with RESEA staff every 30 days until he/she has returned to work or is no longer receiving benefits. At each follow-up the claimant provides their work search contacts for the previous four weeks. (Page 160)
Council Comment: Development of informational materials is needed for use with outreach with schools, referral sources, parents and consumers. KRS should also focus on outreach to organizations such as the Kansas Physical Therapy Association and the Kansas Occupational Therapy Association and speech/language professional organizations. Professionals in these disciplines often have contact with individuals with disabilities and could pass along information about VR.
KRS Response: KRS will work with DCF Communications regarding this request. (Page 204)
• KRS and DCF Economic and Employment Services collaborate to serve recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who have disabilities. Consumers benefit by being able to receive the coordinated and specialized services they need to achieve employment before their time-limited TANF benefits cease.
• KRS and DCF Prevention and Protection Services independent living staff will coordinate to address the employment and/or post-secondary education needs of youth with disabilities who age out of foster care.
• Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care.
• KRS maintains an active presence on numerous councils and committees, including:
 The Statewide Independent Living Council of Kansas.
 The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.
 The Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its Vocational Sub-Committee.
 The Governor’s Commission on Autism.
 Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities
 KANSASWORKS State Board
 5 Local workforce development boards
• A memorandum of understanding with the Prairie Band Potawatomie Nation Native American VR program addresses the coordination of services to help consumers achieve employment. (Page 209)
As outlined in the agreement, KRS will provide VR services for students in accordance with KRS policy under the following conditions:
• The student has been determined eligible for VR and can be served within the Order of Selection.
• The student (and his/her parents or representative if appropriate) and the VR counselor have agreed to an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE).
• The goods or services provided will be necessary for post-high school training or employment, or will substantially contribute to achievement of the competitive, integrated employment objective on the IPE.
• Employment or post-secondary services provided by VR must occur outside the established school sessions. The term “school sessions” refers not only to the school semester or term, but also to the school day.
• Consideration of comparable benefits and application of the economic need policy are required. (Page 215)
KRS will continue to develop, implement and maintain a professional development system for new and experienced staff. A priority focus area will be to address effective communication strategies to assure consumer engagement and progress toward employment, and development and implementation of effective Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs). Other areas of focus continue to be informed choice; understanding the purpose and intent of the VR program; linkages between eligibility, rehabilitation needs, consumer goals and priorities, and services provided; development of effective progress measures; time and caseload management techniques; financial accountability cultural competence; accountable decision-making; expertise related to disability populations served (specifically persons who are blind or visually impaired, persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, persons with mental illness, and persons with head injury); leadership development; use of comparable benefits; basic benefits counseling issues surrounding employment; use of Kansas specific labor market trends and demands; and, effective career counseling and guidance related to employment as the avenue to self-reliance.(Page 236)
Annually about 10% of the total persons served (Status 02-24 +32) receive supported employment services. Individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, significant intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injury are among the primary populations receiving supported employment services. Their services are characterized by:
• The need for community-based work assessments or job tryouts in competitive, integrated employment so that individuals who have not previously worked can explore jobs that are a good match for their skills and interests.
• The importance of an individualized approach in connecting these individuals with: available social service and disability-related services; transportation; benefits counseling; and natural support networks in their home communities.
• The need for employability or soft skill training on issues such as self-advocacy, communications, taking direction from employers, getting along with co-workers and customer service.
• The need for specific job skill training matched with current and projected labor market needs. (Page 251)
1.9  The number of KRS SSI recipients and SSDI beneficiaries for whom KRS receives reimbursement funding. To meet this standard, the individuals must achieve the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months.
1.10  The number of VR consumers receiving qualified benefits counseling.
Goal 2: KRS will emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities and improve the outreach and outcomes for transition-aged students.
Strategies for Goal 2:
KRS will implement the following strategies:
A. Build and maintain VR capacity to deliver Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS).
B. Build partnerships with school transition personnel to encourage those career-focused and work-based experiences are incorporated into transition Individual Education Plans and to increase referrals of PETS-eligible students to the VR program. (Page 269)
KRS will also:
• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so that consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 278)
Identified in the FFY 2015 Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Plan. These highlights are based on FFY 2015 indicators.
• A total of 1,345 Kansans with disabilities achieved stable employment as a result of VR services, earning an average of $9.88 an hour. VR consumers achieved employment in high-wage, high-demand jobs, for example: more than $40 an hour as an Information Technology Systems Administrator and numerous placements of more than $30 an hour in the nursing field.
• The percent of individuals who reported their own earnings as the largest source of support at the time of vocational rehabilitation (VR) case closure was 72.4%, 57% higher than at application. This represents a significant milestone toward increased self-reliance.
• The number of successful employment outcomes after participating in post-secondary education was 242. This indicator represents a significant quality measure as increased education and technical training often lead to higher-wage, career track positions and therefore increased self-reliance.
• KRS receives reimbursement funds from the Social Security Administration for consumers who are recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or beneficiaries of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) when those individuals work at the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months. In FFY 2015, reimbursement funds received by the agency totaled $1,123,976.
• Providing employment-focused services for transition youth is a priority for KRS. KRS has traditionally defined transition youth as persons who are age 21 or younger at the time of application). Under WIOA, the definition of youth is inclusive of persons aged 14 through 24. When youth achieve an early attachment to employment and all of its advantages, the likelihood of their reliance on public benefits through their lifetime is reduced. (Page 286)
FFY 2015: Service providers: 5.72; educators: 4.72; general advocates category not surveyed.
Indicator 2.7: Average expended per rehabilitation for the life of the case. FFY 2015: $6,464
Indicator 2.8: Annual number of persons served (status 02-24 +32). FFY 2015: 11,419
Indicator 2.9: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.10: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services provided through one-stop workforce centers. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.11: Rehabilitation rate of persons referred to placement or supported employment providers.
FFY 2015: 54%
Indicator 2.12: The average wage achieved by persons referred to placement or supported employment providers. (Page 289)
For the purpose of promoting the hiring and retention of veterans, Workforce Center staff will provide and facilitate a full range of employment and training services. LVER staff will advocate for veterans to employers and seek other opportunities with business and industry, community based organizations, and contractors of all kinds, to include federal contractors. All Workforce Center staff, as well as LVER staff, will work together to plan and participate in job fairs to promote the hiring of veterans and eligible persons. LVER staff will communicate job fair participation opportunities and the benefits of attending job fairs, to employers and federal contractors. LVERs will also make contact with unions, apprenticeship programs and the business community to promote employment and training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons, and furthermore promote credentialing and training opportunities with training providers and credentialing bodies. (Page 320)
Improving SCSEP Services Kansas is posting a Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) to assure the upcoming grant period will focus on strategies to improve and better achieve the goals of SCSEP. The strategies will include the following action steps:
• Increase recruitment and enrollment to increase the number of active participants. This focus will include reaching out to community organizations and other senior service providers to provide information on the SCSEP program and its’ benefits.
• Focus participant training towards employment skills acquisition as guided by IEP, TAD and assessment results based on labor market needs, Training will include short–term training classes, education and WORKReady! Certification. SCSEP will also insure that participants are receiving the job notification list that is generated by the One–Stop so that participants are better informed about area job openings.
• Increase follow–up contact with participants exited for unsubsidized employment to address employment and life issues to help maintain employment.
• Insure all most–in–need measures are accurately and timely entered into SPARQ.
• Create host agency skill development training and tracking to be reviewed with participant and agency quarterly based on each individuals IEP.
• Reinforce the goal of SCSEP program with participants, e.g. unsubsidized employment, at each contact. (Page 339)
 

School to Work Transition

~~A priority target population for End-Dependence Kansas is youth transitioning from school to work. End-Dependence Kansas, coupled with outreach for Pre-Employment Transition Services and Section 511 services to divert youth from direct entry into sub-minimum wage work, will expand supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Significant training and technical assistance will be focused on improved communication with students and youth with disabilities encouraging competitive integrated employment. Also, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Education, KRS will offer opportunities for training and technical assistance for school personnel to learn and understand the needs of students and youth pursuing employment rather than services only, to establish and implement the soft skills and employment preparedness skills needed by employers and how and when to complete a referral to the VR program. In addition to these strategies, KRS will work collaboratively to assure Title I youth services are readily available to students and youth with disabilities to enjoy work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, career exploration and coaching, etc. (Page 278)

Data Collection

~~(1) (A) The Commerce workforce system uses the America’s Job Link Alliance Management Information System to meet all of the requirements of US Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration for data collection and reporting. The AJLA system in Kansas, www.kansasworks.com also provides the public with access to labor market information, connects to postsecondary training programs and performance outcomes by training program. The AJLA system provides case management tools and creates participant records and can be used for payment for services and cost allocation of services. Employers may enter job postings in KANSASWORKS.com in addition to finding qualified applicants for jobs. Today, there are 35,524 job postings and 9021 resumes in KANSASWORKS.com. (Page 88)
Data-collection and reporting processes are consistent throughout each local area; data is validated as required by US DOL. Commerce has policies related to data collection and reporting processes required for each local workforce system, including Data and Information Collection and Maintenance, Record Maintenance and Retention, Eligibility Determination and Documentation, Fiscal Manual, and the State Performance Accountability System. All current and draft policies can be found at http://kwpolicies.kansascommerce.com/Pages/Default.aspx
VR will collect and report data necessary for the common accountability measures identified in WIOA, the quarterly state-specific data measures identified in the Performance Indicators operational elements, the data necessary for the extensive metrics included in the goals and priorities section of the VR Services Portion of the Combined State Plan, and the data necessary for evaluation and continuous improvement. (Page 89)
5. System and program accessibility: Data will be disaggregated by those with significant barriers to employment, including those with disabilities to allow local and state policy makers to evaluate the services provided to those individuals.
Measurement of success with these stated operational elements or activities will be attributed to the successful development of inter-agency data sharing agreements and related linkages of systems as a result of data sharing. All partners will monitor of data collection and validate data.
With a Round 3 Workforce Data Quality Initiative grant (WDQI), Regents, Commerce, and Labor have collaborated to create an interoperable data system. The Kansas WDQI Round 5 grant includes Vocational Rehabilitation to build on the work already in progress and create a system which will support the reduction of duplicative data collection. (Page 90)
KRS will also:
• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so that consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 278)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~• Direct work with individuals with disabilities in a setting such as an independent living center;
• Direct service or advocacy activities that provide such individual with experience and skills in working with individuals with disabilities; or
• Direct experience in competitive integrated employment environments as an employer, as a small business owner or operator, or in self-employment, or other experience in human resources or recruitment, or experience in supervising employees, training, or other activities (Page 233)
 

Career Pathways

~~The State will implement sector strategies, as described, regarding identified economic regions found in Title IB, Section VI and career pathways already utilized in multiple workforce programs, including formula and competitive grant programs. Career pathways will prepare individuals to be successful in a full range of secondary or postsecondary options including registered apprenticeships. Career pathways will enable individuals to attain a high school equivalency certificate, where necessary, as well as at least one recognized postsecondary credential. Where practicable, career pathways will integrate education, training, and other services including counseling and workforce preparation activities in order to accelerate the educational and career advancement of individuals. Since 2011, Regents, employers and individual postsecondary institutions have worked together to develop career pathways in twenty–five aligned programs. Local Workforce Boards may also develop additional career pathways as required by local employers. Adult Education will collaborate with workforce partners in offering basic skills to registered apprenticeship participants and with colleges in offering concurrent enrollment and team–teaching in Adult Education and CTE programs. (Page 44)
Specific Strategy (Operational Element/Method/Activity) Recommended for Implementation: Collaborative youth services based on individual service strategies focused on skill development and career pathways. Work–based learning addresses a broad range of skills needs—both “soft” skills and technical skills. While this strategy makes work–based learning a priority, we recognize that it is not a panacea for all youth, and even when it is included in a youth’s individual service strategy, it will be supplemented with other forms of learning. Key elements of this strategy include:
• Paid work–based experiences. (Real Job)
• Summer employment partnerships
• Pre–apprenticeship opportunities
• Internships and job shadowing
• On the job training opportunities (Page 50)
Components of this strategy:
• To be effective, work experience must come in different forms. This includes, but is not limited to on–the–job training, summer employment programs, pre-apprenticeship opportunities, and internships/job shadowing.
• The importance of existing and continued development of career pathways that incorporate an element of work experience.
• The importance of locally identified career pathways.
• Continued education and training that includes, but is not limited to, achievement of the high school diploma or its equivalent, technical training, industry-recognized certificates, etc. that is included under all of the sections of WIOA.
• The specific requirements of Title I and Title IV. (Page 54)
Specific Strategy (Operational Element/Method/Activity) Recommended for Implementation: Collaborative youth services based on individual service strategies focused on skill development and career pathways. Work-based learning addresses a broad range of skills needs—both “soft” skills and technical skills. While this strategy makes work-based learning a priority, we recognize that it is not a panacea for all youth, and even when it is included in a youth’s individual service strategy, it will be supplemented with other forms of learning. Key elements of this strategy include:
• Paid work-based experiences (Real Job)
• Summer employment partnerships
• Pre-apprenticeship opportunities
• Internships and job shadowing
• On the job training opportunities (Page 147)
Local plans must address coordination with education and training options available in the local area, particularly education and training offered through community and technical colleges throughout the state. Education and training opportunities must be tied to the attainment of industry-recognized credentials along career pathways for demand occupations.
Career pathways provide a sequence of education and training that give youth a clear line-of-sight to an industry recognized credential and a career. WIOA requires that career pathways meet the workforce needs of the region or state, offer individuals the opportunity to earn at least one recognized post-secondary credential, provide contextual education concurrently with workforce preparation and training, and include counseling to support individuals in achieving their education and career goals. Accelerating Opportunity: Kansas (AO-K) enhances these required elements with classes that are team-taught by basic skills and CTE instructors, transcript post-secondary credit, wrap-around support services, and the opportunity to earn stackable credentials. Training (in all forms) must be tied to the types of job opportunities that are prevalent in the local area, and should be designed to develop skills that are in demand in the region. Skill development must be consistent with regional and statewide economic development strategies. Local areas’ employer engagement strategies should also include engaging economic development organizations. (Page 148)
• As a partner in the state workforce development system, KRS will have access to cross training and informational resources about economic development areas, workforce needs, career pathways, and sector strategies. The KRS Director is a member of the state workforce development board as well as all of the local workforce development boards. Regional Program Administrators for VR are involved in local area sub-committees and partnership councils. Through each of these entities, KRS staff are kept up-to-date about workforce issues. Then, in turn, all of this information is shared at both local and state levels with staff to enhance their understanding of employment opportunities, employer needs and workforce issues. KRS will partner on the state’s Workforce Innovation Fund grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to enhance cross training.
• KRS will provide a link on its staff-use website to the National Clearinghouse of Rehabilitation Training Material, and bring it to the attention of staff periodically. KRS also supports staff participation in nationally sponsored webinars related to vocational rehabilitation, competitive, integrated employment, and disability issues.
• The KRS Employer Development Specialist sends frequent updates to direct service staff statewide about specific job opportunities and employment trends. 
• KRS outsources most job placement services through its network of more than 100 community-based service providers.
• The End-Dependence Kansas initiative, described in detail in Section C1, focuses on the implementation of evidence-based and promising practices. Significant training and technical assistance will be provided to KRS staff and contracting agencies to enhance their skills to use these research-based strategies. (Page 235)
 Job Developers, utilizing current labor market information will seek out and develop relationships with businesses in growing industries and occupations. Potential employment and career opportunities for project participants in the industries projected to have the most growth will include but not be limited to a variety of options within schools, hospitals, home health care, temporary help services, food preparation and serving, cashiers and retail sales. Key steps to career pathways in all of these fields include: related community service assignment; job search skills workshops, relevant computer/technology training and certifications for food handlers, basic first aid, CPR, computer proficiency and any other training identified as increasing participant marketability for job attainment.
 Job Developers will develop lists of employers in the targeted industries focusing on creating and establishing innovative working relationships, particularly with those that have a special interest in (Page 339)
 

Employment Networks

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 305).

Displaying 1 - 10 of 41

“Pre-Employment Services Being Offered to Youth with Disabilities “ - 10/02/2017

~~“As a result of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, DCF recently launched a new program, Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS), to further its efforts to help Kansans with disabilities gain meaningful employment. Pre-ETS was first launched in FY 2017, and its services are designed to help youth with disabilities get an early start at job exploration, assist students with disabilities in making the transition from secondary to post-secondary education/training and to empower them to realize their full potential.  

While many services are offered within Pre-ETS, Rehabilitation Services Director Michael Donnelly says that the program emphasizes the paid, work-based learning experiences”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Resource Guide - 08/12/2017

~~“The Kansas Resource Guide (KRG) is a collaborative effort to connect consumers with resources and services for women, infants, children, youth and people with disabilities in Kansas. The Kansas Resource phone and e-mail are answered Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., so consumers can access personalized assistance.

What you can find in the Navigational Tool Kit The Navigational Tool Kit is designed to assist consumers in finding needed resources and services in a fast and user friendly way. Simply clink on the appropriate button below to locate a list of local, state and national resources and services. Each resource has a description and a link to get to their website &/or list contact information to assist the consumer in locating the resource they want.

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM - 07/20/2017

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

“With a little help you can return home.Money Follows the Person (MFP) Program” - 06/21/2017

~~“If you live in a nursing home, the Money Follows the Person (MFP) program may be able to help you move home. The state of Kansas received grant money from The Centers for Medicare and MedicaidServices (CMS). This money is used to help people move out of nursing homes. The MFP provides Transition Coordination Services. That means the program will pay someone to help you with each step. It covers things like:• Finding an apartment or assisted living facility.• Filling out apartment applications.• Getting all the legal documents you need tomove into the community.• Paying up to a certain amount for householditems. You may need furniture, kitchen utensils,pots and pans, and bedding.• Paying up to a certain amount to make changesto your home. You may need a wheelchair rampor wider door ways. The bathroom may needmore space for grab bars for the tub or toilet.• Paying security deposits.• Finding the personal care that you need.Care may include help with bathing, goingto the bathroom, meals and housekeeping.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Project Search - Kansas - 06/10/2017

~~“High School Transition Program:”Project SEARCH came to Kansas in 2010 with the first class of interns beginning in the fall of 2011. After the sixth year of implementation, over 350 Kansans have participated in Project SEARCH. 70 percent of those interns have secured competitive employment.90 interns have been selected for the 2017-2018 year.There are 13 host business sites in Kansas:• University of Kansas, Lawrence• Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Lawrence• Butler Community College, El Dorado• Susan B Allen Memorial Hospital, El Dorado• Newton Medical Center, Newton• Salina Regional Health Center, Salina• Via Christi Hospital, Wichita• Sedgwick County Government, Wichita• McConnell Air Force Base, Derby• Johnson County Government, Olathe• Embassy Suites, Olathe• Tabor College, Hillsboro• Cintas, Wichita” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

KanCare Section 1115 DemonstrationProject No. 11-W-00283/7 - 05/31/2017

~~“The current KanCare demonstration expires on December 31, 2017. Pursuant to Section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) is requesting a one-year extension of the current KanCare demonstration, including the Uncompensated Care (UC) Pool and the Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Pool. The requested extension period is January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018. KDHE is not requesting any changes to the demonstration for the one-year extension period.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Medicaid: A Primer 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~KanCare operates under concurrent waivers—a set of Section 1915(c) waivers for HCBS and a Section 1115 demonstration that created KanCare and allows—among other things—the mandatory enrollment of nearly all covered populations in managed care for most services. The current KanCare demonstration is approved through the end of calendar year 2017, and the state may request it be extended. Renewals require specific actions to ensure transparency, including public meetings.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Accommodations Manual 2016-17 Rev. January 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~“2. Accommodations listed on the following pages are acceptable for the general population, ELL students, and for students with IEPs or Section 504 Plans. All accommodations used for state assessments must be used by the student during instruction on a regular basis, as well as on classroom assessments.3. Students with an IEP or Section 504 Plan or ELL plan must have accommodations specified within the plan, for use both on the Kansas Assessment Programs (KAP) and on a regular basis for classroom instruction, assignments and tests.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services ”HCBS Providers – Financial Template” - 09/22/2016

“The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has contracted with Optumas, an actuary and consulting firm, to study the adequacy of Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) service payment rates. To assist with that study, Optumas has developed a financial template to be completed by all HCBS service providers.… The template requests information on your organization’s revenue, expenses, and service delivery count. The goal of requesting this information is to assess the profit/loss position for HCBS providers and use that information to make a statement on the adequacy of HCBS service reimbursement. Revenue and service information submitted in this template will be validated against Medicaid encounter data.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and Oversight Commission (HB 2336) - 04/29/2015

“HB 2336 creates the Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The bill requires state programs and services that support employment of persons with disabilities to consider, as their first option, competitive and integrated employment for persons with disabilities. The bill does not require an employer to give preference to hiring persons with a disability.   “The bill requires all state agencies to follow the policy for employment by coordinating and collaborating efforts among agencies. In addition, agencies may share data and information whenever possible across systems in order to track progress. State agencies may adopt rules and regulations to implement the Act.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Kansas ABLE Program (HB 2216) - 04/16/2015

"There is hereby established an enabling savings program and such program shall be known and may be cited as the Kansas ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] savings program. The purpose of the Kansas ABLE savings program is to authorize the establishment of savings accounts empowering individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability and to provide guidelines for the maintenance of such accounts."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission Senate substitute for HB 2150 - 07/01/2013

“Senate Sub. for HB 2150 revises the size and responsibilities for the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The Commission increases from five members to seven members. The Governor appoints the two additional members, with one having disability employment experience and the other having business employment experience. The bill repeals the requirement that the one member currently appointed by the Governor not be a state employee.   “The bill repeals the responsibilities of the Commission to establish measurable goals and objectives for the State of Kansas and track the progress of state agencies implementing the Employment First Initiative. The Commission must work with state agencies and nongovernmental organizations to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain employment. The Commission may educate state agencies and stakeholders about the Initiative.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas HB 2453: Bidding Preferences for Businesses Employing Individuals with Disabilities - 07/01/2012

This legislation, signed into law by Governor Brownback in 2012, places responsibility for operating the “Kansas Bidders Preference Program” within Kansas Department of Administration In this program, which provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities, a certified business gets certain benefits and advantages when bidding on state contracts. To be certified, a business must meet several requirements, including having at least 20% of their workforce comprised of qualified people with disabilities. This provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

44-1136. Kansas Employment First Initiative Act: Definitions & Policy Declaration

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of the state of Kansas that competitive and integrated employment shall be considered its first option when serving persons with disabilities who are of working age to obtain employment. This policy applies to programs and services that provide services and support to help obtain employment for persons with disabilities. All state agencies shall follow this policy and ensure that it is effectively implemented in their programs and services. Nothing in this section shall be construed to require any employer to give preference to hiring people with a disability.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

“Pre-Employment Services Being Offered to Youth with Disabilities “ - 10/02/2017

~~“As a result of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, DCF recently launched a new program, Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS), to further its efforts to help Kansans with disabilities gain meaningful employment. Pre-ETS was first launched in FY 2017, and its services are designed to help youth with disabilities get an early start at job exploration, assist students with disabilities in making the transition from secondary to post-secondary education/training and to empower them to realize their full potential.  

While many services are offered within Pre-ETS, Rehabilitation Services Director Michael Donnelly says that the program emphasizes the paid, work-based learning experiences”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Resource Guide - 08/12/2017

~~“The Kansas Resource Guide (KRG) is a collaborative effort to connect consumers with resources and services for women, infants, children, youth and people with disabilities in Kansas. The Kansas Resource phone and e-mail are answered Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., so consumers can access personalized assistance.

What you can find in the Navigational Tool Kit The Navigational Tool Kit is designed to assist consumers in finding needed resources and services in a fast and user friendly way. Simply clink on the appropriate button below to locate a list of local, state and national resources and services. Each resource has a description and a link to get to their website &/or list contact information to assist the consumer in locating the resource they want.

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM - 07/20/2017

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Accommodations Manual 2016-17 Rev. January 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~“2. Accommodations listed on the following pages are acceptable for the general population, ELL students, and for students with IEPs or Section 504 Plans. All accommodations used for state assessments must be used by the student during instruction on a regular basis, as well as on classroom assessments.3. Students with an IEP or Section 504 Plan or ELL plan must have accommodations specified within the plan, for use both on the Kansas Assessment Programs (KAP) and on a regular basis for classroom instruction, assignments and tests.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Serivces - 07/15/2016

Shared Living

Shared Living is a nationally recognized model for habilitation or residential services for individuals with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability (IDD). Other terms that can encompass the Shared Living approach include adult foster care, mentor, residence or family home, host home or family care, extended-family teaching or family teaching services. In Shared Living, one or two (but not to exceed three) persons with IDD join a family (contractor) or single adult’s (contractor) family in the Shared Living/host family’s home. The Shared Living Contractor lives with the person with a disability and provides whatever supports the person(s) needs in their day-to-day activities (social, companionship, teaching, daily living skills, supported employment, night supports, etc.…).

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities “2017-2021 Proposed Goals and Objectives Draft” - 04/20/2016

GOAL 2 –EMPLOYMENT: By 2021, Kansans with I/DD will have increased opportunities to engage in competitive integrated employment

OBJECTIVE  2.1: KCDD  will  provide Kansans with  I/DD, their  families, employers, providers, and employment support staff with meaningful information about competitive integrated employment

OBJECTIVE 2.2: By 2021, Kansans with I/DD will have increased resources for formal and informal long-term supports for competitive integrated employment.

OBJECTIVE 2.3: KCDD will partner with KDADS to provide South Western Kansans with  I/DD and  their  families, whose native  language  is Spanish, with  meaningful information about services including competitive integrated employment.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission Annual Report - 01/14/2013

“The Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission was created by the state law requiring competitive and integrated employment to be the first option when serving people with disabilities (KSA 44-1136 to 44-1138, also called the Employment First Initiative Act). The Oversight Commission is charged with carrying out certain duties,including reporting in detail on the measurable progress of state agencies toward the Goals and Objectives it has established for them, as well as reporting the overall progress of the Act’s full implementation. Additionally, the Oversight Commission must identify barriers and strategies that can help realize the Goals and Objectives of the Employment First Initiative…”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Kansas Department for Children and Families Rehabilitation Services (Discovery/Supported Employment) - 11/19/2012

“Rehabilitation Services (RS) is a state agency that provides vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to help people with disabilities achieve permanent, integrated, competitive employment. Services are customized for each consumer, consistent with their strengths, vocational objectives, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice. This Discovery/Supported Employment (D/SE) service description is designed specifically for individuals with the most significant intellectual disabilities who are participating in the Great Expectations Initiative (GEI) demonstration project.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities “Interhab Employment Systems Change 5/2016”

KCDD Employment Systems Change  request for proposal is based on the Employment First Commission report 2014 The proposed system changes include more focus on Customized Employment and eliminating sub-minimum wage positions.

Current research shows customized employment 30-70 hours for discovery/job development 100-250 hours employer/systematic instruction 50-100 hours follow-up per year (usually paid from long-term funding)

WIOA Limitation on the use of Sub-Minimum Wages

As of 2016 a series of steps must occur prior to anyone under the age of 24 be placed in a job paying less than minimum wage Schools are prohibited from contracting with Sub-Minimum Wage providers for “Transition Services” Legislative definition of “Competitive Integrated Employment” Full or part time, minimum wage or higher, same benefits, fully integrated with co-workers
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas State Department of Education “KSDE Policy Statement on Employment First”

As a relevant state agency in the implementation of Employment First policy, the Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE) is responsible for the monitoring of district practices in planning for and providing appropriate transition services to students with significant disabilities, and assuring that KSDE developed resources and materials encourage Employment First policy.

Research demonstrates that when provided with preparatory, hands-on job experience in the form of part-time work, internships, or summer employment, students with significant disabilities can successfully obtain and sustain work in integrated settings and earn competitive wages. The goal of publically-funded transition services and supports for youth with significant disabilities should be focused on helping these youth to acquire the skills, knowledge and experience necessary to obtain jobs in integrated settings at a competitive wage that promotes community participation and self-sufficiency.

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Project Search - Kansas - 06/10/2017

~~“High School Transition Program:”Project SEARCH came to Kansas in 2010 with the first class of interns beginning in the fall of 2011. After the sixth year of implementation, over 350 Kansans have participated in Project SEARCH. 70 percent of those interns have secured competitive employment.90 interns have been selected for the 2017-2018 year.There are 13 host business sites in Kansas:• University of Kansas, Lawrence• Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Lawrence• Butler Community College, El Dorado• Susan B Allen Memorial Hospital, El Dorado• Newton Medical Center, Newton• Salina Regional Health Center, Salina• Via Christi Hospital, Wichita• Sedgwick County Government, Wichita• McConnell Air Force Base, Derby• Johnson County Government, Olathe• Embassy Suites, Olathe• Tabor College, Hillsboro• Cintas, Wichita” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities

The purpose of the Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities (KCDD) is to support people of all ages with developmental disabilities so they have the opportunity to make choices regarding both their participation in society, and their quality of life.   In their current plan the KCDD has identified “4 areas of priority” of which one is employment  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission

“In order to ensure the Oversight Commission can effectively carry out its duties, the law places certain requirements on state agencies to help ensure that the law will be effectively and fully implemented. The law also places requirements on state agencies to provide the Commission information documenting measurable progress on the Goals and objectives established by the Commission and proving effective implementation of the law….Although the Employment First law requires all state agencies to implement its requirements, the Oversight Commission has identified a handful of state agencies that have programs and activities directly impacted by Employment First. These are referred to as “relevant state agencies” throughout this document. The relevant state agencies are:

•Kansas Department for Children and Families (KDCF –formerly Kansas Dept. of Social and Rehabilitation Services)

•Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS – formerly Kansas Dept. on Aging)

•Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE)

•Kansas Department of Commerce (Commerce)

•Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE)

•Kansas Department on Administration (KDOA) ”

.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
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Kansas DEI (Round 5) - 10/01/2014

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2014, Kansas was awarded a Round 5 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The grant will end in 2017.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kansas MIG-RATS - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
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Kansas Department of Health and Environment CESP - 03/13/2013

“Certification of Employment Services Professionals - KDHE funded the provision of the Certified Employment Services Professional (CESP) in two locations during 2012. The CESP is a newly developed credential governed by the APSE Employment Services Professional Certification Council (ESPCC). Individuals who earn the CESP credential have demonstrated knowledge of the facilitation, and advocacy skills necessary to help establish and expand equitable employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. 64 people took the exam; 54 passed it. According to APSE, the number of candidates who sat for the exam in Kansas was double the number of candidates who sat for the initial administration of the exam by APSE during December 2011, and was the largest candidate sponsorship by any state since the inception of the exam in 2011 (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year State Plan - 08/16/2011

Goal #3: Advocacy: Community Resources/Alternatives

 

Provide information and training, written materials and web sites to educate people with DD and their support networks on resources available to assist them to live and succeed in the community. There are over 3000 adults and children (under age 21) on the DD waiting list. Often these individuals do not know about resources outside DD Waiver that can help them succeed. The goal is to provide information on these alternative resources.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Southeast Kansas Works Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Local Plan

Training must be industry or company specific and provide technical and skill upgrades. Training may be conducted at the applicant’s facility, at a public or private training provider site or at a combination of sites best meeting the needs of the organization. LA V allows the following types of training for employer projects meeting the above criteria:

 

Customized  occupational  training  designed  to  meet  the  special  requirements  of  an employer  (including  a  group  of  employers)  conducted  with  a  commitment  by  the employer to continue to employ an individual upon successful completion of the training.

 

Customized   on-the   job-training   relating   to   the   introduction   of   new   technologies,  introduction to new production or service procedures, or upgrading to new jobs requiring additional skills. LA V offers a variety of resources and information on services available to persons with disabilities including: information on training opportunities and links to online training; technology guides for using screen enlargement software, and screen reading software.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

“With a little help you can return home.Money Follows the Person (MFP) Program” - 06/21/2017

~~“If you live in a nursing home, the Money Follows the Person (MFP) program may be able to help you move home. The state of Kansas received grant money from The Centers for Medicare and MedicaidServices (CMS). This money is used to help people move out of nursing homes. The MFP provides Transition Coordination Services. That means the program will pay someone to help you with each step. It covers things like:• Finding an apartment or assisted living facility.• Filling out apartment applications.• Getting all the legal documents you need tomove into the community.• Paying up to a certain amount for householditems. You may need furniture, kitchen utensils,pots and pans, and bedding.• Paying up to a certain amount to make changesto your home. You may need a wheelchair rampor wider door ways. The bathroom may needmore space for grab bars for the tub or toilet.• Paying security deposits.• Finding the personal care that you need.Care may include help with bathing, goingto the bathroom, meals and housekeeping.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KanCare Section 1115 DemonstrationProject No. 11-W-00283/7 - 05/31/2017

~~“The current KanCare demonstration expires on December 31, 2017. Pursuant to Section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) is requesting a one-year extension of the current KanCare demonstration, including the Uncompensated Care (UC) Pool and the Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Pool. The requested extension period is January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018. KDHE is not requesting any changes to the demonstration for the one-year extension period.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Medicaid: A Primer 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~KanCare operates under concurrent waivers—a set of Section 1915(c) waivers for HCBS and a Section 1115 demonstration that created KanCare and allows—among other things—the mandatory enrollment of nearly all covered populations in managed care for most services. The current KanCare demonstration is approved through the end of calendar year 2017, and the state may request it be extended. Renewals require specific actions to ensure transparency, including public meetings.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services ”HCBS Providers – Financial Template” - 09/22/2016

“The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has contracted with Optumas, an actuary and consulting firm, to study the adequacy of Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) service payment rates. To assist with that study, Optumas has developed a financial template to be completed by all HCBS service providers.… The template requests information on your organization’s revenue, expenses, and service delivery count. The goal of requesting this information is to assess the profit/loss position for HCBS providers and use that information to make a statement on the adequacy of HCBS service reimbursement. Revenue and service information submitted in this template will be validated against Medicaid encounter data.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services “Crisis and Exception Policy” - 09/15/2016

~~“Transitions to the I/DD WaiverThe  following  HCBS  programs  shall  transition  to  HCBS  IDD wavier program  if  they  meet HCBS IDD functional eligibility:1. Person is determined no longer eligible for the TA, Autism, or TBI waiver program.2. The respective program manager sends NOA to person of their ineligibility.  The  IDD  waiver  program  manager, the MCO, and  DCF  for  persons  in  the  custody  of  DCF are emailed a copy of the NOA.3. The IDD waiver program manager coordinates with CDDO to determine if person is eligible to transition to IDD waiver program. 4. If a person is eligible for the IDD waiver program, a functional assessment is scheduled if current assessment is more than 365 days old.5. Upon  completion  of  functional  assessment  the  CDDO  will  notify  the  IDD  programmanager and the MCO of the functional eligibility determination. 6. Upon  functional  eligibility  determination,  the  IDD  waiver program  manager  sends the NOA  of  approval  for  IDD  waiver  program to  the  person. For  children  in  the custody  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Kansas  Department  for  Children  and  Families,  the NOA shall also be forwarded to DCF.7. 3160 sent to CDDO KDHE Clearinghouse and MCO.I/DD services must begin within forty-five (45) days of issuances of the 3160. 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Employment First Initiative Act Annual Report - 01/14/2013

“KDADS provided information about provisions in its contract with Community Developmental Disability Organizations (CDDOs) where persons on the waiting list for HCBS Developmental Disability (DD) Waiver services who are ‘referred to RS (Rehabilitation Services) for employment services and successfully closed from Vocational Rehabilitation Services as competitively employed, will have access to HCBS Developmental Disability (DD) Supported Employment waiver funding needed to successfully maintain their employment.’ This modification to the CDDO contract allows individuals on the DD waiver waiting list who are employed in competitive, integrated employment to receive long term supports to maintain employment, which is funded by the waiver. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Social Security Alternative Pilot - 01/14/2013

“Social Security Alternative Pilot under KanCare - This Pilot is designed for up to 200 Kansans with disabilities who have not yet been determined to be eligible for Social Security disability. The goal of this pilot is to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain employment with employer-based health insurance as well as avoid unnecessary dislocation from the workforce and impoverishment in order to obtain health insurance. The pilot will include a Presumptive Medical Disability (PMD) process to determine whether individuals meet the criteria for a Social Security disability determination, Medicaid-like coverage as needed, a monthly allocation to pay for personal assistance and employment support services if needed, and accelerated PMD review to restore the path to Social Security disability status in the event of a worsening medical condition or loss of employment. The pilot also allows for temporary unemployment benefits (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas SSI Employment Support Pilot - 01/14/2013

“SSI Employment Support Pilot under KanCare – This Pilot will support up to 400 individuals currently on the Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Developmental Disability (DD) or Physical Disability (PD) waiting lists who are employed 40 hours per month or more at federal minimum wage in competitive and integrated settings. In addition to Medicaid coverage, pilot participants will receive up to $1,500 per month to pay for personal assistance and employment support services to enable them to live and work in the community. Working Healthy Benefits Specialists will be available to discuss this option and alternatives to this option that may be available to the individual. Participants will be restored to their former position on the waiting list if employment is lost. The pilot also allows for temporary unemployment (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas I/DD Waiver (0224.R05.00) - 07/01/2009

Provides day supports, overnight respite care, personal assistant, residential supports, supported employment, FMS, assistive services, medical alert rental, sleep cycle support, specialized medical care, supportive home care, wellness monitoring for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 5 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas State HCBS Transition Plan (Draft)

The new HCBS Settings Rule from CMS applies to all programs that provide home and community based services. In Kansas, this rule will apply to all settings where home and community based services are provided for these programs: Frail Elderly (65+) Autism (child who starts services prior to age 6) Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (5+) Physical Disability (16-64) Serious Emotional Disturbance (0-18) Technology Assisted (0 through 21) Traumatic Brain Injury (16-64)
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

There's no place like the workplace for great career opportunities for employees with disabilities in the Sunflower State of Kansas. See what Kansas is doing to make sure that workers with disabilities are bringing home the dough in America's Bread Basket.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kansas' VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.26%
Change from
2014 to 2015
2,911,641
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.08%
Change from
2014 to 2015
184,791
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.25%
Change from
2014 to 2015
79,132
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.03%
Change from
2014 to 2015
42.82%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.16%
Change from
2014 to 2015
79.88%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 2,893,957 2,904,021 2,911,641
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 178,125 192,334 184,791
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 74,268 76,562 79,132
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,225,917 1,222,393 1,229,527
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.69% 39.81% 42.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.98% 79.75% 79.88%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.30% 4.50% 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.40% 20.30% 19.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.30% 12.60% 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 173,213 178,052 184,846
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 177,555 188,341 180,957
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 302,912 314,790 317,198
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 23,196 25,710 24,705
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 20,329 24,289 24,638
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,429 4,248 3,650
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,257 4,614 4,082
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 11,506 12,425 11,428
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 4,383 4,154 4,705

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,827 3,913 3,987
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.40% 8.40% 8.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 75,521 75,123 74,677

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 9,957 9,160 9,806
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 30,415 28,503 29,223
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 33,801 31,705 32,407
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 29.50% 28.90% 30.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 16.30% 16.10% 13.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 41.20% 37.90% 31.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,382 1,367 1,315
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 3,505 3,231 2,968
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,001 3,726 4,008
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.02 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 117 100 67
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 61 58 40
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00% 58.00% 60.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.11 2.00 1.37

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,684
3,140
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 123 100 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 244 165 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 916 783 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 985 845 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,360 1,123 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 156 124 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 22.00% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,107 2,793 2,847
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 106,565 106,853 106,902
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 244 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $0 N/A $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 N/A $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 N/A $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 N/A $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 15.00% 13.00% 14.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,862 3,284 3,457
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,437 3,118 3,086
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,338 3,625 3,838
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 30.90 27.70 29.10

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 67.17% 68.61% 69.32%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 7.21% 6.93% 6.72%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.29% 2.30% 2.27%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.24% 97.51% 99.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 32.10% 33.33% 36.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.85% 60.61% 63.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.25% 73.59% 77.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 26.75% 27.27% 27.50%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 454,126
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 810
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 174,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 33,751
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 208,693
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 165
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 184
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,536,706
AbilityOne wages (services). $320,864

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 44 34 36
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 46 36 37
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 77 20 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,324 2,624 2,772
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 119 114 114
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3,520 2,758 2,886

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care.
• Through the Governor’s Sub-Cabinet on Disability, leadership among the Kansas Departments for Children and Families (DCF), Health and Environment, Commerce, Corrections and Aging and Disability Services focuses attention on implementing employment first strategies in state agencies and tracking baseline and performance data to effectively measure outcomes. Sub-Cabinet meetings are also an opportunity for open communications among these departments and advocacy and provider organizations working in the disability system.
• The DCF Secretary is participating on a Governor-directed strategic planning effort with a focus on workforce development. DCF is the designated state agency. (Page 209)
Ongoing communication and collaboration
KRS is in frequent contact with other agencies related to competitive, integrated employment of Kansans with disabilities. Some examples include participation on the:
• Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its vocational sub-committee.
• The KDADS strategic planning team to integrate mental health and substance use disorder services into a recovery oriented system of care.
• The Developmental Disabilities Council.
• The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.
• The Employment First Commission.
• Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (Pages 226)
 

Customized Employment

~~Training and education to learn new vocational skills.
• Rehabilitation technology, telecommunication aids and other adaptive devices.
• Job preparation and placement services.
• Job coaching.
• On-the-job training.
• Services to help students with disabilities get a job after finishing high school.
• Supported and customized employment for individuals who need intensive on-the-job training and ongoing support.
• Referral to other services.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 65)
Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) enters into provider agreements with a variety of community agencies for the provision of supported employment services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Through customized employment provider agreements, six key components or milestones are specified for supported employment services:
1. Creation of a job development action plan.
2. Placement.
3. Stabilization.
4. 45 days of continuous, successful employment.
5. Finalization of an extended ongoing service plan.
Direct hourly Job Coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Customized Employment milestones services descried above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements. (Page 220)
A bachelor’s degree in a field of study reasonably related to vocational rehabilitation, indicating a level of competency and skill demonstrating basic preparation in a field of study such as vocational rehabilitation counseling, social work, psychology, disability studies, business administration, human resources, special education, supported employment, customized employment, economics, or another field that reasonably prepares individuals to work with consumers and employers; and Demonstrated paid or unpaid experience, for not less than one year, consisting of—(Page 232)
The needs assessment revealed the need for job placement and other provider services with specialized expertise in competitive, integrated employment of people with disabilities. As a result, KRS will emphasize the development and maintenance of evidence-based and promising practices through the End-Dependence Kansas initiative. Direct service contracts will be used to promote the development and expansion of Individual Placement and Supports, Individualized Discovery/Customized Employment, and Progressive Employment. (Page 260)
Methods to expand and improve services
When considering opportunities to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, KRS emphasizes strategies that will address the needs of people with the most significant disabilities and people who have been unserved or under-served. Collaborative efforts with consumers, advisory councils, parent groups, advocacy organizations, community rehabilitation programs and other state agencies are undertaken to expand access to VR services and to promote supported employment, customized employment, Pre-Employment Transition Services and assistive technology services. Innovation and expansion activities are consistent with the findings of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment. Specifically, the following functions assist KRS is achieving its goals and priorities related to innovation and expansion: (Page 280)
Direct hourly job coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Supported Employment and Customized Employment milestones services described above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements.
After the time-limited VR services end, the supported employment service provider maintains extended ongoing services with the consumer or has identified a plan specifying how the community-service system will provide the extended ongoing supports the consumer needs to maintain employment. These extended services are not funded with VR dollars. To reinforce and maintain stability of the job placement, ongoing services include regular contact. (Page 295)
 

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~Not significantly increased the number of individuals with barriers to employment who receive training and other more intensive services
• Limited success with blending and braiding resources across multiple systems to meet the needs of job seekers and workers
• Varied success at meeting the workforce needs of all industry sectors, as well as in some geographic areas of the state (Page 22)
The primary role of LVER staff, at the Kansas AJCs, is to conduct outreach to employers in the area, to assist veterans in gaining employment. Additionally, LVERs promote, plan and participate in job fairs and seminars for employers. Furthermore, LVERs promote veterans as job ready candidates, who have highly marketable skills and experience. Kansas LVERs advocate for veterans by promoting employment and training opportunities, coordinating with other business outreach representatives in the AJC to facilitate and promote employment, workshops, job searches, establishing job groups in conjunction with employers, and leverage other employment opportunities for veterans. Kansas LVERs establish, maintain, and facilitate regular contact with federal contractors, unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations. Additionally our LVERs provides educational training to AJC staff, additional employer based training and other outreach services, in accordance with VPL 07-10 and VPL 03-14. The Department of Commerce ensures that there are no blending of roles, whereas LVERs provide monthly activity reports to the State Manager and are often consulted with by AJC supervisors about their activity. Furthermore, LVERs are encouraged to utilize referrals and other resources, such as the Department of Commerce/ KANVET Hire a Veteran Pledge program as a resource to locate veteran friendly businesses/ employers, who are seeking veterans first, to employ. (Page 314)
 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.
Each workforce partner and local area must comply with both program and physical accessibility requirements consistent with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, WIOA Section 188 and related federal guidance, and the Kansas Act against Discrimination. Policies will be established to assure compliance and equal access and usability for all Kansans, regardless of disability. The following key points, at a minimum, must be included in all program and local area accessibility policies. (Page 120)
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~• A workshop with a large hospital and health services company regarding its on-line application and screening processes. Participants were able to learn about how to more effectively use the on-line application process with VR consumers and the response time expectations of companies after vacant positions are posted. Similar workshops are pending with the Veterans’ Administration and an aircraft manufacturer.
• A major energy company is interested in creating a training program for transition youth.
• An ironworker trade union is interested in offering its apprenticeship program to youth with disabilities.
• A pilot project is pending with a major national on-line shopping company to use a preferred vendor as a single point of contact to hire workers with disabilities. A major hospital and a plastics manufacturing firm are also exploring similar inclusion programs.
• A national candy manufacturing company has a campaign to interest Kansas high school students in pursuing manufacturing work. They are interested in including transition-aged youth with disabilities in this initiative.
• Extensive outreach and communication are underway with federal contractors with 503 compliance requirements. (Page 224)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The KWSB is more than an advisory board to the Governor and staff on workforce policy issues. The Board ensures Kansas’ entire workforce system, covering many programs in multiple departments and agencies, meets employers’ needs for skilled workers and meets workers’ needs for career and economic advancement. The KWSB convenes State, regional and local workforce system partners to enhance the capacity and performance of the workforce system; align and improve the outcomes and effectiveness of public workforce investments and thereby promote economic growth. The board engages workforce system representatives including businesses, education, economic development, labor and other stakeholders to achieve the strategic and operational vision and goals of the State Plan as well as the purpose of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA). (Page 96)
Other evaluation and research functions implemented through core programs include:
• Implementing evidence-based employment practices for people with disabilities and ongoing fidelity research into the effectiveness of these practices.
• Using federal and state technical assistance resources, to the extent they are available, for evaluation and research functions.
• Using a research-to-practice approach by leveraging knowledge transfer from national resources including technical assistance centers funded by the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) with funding from the US Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, the National Skills Coalition, and other similar organizations that disseminate research-based information on improving service delivery.
• Dissemination of information concerning research-based best practices for service delivery, alignment, and policy development.  (Page 101)
 

Benefits

~~• Services are individualized to address each person’s unique strengths, impediments to employment and vocational goals. An individual plan for employment is jointly developed between each customer and the VR counselor to address specific barriers to employment, the vocational objective, and the services necessary to achieve that objective.
• VR counselors are highly trained to address the complex disability, employment and cultural issues that impact persons served, and to facilitate informed decision–making in partnership with their customers.
• 95% of persons rehabilitated into employment in FFY 2014 were persons with significant disabilities, meaning that they had multiple functional limitations in major life areas such as mobility, communications, self–care, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, work skills and self–direction.
• VR emphasizes the employment potential of youth with disabilities and the importance of them gaining an early attachment to work or postsecondary education resulting in employment. 21% of persons served in FFY 2014 were transition–aged youth with disabilities (21 years old or younger at the time of application). 23% of persons rehabilitated that year were youth.  (Page 65)
• Over the past ten years, approximately 75% of persons rehabilitated report their own earnings as their largest source of financial support, a significant milestone toward self–sufficiency and reduced reliance on public benefits.
• VR services are comprehensive and flexible in order to empower each customer to maximize employment.
• The End–Dependence Kansas initiative emphasizes the use of evidence–based practices throughout the VR service delivery system, including community–based service providers, to increase employment outcomes.
• Local areas should incorporate mitigating strategies, such as Earned Income Tax Credit program awareness, into their service strategies.
• State–level core partners should ensure that local partners are familiar with resources such as Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) benefits counselors, Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA), and other resources, and should develop strategies to share this information and/or train local area staff on an ongoing basis.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 65)
The VR program supports customers to pursue postsecondary education at all levels if necessary to achieve their vocational goals. VR assists customers to access comparable benefits, such as PELL Grants, to help pay for higher education before expending VR funds. Agreements between VR and all Kansas institutions of higher education specify cost sharing responsibilities related to the provision of auxiliary aids and services.
8. Schedule. Applicants must comply with the following timetable:
1. Provide required application forms and narratives to the Kansas Department of Commerce no later than 4:00 PM __________.
2. Pre-Bid Telephone Conference Call is scheduled for____. Call 1-866-XXX-XXXX.
3. Complete application packages must be emailed to:________.
4. Commerce will announce Grant Awards by __date_____(Page 135)
• Work Registration - RESEA participants must have a Plus account which includes a complete, up- to-date and active resume in KANSASWORKS (the state’s employment website). Staff will provide resume assistance if appropriate.
• Orientation to One-Stop services - An introduction to the workforce center that includes an overview of the programs and services available, and instruction on using self-help tools
• UI Eligibility Review - Potential eligibility issues are documented and referred to UI.
• Initial Assessment - Evaluation of the customer’s employment history, education, interests and skills resulting in the identification of employment goals, barriers to employment and the services needed to obtain his/her goals.
• Labor Market Information - Based on desired residential location and claimant’s employment history/interests
• Individual Employment Plan - In consultation with the claimant, a written Individual Employment Plan (IEP) matched to the claimant’s needs based on information gathered during the Initial Assessment is developed.
• Follow-up: Claimants must follow up with RESEA staff every 30 days until he/she has returned to work or is no longer receiving benefits. At each follow-up the claimant provides their work search contacts for the previous four weeks. (Page 160)
Council Comment: Development of informational materials is needed for use with outreach with schools, referral sources, parents and consumers. KRS should also focus on outreach to organizations such as the Kansas Physical Therapy Association and the Kansas Occupational Therapy Association and speech/language professional organizations. Professionals in these disciplines often have contact with individuals with disabilities and could pass along information about VR.
KRS Response: KRS will work with DCF Communications regarding this request. (Page 204)
• KRS and DCF Economic and Employment Services collaborate to serve recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who have disabilities. Consumers benefit by being able to receive the coordinated and specialized services they need to achieve employment before their time-limited TANF benefits cease.
• KRS and DCF Prevention and Protection Services independent living staff will coordinate to address the employment and/or post-secondary education needs of youth with disabilities who age out of foster care.
• Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care.
• KRS maintains an active presence on numerous councils and committees, including:
 The Statewide Independent Living Council of Kansas.
 The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.
 The Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its Vocational Sub-Committee.
 The Governor’s Commission on Autism.
 Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities
 KANSASWORKS State Board
 5 Local workforce development boards
• A memorandum of understanding with the Prairie Band Potawatomie Nation Native American VR program addresses the coordination of services to help consumers achieve employment. (Page 209)
As outlined in the agreement, KRS will provide VR services for students in accordance with KRS policy under the following conditions:
• The student has been determined eligible for VR and can be served within the Order of Selection.
• The student (and his/her parents or representative if appropriate) and the VR counselor have agreed to an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE).
• The goods or services provided will be necessary for post-high school training or employment, or will substantially contribute to achievement of the competitive, integrated employment objective on the IPE.
• Employment or post-secondary services provided by VR must occur outside the established school sessions. The term “school sessions” refers not only to the school semester or term, but also to the school day.
• Consideration of comparable benefits and application of the economic need policy are required. (Page 215)
KRS will continue to develop, implement and maintain a professional development system for new and experienced staff. A priority focus area will be to address effective communication strategies to assure consumer engagement and progress toward employment, and development and implementation of effective Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs). Other areas of focus continue to be informed choice; understanding the purpose and intent of the VR program; linkages between eligibility, rehabilitation needs, consumer goals and priorities, and services provided; development of effective progress measures; time and caseload management techniques; financial accountability cultural competence; accountable decision-making; expertise related to disability populations served (specifically persons who are blind or visually impaired, persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, persons with mental illness, and persons with head injury); leadership development; use of comparable benefits; basic benefits counseling issues surrounding employment; use of Kansas specific labor market trends and demands; and, effective career counseling and guidance related to employment as the avenue to self-reliance.(Page 236)
Annually about 10% of the total persons served (Status 02-24 +32) receive supported employment services. Individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, significant intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injury are among the primary populations receiving supported employment services. Their services are characterized by:
• The need for community-based work assessments or job tryouts in competitive, integrated employment so that individuals who have not previously worked can explore jobs that are a good match for their skills and interests.
• The importance of an individualized approach in connecting these individuals with: available social service and disability-related services; transportation; benefits counseling; and natural support networks in their home communities.
• The need for employability or soft skill training on issues such as self-advocacy, communications, taking direction from employers, getting along with co-workers and customer service.
• The need for specific job skill training matched with current and projected labor market needs. (Page 251)
1.9  The number of KRS SSI recipients and SSDI beneficiaries for whom KRS receives reimbursement funding. To meet this standard, the individuals must achieve the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months.
1.10  The number of VR consumers receiving qualified benefits counseling.
Goal 2: KRS will emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities and improve the outreach and outcomes for transition-aged students.
Strategies for Goal 2:
KRS will implement the following strategies:
A. Build and maintain VR capacity to deliver Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS).
B. Build partnerships with school transition personnel to encourage those career-focused and work-based experiences are incorporated into transition Individual Education Plans and to increase referrals of PETS-eligible students to the VR program. (Page 269)
KRS will also:
• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so that consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 278)
Identified in the FFY 2015 Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Plan. These highlights are based on FFY 2015 indicators.
• A total of 1,345 Kansans with disabilities achieved stable employment as a result of VR services, earning an average of $9.88 an hour. VR consumers achieved employment in high-wage, high-demand jobs, for example: more than $40 an hour as an Information Technology Systems Administrator and numerous placements of more than $30 an hour in the nursing field.
• The percent of individuals who reported their own earnings as the largest source of support at the time of vocational rehabilitation (VR) case closure was 72.4%, 57% higher than at application. This represents a significant milestone toward increased self-reliance.
• The number of successful employment outcomes after participating in post-secondary education was 242. This indicator represents a significant quality measure as increased education and technical training often lead to higher-wage, career track positions and therefore increased self-reliance.
• KRS receives reimbursement funds from the Social Security Administration for consumers who are recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or beneficiaries of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) when those individuals work at the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months. In FFY 2015, reimbursement funds received by the agency totaled $1,123,976.
• Providing employment-focused services for transition youth is a priority for KRS. KRS has traditionally defined transition youth as persons who are age 21 or younger at the time of application). Under WIOA, the definition of youth is inclusive of persons aged 14 through 24. When youth achieve an early attachment to employment and all of its advantages, the likelihood of their reliance on public benefits through their lifetime is reduced. (Page 286)
FFY 2015: Service providers: 5.72; educators: 4.72; general advocates category not surveyed.
Indicator 2.7: Average expended per rehabilitation for the life of the case. FFY 2015: $6,464
Indicator 2.8: Annual number of persons served (status 02-24 +32). FFY 2015: 11,419
Indicator 2.9: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.10: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services provided through one-stop workforce centers. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.11: Rehabilitation rate of persons referred to placement or supported employment providers.
FFY 2015: 54%
Indicator 2.12: The average wage achieved by persons referred to placement or supported employment providers. (Page 289)
For the purpose of promoting the hiring and retention of veterans, Workforce Center staff will provide and facilitate a full range of employment and training services. LVER staff will advocate for veterans to employers and seek other opportunities with business and industry, community based organizations, and contractors of all kinds, to include federal contractors. All Workforce Center staff, as well as LVER staff, will work together to plan and participate in job fairs to promote the hiring of veterans and eligible persons. LVER staff will communicate job fair participation opportunities and the benefits of attending job fairs, to employers and federal contractors. LVERs will also make contact with unions, apprenticeship programs and the business community to promote employment and training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons, and furthermore promote credentialing and training opportunities with training providers and credentialing bodies. (Page 320)
Improving SCSEP Services Kansas is posting a Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) to assure the upcoming grant period will focus on strategies to improve and better achieve the goals of SCSEP. The strategies will include the following action steps:
• Increase recruitment and enrollment to increase the number of active participants. This focus will include reaching out to community organizations and other senior service providers to provide information on the SCSEP program and its’ benefits.
• Focus participant training towards employment skills acquisition as guided by IEP, TAD and assessment results based on labor market needs, Training will include short–term training classes, education and WORKReady! Certification. SCSEP will also insure that participants are receiving the job notification list that is generated by the One–Stop so that participants are better informed about area job openings.
• Increase follow–up contact with participants exited for unsubsidized employment to address employment and life issues to help maintain employment.
• Insure all most–in–need measures are accurately and timely entered into SPARQ.
• Create host agency skill development training and tracking to be reviewed with participant and agency quarterly based on each individuals IEP.
• Reinforce the goal of SCSEP program with participants, e.g. unsubsidized employment, at each contact. (Page 339)
 

School to Work Transition

~~A priority target population for End-Dependence Kansas is youth transitioning from school to work. End-Dependence Kansas, coupled with outreach for Pre-Employment Transition Services and Section 511 services to divert youth from direct entry into sub-minimum wage work, will expand supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Significant training and technical assistance will be focused on improved communication with students and youth with disabilities encouraging competitive integrated employment. Also, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Education, KRS will offer opportunities for training and technical assistance for school personnel to learn and understand the needs of students and youth pursuing employment rather than services only, to establish and implement the soft skills and employment preparedness skills needed by employers and how and when to complete a referral to the VR program. In addition to these strategies, KRS will work collaboratively to assure Title I youth services are readily available to students and youth with disabilities to enjoy work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, career exploration and coaching, etc. (Page 278)

Data Collection

~~(1) (A) The Commerce workforce system uses the America’s Job Link Alliance Management Information System to meet all of the requirements of US Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration for data collection and reporting. The AJLA system in Kansas, www.kansasworks.com also provides the public with access to labor market information, connects to postsecondary training programs and performance outcomes by training program. The AJLA system provides case management tools and creates participant records and can be used for payment for services and cost allocation of services. Employers may enter job postings in KANSASWORKS.com in addition to finding qualified applicants for jobs. Today, there are 35,524 job postings and 9021 resumes in KANSASWORKS.com. (Page 88)
Data-collection and reporting processes are consistent throughout each local area; data is validated as required by US DOL. Commerce has policies related to data collection and reporting processes required for each local workforce system, including Data and Information Collection and Maintenance, Record Maintenance and Retention, Eligibility Determination and Documentation, Fiscal Manual, and the State Performance Accountability System. All current and draft policies can be found at http://kwpolicies.kansascommerce.com/Pages/Default.aspx
VR will collect and report data necessary for the common accountability measures identified in WIOA, the quarterly state-specific data measures identified in the Performance Indicators operational elements, the data necessary for the extensive metrics included in the goals and priorities section of the VR Services Portion of the Combined State Plan, and the data necessary for evaluation and continuous improvement. (Page 89)
5. System and program accessibility: Data will be disaggregated by those with significant barriers to employment, including those with disabilities to allow local and state policy makers to evaluate the services provided to those individuals.
Measurement of success with these stated operational elements or activities will be attributed to the successful development of inter-agency data sharing agreements and related linkages of systems as a result of data sharing. All partners will monitor of data collection and validate data.
With a Round 3 Workforce Data Quality Initiative grant (WDQI), Regents, Commerce, and Labor have collaborated to create an interoperable data system. The Kansas WDQI Round 5 grant includes Vocational Rehabilitation to build on the work already in progress and create a system which will support the reduction of duplicative data collection. (Page 90)
KRS will also:
• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so that consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 278)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~• Direct work with individuals with disabilities in a setting such as an independent living center;
• Direct service or advocacy activities that provide such individual with experience and skills in working with individuals with disabilities; or
• Direct experience in competitive integrated employment environments as an employer, as a small business owner or operator, or in self-employment, or other experience in human resources or recruitment, or experience in supervising employees, training, or other activities (Page 233)
 

Career Pathways

~~The State will implement sector strategies, as described, regarding identified economic regions found in Title IB, Section VI and career pathways already utilized in multiple workforce programs, including formula and competitive grant programs. Career pathways will prepare individuals to be successful in a full range of secondary or postsecondary options including registered apprenticeships. Career pathways will enable individuals to attain a high school equivalency certificate, where necessary, as well as at least one recognized postsecondary credential. Where practicable, career pathways will integrate education, training, and other services including counseling and workforce preparation activities in order to accelerate the educational and career advancement of individuals. Since 2011, Regents, employers and individual postsecondary institutions have worked together to develop career pathways in twenty–five aligned programs. Local Workforce Boards may also develop additional career pathways as required by local employers. Adult Education will collaborate with workforce partners in offering basic skills to registered apprenticeship participants and with colleges in offering concurrent enrollment and team–teaching in Adult Education and CTE programs. (Page 44)
Specific Strategy (Operational Element/Method/Activity) Recommended for Implementation: Collaborative youth services based on individual service strategies focused on skill development and career pathways. Work–based learning addresses a broad range of skills needs—both “soft” skills and technical skills. While this strategy makes work–based learning a priority, we recognize that it is not a panacea for all youth, and even when it is included in a youth’s individual service strategy, it will be supplemented with other forms of learning. Key elements of this strategy include:
• Paid work–based experiences. (Real Job)
• Summer employment partnerships
• Pre–apprenticeship opportunities
• Internships and job shadowing
• On the job training opportunities (Page 50)
Components of this strategy:
• To be effective, work experience must come in different forms. This includes, but is not limited to on–the–job training, summer employment programs, pre-apprenticeship opportunities, and internships/job shadowing.
• The importance of existing and continued development of career pathways that incorporate an element of work experience.
• The importance of locally identified career pathways.
• Continued education and training that includes, but is not limited to, achievement of the high school diploma or its equivalent, technical training, industry-recognized certificates, etc. that is included under all of the sections of WIOA.
• The specific requirements of Title I and Title IV. (Page 54)
Specific Strategy (Operational Element/Method/Activity) Recommended for Implementation: Collaborative youth services based on individual service strategies focused on skill development and career pathways. Work-based learning addresses a broad range of skills needs—both “soft” skills and technical skills. While this strategy makes work-based learning a priority, we recognize that it is not a panacea for all youth, and even when it is included in a youth’s individual service strategy, it will be supplemented with other forms of learning. Key elements of this strategy include:
• Paid work-based experiences (Real Job)
• Summer employment partnerships
• Pre-apprenticeship opportunities
• Internships and job shadowing
• On the job training opportunities (Page 147)
Local plans must address coordination with education and training options available in the local area, particularly education and training offered through community and technical colleges throughout the state. Education and training opportunities must be tied to the attainment of industry-recognized credentials along career pathways for demand occupations.
Career pathways provide a sequence of education and training that give youth a clear line-of-sight to an industry recognized credential and a career. WIOA requires that career pathways meet the workforce needs of the region or state, offer individuals the opportunity to earn at least one recognized post-secondary credential, provide contextual education concurrently with workforce preparation and training, and include counseling to support individuals in achieving their education and career goals. Accelerating Opportunity: Kansas (AO-K) enhances these required elements with classes that are team-taught by basic skills and CTE instructors, transcript post-secondary credit, wrap-around support services, and the opportunity to earn stackable credentials. Training (in all forms) must be tied to the types of job opportunities that are prevalent in the local area, and should be designed to develop skills that are in demand in the region. Skill development must be consistent with regional and statewide economic development strategies. Local areas’ employer engagement strategies should also include engaging economic development organizations. (Page 148)
• As a partner in the state workforce development system, KRS will have access to cross training and informational resources about economic development areas, workforce needs, career pathways, and sector strategies. The KRS Director is a member of the state workforce development board as well as all of the local workforce development boards. Regional Program Administrators for VR are involved in local area sub-committees and partnership councils. Through each of these entities, KRS staff are kept up-to-date about workforce issues. Then, in turn, all of this information is shared at both local and state levels with staff to enhance their understanding of employment opportunities, employer needs and workforce issues. KRS will partner on the state’s Workforce Innovation Fund grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to enhance cross training.
• KRS will provide a link on its staff-use website to the National Clearinghouse of Rehabilitation Training Material, and bring it to the attention of staff periodically. KRS also supports staff participation in nationally sponsored webinars related to vocational rehabilitation, competitive, integrated employment, and disability issues.
• The KRS Employer Development Specialist sends frequent updates to direct service staff statewide about specific job opportunities and employment trends. 
• KRS outsources most job placement services through its network of more than 100 community-based service providers.
• The End-Dependence Kansas initiative, described in detail in Section C1, focuses on the implementation of evidence-based and promising practices. Significant training and technical assistance will be provided to KRS staff and contracting agencies to enhance their skills to use these research-based strategies. (Page 235)
 Job Developers, utilizing current labor market information will seek out and develop relationships with businesses in growing industries and occupations. Potential employment and career opportunities for project participants in the industries projected to have the most growth will include but not be limited to a variety of options within schools, hospitals, home health care, temporary help services, food preparation and serving, cashiers and retail sales. Key steps to career pathways in all of these fields include: related community service assignment; job search skills workshops, relevant computer/technology training and certifications for food handlers, basic first aid, CPR, computer proficiency and any other training identified as increasing participant marketability for job attainment.
 Job Developers will develop lists of employers in the targeted industries focusing on creating and establishing innovative working relationships, particularly with those that have a special interest in (Page 339)
 

Employment Networks

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 305).

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 41

“Pre-Employment Services Being Offered to Youth with Disabilities “ - 10/02/2017

~~“As a result of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, DCF recently launched a new program, Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS), to further its efforts to help Kansans with disabilities gain meaningful employment. Pre-ETS was first launched in FY 2017, and its services are designed to help youth with disabilities get an early start at job exploration, assist students with disabilities in making the transition from secondary to post-secondary education/training and to empower them to realize their full potential.  

While many services are offered within Pre-ETS, Rehabilitation Services Director Michael Donnelly says that the program emphasizes the paid, work-based learning experiences”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Resource Guide - 08/12/2017

~~“The Kansas Resource Guide (KRG) is a collaborative effort to connect consumers with resources and services for women, infants, children, youth and people with disabilities in Kansas. The Kansas Resource phone and e-mail are answered Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., so consumers can access personalized assistance.

What you can find in the Navigational Tool Kit The Navigational Tool Kit is designed to assist consumers in finding needed resources and services in a fast and user friendly way. Simply clink on the appropriate button below to locate a list of local, state and national resources and services. Each resource has a description and a link to get to their website &/or list contact information to assist the consumer in locating the resource they want.

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM - 07/20/2017

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

“With a little help you can return home.Money Follows the Person (MFP) Program” - 06/21/2017

~~“If you live in a nursing home, the Money Follows the Person (MFP) program may be able to help you move home. The state of Kansas received grant money from The Centers for Medicare and MedicaidServices (CMS). This money is used to help people move out of nursing homes. The MFP provides Transition Coordination Services. That means the program will pay someone to help you with each step. It covers things like:• Finding an apartment or assisted living facility.• Filling out apartment applications.• Getting all the legal documents you need tomove into the community.• Paying up to a certain amount for householditems. You may need furniture, kitchen utensils,pots and pans, and bedding.• Paying up to a certain amount to make changesto your home. You may need a wheelchair rampor wider door ways. The bathroom may needmore space for grab bars for the tub or toilet.• Paying security deposits.• Finding the personal care that you need.Care may include help with bathing, goingto the bathroom, meals and housekeeping.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Project Search - Kansas - 06/10/2017

~~“High School Transition Program:”Project SEARCH came to Kansas in 2010 with the first class of interns beginning in the fall of 2011. After the sixth year of implementation, over 350 Kansans have participated in Project SEARCH. 70 percent of those interns have secured competitive employment.90 interns have been selected for the 2017-2018 year.There are 13 host business sites in Kansas:• University of Kansas, Lawrence• Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Lawrence• Butler Community College, El Dorado• Susan B Allen Memorial Hospital, El Dorado• Newton Medical Center, Newton• Salina Regional Health Center, Salina• Via Christi Hospital, Wichita• Sedgwick County Government, Wichita• McConnell Air Force Base, Derby• Johnson County Government, Olathe• Embassy Suites, Olathe• Tabor College, Hillsboro• Cintas, Wichita” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

KanCare Section 1115 DemonstrationProject No. 11-W-00283/7 - 05/31/2017

~~“The current KanCare demonstration expires on December 31, 2017. Pursuant to Section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) is requesting a one-year extension of the current KanCare demonstration, including the Uncompensated Care (UC) Pool and the Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Pool. The requested extension period is January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018. KDHE is not requesting any changes to the demonstration for the one-year extension period.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Medicaid: A Primer 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~KanCare operates under concurrent waivers—a set of Section 1915(c) waivers for HCBS and a Section 1115 demonstration that created KanCare and allows—among other things—the mandatory enrollment of nearly all covered populations in managed care for most services. The current KanCare demonstration is approved through the end of calendar year 2017, and the state may request it be extended. Renewals require specific actions to ensure transparency, including public meetings.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Accommodations Manual 2016-17 Rev. January 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~“2. Accommodations listed on the following pages are acceptable for the general population, ELL students, and for students with IEPs or Section 504 Plans. All accommodations used for state assessments must be used by the student during instruction on a regular basis, as well as on classroom assessments.3. Students with an IEP or Section 504 Plan or ELL plan must have accommodations specified within the plan, for use both on the Kansas Assessment Programs (KAP) and on a regular basis for classroom instruction, assignments and tests.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services ”HCBS Providers – Financial Template” - 09/22/2016

“The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has contracted with Optumas, an actuary and consulting firm, to study the adequacy of Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) service payment rates. To assist with that study, Optumas has developed a financial template to be completed by all HCBS service providers.… The template requests information on your organization’s revenue, expenses, and service delivery count. The goal of requesting this information is to assess the profit/loss position for HCBS providers and use that information to make a statement on the adequacy of HCBS service reimbursement. Revenue and service information submitted in this template will be validated against Medicaid encounter data.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and Oversight Commission (HB 2336) - 04/29/2015

“HB 2336 creates the Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The bill requires state programs and services that support employment of persons with disabilities to consider, as their first option, competitive and integrated employment for persons with disabilities. The bill does not require an employer to give preference to hiring persons with a disability.   “The bill requires all state agencies to follow the policy for employment by coordinating and collaborating efforts among agencies. In addition, agencies may share data and information whenever possible across systems in order to track progress. State agencies may adopt rules and regulations to implement the Act.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Kansas ABLE Program (HB 2216) - 04/16/2015

"There is hereby established an enabling savings program and such program shall be known and may be cited as the Kansas ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] savings program. The purpose of the Kansas ABLE savings program is to authorize the establishment of savings accounts empowering individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability and to provide guidelines for the maintenance of such accounts."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission Senate substitute for HB 2150 - 07/01/2013

“Senate Sub. for HB 2150 revises the size and responsibilities for the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The Commission increases from five members to seven members. The Governor appoints the two additional members, with one having disability employment experience and the other having business employment experience. The bill repeals the requirement that the one member currently appointed by the Governor not be a state employee.   “The bill repeals the responsibilities of the Commission to establish measurable goals and objectives for the State of Kansas and track the progress of state agencies implementing the Employment First Initiative. The Commission must work with state agencies and nongovernmental organizations to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain employment. The Commission may educate state agencies and stakeholders about the Initiative.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas HB 2453: Bidding Preferences for Businesses Employing Individuals with Disabilities - 07/01/2012

This legislation, signed into law by Governor Brownback in 2012, places responsibility for operating the “Kansas Bidders Preference Program” within Kansas Department of Administration In this program, which provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities, a certified business gets certain benefits and advantages when bidding on state contracts. To be certified, a business must meet several requirements, including having at least 20% of their workforce comprised of qualified people with disabilities. This provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

44-1136. Kansas Employment First Initiative Act: Definitions & Policy Declaration

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of the state of Kansas that competitive and integrated employment shall be considered its first option when serving persons with disabilities who are of working age to obtain employment. This policy applies to programs and services that provide services and support to help obtain employment for persons with disabilities. All state agencies shall follow this policy and ensure that it is effectively implemented in their programs and services. Nothing in this section shall be construed to require any employer to give preference to hiring people with a disability.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

“Pre-Employment Services Being Offered to Youth with Disabilities “ - 10/02/2017

~~“As a result of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, DCF recently launched a new program, Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS), to further its efforts to help Kansans with disabilities gain meaningful employment. Pre-ETS was first launched in FY 2017, and its services are designed to help youth with disabilities get an early start at job exploration, assist students with disabilities in making the transition from secondary to post-secondary education/training and to empower them to realize their full potential.  

While many services are offered within Pre-ETS, Rehabilitation Services Director Michael Donnelly says that the program emphasizes the paid, work-based learning experiences”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Resource Guide - 08/12/2017

~~“The Kansas Resource Guide (KRG) is a collaborative effort to connect consumers with resources and services for women, infants, children, youth and people with disabilities in Kansas. The Kansas Resource phone and e-mail are answered Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., so consumers can access personalized assistance.

What you can find in the Navigational Tool Kit The Navigational Tool Kit is designed to assist consumers in finding needed resources and services in a fast and user friendly way. Simply clink on the appropriate button below to locate a list of local, state and national resources and services. Each resource has a description and a link to get to their website &/or list contact information to assist the consumer in locating the resource they want.

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM - 07/20/2017

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Accommodations Manual 2016-17 Rev. January 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~“2. Accommodations listed on the following pages are acceptable for the general population, ELL students, and for students with IEPs or Section 504 Plans. All accommodations used for state assessments must be used by the student during instruction on a regular basis, as well as on classroom assessments.3. Students with an IEP or Section 504 Plan or ELL plan must have accommodations specified within the plan, for use both on the Kansas Assessment Programs (KAP) and on a regular basis for classroom instruction, assignments and tests.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Serivces - 07/15/2016

Shared Living

Shared Living is a nationally recognized model for habilitation or residential services for individuals with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability (IDD). Other terms that can encompass the Shared Living approach include adult foster care, mentor, residence or family home, host home or family care, extended-family teaching or family teaching services. In Shared Living, one or two (but not to exceed three) persons with IDD join a family (contractor) or single adult’s (contractor) family in the Shared Living/host family’s home. The Shared Living Contractor lives with the person with a disability and provides whatever supports the person(s) needs in their day-to-day activities (social, companionship, teaching, daily living skills, supported employment, night supports, etc.…).

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities “2017-2021 Proposed Goals and Objectives Draft” - 04/20/2016

GOAL 2 –EMPLOYMENT: By 2021, Kansans with I/DD will have increased opportunities to engage in competitive integrated employment

OBJECTIVE  2.1: KCDD  will  provide Kansans with  I/DD, their  families, employers, providers, and employment support staff with meaningful information about competitive integrated employment

OBJECTIVE 2.2: By 2021, Kansans with I/DD will have increased resources for formal and informal long-term supports for competitive integrated employment.

OBJECTIVE 2.3: KCDD will partner with KDADS to provide South Western Kansans with  I/DD and  their  families, whose native  language  is Spanish, with  meaningful information about services including competitive integrated employment.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission Annual Report - 01/14/2013

“The Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission was created by the state law requiring competitive and integrated employment to be the first option when serving people with disabilities (KSA 44-1136 to 44-1138, also called the Employment First Initiative Act). The Oversight Commission is charged with carrying out certain duties,including reporting in detail on the measurable progress of state agencies toward the Goals and Objectives it has established for them, as well as reporting the overall progress of the Act’s full implementation. Additionally, the Oversight Commission must identify barriers and strategies that can help realize the Goals and Objectives of the Employment First Initiative…”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Kansas Department for Children and Families Rehabilitation Services (Discovery/Supported Employment) - 11/19/2012

“Rehabilitation Services (RS) is a state agency that provides vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to help people with disabilities achieve permanent, integrated, competitive employment. Services are customized for each consumer, consistent with their strengths, vocational objectives, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice. This Discovery/Supported Employment (D/SE) service description is designed specifically for individuals with the most significant intellectual disabilities who are participating in the Great Expectations Initiative (GEI) demonstration project.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities “Interhab Employment Systems Change 5/2016”

KCDD Employment Systems Change  request for proposal is based on the Employment First Commission report 2014 The proposed system changes include more focus on Customized Employment and eliminating sub-minimum wage positions.

Current research shows customized employment 30-70 hours for discovery/job development 100-250 hours employer/systematic instruction 50-100 hours follow-up per year (usually paid from long-term funding)

WIOA Limitation on the use of Sub-Minimum Wages

As of 2016 a series of steps must occur prior to anyone under the age of 24 be placed in a job paying less than minimum wage Schools are prohibited from contracting with Sub-Minimum Wage providers for “Transition Services” Legislative definition of “Competitive Integrated Employment” Full or part time, minimum wage or higher, same benefits, fully integrated with co-workers
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas State Department of Education “KSDE Policy Statement on Employment First”

As a relevant state agency in the implementation of Employment First policy, the Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE) is responsible for the monitoring of district practices in planning for and providing appropriate transition services to students with significant disabilities, and assuring that KSDE developed resources and materials encourage Employment First policy.

Research demonstrates that when provided with preparatory, hands-on job experience in the form of part-time work, internships, or summer employment, students with significant disabilities can successfully obtain and sustain work in integrated settings and earn competitive wages. The goal of publically-funded transition services and supports for youth with significant disabilities should be focused on helping these youth to acquire the skills, knowledge and experience necessary to obtain jobs in integrated settings at a competitive wage that promotes community participation and self-sufficiency.

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Project Search - Kansas - 06/10/2017

~~“High School Transition Program:”Project SEARCH came to Kansas in 2010 with the first class of interns beginning in the fall of 2011. After the sixth year of implementation, over 350 Kansans have participated in Project SEARCH. 70 percent of those interns have secured competitive employment.90 interns have been selected for the 2017-2018 year.There are 13 host business sites in Kansas:• University of Kansas, Lawrence• Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Lawrence• Butler Community College, El Dorado• Susan B Allen Memorial Hospital, El Dorado• Newton Medical Center, Newton• Salina Regional Health Center, Salina• Via Christi Hospital, Wichita• Sedgwick County Government, Wichita• McConnell Air Force Base, Derby• Johnson County Government, Olathe• Embassy Suites, Olathe• Tabor College, Hillsboro• Cintas, Wichita” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities

The purpose of the Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities (KCDD) is to support people of all ages with developmental disabilities so they have the opportunity to make choices regarding both their participation in society, and their quality of life.   In their current plan the KCDD has identified “4 areas of priority” of which one is employment  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission

“In order to ensure the Oversight Commission can effectively carry out its duties, the law places certain requirements on state agencies to help ensure that the law will be effectively and fully implemented. The law also places requirements on state agencies to provide the Commission information documenting measurable progress on the Goals and objectives established by the Commission and proving effective implementation of the law….Although the Employment First law requires all state agencies to implement its requirements, the Oversight Commission has identified a handful of state agencies that have programs and activities directly impacted by Employment First. These are referred to as “relevant state agencies” throughout this document. The relevant state agencies are:

•Kansas Department for Children and Families (KDCF –formerly Kansas Dept. of Social and Rehabilitation Services)

•Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS – formerly Kansas Dept. on Aging)

•Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE)

•Kansas Department of Commerce (Commerce)

•Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE)

•Kansas Department on Administration (KDOA) ”

.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Kansas DEI (Round 5) - 10/01/2014

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2014, Kansas was awarded a Round 5 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The grant will end in 2017.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kansas MIG-RATS - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Kansas Department of Health and Environment CESP - 03/13/2013

“Certification of Employment Services Professionals - KDHE funded the provision of the Certified Employment Services Professional (CESP) in two locations during 2012. The CESP is a newly developed credential governed by the APSE Employment Services Professional Certification Council (ESPCC). Individuals who earn the CESP credential have demonstrated knowledge of the facilitation, and advocacy skills necessary to help establish and expand equitable employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. 64 people took the exam; 54 passed it. According to APSE, the number of candidates who sat for the exam in Kansas was double the number of candidates who sat for the initial administration of the exam by APSE during December 2011, and was the largest candidate sponsorship by any state since the inception of the exam in 2011 (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year State Plan - 08/16/2011

Goal #3: Advocacy: Community Resources/Alternatives

 

Provide information and training, written materials and web sites to educate people with DD and their support networks on resources available to assist them to live and succeed in the community. There are over 3000 adults and children (under age 21) on the DD waiting list. Often these individuals do not know about resources outside DD Waiver that can help them succeed. The goal is to provide information on these alternative resources.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Southeast Kansas Works Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Local Plan

Training must be industry or company specific and provide technical and skill upgrades. Training may be conducted at the applicant’s facility, at a public or private training provider site or at a combination of sites best meeting the needs of the organization. LA V allows the following types of training for employer projects meeting the above criteria:

 

Customized  occupational  training  designed  to  meet  the  special  requirements  of  an employer  (including  a  group  of  employers)  conducted  with  a  commitment  by  the employer to continue to employ an individual upon successful completion of the training.

 

Customized   on-the   job-training   relating   to   the   introduction   of   new   technologies,  introduction to new production or service procedures, or upgrading to new jobs requiring additional skills. LA V offers a variety of resources and information on services available to persons with disabilities including: information on training opportunities and links to online training; technology guides for using screen enlargement software, and screen reading software.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

“With a little help you can return home.Money Follows the Person (MFP) Program” - 06/21/2017

~~“If you live in a nursing home, the Money Follows the Person (MFP) program may be able to help you move home. The state of Kansas received grant money from The Centers for Medicare and MedicaidServices (CMS). This money is used to help people move out of nursing homes. The MFP provides Transition Coordination Services. That means the program will pay someone to help you with each step. It covers things like:• Finding an apartment or assisted living facility.• Filling out apartment applications.• Getting all the legal documents you need tomove into the community.• Paying up to a certain amount for householditems. You may need furniture, kitchen utensils,pots and pans, and bedding.• Paying up to a certain amount to make changesto your home. You may need a wheelchair rampor wider door ways. The bathroom may needmore space for grab bars for the tub or toilet.• Paying security deposits.• Finding the personal care that you need.Care may include help with bathing, goingto the bathroom, meals and housekeeping.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KanCare Section 1115 DemonstrationProject No. 11-W-00283/7 - 05/31/2017

~~“The current KanCare demonstration expires on December 31, 2017. Pursuant to Section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) is requesting a one-year extension of the current KanCare demonstration, including the Uncompensated Care (UC) Pool and the Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Pool. The requested extension period is January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018. KDHE is not requesting any changes to the demonstration for the one-year extension period.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Medicaid: A Primer 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~KanCare operates under concurrent waivers—a set of Section 1915(c) waivers for HCBS and a Section 1115 demonstration that created KanCare and allows—among other things—the mandatory enrollment of nearly all covered populations in managed care for most services. The current KanCare demonstration is approved through the end of calendar year 2017, and the state may request it be extended. Renewals require specific actions to ensure transparency, including public meetings.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services ”HCBS Providers – Financial Template” - 09/22/2016

“The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has contracted with Optumas, an actuary and consulting firm, to study the adequacy of Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) service payment rates. To assist with that study, Optumas has developed a financial template to be completed by all HCBS service providers.… The template requests information on your organization’s revenue, expenses, and service delivery count. The goal of requesting this information is to assess the profit/loss position for HCBS providers and use that information to make a statement on the adequacy of HCBS service reimbursement. Revenue and service information submitted in this template will be validated against Medicaid encounter data.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services “Crisis and Exception Policy” - 09/15/2016

~~“Transitions to the I/DD WaiverThe  following  HCBS  programs  shall  transition  to  HCBS  IDD wavier program  if  they  meet HCBS IDD functional eligibility:1. Person is determined no longer eligible for the TA, Autism, or TBI waiver program.2. The respective program manager sends NOA to person of their ineligibility.  The  IDD  waiver  program  manager, the MCO, and  DCF  for  persons  in  the  custody  of  DCF are emailed a copy of the NOA.3. The IDD waiver program manager coordinates with CDDO to determine if person is eligible to transition to IDD waiver program. 4. If a person is eligible for the IDD waiver program, a functional assessment is scheduled if current assessment is more than 365 days old.5. Upon  completion  of  functional  assessment  the  CDDO  will  notify  the  IDD  programmanager and the MCO of the functional eligibility determination. 6. Upon  functional  eligibility  determination,  the  IDD  waiver program  manager  sends the NOA  of  approval  for  IDD  waiver  program to  the  person. For  children  in  the custody  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Kansas  Department  for  Children  and  Families,  the NOA shall also be forwarded to DCF.7. 3160 sent to CDDO KDHE Clearinghouse and MCO.I/DD services must begin within forty-five (45) days of issuances of the 3160. 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Employment First Initiative Act Annual Report - 01/14/2013

“KDADS provided information about provisions in its contract with Community Developmental Disability Organizations (CDDOs) where persons on the waiting list for HCBS Developmental Disability (DD) Waiver services who are ‘referred to RS (Rehabilitation Services) for employment services and successfully closed from Vocational Rehabilitation Services as competitively employed, will have access to HCBS Developmental Disability (DD) Supported Employment waiver funding needed to successfully maintain their employment.’ This modification to the CDDO contract allows individuals on the DD waiver waiting list who are employed in competitive, integrated employment to receive long term supports to maintain employment, which is funded by the waiver. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Social Security Alternative Pilot - 01/14/2013

“Social Security Alternative Pilot under KanCare - This Pilot is designed for up to 200 Kansans with disabilities who have not yet been determined to be eligible for Social Security disability. The goal of this pilot is to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain employment with employer-based health insurance as well as avoid unnecessary dislocation from the workforce and impoverishment in order to obtain health insurance. The pilot will include a Presumptive Medical Disability (PMD) process to determine whether individuals meet the criteria for a Social Security disability determination, Medicaid-like coverage as needed, a monthly allocation to pay for personal assistance and employment support services if needed, and accelerated PMD review to restore the path to Social Security disability status in the event of a worsening medical condition or loss of employment. The pilot also allows for temporary unemployment benefits (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas SSI Employment Support Pilot - 01/14/2013

“SSI Employment Support Pilot under KanCare – This Pilot will support up to 400 individuals currently on the Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Developmental Disability (DD) or Physical Disability (PD) waiting lists who are employed 40 hours per month or more at federal minimum wage in competitive and integrated settings. In addition to Medicaid coverage, pilot participants will receive up to $1,500 per month to pay for personal assistance and employment support services to enable them to live and work in the community. Working Healthy Benefits Specialists will be available to discuss this option and alternatives to this option that may be available to the individual. Participants will be restored to their former position on the waiting list if employment is lost. The pilot also allows for temporary unemployment (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas I/DD Waiver (0224.R05.00) - 07/01/2009

Provides day supports, overnight respite care, personal assistant, residential supports, supported employment, FMS, assistive services, medical alert rental, sleep cycle support, specialized medical care, supportive home care, wellness monitoring for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 5 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas State HCBS Transition Plan (Draft)

The new HCBS Settings Rule from CMS applies to all programs that provide home and community based services. In Kansas, this rule will apply to all settings where home and community based services are provided for these programs: Frail Elderly (65+) Autism (child who starts services prior to age 6) Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (5+) Physical Disability (16-64) Serious Emotional Disturbance (0-18) Technology Assisted (0 through 21) Traumatic Brain Injury (16-64)
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

There's no place like the workplace for great career opportunities for employees with disabilities in the Sunflower State of Kansas. See what Kansas is doing to make sure that workers with disabilities are bringing home the dough in America's Bread Basket.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kansas' VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.26%
Change from
2014 to 2015
2,911,641
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.08%
Change from
2014 to 2015
184,791
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.25%
Change from
2014 to 2015
79,132
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.03%
Change from
2014 to 2015
42.82%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.16%
Change from
2014 to 2015
79.88%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 2,893,957 2,904,021 2,911,641
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 178,125 192,334 184,791
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 74,268 76,562 79,132
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,225,917 1,222,393 1,229,527
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.69% 39.81% 42.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.98% 79.75% 79.88%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.30% 4.50% 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.40% 20.30% 19.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.30% 12.60% 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 173,213 178,052 184,846
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 177,555 188,341 180,957
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 302,912 314,790 317,198
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 23,196 25,710 24,705
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 20,329 24,289 24,638
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,429 4,248 3,650
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,257 4,614 4,082
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 11,506 12,425 11,428
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 4,383 4,154 4,705

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,827 3,913 3,987
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.40% 8.40% 8.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 75,521 75,123 74,677

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 9,957 9,160 9,806
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 30,415 28,503 29,223
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 33,801 31,705 32,407
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 29.50% 28.90% 30.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 16.30% 16.10% 13.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 41.20% 37.90% 31.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,382 1,367 1,315
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 3,505 3,231 2,968
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,001 3,726 4,008
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.02 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 117 100 67
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 61 58 40
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00% 58.00% 60.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.11 2.00 1.37

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,684
3,140
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 123 100 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 244 165 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 916 783 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 985 845 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,360 1,123 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 156 124 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 22.00% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,107 2,793 2,847
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 106,565 106,853 106,902
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 244 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $0 N/A $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 N/A $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 N/A $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 N/A $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 15.00% 13.00% 14.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,862 3,284 3,457
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,437 3,118 3,086
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,338 3,625 3,838
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 30.90 27.70 29.10

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 67.17% 68.61% 69.32%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 7.21% 6.93% 6.72%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.29% 2.30% 2.27%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.24% 97.51% 99.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 32.10% 33.33% 36.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.85% 60.61% 63.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.25% 73.59% 77.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 26.75% 27.27% 27.50%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 454,126
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 810
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 174,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 33,751
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 208,693
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 165
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 184
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,536,706
AbilityOne wages (services). $320,864

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 44 34 36
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 46 36 37
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 77 20 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,324 2,624 2,772
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 119 114 114
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3,520 2,758 2,886

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care.
• Through the Governor’s Sub-Cabinet on Disability, leadership among the Kansas Departments for Children and Families (DCF), Health and Environment, Commerce, Corrections and Aging and Disability Services focuses attention on implementing employment first strategies in state agencies and tracking baseline and performance data to effectively measure outcomes. Sub-Cabinet meetings are also an opportunity for open communications among these departments and advocacy and provider organizations working in the disability system.
• The DCF Secretary is participating on a Governor-directed strategic planning effort with a focus on workforce development. DCF is the designated state agency. (Page 209)
Ongoing communication and collaboration
KRS is in frequent contact with other agencies related to competitive, integrated employment of Kansans with disabilities. Some examples include participation on the:
• Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its vocational sub-committee.
• The KDADS strategic planning team to integrate mental health and substance use disorder services into a recovery oriented system of care.
• The Developmental Disabilities Council.
• The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.
• The Employment First Commission.
• Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (Pages 226)
 

Customized Employment

~~Training and education to learn new vocational skills.
• Rehabilitation technology, telecommunication aids and other adaptive devices.
• Job preparation and placement services.
• Job coaching.
• On-the-job training.
• Services to help students with disabilities get a job after finishing high school.
• Supported and customized employment for individuals who need intensive on-the-job training and ongoing support.
• Referral to other services.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 65)
Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) enters into provider agreements with a variety of community agencies for the provision of supported employment services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Through customized employment provider agreements, six key components or milestones are specified for supported employment services:
1. Creation of a job development action plan.
2. Placement.
3. Stabilization.
4. 45 days of continuous, successful employment.
5. Finalization of an extended ongoing service plan.
Direct hourly Job Coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Customized Employment milestones services descried above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements. (Page 220)
A bachelor’s degree in a field of study reasonably related to vocational rehabilitation, indicating a level of competency and skill demonstrating basic preparation in a field of study such as vocational rehabilitation counseling, social work, psychology, disability studies, business administration, human resources, special education, supported employment, customized employment, economics, or another field that reasonably prepares individuals to work with consumers and employers; and Demonstrated paid or unpaid experience, for not less than one year, consisting of—(Page 232)
The needs assessment revealed the need for job placement and other provider services with specialized expertise in competitive, integrated employment of people with disabilities. As a result, KRS will emphasize the development and maintenance of evidence-based and promising practices through the End-Dependence Kansas initiative. Direct service contracts will be used to promote the development and expansion of Individual Placement and Supports, Individualized Discovery/Customized Employment, and Progressive Employment. (Page 260)
Methods to expand and improve services
When considering opportunities to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, KRS emphasizes strategies that will address the needs of people with the most significant disabilities and people who have been unserved or under-served. Collaborative efforts with consumers, advisory councils, parent groups, advocacy organizations, community rehabilitation programs and other state agencies are undertaken to expand access to VR services and to promote supported employment, customized employment, Pre-Employment Transition Services and assistive technology services. Innovation and expansion activities are consistent with the findings of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment. Specifically, the following functions assist KRS is achieving its goals and priorities related to innovation and expansion: (Page 280)
Direct hourly job coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Supported Employment and Customized Employment milestones services described above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements.
After the time-limited VR services end, the supported employment service provider maintains extended ongoing services with the consumer or has identified a plan specifying how the community-service system will provide the extended ongoing supports the consumer needs to maintain employment. These extended services are not funded with VR dollars. To reinforce and maintain stability of the job placement, ongoing services include regular contact. (Page 295)
 

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~Not significantly increased the number of individuals with barriers to employment who receive training and other more intensive services
• Limited success with blending and braiding resources across multiple systems to meet the needs of job seekers and workers
• Varied success at meeting the workforce needs of all industry sectors, as well as in some geographic areas of the state (Page 22)
The primary role of LVER staff, at the Kansas AJCs, is to conduct outreach to employers in the area, to assist veterans in gaining employment. Additionally, LVERs promote, plan and participate in job fairs and seminars for employers. Furthermore, LVERs promote veterans as job ready candidates, who have highly marketable skills and experience. Kansas LVERs advocate for veterans by promoting employment and training opportunities, coordinating with other business outreach representatives in the AJC to facilitate and promote employment, workshops, job searches, establishing job groups in conjunction with employers, and leverage other employment opportunities for veterans. Kansas LVERs establish, maintain, and facilitate regular contact with federal contractors, unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations. Additionally our LVERs provides educational training to AJC staff, additional employer based training and other outreach services, in accordance with VPL 07-10 and VPL 03-14. The Department of Commerce ensures that there are no blending of roles, whereas LVERs provide monthly activity reports to the State Manager and are often consulted with by AJC supervisors about their activity. Furthermore, LVERs are encouraged to utilize referrals and other resources, such as the Department of Commerce/ KANVET Hire a Veteran Pledge program as a resource to locate veteran friendly businesses/ employers, who are seeking veterans first, to employ. (Page 314)
 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.
Each workforce partner and local area must comply with both program and physical accessibility requirements consistent with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, WIOA Section 188 and related federal guidance, and the Kansas Act against Discrimination. Policies will be established to assure compliance and equal access and usability for all Kansans, regardless of disability. The following key points, at a minimum, must be included in all program and local area accessibility policies. (Page 120)
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~• A workshop with a large hospital and health services company regarding its on-line application and screening processes. Participants were able to learn about how to more effectively use the on-line application process with VR consumers and the response time expectations of companies after vacant positions are posted. Similar workshops are pending with the Veterans’ Administration and an aircraft manufacturer.
• A major energy company is interested in creating a training program for transition youth.
• An ironworker trade union is interested in offering its apprenticeship program to youth with disabilities.
• A pilot project is pending with a major national on-line shopping company to use a preferred vendor as a single point of contact to hire workers with disabilities. A major hospital and a plastics manufacturing firm are also exploring similar inclusion programs.
• A national candy manufacturing company has a campaign to interest Kansas high school students in pursuing manufacturing work. They are interested in including transition-aged youth with disabilities in this initiative.
• Extensive outreach and communication are underway with federal contractors with 503 compliance requirements. (Page 224)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The KWSB is more than an advisory board to the Governor and staff on workforce policy issues. The Board ensures Kansas’ entire workforce system, covering many programs in multiple departments and agencies, meets employers’ needs for skilled workers and meets workers’ needs for career and economic advancement. The KWSB convenes State, regional and local workforce system partners to enhance the capacity and performance of the workforce system; align and improve the outcomes and effectiveness of public workforce investments and thereby promote economic growth. The board engages workforce system representatives including businesses, education, economic development, labor and other stakeholders to achieve the strategic and operational vision and goals of the State Plan as well as the purpose of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA). (Page 96)
Other evaluation and research functions implemented through core programs include:
• Implementing evidence-based employment practices for people with disabilities and ongoing fidelity research into the effectiveness of these practices.
• Using federal and state technical assistance resources, to the extent they are available, for evaluation and research functions.
• Using a research-to-practice approach by leveraging knowledge transfer from national resources including technical assistance centers funded by the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) with funding from the US Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, the National Skills Coalition, and other similar organizations that disseminate research-based information on improving service delivery.
• Dissemination of information concerning research-based best practices for service delivery, alignment, and policy development.  (Page 101)
 

Benefits

~~• Services are individualized to address each person’s unique strengths, impediments to employment and vocational goals. An individual plan for employment is jointly developed between each customer and the VR counselor to address specific barriers to employment, the vocational objective, and the services necessary to achieve that objective.
• VR counselors are highly trained to address the complex disability, employment and cultural issues that impact persons served, and to facilitate informed decision–making in partnership with their customers.
• 95% of persons rehabilitated into employment in FFY 2014 were persons with significant disabilities, meaning that they had multiple functional limitations in major life areas such as mobility, communications, self–care, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, work skills and self–direction.
• VR emphasizes the employment potential of youth with disabilities and the importance of them gaining an early attachment to work or postsecondary education resulting in employment. 21% of persons served in FFY 2014 were transition–aged youth with disabilities (21 years old or younger at the time of application). 23% of persons rehabilitated that year were youth.  (Page 65)
• Over the past ten years, approximately 75% of persons rehabilitated report their own earnings as their largest source of financial support, a significant milestone toward self–sufficiency and reduced reliance on public benefits.
• VR services are comprehensive and flexible in order to empower each customer to maximize employment.
• The End–Dependence Kansas initiative emphasizes the use of evidence–based practices throughout the VR service delivery system, including community–based service providers, to increase employment outcomes.
• Local areas should incorporate mitigating strategies, such as Earned Income Tax Credit program awareness, into their service strategies.
• State–level core partners should ensure that local partners are familiar with resources such as Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) benefits counselors, Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA), and other resources, and should develop strategies to share this information and/or train local area staff on an ongoing basis.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 65)
The VR program supports customers to pursue postsecondary education at all levels if necessary to achieve their vocational goals. VR assists customers to access comparable benefits, such as PELL Grants, to help pay for higher education before expending VR funds. Agreements between VR and all Kansas institutions of higher education specify cost sharing responsibilities related to the provision of auxiliary aids and services.
8. Schedule. Applicants must comply with the following timetable:
1. Provide required application forms and narratives to the Kansas Department of Commerce no later than 4:00 PM __________.
2. Pre-Bid Telephone Conference Call is scheduled for____. Call 1-866-XXX-XXXX.
3. Complete application packages must be emailed to:________.
4. Commerce will announce Grant Awards by __date_____(Page 135)
• Work Registration - RESEA participants must have a Plus account which includes a complete, up- to-date and active resume in KANSASWORKS (the state’s employment website). Staff will provide resume assistance if appropriate.
• Orientation to One-Stop services - An introduction to the workforce center that includes an overview of the programs and services available, and instruction on using self-help tools
• UI Eligibility Review - Potential eligibility issues are documented and referred to UI.
• Initial Assessment - Evaluation of the customer’s employment history, education, interests and skills resulting in the identification of employment goals, barriers to employment and the services needed to obtain his/her goals.
• Labor Market Information - Based on desired residential location and claimant’s employment history/interests
• Individual Employment Plan - In consultation with the claimant, a written Individual Employment Plan (IEP) matched to the claimant’s needs based on information gathered during the Initial Assessment is developed.
• Follow-up: Claimants must follow up with RESEA staff every 30 days until he/she has returned to work or is no longer receiving benefits. At each follow-up the claimant provides their work search contacts for the previous four weeks. (Page 160)
Council Comment: Development of informational materials is needed for use with outreach with schools, referral sources, parents and consumers. KRS should also focus on outreach to organizations such as the Kansas Physical Therapy Association and the Kansas Occupational Therapy Association and speech/language professional organizations. Professionals in these disciplines often have contact with individuals with disabilities and could pass along information about VR.
KRS Response: KRS will work with DCF Communications regarding this request. (Page 204)
• KRS and DCF Economic and Employment Services collaborate to serve recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who have disabilities. Consumers benefit by being able to receive the coordinated and specialized services they need to achieve employment before their time-limited TANF benefits cease.
• KRS and DCF Prevention and Protection Services independent living staff will coordinate to address the employment and/or post-secondary education needs of youth with disabilities who age out of foster care.
• Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care.
• KRS maintains an active presence on numerous councils and committees, including:
 The Statewide Independent Living Council of Kansas.
 The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.
 The Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its Vocational Sub-Committee.
 The Governor’s Commission on Autism.
 Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities
 KANSASWORKS State Board
 5 Local workforce development boards
• A memorandum of understanding with the Prairie Band Potawatomie Nation Native American VR program addresses the coordination of services to help consumers achieve employment. (Page 209)
As outlined in the agreement, KRS will provide VR services for students in accordance with KRS policy under the following conditions:
• The student has been determined eligible for VR and can be served within the Order of Selection.
• The student (and his/her parents or representative if appropriate) and the VR counselor have agreed to an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE).
• The goods or services provided will be necessary for post-high school training or employment, or will substantially contribute to achievement of the competitive, integrated employment objective on the IPE.
• Employment or post-secondary services provided by VR must occur outside the established school sessions. The term “school sessions” refers not only to the school semester or term, but also to the school day.
• Consideration of comparable benefits and application of the economic need policy are required. (Page 215)
KRS will continue to develop, implement and maintain a professional development system for new and experienced staff. A priority focus area will be to address effective communication strategies to assure consumer engagement and progress toward employment, and development and implementation of effective Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs). Other areas of focus continue to be informed choice; understanding the purpose and intent of the VR program; linkages between eligibility, rehabilitation needs, consumer goals and priorities, and services provided; development of effective progress measures; time and caseload management techniques; financial accountability cultural competence; accountable decision-making; expertise related to disability populations served (specifically persons who are blind or visually impaired, persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, persons with mental illness, and persons with head injury); leadership development; use of comparable benefits; basic benefits counseling issues surrounding employment; use of Kansas specific labor market trends and demands; and, effective career counseling and guidance related to employment as the avenue to self-reliance.(Page 236)
Annually about 10% of the total persons served (Status 02-24 +32) receive supported employment services. Individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, significant intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injury are among the primary populations receiving supported employment services. Their services are characterized by:
• The need for community-based work assessments or job tryouts in competitive, integrated employment so that individuals who have not previously worked can explore jobs that are a good match for their skills and interests.
• The importance of an individualized approach in connecting these individuals with: available social service and disability-related services; transportation; benefits counseling; and natural support networks in their home communities.
• The need for employability or soft skill training on issues such as self-advocacy, communications, taking direction from employers, getting along with co-workers and customer service.
• The need for specific job skill training matched with current and projected labor market needs. (Page 251)
1.9  The number of KRS SSI recipients and SSDI beneficiaries for whom KRS receives reimbursement funding. To meet this standard, the individuals must achieve the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months.
1.10  The number of VR consumers receiving qualified benefits counseling.
Goal 2: KRS will emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities and improve the outreach and outcomes for transition-aged students.
Strategies for Goal 2:
KRS will implement the following strategies:
A. Build and maintain VR capacity to deliver Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS).
B. Build partnerships with school transition personnel to encourage those career-focused and work-based experiences are incorporated into transition Individual Education Plans and to increase referrals of PETS-eligible students to the VR program. (Page 269)
KRS will also:
• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so that consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 278)
Identified in the FFY 2015 Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Plan. These highlights are based on FFY 2015 indicators.
• A total of 1,345 Kansans with disabilities achieved stable employment as a result of VR services, earning an average of $9.88 an hour. VR consumers achieved employment in high-wage, high-demand jobs, for example: more than $40 an hour as an Information Technology Systems Administrator and numerous placements of more than $30 an hour in the nursing field.
• The percent of individuals who reported their own earnings as the largest source of support at the time of vocational rehabilitation (VR) case closure was 72.4%, 57% higher than at application. This represents a significant milestone toward increased self-reliance.
• The number of successful employment outcomes after participating in post-secondary education was 242. This indicator represents a significant quality measure as increased education and technical training often lead to higher-wage, career track positions and therefore increased self-reliance.
• KRS receives reimbursement funds from the Social Security Administration for consumers who are recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or beneficiaries of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) when those individuals work at the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months. In FFY 2015, reimbursement funds received by the agency totaled $1,123,976.
• Providing employment-focused services for transition youth is a priority for KRS. KRS has traditionally defined transition youth as persons who are age 21 or younger at the time of application). Under WIOA, the definition of youth is inclusive of persons aged 14 through 24. When youth achieve an early attachment to employment and all of its advantages, the likelihood of their reliance on public benefits through their lifetime is reduced. (Page 286)
FFY 2015: Service providers: 5.72; educators: 4.72; general advocates category not surveyed.
Indicator 2.7: Average expended per rehabilitation for the life of the case. FFY 2015: $6,464
Indicator 2.8: Annual number of persons served (status 02-24 +32). FFY 2015: 11,419
Indicator 2.9: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.10: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services provided through one-stop workforce centers. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.11: Rehabilitation rate of persons referred to placement or supported employment providers.
FFY 2015: 54%
Indicator 2.12: The average wage achieved by persons referred to placement or supported employment providers. (Page 289)
For the purpose of promoting the hiring and retention of veterans, Workforce Center staff will provide and facilitate a full range of employment and training services. LVER staff will advocate for veterans to employers and seek other opportunities with business and industry, community based organizations, and contractors of all kinds, to include federal contractors. All Workforce Center staff, as well as LVER staff, will work together to plan and participate in job fairs to promote the hiring of veterans and eligible persons. LVER staff will communicate job fair participation opportunities and the benefits of attending job fairs, to employers and federal contractors. LVERs will also make contact with unions, apprenticeship programs and the business community to promote employment and training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons, and furthermore promote credentialing and training opportunities with training providers and credentialing bodies. (Page 320)
Improving SCSEP Services Kansas is posting a Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) to assure the upcoming grant period will focus on strategies to improve and better achieve the goals of SCSEP. The strategies will include the following action steps:
• Increase recruitment and enrollment to increase the number of active participants. This focus will include reaching out to community organizations and other senior service providers to provide information on the SCSEP program and its’ benefits.
• Focus participant training towards employment skills acquisition as guided by IEP, TAD and assessment results based on labor market needs, Training will include short–term training classes, education and WORKReady! Certification. SCSEP will also insure that participants are receiving the job notification list that is generated by the One–Stop so that participants are better informed about area job openings.
• Increase follow–up contact with participants exited for unsubsidized employment to address employment and life issues to help maintain employment.
• Insure all most–in–need measures are accurately and timely entered into SPARQ.
• Create host agency skill development training and tracking to be reviewed with participant and agency quarterly based on each individuals IEP.
• Reinforce the goal of SCSEP program with participants, e.g. unsubsidized employment, at each contact. (Page 339)
 

School to Work Transition

~~A priority target population for End-Dependence Kansas is youth transitioning from school to work. End-Dependence Kansas, coupled with outreach for Pre-Employment Transition Services and Section 511 services to divert youth from direct entry into sub-minimum wage work, will expand supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Significant training and technical assistance will be focused on improved communication with students and youth with disabilities encouraging competitive integrated employment. Also, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Education, KRS will offer opportunities for training and technical assistance for school personnel to learn and understand the needs of students and youth pursuing employment rather than services only, to establish and implement the soft skills and employment preparedness skills needed by employers and how and when to complete a referral to the VR program. In addition to these strategies, KRS will work collaboratively to assure Title I youth services are readily available to students and youth with disabilities to enjoy work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, career exploration and coaching, etc. (Page 278)

Data Collection

~~(1) (A) The Commerce workforce system uses the America’s Job Link Alliance Management Information System to meet all of the requirements of US Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration for data collection and reporting. The AJLA system in Kansas, www.kansasworks.com also provides the public with access to labor market information, connects to postsecondary training programs and performance outcomes by training program. The AJLA system provides case management tools and creates participant records and can be used for payment for services and cost allocation of services. Employers may enter job postings in KANSASWORKS.com in addition to finding qualified applicants for jobs. Today, there are 35,524 job postings and 9021 resumes in KANSASWORKS.com. (Page 88)
Data-collection and reporting processes are consistent throughout each local area; data is validated as required by US DOL. Commerce has policies related to data collection and reporting processes required for each local workforce system, including Data and Information Collection and Maintenance, Record Maintenance and Retention, Eligibility Determination and Documentation, Fiscal Manual, and the State Performance Accountability System. All current and draft policies can be found at http://kwpolicies.kansascommerce.com/Pages/Default.aspx
VR will collect and report data necessary for the common accountability measures identified in WIOA, the quarterly state-specific data measures identified in the Performance Indicators operational elements, the data necessary for the extensive metrics included in the goals and priorities section of the VR Services Portion of the Combined State Plan, and the data necessary for evaluation and continuous improvement. (Page 89)
5. System and program accessibility: Data will be disaggregated by those with significant barriers to employment, including those with disabilities to allow local and state policy makers to evaluate the services provided to those individuals.
Measurement of success with these stated operational elements or activities will be attributed to the successful development of inter-agency data sharing agreements and related linkages of systems as a result of data sharing. All partners will monitor of data collection and validate data.
With a Round 3 Workforce Data Quality Initiative grant (WDQI), Regents, Commerce, and Labor have collaborated to create an interoperable data system. The Kansas WDQI Round 5 grant includes Vocational Rehabilitation to build on the work already in progress and create a system which will support the reduction of duplicative data collection. (Page 90)
KRS will also:
• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so that consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 278)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~• Direct work with individuals with disabilities in a setting such as an independent living center;
• Direct service or advocacy activities that provide such individual with experience and skills in working with individuals with disabilities; or
• Direct experience in competitive integrated employment environments as an employer, as a small business owner or operator, or in self-employment, or other experience in human resources or recruitment, or experience in supervising employees, training, or other activities (Page 233)
 

Career Pathways

~~The State will implement sector strategies, as described, regarding identified economic regions found in Title IB, Section VI and career pathways already utilized in multiple workforce programs, including formula and competitive grant programs. Career pathways will prepare individuals to be successful in a full range of secondary or postsecondary options including registered apprenticeships. Career pathways will enable individuals to attain a high school equivalency certificate, where necessary, as well as at least one recognized postsecondary credential. Where practicable, career pathways will integrate education, training, and other services including counseling and workforce preparation activities in order to accelerate the educational and career advancement of individuals. Since 2011, Regents, employers and individual postsecondary institutions have worked together to develop career pathways in twenty–five aligned programs. Local Workforce Boards may also develop additional career pathways as required by local employers. Adult Education will collaborate with workforce partners in offering basic skills to registered apprenticeship participants and with colleges in offering concurrent enrollment and team–teaching in Adult Education and CTE programs. (Page 44)
Specific Strategy (Operational Element/Method/Activity) Recommended for Implementation: Collaborative youth services based on individual service strategies focused on skill development and career pathways. Work–based learning addresses a broad range of skills needs—both “soft” skills and technical skills. While this strategy makes work–based learning a priority, we recognize that it is not a panacea for all youth, and even when it is included in a youth’s individual service strategy, it will be supplemented with other forms of learning. Key elements of this strategy include:
• Paid work–based experiences. (Real Job)
• Summer employment partnerships
• Pre–apprenticeship opportunities
• Internships and job shadowing
• On the job training opportunities (Page 50)
Components of this strategy:
• To be effective, work experience must come in different forms. This includes, but is not limited to on–the–job training, summer employment programs, pre-apprenticeship opportunities, and internships/job shadowing.
• The importance of existing and continued development of career pathways that incorporate an element of work experience.
• The importance of locally identified career pathways.
• Continued education and training that includes, but is not limited to, achievement of the high school diploma or its equivalent, technical training, industry-recognized certificates, etc. that is included under all of the sections of WIOA.
• The specific requirements of Title I and Title IV. (Page 54)
Specific Strategy (Operational Element/Method/Activity) Recommended for Implementation: Collaborative youth services based on individual service strategies focused on skill development and career pathways. Work-based learning addresses a broad range of skills needs—both “soft” skills and technical skills. While this strategy makes work-based learning a priority, we recognize that it is not a panacea for all youth, and even when it is included in a youth’s individual service strategy, it will be supplemented with other forms of learning. Key elements of this strategy include:
• Paid work-based experiences (Real Job)
• Summer employment partnerships
• Pre-apprenticeship opportunities
• Internships and job shadowing
• On the job training opportunities (Page 147)
Local plans must address coordination with education and training options available in the local area, particularly education and training offered through community and technical colleges throughout the state. Education and training opportunities must be tied to the attainment of industry-recognized credentials along career pathways for demand occupations.
Career pathways provide a sequence of education and training that give youth a clear line-of-sight to an industry recognized credential and a career. WIOA requires that career pathways meet the workforce needs of the region or state, offer individuals the opportunity to earn at least one recognized post-secondary credential, provide contextual education concurrently with workforce preparation and training, and include counseling to support individuals in achieving their education and career goals. Accelerating Opportunity: Kansas (AO-K) enhances these required elements with classes that are team-taught by basic skills and CTE instructors, transcript post-secondary credit, wrap-around support services, and the opportunity to earn stackable credentials. Training (in all forms) must be tied to the types of job opportunities that are prevalent in the local area, and should be designed to develop skills that are in demand in the region. Skill development must be consistent with regional and statewide economic development strategies. Local areas’ employer engagement strategies should also include engaging economic development organizations. (Page 148)
• As a partner in the state workforce development system, KRS will have access to cross training and informational resources about economic development areas, workforce needs, career pathways, and sector strategies. The KRS Director is a member of the state workforce development board as well as all of the local workforce development boards. Regional Program Administrators for VR are involved in local area sub-committees and partnership councils. Through each of these entities, KRS staff are kept up-to-date about workforce issues. Then, in turn, all of this information is shared at both local and state levels with staff to enhance their understanding of employment opportunities, employer needs and workforce issues. KRS will partner on the state’s Workforce Innovation Fund grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to enhance cross training.
• KRS will provide a link on its staff-use website to the National Clearinghouse of Rehabilitation Training Material, and bring it to the attention of staff periodically. KRS also supports staff participation in nationally sponsored webinars related to vocational rehabilitation, competitive, integrated employment, and disability issues.
• The KRS Employer Development Specialist sends frequent updates to direct service staff statewide about specific job opportunities and employment trends. 
• KRS outsources most job placement services through its network of more than 100 community-based service providers.
• The End-Dependence Kansas initiative, described in detail in Section C1, focuses on the implementation of evidence-based and promising practices. Significant training and technical assistance will be provided to KRS staff and contracting agencies to enhance their skills to use these research-based strategies. (Page 235)
 Job Developers, utilizing current labor market information will seek out and develop relationships with businesses in growing industries and occupations. Potential employment and career opportunities for project participants in the industries projected to have the most growth will include but not be limited to a variety of options within schools, hospitals, home health care, temporary help services, food preparation and serving, cashiers and retail sales. Key steps to career pathways in all of these fields include: related community service assignment; job search skills workshops, relevant computer/technology training and certifications for food handlers, basic first aid, CPR, computer proficiency and any other training identified as increasing participant marketability for job attainment.
 Job Developers will develop lists of employers in the targeted industries focusing on creating and establishing innovative working relationships, particularly with those that have a special interest in (Page 339)
 

Employment Networks

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 305).

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 41

“Pre-Employment Services Being Offered to Youth with Disabilities “ - 10/02/2017

~~“As a result of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, DCF recently launched a new program, Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS), to further its efforts to help Kansans with disabilities gain meaningful employment. Pre-ETS was first launched in FY 2017, and its services are designed to help youth with disabilities get an early start at job exploration, assist students with disabilities in making the transition from secondary to post-secondary education/training and to empower them to realize their full potential.  

While many services are offered within Pre-ETS, Rehabilitation Services Director Michael Donnelly says that the program emphasizes the paid, work-based learning experiences”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Resource Guide - 08/12/2017

~~“The Kansas Resource Guide (KRG) is a collaborative effort to connect consumers with resources and services for women, infants, children, youth and people with disabilities in Kansas. The Kansas Resource phone and e-mail are answered Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., so consumers can access personalized assistance.

What you can find in the Navigational Tool Kit The Navigational Tool Kit is designed to assist consumers in finding needed resources and services in a fast and user friendly way. Simply clink on the appropriate button below to locate a list of local, state and national resources and services. Each resource has a description and a link to get to their website &/or list contact information to assist the consumer in locating the resource they want.

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM - 07/20/2017

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

“With a little help you can return home.Money Follows the Person (MFP) Program” - 06/21/2017

~~“If you live in a nursing home, the Money Follows the Person (MFP) program may be able to help you move home. The state of Kansas received grant money from The Centers for Medicare and MedicaidServices (CMS). This money is used to help people move out of nursing homes. The MFP provides Transition Coordination Services. That means the program will pay someone to help you with each step. It covers things like:• Finding an apartment or assisted living facility.• Filling out apartment applications.• Getting all the legal documents you need tomove into the community.• Paying up to a certain amount for householditems. You may need furniture, kitchen utensils,pots and pans, and bedding.• Paying up to a certain amount to make changesto your home. You may need a wheelchair rampor wider door ways. The bathroom may needmore space for grab bars for the tub or toilet.• Paying security deposits.• Finding the personal care that you need.Care may include help with bathing, goingto the bathroom, meals and housekeeping.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Project Search - Kansas - 06/10/2017

~~“High School Transition Program:”Project SEARCH came to Kansas in 2010 with the first class of interns beginning in the fall of 2011. After the sixth year of implementation, over 350 Kansans have participated in Project SEARCH. 70 percent of those interns have secured competitive employment.90 interns have been selected for the 2017-2018 year.There are 13 host business sites in Kansas:• University of Kansas, Lawrence• Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Lawrence• Butler Community College, El Dorado• Susan B Allen Memorial Hospital, El Dorado• Newton Medical Center, Newton• Salina Regional Health Center, Salina• Via Christi Hospital, Wichita• Sedgwick County Government, Wichita• McConnell Air Force Base, Derby• Johnson County Government, Olathe• Embassy Suites, Olathe• Tabor College, Hillsboro• Cintas, Wichita” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

KanCare Section 1115 DemonstrationProject No. 11-W-00283/7 - 05/31/2017

~~“The current KanCare demonstration expires on December 31, 2017. Pursuant to Section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) is requesting a one-year extension of the current KanCare demonstration, including the Uncompensated Care (UC) Pool and the Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Pool. The requested extension period is January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018. KDHE is not requesting any changes to the demonstration for the one-year extension period.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Medicaid: A Primer 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~KanCare operates under concurrent waivers—a set of Section 1915(c) waivers for HCBS and a Section 1115 demonstration that created KanCare and allows—among other things—the mandatory enrollment of nearly all covered populations in managed care for most services. The current KanCare demonstration is approved through the end of calendar year 2017, and the state may request it be extended. Renewals require specific actions to ensure transparency, including public meetings.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Accommodations Manual 2016-17 Rev. January 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~“2. Accommodations listed on the following pages are acceptable for the general population, ELL students, and for students with IEPs or Section 504 Plans. All accommodations used for state assessments must be used by the student during instruction on a regular basis, as well as on classroom assessments.3. Students with an IEP or Section 504 Plan or ELL plan must have accommodations specified within the plan, for use both on the Kansas Assessment Programs (KAP) and on a regular basis for classroom instruction, assignments and tests.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services ”HCBS Providers – Financial Template” - 09/22/2016

“The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has contracted with Optumas, an actuary and consulting firm, to study the adequacy of Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) service payment rates. To assist with that study, Optumas has developed a financial template to be completed by all HCBS service providers.… The template requests information on your organization’s revenue, expenses, and service delivery count. The goal of requesting this information is to assess the profit/loss position for HCBS providers and use that information to make a statement on the adequacy of HCBS service reimbursement. Revenue and service information submitted in this template will be validated against Medicaid encounter data.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and Oversight Commission (HB 2336) - 04/29/2015

“HB 2336 creates the Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The bill requires state programs and services that support employment of persons with disabilities to consider, as their first option, competitive and integrated employment for persons with disabilities. The bill does not require an employer to give preference to hiring persons with a disability.   “The bill requires all state agencies to follow the policy for employment by coordinating and collaborating efforts among agencies. In addition, agencies may share data and information whenever possible across systems in order to track progress. State agencies may adopt rules and regulations to implement the Act.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Kansas ABLE Program (HB 2216) - 04/16/2015

"There is hereby established an enabling savings program and such program shall be known and may be cited as the Kansas ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] savings program. The purpose of the Kansas ABLE savings program is to authorize the establishment of savings accounts empowering individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability and to provide guidelines for the maintenance of such accounts."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission Senate substitute for HB 2150 - 07/01/2013

“Senate Sub. for HB 2150 revises the size and responsibilities for the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The Commission increases from five members to seven members. The Governor appoints the two additional members, with one having disability employment experience and the other having business employment experience. The bill repeals the requirement that the one member currently appointed by the Governor not be a state employee.   “The bill repeals the responsibilities of the Commission to establish measurable goals and objectives for the State of Kansas and track the progress of state agencies implementing the Employment First Initiative. The Commission must work with state agencies and nongovernmental organizations to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain employment. The Commission may educate state agencies and stakeholders about the Initiative.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas HB 2453: Bidding Preferences for Businesses Employing Individuals with Disabilities - 07/01/2012

This legislation, signed into law by Governor Brownback in 2012, places responsibility for operating the “Kansas Bidders Preference Program” within Kansas Department of Administration In this program, which provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities, a certified business gets certain benefits and advantages when bidding on state contracts. To be certified, a business must meet several requirements, including having at least 20% of their workforce comprised of qualified people with disabilities. This provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

44-1136. Kansas Employment First Initiative Act: Definitions & Policy Declaration

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of the state of Kansas that competitive and integrated employment shall be considered its first option when serving persons with disabilities who are of working age to obtain employment. This policy applies to programs and services that provide services and support to help obtain employment for persons with disabilities. All state agencies shall follow this policy and ensure that it is effectively implemented in their programs and services. Nothing in this section shall be construed to require any employer to give preference to hiring people with a disability.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

“Pre-Employment Services Being Offered to Youth with Disabilities “ - 10/02/2017

~~“As a result of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, DCF recently launched a new program, Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS), to further its efforts to help Kansans with disabilities gain meaningful employment. Pre-ETS was first launched in FY 2017, and its services are designed to help youth with disabilities get an early start at job exploration, assist students with disabilities in making the transition from secondary to post-secondary education/training and to empower them to realize their full potential.  

While many services are offered within Pre-ETS, Rehabilitation Services Director Michael Donnelly says that the program emphasizes the paid, work-based learning experiences”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Resource Guide - 08/12/2017

~~“The Kansas Resource Guide (KRG) is a collaborative effort to connect consumers with resources and services for women, infants, children, youth and people with disabilities in Kansas. The Kansas Resource phone and e-mail are answered Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., so consumers can access personalized assistance.

What you can find in the Navigational Tool Kit The Navigational Tool Kit is designed to assist consumers in finding needed resources and services in a fast and user friendly way. Simply clink on the appropriate button below to locate a list of local, state and national resources and services. Each resource has a description and a link to get to their website &/or list contact information to assist the consumer in locating the resource they want.

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM - 07/20/2017

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Accommodations Manual 2016-17 Rev. January 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~“2. Accommodations listed on the following pages are acceptable for the general population, ELL students, and for students with IEPs or Section 504 Plans. All accommodations used for state assessments must be used by the student during instruction on a regular basis, as well as on classroom assessments.3. Students with an IEP or Section 504 Plan or ELL plan must have accommodations specified within the plan, for use both on the Kansas Assessment Programs (KAP) and on a regular basis for classroom instruction, assignments and tests.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Serivces - 07/15/2016

Shared Living

Shared Living is a nationally recognized model for habilitation or residential services for individuals with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability (IDD). Other terms that can encompass the Shared Living approach include adult foster care, mentor, residence or family home, host home or family care, extended-family teaching or family teaching services. In Shared Living, one or two (but not to exceed three) persons with IDD join a family (contractor) or single adult’s (contractor) family in the Shared Living/host family’s home. The Shared Living Contractor lives with the person with a disability and provides whatever supports the person(s) needs in their day-to-day activities (social, companionship, teaching, daily living skills, supported employment, night supports, etc.…).

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities “2017-2021 Proposed Goals and Objectives Draft” - 04/20/2016

GOAL 2 –EMPLOYMENT: By 2021, Kansans with I/DD will have increased opportunities to engage in competitive integrated employment

OBJECTIVE  2.1: KCDD  will  provide Kansans with  I/DD, their  families, employers, providers, and employment support staff with meaningful information about competitive integrated employment

OBJECTIVE 2.2: By 2021, Kansans with I/DD will have increased resources for formal and informal long-term supports for competitive integrated employment.

OBJECTIVE 2.3: KCDD will partner with KDADS to provide South Western Kansans with  I/DD and  their  families, whose native  language  is Spanish, with  meaningful information about services including competitive integrated employment.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission Annual Report - 01/14/2013

“The Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission was created by the state law requiring competitive and integrated employment to be the first option when serving people with disabilities (KSA 44-1136 to 44-1138, also called the Employment First Initiative Act). The Oversight Commission is charged with carrying out certain duties,including reporting in detail on the measurable progress of state agencies toward the Goals and Objectives it has established for them, as well as reporting the overall progress of the Act’s full implementation. Additionally, the Oversight Commission must identify barriers and strategies that can help realize the Goals and Objectives of the Employment First Initiative…”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Kansas Department for Children and Families Rehabilitation Services (Discovery/Supported Employment) - 11/19/2012

“Rehabilitation Services (RS) is a state agency that provides vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to help people with disabilities achieve permanent, integrated, competitive employment. Services are customized for each consumer, consistent with their strengths, vocational objectives, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice. This Discovery/Supported Employment (D/SE) service description is designed specifically for individuals with the most significant intellectual disabilities who are participating in the Great Expectations Initiative (GEI) demonstration project.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities “Interhab Employment Systems Change 5/2016”

KCDD Employment Systems Change  request for proposal is based on the Employment First Commission report 2014 The proposed system changes include more focus on Customized Employment and eliminating sub-minimum wage positions.

Current research shows customized employment 30-70 hours for discovery/job development 100-250 hours employer/systematic instruction 50-100 hours follow-up per year (usually paid from long-term funding)

WIOA Limitation on the use of Sub-Minimum Wages

As of 2016 a series of steps must occur prior to anyone under the age of 24 be placed in a job paying less than minimum wage Schools are prohibited from contracting with Sub-Minimum Wage providers for “Transition Services” Legislative definition of “Competitive Integrated Employment” Full or part time, minimum wage or higher, same benefits, fully integrated with co-workers
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas State Department of Education “KSDE Policy Statement on Employment First”

As a relevant state agency in the implementation of Employment First policy, the Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE) is responsible for the monitoring of district practices in planning for and providing appropriate transition services to students with significant disabilities, and assuring that KSDE developed resources and materials encourage Employment First policy.

Research demonstrates that when provided with preparatory, hands-on job experience in the form of part-time work, internships, or summer employment, students with significant disabilities can successfully obtain and sustain work in integrated settings and earn competitive wages. The goal of publically-funded transition services and supports for youth with significant disabilities should be focused on helping these youth to acquire the skills, knowledge and experience necessary to obtain jobs in integrated settings at a competitive wage that promotes community participation and self-sufficiency.

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Project Search - Kansas - 06/10/2017

~~“High School Transition Program:”Project SEARCH came to Kansas in 2010 with the first class of interns beginning in the fall of 2011. After the sixth year of implementation, over 350 Kansans have participated in Project SEARCH. 70 percent of those interns have secured competitive employment.90 interns have been selected for the 2017-2018 year.There are 13 host business sites in Kansas:• University of Kansas, Lawrence• Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Lawrence• Butler Community College, El Dorado• Susan B Allen Memorial Hospital, El Dorado• Newton Medical Center, Newton• Salina Regional Health Center, Salina• Via Christi Hospital, Wichita• Sedgwick County Government, Wichita• McConnell Air Force Base, Derby• Johnson County Government, Olathe• Embassy Suites, Olathe• Tabor College, Hillsboro• Cintas, Wichita” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities

The purpose of the Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities (KCDD) is to support people of all ages with developmental disabilities so they have the opportunity to make choices regarding both their participation in society, and their quality of life.   In their current plan the KCDD has identified “4 areas of priority” of which one is employment  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission

“In order to ensure the Oversight Commission can effectively carry out its duties, the law places certain requirements on state agencies to help ensure that the law will be effectively and fully implemented. The law also places requirements on state agencies to provide the Commission information documenting measurable progress on the Goals and objectives established by the Commission and proving effective implementation of the law….Although the Employment First law requires all state agencies to implement its requirements, the Oversight Commission has identified a handful of state agencies that have programs and activities directly impacted by Employment First. These are referred to as “relevant state agencies” throughout this document. The relevant state agencies are:

•Kansas Department for Children and Families (KDCF –formerly Kansas Dept. of Social and Rehabilitation Services)

•Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS – formerly Kansas Dept. on Aging)

•Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE)

•Kansas Department of Commerce (Commerce)

•Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE)

•Kansas Department on Administration (KDOA) ”

.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Kansas DEI (Round 5) - 10/01/2014

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2014, Kansas was awarded a Round 5 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The grant will end in 2017.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kansas MIG-RATS - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Kansas Department of Health and Environment CESP - 03/13/2013

“Certification of Employment Services Professionals - KDHE funded the provision of the Certified Employment Services Professional (CESP) in two locations during 2012. The CESP is a newly developed credential governed by the APSE Employment Services Professional Certification Council (ESPCC). Individuals who earn the CESP credential have demonstrated knowledge of the facilitation, and advocacy skills necessary to help establish and expand equitable employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. 64 people took the exam; 54 passed it. According to APSE, the number of candidates who sat for the exam in Kansas was double the number of candidates who sat for the initial administration of the exam by APSE during December 2011, and was the largest candidate sponsorship by any state since the inception of the exam in 2011 (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year State Plan - 08/16/2011

Goal #3: Advocacy: Community Resources/Alternatives

 

Provide information and training, written materials and web sites to educate people with DD and their support networks on resources available to assist them to live and succeed in the community. There are over 3000 adults and children (under age 21) on the DD waiting list. Often these individuals do not know about resources outside DD Waiver that can help them succeed. The goal is to provide information on these alternative resources.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Southeast Kansas Works Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Local Plan

Training must be industry or company specific and provide technical and skill upgrades. Training may be conducted at the applicant’s facility, at a public or private training provider site or at a combination of sites best meeting the needs of the organization. LA V allows the following types of training for employer projects meeting the above criteria:

 

Customized  occupational  training  designed  to  meet  the  special  requirements  of  an employer  (including  a  group  of  employers)  conducted  with  a  commitment  by  the employer to continue to employ an individual upon successful completion of the training.

 

Customized   on-the   job-training   relating   to   the   introduction   of   new   technologies,  introduction to new production or service procedures, or upgrading to new jobs requiring additional skills. LA V offers a variety of resources and information on services available to persons with disabilities including: information on training opportunities and links to online training; technology guides for using screen enlargement software, and screen reading software.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

“With a little help you can return home.Money Follows the Person (MFP) Program” - 06/21/2017

~~“If you live in a nursing home, the Money Follows the Person (MFP) program may be able to help you move home. The state of Kansas received grant money from The Centers for Medicare and MedicaidServices (CMS). This money is used to help people move out of nursing homes. The MFP provides Transition Coordination Services. That means the program will pay someone to help you with each step. It covers things like:• Finding an apartment or assisted living facility.• Filling out apartment applications.• Getting all the legal documents you need tomove into the community.• Paying up to a certain amount for householditems. You may need furniture, kitchen utensils,pots and pans, and bedding.• Paying up to a certain amount to make changesto your home. You may need a wheelchair rampor wider door ways. The bathroom may needmore space for grab bars for the tub or toilet.• Paying security deposits.• Finding the personal care that you need.Care may include help with bathing, goingto the bathroom, meals and housekeeping.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KanCare Section 1115 DemonstrationProject No. 11-W-00283/7 - 05/31/2017

~~“The current KanCare demonstration expires on December 31, 2017. Pursuant to Section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) is requesting a one-year extension of the current KanCare demonstration, including the Uncompensated Care (UC) Pool and the Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Pool. The requested extension period is January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018. KDHE is not requesting any changes to the demonstration for the one-year extension period.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Medicaid: A Primer 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~KanCare operates under concurrent waivers—a set of Section 1915(c) waivers for HCBS and a Section 1115 demonstration that created KanCare and allows—among other things—the mandatory enrollment of nearly all covered populations in managed care for most services. The current KanCare demonstration is approved through the end of calendar year 2017, and the state may request it be extended. Renewals require specific actions to ensure transparency, including public meetings.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services ”HCBS Providers – Financial Template” - 09/22/2016

“The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has contracted with Optumas, an actuary and consulting firm, to study the adequacy of Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) service payment rates. To assist with that study, Optumas has developed a financial template to be completed by all HCBS service providers.… The template requests information on your organization’s revenue, expenses, and service delivery count. The goal of requesting this information is to assess the profit/loss position for HCBS providers and use that information to make a statement on the adequacy of HCBS service reimbursement. Revenue and service information submitted in this template will be validated against Medicaid encounter data.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services “Crisis and Exception Policy” - 09/15/2016

~~“Transitions to the I/DD WaiverThe  following  HCBS  programs  shall  transition  to  HCBS  IDD wavier program  if  they  meet HCBS IDD functional eligibility:1. Person is determined no longer eligible for the TA, Autism, or TBI waiver program.2. The respective program manager sends NOA to person of their ineligibility.  The  IDD  waiver  program  manager, the MCO, and  DCF  for  persons  in  the  custody  of  DCF are emailed a copy of the NOA.3. The IDD waiver program manager coordinates with CDDO to determine if person is eligible to transition to IDD waiver program. 4. If a person is eligible for the IDD waiver program, a functional assessment is scheduled if current assessment is more than 365 days old.5. Upon  completion  of  functional  assessment  the  CDDO  will  notify  the  IDD  programmanager and the MCO of the functional eligibility determination. 6. Upon  functional  eligibility  determination,  the  IDD  waiver program  manager  sends the NOA  of  approval  for  IDD  waiver  program to  the  person. For  children  in  the custody  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Kansas  Department  for  Children  and  Families,  the NOA shall also be forwarded to DCF.7. 3160 sent to CDDO KDHE Clearinghouse and MCO.I/DD services must begin within forty-five (45) days of issuances of the 3160. 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Employment First Initiative Act Annual Report - 01/14/2013

“KDADS provided information about provisions in its contract with Community Developmental Disability Organizations (CDDOs) where persons on the waiting list for HCBS Developmental Disability (DD) Waiver services who are ‘referred to RS (Rehabilitation Services) for employment services and successfully closed from Vocational Rehabilitation Services as competitively employed, will have access to HCBS Developmental Disability (DD) Supported Employment waiver funding needed to successfully maintain their employment.’ This modification to the CDDO contract allows individuals on the DD waiver waiting list who are employed in competitive, integrated employment to receive long term supports to maintain employment, which is funded by the waiver. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Social Security Alternative Pilot - 01/14/2013

“Social Security Alternative Pilot under KanCare - This Pilot is designed for up to 200 Kansans with disabilities who have not yet been determined to be eligible for Social Security disability. The goal of this pilot is to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain employment with employer-based health insurance as well as avoid unnecessary dislocation from the workforce and impoverishment in order to obtain health insurance. The pilot will include a Presumptive Medical Disability (PMD) process to determine whether individuals meet the criteria for a Social Security disability determination, Medicaid-like coverage as needed, a monthly allocation to pay for personal assistance and employment support services if needed, and accelerated PMD review to restore the path to Social Security disability status in the event of a worsening medical condition or loss of employment. The pilot also allows for temporary unemployment benefits (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas SSI Employment Support Pilot - 01/14/2013

“SSI Employment Support Pilot under KanCare – This Pilot will support up to 400 individuals currently on the Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Developmental Disability (DD) or Physical Disability (PD) waiting lists who are employed 40 hours per month or more at federal minimum wage in competitive and integrated settings. In addition to Medicaid coverage, pilot participants will receive up to $1,500 per month to pay for personal assistance and employment support services to enable them to live and work in the community. Working Healthy Benefits Specialists will be available to discuss this option and alternatives to this option that may be available to the individual. Participants will be restored to their former position on the waiting list if employment is lost. The pilot also allows for temporary unemployment (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas I/DD Waiver (0224.R05.00) - 07/01/2009

Provides day supports, overnight respite care, personal assistant, residential supports, supported employment, FMS, assistive services, medical alert rental, sleep cycle support, specialized medical care, supportive home care, wellness monitoring for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 5 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas State HCBS Transition Plan (Draft)

The new HCBS Settings Rule from CMS applies to all programs that provide home and community based services. In Kansas, this rule will apply to all settings where home and community based services are provided for these programs: Frail Elderly (65+) Autism (child who starts services prior to age 6) Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (5+) Physical Disability (16-64) Serious Emotional Disturbance (0-18) Technology Assisted (0 through 21) Traumatic Brain Injury (16-64)
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

There's no place like the workplace for great career opportunities for employees with disabilities in the Sunflower State of Kansas. See what Kansas is doing to make sure that workers with disabilities are bringing home the dough in America's Bread Basket.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kansas' VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.26%
Change from
2014 to 2015
2,911,641
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.08%
Change from
2014 to 2015
184,791
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.25%
Change from
2014 to 2015
79,132
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.03%
Change from
2014 to 2015
42.82%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.16%
Change from
2014 to 2015
79.88%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 2,911,641
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 184,791
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 79,132
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,229,527
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 42.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.88%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 184,846
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 180,957
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 317,198
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 24,705
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 24,638
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,650
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,082
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 11,428
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 4,705

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,987
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 74,677

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 9,806
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 29,223
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 32,407
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 30.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 13.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 31.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,315
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,968
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,008
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 67
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 40
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 60.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.37

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,847
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 106,902
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 14.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,457
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,086
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,838
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 29.10

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 69.32%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 6.72%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.27%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 63.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 77.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 27.50%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 454,126
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 810
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 174,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 33,751
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 208,693
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 165
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 184
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,536,706
AbilityOne wages (services). $320,864

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 36
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 37
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,772
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 114
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,886

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care.
• Through the Governor’s Sub-Cabinet on Disability, leadership among the Kansas Departments for Children and Families (DCF), Health and Environment, Commerce, Corrections and Aging and Disability Services focuses attention on implementing employment first strategies in state agencies and tracking baseline and performance data to effectively measure outcomes. Sub-Cabinet meetings are also an opportunity for open communications among these departments and advocacy and provider organizations working in the disability system.
• The DCF Secretary is participating on a Governor-directed strategic planning effort with a focus on workforce development. DCF is the designated state agency. (Page 209)
Ongoing communication and collaboration
KRS is in frequent contact with other agencies related to competitive, integrated employment of Kansans with disabilities. Some examples include participation on the:
• Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its vocational sub-committee.
• The KDADS strategic planning team to integrate mental health and substance use disorder services into a recovery oriented system of care.
• The Developmental Disabilities Council.
• The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.
• The Employment First Commission.
• Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (Pages 226)
 

Customized Employment

~~Training and education to learn new vocational skills.
• Rehabilitation technology, telecommunication aids and other adaptive devices.
• Job preparation and placement services.
• Job coaching.
• On-the-job training.
• Services to help students with disabilities get a job after finishing high school.
• Supported and customized employment for individuals who need intensive on-the-job training and ongoing support.
• Referral to other services.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 65)
Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) enters into provider agreements with a variety of community agencies for the provision of supported employment services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Through customized employment provider agreements, six key components or milestones are specified for supported employment services:
1. Creation of a job development action plan.
2. Placement.
3. Stabilization.
4. 45 days of continuous, successful employment.
5. Finalization of an extended ongoing service plan.
Direct hourly Job Coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Customized Employment milestones services descried above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements. (Page 220)
A bachelor’s degree in a field of study reasonably related to vocational rehabilitation, indicating a level of competency and skill demonstrating basic preparation in a field of study such as vocational rehabilitation counseling, social work, psychology, disability studies, business administration, human resources, special education, supported employment, customized employment, economics, or another field that reasonably prepares individuals to work with consumers and employers; and Demonstrated paid or unpaid experience, for not less than one year, consisting of—(Page 232)
The needs assessment revealed the need for job placement and other provider services with specialized expertise in competitive, integrated employment of people with disabilities. As a result, KRS will emphasize the development and maintenance of evidence-based and promising practices through the End-Dependence Kansas initiative. Direct service contracts will be used to promote the development and expansion of Individual Placement and Supports, Individualized Discovery/Customized Employment, and Progressive Employment. (Page 260)
Methods to expand and improve services
When considering opportunities to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, KRS emphasizes strategies that will address the needs of people with the most significant disabilities and people who have been unserved or under-served. Collaborative efforts with consumers, advisory councils, parent groups, advocacy organizations, community rehabilitation programs and other state agencies are undertaken to expand access to VR services and to promote supported employment, customized employment, Pre-Employment Transition Services and assistive technology services. Innovation and expansion activities are consistent with the findings of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment. Specifically, the following functions assist KRS is achieving its goals and priorities related to innovation and expansion: (Page 280)
Direct hourly job coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Supported Employment and Customized Employment milestones services described above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements.
After the time-limited VR services end, the supported employment service provider maintains extended ongoing services with the consumer or has identified a plan specifying how the community-service system will provide the extended ongoing supports the consumer needs to maintain employment. These extended services are not funded with VR dollars. To reinforce and maintain stability of the job placement, ongoing services include regular contact. (Page 295)
 

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~Not significantly increased the number of individuals with barriers to employment who receive training and other more intensive services
• Limited success with blending and braiding resources across multiple systems to meet the needs of job seekers and workers
• Varied success at meeting the workforce needs of all industry sectors, as well as in some geographic areas of the state (Page 22)
The primary role of LVER staff, at the Kansas AJCs, is to conduct outreach to employers in the area, to assist veterans in gaining employment. Additionally, LVERs promote, plan and participate in job fairs and seminars for employers. Furthermore, LVERs promote veterans as job ready candidates, who have highly marketable skills and experience. Kansas LVERs advocate for veterans by promoting employment and training opportunities, coordinating with other business outreach representatives in the AJC to facilitate and promote employment, workshops, job searches, establishing job groups in conjunction with employers, and leverage other employment opportunities for veterans. Kansas LVERs establish, maintain, and facilitate regular contact with federal contractors, unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations. Additionally our LVERs provides educational training to AJC staff, additional employer based training and other outreach services, in accordance with VPL 07-10 and VPL 03-14. The Department of Commerce ensures that there are no blending of roles, whereas LVERs provide monthly activity reports to the State Manager and are often consulted with by AJC supervisors about their activity. Furthermore, LVERs are encouraged to utilize referrals and other resources, such as the Department of Commerce/ KANVET Hire a Veteran Pledge program as a resource to locate veteran friendly businesses/ employers, who are seeking veterans first, to employ. (Page 314)
 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.
Each workforce partner and local area must comply with both program and physical accessibility requirements consistent with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, WIOA Section 188 and related federal guidance, and the Kansas Act against Discrimination. Policies will be established to assure compliance and equal access and usability for all Kansans, regardless of disability. The following key points, at a minimum, must be included in all program and local area accessibility policies. (Page 120)
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~• A workshop with a large hospital and health services company regarding its on-line application and screening processes. Participants were able to learn about how to more effectively use the on-line application process with VR consumers and the response time expectations of companies after vacant positions are posted. Similar workshops are pending with the Veterans’ Administration and an aircraft manufacturer.
• A major energy company is interested in creating a training program for transition youth.
• An ironworker trade union is interested in offering its apprenticeship program to youth with disabilities.
• A pilot project is pending with a major national on-line shopping company to use a preferred vendor as a single point of contact to hire workers with disabilities. A major hospital and a plastics manufacturing firm are also exploring similar inclusion programs.
• A national candy manufacturing company has a campaign to interest Kansas high school students in pursuing manufacturing work. They are interested in including transition-aged youth with disabilities in this initiative.
• Extensive outreach and communication are underway with federal contractors with 503 compliance requirements. (Page 224)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The KWSB is more than an advisory board to the Governor and staff on workforce policy issues. The Board ensures Kansas’ entire workforce system, covering many programs in multiple departments and agencies, meets employers’ needs for skilled workers and meets workers’ needs for career and economic advancement. The KWSB convenes State, regional and local workforce system partners to enhance the capacity and performance of the workforce system; align and improve the outcomes and effectiveness of public workforce investments and thereby promote economic growth. The board engages workforce system representatives including businesses, education, economic development, labor and other stakeholders to achieve the strategic and operational vision and goals of the State Plan as well as the purpose of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA). (Page 96)
Other evaluation and research functions implemented through core programs include:
• Implementing evidence-based employment practices for people with disabilities and ongoing fidelity research into the effectiveness of these practices.
• Using federal and state technical assistance resources, to the extent they are available, for evaluation and research functions.
• Using a research-to-practice approach by leveraging knowledge transfer from national resources including technical assistance centers funded by the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) with funding from the US Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, the National Skills Coalition, and other similar organizations that disseminate research-based information on improving service delivery.
• Dissemination of information concerning research-based best practices for service delivery, alignment, and policy development.  (Page 101)
 

Benefits

~~• Services are individualized to address each person’s unique strengths, impediments to employment and vocational goals. An individual plan for employment is jointly developed between each customer and the VR counselor to address specific barriers to employment, the vocational objective, and the services necessary to achieve that objective.
• VR counselors are highly trained to address the complex disability, employment and cultural issues that impact persons served, and to facilitate informed decision–making in partnership with their customers.
• 95% of persons rehabilitated into employment in FFY 2014 were persons with significant disabilities, meaning that they had multiple functional limitations in major life areas such as mobility, communications, self–care, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, work skills and self–direction.
• VR emphasizes the employment potential of youth with disabilities and the importance of them gaining an early attachment to work or postsecondary education resulting in employment. 21% of persons served in FFY 2014 were transition–aged youth with disabilities (21 years old or younger at the time of application). 23% of persons rehabilitated that year were youth.  (Page 65)
• Over the past ten years, approximately 75% of persons rehabilitated report their own earnings as their largest source of financial support, a significant milestone toward self–sufficiency and reduced reliance on public benefits.
• VR services are comprehensive and flexible in order to empower each customer to maximize employment.
• The End–Dependence Kansas initiative emphasizes the use of evidence–based practices throughout the VR service delivery system, including community–based service providers, to increase employment outcomes.
• Local areas should incorporate mitigating strategies, such as Earned Income Tax Credit program awareness, into their service strategies.
• State–level core partners should ensure that local partners are familiar with resources such as Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) benefits counselors, Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA), and other resources, and should develop strategies to share this information and/or train local area staff on an ongoing basis.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 65)
The VR program supports customers to pursue postsecondary education at all levels if necessary to achieve their vocational goals. VR assists customers to access comparable benefits, such as PELL Grants, to help pay for higher education before expending VR funds. Agreements between VR and all Kansas institutions of higher education specify cost sharing responsibilities related to the provision of auxiliary aids and services.
8. Schedule. Applicants must comply with the following timetable:
1. Provide required application forms and narratives to the Kansas Department of Commerce no later than 4:00 PM __________.
2. Pre-Bid Telephone Conference Call is scheduled for____. Call 1-866-XXX-XXXX.
3. Complete application packages must be emailed to:________.
4. Commerce will announce Grant Awards by __date_____(Page 135)
• Work Registration - RESEA participants must have a Plus account which includes a complete, up- to-date and active resume in KANSASWORKS (the state’s employment website). Staff will provide resume assistance if appropriate.
• Orientation to One-Stop services - An introduction to the workforce center that includes an overview of the programs and services available, and instruction on using self-help tools
• UI Eligibility Review - Potential eligibility issues are documented and referred to UI.
• Initial Assessment - Evaluation of the customer’s employment history, education, interests and skills resulting in the identification of employment goals, barriers to employment and the services needed to obtain his/her goals.
• Labor Market Information - Based on desired residential location and claimant’s employment history/interests
• Individual Employment Plan - In consultation with the claimant, a written Individual Employment Plan (IEP) matched to the claimant’s needs based on information gathered during the Initial Assessment is developed.
• Follow-up: Claimants must follow up with RESEA staff every 30 days until he/she has returned to work or is no longer receiving benefits. At each follow-up the claimant provides their work search contacts for the previous four weeks. (Page 160)
Council Comment: Development of informational materials is needed for use with outreach with schools, referral sources, parents and consumers. KRS should also focus on outreach to organizations such as the Kansas Physical Therapy Association and the Kansas Occupational Therapy Association and speech/language professional organizations. Professionals in these disciplines often have contact with individuals with disabilities and could pass along information about VR.
KRS Response: KRS will work with DCF Communications regarding this request. (Page 204)
• KRS and DCF Economic and Employment Services collaborate to serve recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who have disabilities. Consumers benefit by being able to receive the coordinated and specialized services they need to achieve employment before their time-limited TANF benefits cease.
• KRS and DCF Prevention and Protection Services independent living staff will coordinate to address the employment and/or post-secondary education needs of youth with disabilities who age out of foster care.
• Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care.
• KRS maintains an active presence on numerous councils and committees, including:
 The Statewide Independent Living Council of Kansas.
 The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.
 The Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its Vocational Sub-Committee.
 The Governor’s Commission on Autism.
 Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities
 KANSASWORKS State Board
 5 Local workforce development boards
• A memorandum of understanding with the Prairie Band Potawatomie Nation Native American VR program addresses the coordination of services to help consumers achieve employment. (Page 209)
As outlined in the agreement, KRS will provide VR services for students in accordance with KRS policy under the following conditions:
• The student has been determined eligible for VR and can be served within the Order of Selection.
• The student (and his/her parents or representative if appropriate) and the VR counselor have agreed to an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE).
• The goods or services provided will be necessary for post-high school training or employment, or will substantially contribute to achievement of the competitive, integrated employment objective on the IPE.
• Employment or post-secondary services provided by VR must occur outside the established school sessions. The term “school sessions” refers not only to the school semester or term, but also to the school day.
• Consideration of comparable benefits and application of the economic need policy are required. (Page 215)
KRS will continue to develop, implement and maintain a professional development system for new and experienced staff. A priority focus area will be to address effective communication strategies to assure consumer engagement and progress toward employment, and development and implementation of effective Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs). Other areas of focus continue to be informed choice; understanding the purpose and intent of the VR program; linkages between eligibility, rehabilitation needs, consumer goals and priorities, and services provided; development of effective progress measures; time and caseload management techniques; financial accountability cultural competence; accountable decision-making; expertise related to disability populations served (specifically persons who are blind or visually impaired, persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, persons with mental illness, and persons with head injury); leadership development; use of comparable benefits; basic benefits counseling issues surrounding employment; use of Kansas specific labor market trends and demands; and, effective career counseling and guidance related to employment as the avenue to self-reliance.(Page 236)
Annually about 10% of the total persons served (Status 02-24 +32) receive supported employment services. Individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, significant intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injury are among the primary populations receiving supported employment services. Their services are characterized by:
• The need for community-based work assessments or job tryouts in competitive, integrated employment so that individuals who have not previously worked can explore jobs that are a good match for their skills and interests.
• The importance of an individualized approach in connecting these individuals with: available social service and disability-related services; transportation; benefits counseling; and natural support networks in their home communities.
• The need for employability or soft skill training on issues such as self-advocacy, communications, taking direction from employers, getting along with co-workers and customer service.
• The need for specific job skill training matched with current and projected labor market needs. (Page 251)
1.9  The number of KRS SSI recipients and SSDI beneficiaries for whom KRS receives reimbursement funding. To meet this standard, the individuals must achieve the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months.
1.10  The number of VR consumers receiving qualified benefits counseling.
Goal 2: KRS will emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities and improve the outreach and outcomes for transition-aged students.
Strategies for Goal 2:
KRS will implement the following strategies:
A. Build and maintain VR capacity to deliver Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS).
B. Build partnerships with school transition personnel to encourage those career-focused and work-based experiences are incorporated into transition Individual Education Plans and to increase referrals of PETS-eligible students to the VR program. (Page 269)
KRS will also:
• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so that consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 278)
Identified in the FFY 2015 Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Plan. These highlights are based on FFY 2015 indicators.
• A total of 1,345 Kansans with disabilities achieved stable employment as a result of VR services, earning an average of $9.88 an hour. VR consumers achieved employment in high-wage, high-demand jobs, for example: more than $40 an hour as an Information Technology Systems Administrator and numerous placements of more than $30 an hour in the nursing field.
• The percent of individuals who reported their own earnings as the largest source of support at the time of vocational rehabilitation (VR) case closure was 72.4%, 57% higher than at application. This represents a significant milestone toward increased self-reliance.
• The number of successful employment outcomes after participating in post-secondary education was 242. This indicator represents a significant quality measure as increased education and technical training often lead to higher-wage, career track positions and therefore increased self-reliance.
• KRS receives reimbursement funds from the Social Security Administration for consumers who are recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or beneficiaries of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) when those individuals work at the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months. In FFY 2015, reimbursement funds received by the agency totaled $1,123,976.
• Providing employment-focused services for transition youth is a priority for KRS. KRS has traditionally defined transition youth as persons who are age 21 or younger at the time of application). Under WIOA, the definition of youth is inclusive of persons aged 14 through 24. When youth achieve an early attachment to employment and all of its advantages, the likelihood of their reliance on public benefits through their lifetime is reduced. (Page 286)
FFY 2015: Service providers: 5.72; educators: 4.72; general advocates category not surveyed.
Indicator 2.7: Average expended per rehabilitation for the life of the case. FFY 2015: $6,464
Indicator 2.8: Annual number of persons served (status 02-24 +32). FFY 2015: 11,419
Indicator 2.9: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.10: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services provided through one-stop workforce centers. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.11: Rehabilitation rate of persons referred to placement or supported employment providers.
FFY 2015: 54%
Indicator 2.12: The average wage achieved by persons referred to placement or supported employment providers. (Page 289)
For the purpose of promoting the hiring and retention of veterans, Workforce Center staff will provide and facilitate a full range of employment and training services. LVER staff will advocate for veterans to employers and seek other opportunities with business and industry, community based organizations, and contractors of all kinds, to include federal contractors. All Workforce Center staff, as well as LVER staff, will work together to plan and participate in job fairs to promote the hiring of veterans and eligible persons. LVER staff will communicate job fair participation opportunities and the benefits of attending job fairs, to employers and federal contractors. LVERs will also make contact with unions, apprenticeship programs and the business community to promote employment and training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons, and furthermore promote credentialing and training opportunities with training providers and credentialing bodies. (Page 320)
Improving SCSEP Services Kansas is posting a Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) to assure the upcoming grant period will focus on strategies to improve and better achieve the goals of SCSEP. The strategies will include the following action steps:
• Increase recruitment and enrollment to increase the number of active participants. This focus will include reaching out to community organizations and other senior service providers to provide information on the SCSEP program and its’ benefits.
• Focus participant training towards employment skills acquisition as guided by IEP, TAD and assessment results based on labor market needs, Training will include short–term training classes, education and WORKReady! Certification. SCSEP will also insure that participants are receiving the job notification list that is generated by the One–Stop so that participants are better informed about area job openings.
• Increase follow–up contact with participants exited for unsubsidized employment to address employment and life issues to help maintain employment.
• Insure all most–in–need measures are accurately and timely entered into SPARQ.
• Create host agency skill development training and tracking to be reviewed with participant and agency quarterly based on each individuals IEP.
• Reinforce the goal of SCSEP program with participants, e.g. unsubsidized employment, at each contact. (Page 339)
 

School to Work Transition

~~A priority target population for End-Dependence Kansas is youth transitioning from school to work. End-Dependence Kansas, coupled with outreach for Pre-Employment Transition Services and Section 511 services to divert youth from direct entry into sub-minimum wage work, will expand supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Significant training and technical assistance will be focused on improved communication with students and youth with disabilities encouraging competitive integrated employment. Also, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Education, KRS will offer opportunities for training and technical assistance for school personnel to learn and understand the needs of students and youth pursuing employment rather than services only, to establish and implement the soft skills and employment preparedness skills needed by employers and how and when to complete a referral to the VR program. In addition to these strategies, KRS will work collaboratively to assure Title I youth services are readily available to students and youth with disabilities to enjoy work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, career exploration and coaching, etc. (Page 278)

Data Collection

~~(1) (A) The Commerce workforce system uses the America’s Job Link Alliance Management Information System to meet all of the requirements of US Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration for data collection and reporting. The AJLA system in Kansas, www.kansasworks.com also provides the public with access to labor market information, connects to postsecondary training programs and performance outcomes by training program. The AJLA system provides case management tools and creates participant records and can be used for payment for services and cost allocation of services. Employers may enter job postings in KANSASWORKS.com in addition to finding qualified applicants for jobs. Today, there are 35,524 job postings and 9021 resumes in KANSASWORKS.com. (Page 88)
Data-collection and reporting processes are consistent throughout each local area; data is validated as required by US DOL. Commerce has policies related to data collection and reporting processes required for each local workforce system, including Data and Information Collection and Maintenance, Record Maintenance and Retention, Eligibility Determination and Documentation, Fiscal Manual, and the State Performance Accountability System. All current and draft policies can be found at http://kwpolicies.kansascommerce.com/Pages/Default.aspx
VR will collect and report data necessary for the common accountability measures identified in WIOA, the quarterly state-specific data measures identified in the Performance Indicators operational elements, the data necessary for the extensive metrics included in the goals and priorities section of the VR Services Portion of the Combined State Plan, and the data necessary for evaluation and continuous improvement. (Page 89)
5. System and program accessibility: Data will be disaggregated by those with significant barriers to employment, including those with disabilities to allow local and state policy makers to evaluate the services provided to those individuals.
Measurement of success with these stated operational elements or activities will be attributed to the successful development of inter-agency data sharing agreements and related linkages of systems as a result of data sharing. All partners will monitor of data collection and validate data.
With a Round 3 Workforce Data Quality Initiative grant (WDQI), Regents, Commerce, and Labor have collaborated to create an interoperable data system. The Kansas WDQI Round 5 grant includes Vocational Rehabilitation to build on the work already in progress and create a system which will support the reduction of duplicative data collection. (Page 90)
KRS will also:
• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so that consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 278)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~• Direct work with individuals with disabilities in a setting such as an independent living center;
• Direct service or advocacy activities that provide such individual with experience and skills in working with individuals with disabilities; or
• Direct experience in competitive integrated employment environments as an employer, as a small business owner or operator, or in self-employment, or other experience in human resources or recruitment, or experience in supervising employees, training, or other activities (Page 233)
 

Career Pathways

~~The State will implement sector strategies, as described, regarding identified economic regions found in Title IB, Section VI and career pathways already utilized in multiple workforce programs, including formula and competitive grant programs. Career pathways will prepare individuals to be successful in a full range of secondary or postsecondary options including registered apprenticeships. Career pathways will enable individuals to attain a high school equivalency certificate, where necessary, as well as at least one recognized postsecondary credential. Where practicable, career pathways will integrate education, training, and other services including counseling and workforce preparation activities in order to accelerate the educational and career advancement of individuals. Since 2011, Regents, employers and individual postsecondary institutions have worked together to develop career pathways in twenty–five aligned programs. Local Workforce Boards may also develop additional career pathways as required by local employers. Adult Education will collaborate with workforce partners in offering basic skills to registered apprenticeship participants and with colleges in offering concurrent enrollment and team–teaching in Adult Education and CTE programs. (Page 44)
Specific Strategy (Operational Element/Method/Activity) Recommended for Implementation: Collaborative youth services based on individual service strategies focused on skill development and career pathways. Work–based learning addresses a broad range of skills needs—both “soft” skills and technical skills. While this strategy makes work–based learning a priority, we recognize that it is not a panacea for all youth, and even when it is included in a youth’s individual service strategy, it will be supplemented with other forms of learning. Key elements of this strategy include:
• Paid work–based experiences. (Real Job)
• Summer employment partnerships
• Pre–apprenticeship opportunities
• Internships and job shadowing
• On the job training opportunities (Page 50)
Components of this strategy:
• To be effective, work experience must come in different forms. This includes, but is not limited to on–the–job training, summer employment programs, pre-apprenticeship opportunities, and internships/job shadowing.
• The importance of existing and continued development of career pathways that incorporate an element of work experience.
• The importance of locally identified career pathways.
• Continued education and training that includes, but is not limited to, achievement of the high school diploma or its equivalent, technical training, industry-recognized certificates, etc. that is included under all of the sections of WIOA.
• The specific requirements of Title I and Title IV. (Page 54)
Specific Strategy (Operational Element/Method/Activity) Recommended for Implementation: Collaborative youth services based on individual service strategies focused on skill development and career pathways. Work-based learning addresses a broad range of skills needs—both “soft” skills and technical skills. While this strategy makes work-based learning a priority, we recognize that it is not a panacea for all youth, and even when it is included in a youth’s individual service strategy, it will be supplemented with other forms of learning. Key elements of this strategy include:
• Paid work-based experiences (Real Job)
• Summer employment partnerships
• Pre-apprenticeship opportunities
• Internships and job shadowing
• On the job training opportunities (Page 147)
Local plans must address coordination with education and training options available in the local area, particularly education and training offered through community and technical colleges throughout the state. Education and training opportunities must be tied to the attainment of industry-recognized credentials along career pathways for demand occupations.
Career pathways provide a sequence of education and training that give youth a clear line-of-sight to an industry recognized credential and a career. WIOA requires that career pathways meet the workforce needs of the region or state, offer individuals the opportunity to earn at least one recognized post-secondary credential, provide contextual education concurrently with workforce preparation and training, and include counseling to support individuals in achieving their education and career goals. Accelerating Opportunity: Kansas (AO-K) enhances these required elements with classes that are team-taught by basic skills and CTE instructors, transcript post-secondary credit, wrap-around support services, and the opportunity to earn stackable credentials. Training (in all forms) must be tied to the types of job opportunities that are prevalent in the local area, and should be designed to develop skills that are in demand in the region. Skill development must be consistent with regional and statewide economic development strategies. Local areas’ employer engagement strategies should also include engaging economic development organizations. (Page 148)
• As a partner in the state workforce development system, KRS will have access to cross training and informational resources about economic development areas, workforce needs, career pathways, and sector strategies. The KRS Director is a member of the state workforce development board as well as all of the local workforce development boards. Regional Program Administrators for VR are involved in local area sub-committees and partnership councils. Through each of these entities, KRS staff are kept up-to-date about workforce issues. Then, in turn, all of this information is shared at both local and state levels with staff to enhance their understanding of employment opportunities, employer needs and workforce issues. KRS will partner on the state’s Workforce Innovation Fund grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to enhance cross training.
• KRS will provide a link on its staff-use website to the National Clearinghouse of Rehabilitation Training Material, and bring it to the attention of staff periodically. KRS also supports staff participation in nationally sponsored webinars related to vocational rehabilitation, competitive, integrated employment, and disability issues.
• The KRS Employer Development Specialist sends frequent updates to direct service staff statewide about specific job opportunities and employment trends. 
• KRS outsources most job placement services through its network of more than 100 community-based service providers.
• The End-Dependence Kansas initiative, described in detail in Section C1, focuses on the implementation of evidence-based and promising practices. Significant training and technical assistance will be provided to KRS staff and contracting agencies to enhance their skills to use these research-based strategies. (Page 235)
 Job Developers, utilizing current labor market information will seek out and develop relationships with businesses in growing industries and occupations. Potential employment and career opportunities for project participants in the industries projected to have the most growth will include but not be limited to a variety of options within schools, hospitals, home health care, temporary help services, food preparation and serving, cashiers and retail sales. Key steps to career pathways in all of these fields include: related community service assignment; job search skills workshops, relevant computer/technology training and certifications for food handlers, basic first aid, CPR, computer proficiency and any other training identified as increasing participant marketability for job attainment.
 Job Developers will develop lists of employers in the targeted industries focusing on creating and establishing innovative working relationships, particularly with those that have a special interest in (Page 339)
 

Employment Networks

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 305).

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 41

“Pre-Employment Services Being Offered to Youth with Disabilities “ - 10/02/2017

~~“As a result of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, DCF recently launched a new program, Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS), to further its efforts to help Kansans with disabilities gain meaningful employment. Pre-ETS was first launched in FY 2017, and its services are designed to help youth with disabilities get an early start at job exploration, assist students with disabilities in making the transition from secondary to post-secondary education/training and to empower them to realize their full potential.  

While many services are offered within Pre-ETS, Rehabilitation Services Director Michael Donnelly says that the program emphasizes the paid, work-based learning experiences”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Resource Guide - 08/12/2017

~~“The Kansas Resource Guide (KRG) is a collaborative effort to connect consumers with resources and services for women, infants, children, youth and people with disabilities in Kansas. The Kansas Resource phone and e-mail are answered Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., so consumers can access personalized assistance.

What you can find in the Navigational Tool Kit The Navigational Tool Kit is designed to assist consumers in finding needed resources and services in a fast and user friendly way. Simply clink on the appropriate button below to locate a list of local, state and national resources and services. Each resource has a description and a link to get to their website &/or list contact information to assist the consumer in locating the resource they want.

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM - 07/20/2017

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

“With a little help you can return home.Money Follows the Person (MFP) Program” - 06/21/2017

~~“If you live in a nursing home, the Money Follows the Person (MFP) program may be able to help you move home. The state of Kansas received grant money from The Centers for Medicare and MedicaidServices (CMS). This money is used to help people move out of nursing homes. The MFP provides Transition Coordination Services. That means the program will pay someone to help you with each step. It covers things like:• Finding an apartment or assisted living facility.• Filling out apartment applications.• Getting all the legal documents you need tomove into the community.• Paying up to a certain amount for householditems. You may need furniture, kitchen utensils,pots and pans, and bedding.• Paying up to a certain amount to make changesto your home. You may need a wheelchair rampor wider door ways. The bathroom may needmore space for grab bars for the tub or toilet.• Paying security deposits.• Finding the personal care that you need.Care may include help with bathing, goingto the bathroom, meals and housekeeping.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Project Search - Kansas - 06/10/2017

~~“High School Transition Program:”Project SEARCH came to Kansas in 2010 with the first class of interns beginning in the fall of 2011. After the sixth year of implementation, over 350 Kansans have participated in Project SEARCH. 70 percent of those interns have secured competitive employment.90 interns have been selected for the 2017-2018 year.There are 13 host business sites in Kansas:• University of Kansas, Lawrence• Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Lawrence• Butler Community College, El Dorado• Susan B Allen Memorial Hospital, El Dorado• Newton Medical Center, Newton• Salina Regional Health Center, Salina• Via Christi Hospital, Wichita• Sedgwick County Government, Wichita• McConnell Air Force Base, Derby• Johnson County Government, Olathe• Embassy Suites, Olathe• Tabor College, Hillsboro• Cintas, Wichita” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

KanCare Section 1115 DemonstrationProject No. 11-W-00283/7 - 05/31/2017

~~“The current KanCare demonstration expires on December 31, 2017. Pursuant to Section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) is requesting a one-year extension of the current KanCare demonstration, including the Uncompensated Care (UC) Pool and the Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Pool. The requested extension period is January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018. KDHE is not requesting any changes to the demonstration for the one-year extension period.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Medicaid: A Primer 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~KanCare operates under concurrent waivers—a set of Section 1915(c) waivers for HCBS and a Section 1115 demonstration that created KanCare and allows—among other things—the mandatory enrollment of nearly all covered populations in managed care for most services. The current KanCare demonstration is approved through the end of calendar year 2017, and the state may request it be extended. Renewals require specific actions to ensure transparency, including public meetings.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Accommodations Manual 2016-17 Rev. January 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~“2. Accommodations listed on the following pages are acceptable for the general population, ELL students, and for students with IEPs or Section 504 Plans. All accommodations used for state assessments must be used by the student during instruction on a regular basis, as well as on classroom assessments.3. Students with an IEP or Section 504 Plan or ELL plan must have accommodations specified within the plan, for use both on the Kansas Assessment Programs (KAP) and on a regular basis for classroom instruction, assignments and tests.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services ”HCBS Providers – Financial Template” - 09/22/2016

“The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has contracted with Optumas, an actuary and consulting firm, to study the adequacy of Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) service payment rates. To assist with that study, Optumas has developed a financial template to be completed by all HCBS service providers.… The template requests information on your organization’s revenue, expenses, and service delivery count. The goal of requesting this information is to assess the profit/loss position for HCBS providers and use that information to make a statement on the adequacy of HCBS service reimbursement. Revenue and service information submitted in this template will be validated against Medicaid encounter data.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and Oversight Commission (HB 2336) - 04/29/2015

“HB 2336 creates the Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The bill requires state programs and services that support employment of persons with disabilities to consider, as their first option, competitive and integrated employment for persons with disabilities. The bill does not require an employer to give preference to hiring persons with a disability.   “The bill requires all state agencies to follow the policy for employment by coordinating and collaborating efforts among agencies. In addition, agencies may share data and information whenever possible across systems in order to track progress. State agencies may adopt rules and regulations to implement the Act.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Kansas ABLE Program (HB 2216) - 04/16/2015

"There is hereby established an enabling savings program and such program shall be known and may be cited as the Kansas ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] savings program. The purpose of the Kansas ABLE savings program is to authorize the establishment of savings accounts empowering individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability and to provide guidelines for the maintenance of such accounts."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission Senate substitute for HB 2150 - 07/01/2013

“Senate Sub. for HB 2150 revises the size and responsibilities for the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The Commission increases from five members to seven members. The Governor appoints the two additional members, with one having disability employment experience and the other having business employment experience. The bill repeals the requirement that the one member currently appointed by the Governor not be a state employee.   “The bill repeals the responsibilities of the Commission to establish measurable goals and objectives for the State of Kansas and track the progress of state agencies implementing the Employment First Initiative. The Commission must work with state agencies and nongovernmental organizations to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain employment. The Commission may educate state agencies and stakeholders about the Initiative.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas HB 2453: Bidding Preferences for Businesses Employing Individuals with Disabilities - 07/01/2012

This legislation, signed into law by Governor Brownback in 2012, places responsibility for operating the “Kansas Bidders Preference Program” within Kansas Department of Administration In this program, which provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities, a certified business gets certain benefits and advantages when bidding on state contracts. To be certified, a business must meet several requirements, including having at least 20% of their workforce comprised of qualified people with disabilities. This provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

44-1136. Kansas Employment First Initiative Act: Definitions & Policy Declaration

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of the state of Kansas that competitive and integrated employment shall be considered its first option when serving persons with disabilities who are of working age to obtain employment. This policy applies to programs and services that provide services and support to help obtain employment for persons with disabilities. All state agencies shall follow this policy and ensure that it is effectively implemented in their programs and services. Nothing in this section shall be construed to require any employer to give preference to hiring people with a disability.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

“Pre-Employment Services Being Offered to Youth with Disabilities “ - 10/02/2017

~~“As a result of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, DCF recently launched a new program, Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS), to further its efforts to help Kansans with disabilities gain meaningful employment. Pre-ETS was first launched in FY 2017, and its services are designed to help youth with disabilities get an early start at job exploration, assist students with disabilities in making the transition from secondary to post-secondary education/training and to empower them to realize their full potential.  

While many services are offered within Pre-ETS, Rehabilitation Services Director Michael Donnelly says that the program emphasizes the paid, work-based learning experiences”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Resource Guide - 08/12/2017

~~“The Kansas Resource Guide (KRG) is a collaborative effort to connect consumers with resources and services for women, infants, children, youth and people with disabilities in Kansas. The Kansas Resource phone and e-mail are answered Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., so consumers can access personalized assistance.

What you can find in the Navigational Tool Kit The Navigational Tool Kit is designed to assist consumers in finding needed resources and services in a fast and user friendly way. Simply clink on the appropriate button below to locate a list of local, state and national resources and services. Each resource has a description and a link to get to their website &/or list contact information to assist the consumer in locating the resource they want.

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM - 07/20/2017

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Accommodations Manual 2016-17 Rev. January 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~“2. Accommodations listed on the following pages are acceptable for the general population, ELL students, and for students with IEPs or Section 504 Plans. All accommodations used for state assessments must be used by the student during instruction on a regular basis, as well as on classroom assessments.3. Students with an IEP or Section 504 Plan or ELL plan must have accommodations specified within the plan, for use both on the Kansas Assessment Programs (KAP) and on a regular basis for classroom instruction, assignments and tests.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Serivces - 07/15/2016

Shared Living

Shared Living is a nationally recognized model for habilitation or residential services for individuals with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability (IDD). Other terms that can encompass the Shared Living approach include adult foster care, mentor, residence or family home, host home or family care, extended-family teaching or family teaching services. In Shared Living, one or two (but not to exceed three) persons with IDD join a family (contractor) or single adult’s (contractor) family in the Shared Living/host family’s home. The Shared Living Contractor lives with the person with a disability and provides whatever supports the person(s) needs in their day-to-day activities (social, companionship, teaching, daily living skills, supported employment, night supports, etc.…).

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities “2017-2021 Proposed Goals and Objectives Draft” - 04/20/2016

GOAL 2 –EMPLOYMENT: By 2021, Kansans with I/DD will have increased opportunities to engage in competitive integrated employment

OBJECTIVE  2.1: KCDD  will  provide Kansans with  I/DD, their  families, employers, providers, and employment support staff with meaningful information about competitive integrated employment

OBJECTIVE 2.2: By 2021, Kansans with I/DD will have increased resources for formal and informal long-term supports for competitive integrated employment.

OBJECTIVE 2.3: KCDD will partner with KDADS to provide South Western Kansans with  I/DD and  their  families, whose native  language  is Spanish, with  meaningful information about services including competitive integrated employment.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission Annual Report - 01/14/2013

“The Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission was created by the state law requiring competitive and integrated employment to be the first option when serving people with disabilities (KSA 44-1136 to 44-1138, also called the Employment First Initiative Act). The Oversight Commission is charged with carrying out certain duties,including reporting in detail on the measurable progress of state agencies toward the Goals and Objectives it has established for them, as well as reporting the overall progress of the Act’s full implementation. Additionally, the Oversight Commission must identify barriers and strategies that can help realize the Goals and Objectives of the Employment First Initiative…”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Kansas Department for Children and Families Rehabilitation Services (Discovery/Supported Employment) - 11/19/2012

“Rehabilitation Services (RS) is a state agency that provides vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to help people with disabilities achieve permanent, integrated, competitive employment. Services are customized for each consumer, consistent with their strengths, vocational objectives, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice. This Discovery/Supported Employment (D/SE) service description is designed specifically for individuals with the most significant intellectual disabilities who are participating in the Great Expectations Initiative (GEI) demonstration project.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities “Interhab Employment Systems Change 5/2016”

KCDD Employment Systems Change  request for proposal is based on the Employment First Commission report 2014 The proposed system changes include more focus on Customized Employment and eliminating sub-minimum wage positions.

Current research shows customized employment 30-70 hours for discovery/job development 100-250 hours employer/systematic instruction 50-100 hours follow-up per year (usually paid from long-term funding)

WIOA Limitation on the use of Sub-Minimum Wages

As of 2016 a series of steps must occur prior to anyone under the age of 24 be placed in a job paying less than minimum wage Schools are prohibited from contracting with Sub-Minimum Wage providers for “Transition Services” Legislative definition of “Competitive Integrated Employment” Full or part time, minimum wage or higher, same benefits, fully integrated with co-workers
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas State Department of Education “KSDE Policy Statement on Employment First”

As a relevant state agency in the implementation of Employment First policy, the Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE) is responsible for the monitoring of district practices in planning for and providing appropriate transition services to students with significant disabilities, and assuring that KSDE developed resources and materials encourage Employment First policy.

Research demonstrates that when provided with preparatory, hands-on job experience in the form of part-time work, internships, or summer employment, students with significant disabilities can successfully obtain and sustain work in integrated settings and earn competitive wages. The goal of publically-funded transition services and supports for youth with significant disabilities should be focused on helping these youth to acquire the skills, knowledge and experience necessary to obtain jobs in integrated settings at a competitive wage that promotes community participation and self-sufficiency.

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Project Search - Kansas - 06/10/2017

~~“High School Transition Program:”Project SEARCH came to Kansas in 2010 with the first class of interns beginning in the fall of 2011. After the sixth year of implementation, over 350 Kansans have participated in Project SEARCH. 70 percent of those interns have secured competitive employment.90 interns have been selected for the 2017-2018 year.There are 13 host business sites in Kansas:• University of Kansas, Lawrence• Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Lawrence• Butler Community College, El Dorado• Susan B Allen Memorial Hospital, El Dorado• Newton Medical Center, Newton• Salina Regional Health Center, Salina• Via Christi Hospital, Wichita• Sedgwick County Government, Wichita• McConnell Air Force Base, Derby• Johnson County Government, Olathe• Embassy Suites, Olathe• Tabor College, Hillsboro• Cintas, Wichita” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities

The purpose of the Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities (KCDD) is to support people of all ages with developmental disabilities so they have the opportunity to make choices regarding both their participation in society, and their quality of life.   In their current plan the KCDD has identified “4 areas of priority” of which one is employment  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission

“In order to ensure the Oversight Commission can effectively carry out its duties, the law places certain requirements on state agencies to help ensure that the law will be effectively and fully implemented. The law also places requirements on state agencies to provide the Commission information documenting measurable progress on the Goals and objectives established by the Commission and proving effective implementation of the law….Although the Employment First law requires all state agencies to implement its requirements, the Oversight Commission has identified a handful of state agencies that have programs and activities directly impacted by Employment First. These are referred to as “relevant state agencies” throughout this document. The relevant state agencies are:

•Kansas Department for Children and Families (KDCF –formerly Kansas Dept. of Social and Rehabilitation Services)

•Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS – formerly Kansas Dept. on Aging)

•Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE)

•Kansas Department of Commerce (Commerce)

•Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE)

•Kansas Department on Administration (KDOA) ”

.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Kansas DEI (Round 5) - 10/01/2014

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2014, Kansas was awarded a Round 5 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The grant will end in 2017.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kansas MIG-RATS - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Kansas Department of Health and Environment CESP - 03/13/2013

“Certification of Employment Services Professionals - KDHE funded the provision of the Certified Employment Services Professional (CESP) in two locations during 2012. The CESP is a newly developed credential governed by the APSE Employment Services Professional Certification Council (ESPCC). Individuals who earn the CESP credential have demonstrated knowledge of the facilitation, and advocacy skills necessary to help establish and expand equitable employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. 64 people took the exam; 54 passed it. According to APSE, the number of candidates who sat for the exam in Kansas was double the number of candidates who sat for the initial administration of the exam by APSE during December 2011, and was the largest candidate sponsorship by any state since the inception of the exam in 2011 (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year State Plan - 08/16/2011

Goal #3: Advocacy: Community Resources/Alternatives

 

Provide information and training, written materials and web sites to educate people with DD and their support networks on resources available to assist them to live and succeed in the community. There are over 3000 adults and children (under age 21) on the DD waiting list. Often these individuals do not know about resources outside DD Waiver that can help them succeed. The goal is to provide information on these alternative resources.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Southeast Kansas Works Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Local Plan

Training must be industry or company specific and provide technical and skill upgrades. Training may be conducted at the applicant’s facility, at a public or private training provider site or at a combination of sites best meeting the needs of the organization. LA V allows the following types of training for employer projects meeting the above criteria:

 

Customized  occupational  training  designed  to  meet  the  special  requirements  of  an employer  (including  a  group  of  employers)  conducted  with  a  commitment  by  the employer to continue to employ an individual upon successful completion of the training.

 

Customized   on-the   job-training   relating   to   the   introduction   of   new   technologies,  introduction to new production or service procedures, or upgrading to new jobs requiring additional skills. LA V offers a variety of resources and information on services available to persons with disabilities including: information on training opportunities and links to online training; technology guides for using screen enlargement software, and screen reading software.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

“With a little help you can return home.Money Follows the Person (MFP) Program” - 06/21/2017

~~“If you live in a nursing home, the Money Follows the Person (MFP) program may be able to help you move home. The state of Kansas received grant money from The Centers for Medicare and MedicaidServices (CMS). This money is used to help people move out of nursing homes. The MFP provides Transition Coordination Services. That means the program will pay someone to help you with each step. It covers things like:• Finding an apartment or assisted living facility.• Filling out apartment applications.• Getting all the legal documents you need tomove into the community.• Paying up to a certain amount for householditems. You may need furniture, kitchen utensils,pots and pans, and bedding.• Paying up to a certain amount to make changesto your home. You may need a wheelchair rampor wider door ways. The bathroom may needmore space for grab bars for the tub or toilet.• Paying security deposits.• Finding the personal care that you need.Care may include help with bathing, goingto the bathroom, meals and housekeeping.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KanCare Section 1115 DemonstrationProject No. 11-W-00283/7 - 05/31/2017

~~“The current KanCare demonstration expires on December 31, 2017. Pursuant to Section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) is requesting a one-year extension of the current KanCare demonstration, including the Uncompensated Care (UC) Pool and the Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Pool. The requested extension period is January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018. KDHE is not requesting any changes to the demonstration for the one-year extension period.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Medicaid: A Primer 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~KanCare operates under concurrent waivers—a set of Section 1915(c) waivers for HCBS and a Section 1115 demonstration that created KanCare and allows—among other things—the mandatory enrollment of nearly all covered populations in managed care for most services. The current KanCare demonstration is approved through the end of calendar year 2017, and the state may request it be extended. Renewals require specific actions to ensure transparency, including public meetings.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services ”HCBS Providers – Financial Template” - 09/22/2016

“The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has contracted with Optumas, an actuary and consulting firm, to study the adequacy of Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) service payment rates. To assist with that study, Optumas has developed a financial template to be completed by all HCBS service providers.… The template requests information on your organization’s revenue, expenses, and service delivery count. The goal of requesting this information is to assess the profit/loss position for HCBS providers and use that information to make a statement on the adequacy of HCBS service reimbursement. Revenue and service information submitted in this template will be validated against Medicaid encounter data.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services “Crisis and Exception Policy” - 09/15/2016

~~“Transitions to the I/DD WaiverThe  following  HCBS  programs  shall  transition  to  HCBS  IDD wavier program  if  they  meet HCBS IDD functional eligibility:1. Person is determined no longer eligible for the TA, Autism, or TBI waiver program.2. The respective program manager sends NOA to person of their ineligibility.  The  IDD  waiver  program  manager, the MCO, and  DCF  for  persons  in  the  custody  of  DCF are emailed a copy of the NOA.3. The IDD waiver program manager coordinates with CDDO to determine if person is eligible to transition to IDD waiver program. 4. If a person is eligible for the IDD waiver program, a functional assessment is scheduled if current assessment is more than 365 days old.5. Upon  completion  of  functional  assessment  the  CDDO  will  notify  the  IDD  programmanager and the MCO of the functional eligibility determination. 6. Upon  functional  eligibility  determination,  the  IDD  waiver program  manager  sends the NOA  of  approval  for  IDD  waiver  program to  the  person. For  children  in  the custody  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Kansas  Department  for  Children  and  Families,  the NOA shall also be forwarded to DCF.7. 3160 sent to CDDO KDHE Clearinghouse and MCO.I/DD services must begin within forty-five (45) days of issuances of the 3160. 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Employment First Initiative Act Annual Report - 01/14/2013

“KDADS provided information about provisions in its contract with Community Developmental Disability Organizations (CDDOs) where persons on the waiting list for HCBS Developmental Disability (DD) Waiver services who are ‘referred to RS (Rehabilitation Services) for employment services and successfully closed from Vocational Rehabilitation Services as competitively employed, will have access to HCBS Developmental Disability (DD) Supported Employment waiver funding needed to successfully maintain their employment.’ This modification to the CDDO contract allows individuals on the DD waiver waiting list who are employed in competitive, integrated employment to receive long term supports to maintain employment, which is funded by the waiver. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Social Security Alternative Pilot - 01/14/2013

“Social Security Alternative Pilot under KanCare - This Pilot is designed for up to 200 Kansans with disabilities who have not yet been determined to be eligible for Social Security disability. The goal of this pilot is to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain employment with employer-based health insurance as well as avoid unnecessary dislocation from the workforce and impoverishment in order to obtain health insurance. The pilot will include a Presumptive Medical Disability (PMD) process to determine whether individuals meet the criteria for a Social Security disability determination, Medicaid-like coverage as needed, a monthly allocation to pay for personal assistance and employment support services if needed, and accelerated PMD review to restore the path to Social Security disability status in the event of a worsening medical condition or loss of employment. The pilot also allows for temporary unemployment benefits (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas SSI Employment Support Pilot - 01/14/2013

“SSI Employment Support Pilot under KanCare – This Pilot will support up to 400 individuals currently on the Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Developmental Disability (DD) or Physical Disability (PD) waiting lists who are employed 40 hours per month or more at federal minimum wage in competitive and integrated settings. In addition to Medicaid coverage, pilot participants will receive up to $1,500 per month to pay for personal assistance and employment support services to enable them to live and work in the community. Working Healthy Benefits Specialists will be available to discuss this option and alternatives to this option that may be available to the individual. Participants will be restored to their former position on the waiting list if employment is lost. The pilot also allows for temporary unemployment (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas I/DD Waiver (0224.R05.00) - 07/01/2009

Provides day supports, overnight respite care, personal assistant, residential supports, supported employment, FMS, assistive services, medical alert rental, sleep cycle support, specialized medical care, supportive home care, wellness monitoring for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 5 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas State HCBS Transition Plan (Draft)

The new HCBS Settings Rule from CMS applies to all programs that provide home and community based services. In Kansas, this rule will apply to all settings where home and community based services are provided for these programs: Frail Elderly (65+) Autism (child who starts services prior to age 6) Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (5+) Physical Disability (16-64) Serious Emotional Disturbance (0-18) Technology Assisted (0 through 21) Traumatic Brain Injury (16-64)
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

There's no place like the workplace for great career opportunities for employees with disabilities in the Sunflower State of Kansas. See what Kansas is doing to make sure that workers with disabilities are bringing home the dough in America's Bread Basket.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kansas' VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.26%
Change from
2014 to 2015
2,911,641
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.08%
Change from
2014 to 2015
184,791
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.25%
Change from
2014 to 2015
79,132
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.03%
Change from
2014 to 2015
42.82%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.16%
Change from
2014 to 2015
79.88%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 2,911,641
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 184,791
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 79,132
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,229,527
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 42.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.88%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 184,846
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 180,957
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 317,198
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 24,705
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 24,638
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,650
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,082
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 11,428
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 4,705

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,987
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 74,677

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 9,806
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 29,223
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 32,407
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 30.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 13.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 31.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,315
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,968
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,008
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 67
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 40
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 60.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.37

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,847
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 106,902
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 14.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,457
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,086
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,838
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 29.10

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 69.32%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 6.72%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.27%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 63.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 77.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 27.50%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 454,126
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 810
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 174,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 33,751
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 208,693
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 165
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 184
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,536,706
AbilityOne wages (services). $320,864

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 36
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 37
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,772
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 114
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,886

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care.
• Through the Governor’s Sub-Cabinet on Disability, leadership among the Kansas Departments for Children and Families (DCF), Health and Environment, Commerce, Corrections and Aging and Disability Services focuses attention on implementing employment first strategies in state agencies and tracking baseline and performance data to effectively measure outcomes. Sub-Cabinet meetings are also an opportunity for open communications among these departments and advocacy and provider organizations working in the disability system.
• The DCF Secretary is participating on a Governor-directed strategic planning effort with a focus on workforce development. DCF is the designated state agency. (Page 209)
Ongoing communication and collaboration
KRS is in frequent contact with other agencies related to competitive, integrated employment of Kansans with disabilities. Some examples include participation on the:
• Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its vocational sub-committee.
• The KDADS strategic planning team to integrate mental health and substance use disorder services into a recovery oriented system of care.
• The Developmental Disabilities Council.
• The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.
• The Employment First Commission.
• Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (Pages 226)
 

Customized Employment

~~Training and education to learn new vocational skills.
• Rehabilitation technology, telecommunication aids and other adaptive devices.
• Job preparation and placement services.
• Job coaching.
• On-the-job training.
• Services to help students with disabilities get a job after finishing high school.
• Supported and customized employment for individuals who need intensive on-the-job training and ongoing support.
• Referral to other services.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 65)
Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) enters into provider agreements with a variety of community agencies for the provision of supported employment services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Through customized employment provider agreements, six key components or milestones are specified for supported employment services:
1. Creation of a job development action plan.
2. Placement.
3. Stabilization.
4. 45 days of continuous, successful employment.
5. Finalization of an extended ongoing service plan.
Direct hourly Job Coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Customized Employment milestones services descried above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements. (Page 220)
A bachelor’s degree in a field of study reasonably related to vocational rehabilitation, indicating a level of competency and skill demonstrating basic preparation in a field of study such as vocational rehabilitation counseling, social work, psychology, disability studies, business administration, human resources, special education, supported employment, customized employment, economics, or another field that reasonably prepares individuals to work with consumers and employers; and Demonstrated paid or unpaid experience, for not less than one year, consisting of—(Page 232)
The needs assessment revealed the need for job placement and other provider services with specialized expertise in competitive, integrated employment of people with disabilities. As a result, KRS will emphasize the development and maintenance of evidence-based and promising practices through the End-Dependence Kansas initiative. Direct service contracts will be used to promote the development and expansion of Individual Placement and Supports, Individualized Discovery/Customized Employment, and Progressive Employment. (Page 260)
Methods to expand and improve services
When considering opportunities to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, KRS emphasizes strategies that will address the needs of people with the most significant disabilities and people who have been unserved or under-served. Collaborative efforts with consumers, advisory councils, parent groups, advocacy organizations, community rehabilitation programs and other state agencies are undertaken to expand access to VR services and to promote supported employment, customized employment, Pre-Employment Transition Services and assistive technology services. Innovation and expansion activities are consistent with the findings of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment. Specifically, the following functions assist KRS is achieving its goals and priorities related to innovation and expansion: (Page 280)
Direct hourly job coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Supported Employment and Customized Employment milestones services described above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements.
After the time-limited VR services end, the supported employment service provider maintains extended ongoing services with the consumer or has identified a plan specifying how the community-service system will provide the extended ongoing supports the consumer needs to maintain employment. These extended services are not funded with VR dollars. To reinforce and maintain stability of the job placement, ongoing services include regular contact. (Page 295)
 

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~Not significantly increased the number of individuals with barriers to employment who receive training and other more intensive services
• Limited success with blending and braiding resources across multiple systems to meet the needs of job seekers and workers
• Varied success at meeting the workforce needs of all industry sectors, as well as in some geographic areas of the state (Page 22)
The primary role of LVER staff, at the Kansas AJCs, is to conduct outreach to employers in the area, to assist veterans in gaining employment. Additionally, LVERs promote, plan and participate in job fairs and seminars for employers. Furthermore, LVERs promote veterans as job ready candidates, who have highly marketable skills and experience. Kansas LVERs advocate for veterans by promoting employment and training opportunities, coordinating with other business outreach representatives in the AJC to facilitate and promote employment, workshops, job searches, establishing job groups in conjunction with employers, and leverage other employment opportunities for veterans. Kansas LVERs establish, maintain, and facilitate regular contact with federal contractors, unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations. Additionally our LVERs provides educational training to AJC staff, additional employer based training and other outreach services, in accordance with VPL 07-10 and VPL 03-14. The Department of Commerce ensures that there are no blending of roles, whereas LVERs provide monthly activity reports to the State Manager and are often consulted with by AJC supervisors about their activity. Furthermore, LVERs are encouraged to utilize referrals and other resources, such as the Department of Commerce/ KANVET Hire a Veteran Pledge program as a resource to locate veteran friendly businesses/ employers, who are seeking veterans first, to employ. (Page 314)
 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.
Each workforce partner and local area must comply with both program and physical accessibility requirements consistent with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, WIOA Section 188 and related federal guidance, and the Kansas Act against Discrimination. Policies will be established to assure compliance and equal access and usability for all Kansans, regardless of disability. The following key points, at a minimum, must be included in all program and local area accessibility policies. (Page 120)
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~• A workshop with a large hospital and health services company regarding its on-line application and screening processes. Participants were able to learn about how to more effectively use the on-line application process with VR consumers and the response time expectations of companies after vacant positions are posted. Similar workshops are pending with the Veterans’ Administration and an aircraft manufacturer.
• A major energy company is interested in creating a training program for transition youth.
• An ironworker trade union is interested in offering its apprenticeship program to youth with disabilities.
• A pilot project is pending with a major national on-line shopping company to use a preferred vendor as a single point of contact to hire workers with disabilities. A major hospital and a plastics manufacturing firm are also exploring similar inclusion programs.
• A national candy manufacturing company has a campaign to interest Kansas high school students in pursuing manufacturing work. They are interested in including transition-aged youth with disabilities in this initiative.
• Extensive outreach and communication are underway with federal contractors with 503 compliance requirements. (Page 224)
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The KWSB is more than an advisory board to the Governor and staff on workforce policy issues. The Board ensures Kansas’ entire workforce system, covering many programs in multiple departments and agencies, meets employers’ needs for skilled workers and meets workers’ needs for career and economic advancement. The KWSB convenes State, regional and local workforce system partners to enhance the capacity and performance of the workforce system; align and improve the outcomes and effectiveness of public workforce investments and thereby promote economic growth. The board engages workforce system representatives including businesses, education, economic development, labor and other stakeholders to achieve the strategic and operational vision and goals of the State Plan as well as the purpose of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA). (Page 96)
Other evaluation and research functions implemented through core programs include:
• Implementing evidence-based employment practices for people with disabilities and ongoing fidelity research into the effectiveness of these practices.
• Using federal and state technical assistance resources, to the extent they are available, for evaluation and research functions.
• Using a research-to-practice approach by leveraging knowledge transfer from national resources including technical assistance centers funded by the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) with funding from the US Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, the National Skills Coalition, and other similar organizations that disseminate research-based information on improving service delivery.
• Dissemination of information concerning research-based best practices for service delivery, alignment, and policy development.  (Page 101)
 

Benefits

~~• Services are individualized to address each person’s unique strengths, impediments to employment and vocational goals. An individual plan for employment is jointly developed between each customer and the VR counselor to address specific barriers to employment, the vocational objective, and the services necessary to achieve that objective.
• VR counselors are highly trained to address the complex disability, employment and cultural issues that impact persons served, and to facilitate informed decision–making in partnership with their customers.
• 95% of persons rehabilitated into employment in FFY 2014 were persons with significant disabilities, meaning that they had multiple functional limitations in major life areas such as mobility, communications, self–care, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, work skills and self–direction.
• VR emphasizes the employment potential of youth with disabilities and the importance of them gaining an early attachment to work or postsecondary education resulting in employment. 21% of persons served in FFY 2014 were transition–aged youth with disabilities (21 years old or younger at the time of application). 23% of persons rehabilitated that year were youth.  (Page 65)
• Over the past ten years, approximately 75% of persons rehabilitated report their own earnings as their largest source of financial support, a significant milestone toward self–sufficiency and reduced reliance on public benefits.
• VR services are comprehensive and flexible in order to empower each customer to maximize employment.
• The End–Dependence Kansas initiative emphasizes the use of evidence–based practices throughout the VR service delivery system, including community–based service providers, to increase employment outcomes.
• Local areas should incorporate mitigating strategies, such as Earned Income Tax Credit program awareness, into their service strategies.
• State–level core partners should ensure that local partners are familiar with resources such as Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) benefits counselors, Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA), and other resources, and should develop strategies to share this information and/or train local area staff on an ongoing basis.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 65)
The VR program supports customers to pursue postsecondary education at all levels if necessary to achieve their vocational goals. VR assists customers to access comparable benefits, such as PELL Grants, to help pay for higher education before expending VR funds. Agreements between VR and all Kansas institutions of higher education specify cost sharing responsibilities related to the provision of auxiliary aids and services.
8. Schedule. Applicants must comply with the following timetable:
1. Provide required application forms and narratives to the Kansas Department of Commerce no later than 4:00 PM __________.
2. Pre-Bid Telephone Conference Call is scheduled for____. Call 1-866-XXX-XXXX.
3. Complete application packages must be emailed to:________.
4. Commerce will announce Grant Awards by __date_____(Page 135)
• Work Registration - RESEA participants must have a Plus account which includes a complete, up- to-date and active resume in KANSASWORKS (the state’s employment website). Staff will provide resume assistance if appropriate.
• Orientation to One-Stop services - An introduction to the workforce center that includes an overview of the programs and services available, and instruction on using self-help tools
• UI Eligibility Review - Potential eligibility issues are documented and referred to UI.
• Initial Assessment - Evaluation of the customer’s employment history, education, interests and skills resulting in the identification of employment goals, barriers to employment and the services needed to obtain his/her goals.
• Labor Market Information - Based on desired residential location and claimant’s employment history/interests
• Individual Employment Plan - In consultation with the claimant, a written Individual Employment Plan (IEP) matched to the claimant’s needs based on information gathered during the Initial Assessment is developed.
• Follow-up: Claimants must follow up with RESEA staff every 30 days until he/she has returned to work or is no longer receiving benefits. At each follow-up the claimant provides their work search contacts for the previous four weeks. (Page 160)
Council Comment: Development of informational materials is needed for use with outreach with schools, referral sources, parents and consumers. KRS should also focus on outreach to organizations such as the Kansas Physical Therapy Association and the Kansas Occupational Therapy Association and speech/language professional organizations. Professionals in these disciplines often have contact with individuals with disabilities and could pass along information about VR.
KRS Response: KRS will work with DCF Communications regarding this request. (Page 204)
• KRS and DCF Economic and Employment Services collaborate to serve recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who have disabilities. Consumers benefit by being able to receive the coordinated and specialized services they need to achieve employment before their time-limited TANF benefits cease.
• KRS and DCF Prevention and Protection Services independent living staff will coordinate to address the employment and/or post-secondary education needs of youth with disabilities who age out of foster care.
• Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care.
• KRS maintains an active presence on numerous councils and committees, including:
 The Statewide Independent Living Council of Kansas.
 The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.
 The Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its Vocational Sub-Committee.
 The Governor’s Commission on Autism.
 Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities
 KANSASWORKS State Board
 5 Local workforce development boards
• A memorandum of understanding with the Prairie Band Potawatomie Nation Native American VR program addresses the coordination of services to help consumers achieve employment. (Page 209)
As outlined in the agreement, KRS will provide VR services for students in accordance with KRS policy under the following conditions:
• The student has been determined eligible for VR and can be served within the Order of Selection.
• The student (and his/her parents or representative if appropriate) and the VR counselor have agreed to an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE).
• The goods or services provided will be necessary for post-high school training or employment, or will substantially contribute to achievement of the competitive, integrated employment objective on the IPE.
• Employment or post-secondary services provided by VR must occur outside the established school sessions. The term “school sessions” refers not only to the school semester or term, but also to the school day.
• Consideration of comparable benefits and application of the economic need policy are required. (Page 215)
KRS will continue to develop, implement and maintain a professional development system for new and experienced staff. A priority focus area will be to address effective communication strategies to assure consumer engagement and progress toward employment, and development and implementation of effective Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs). Other areas of focus continue to be informed choice; understanding the purpose and intent of the VR program; linkages between eligibility, rehabilitation needs, consumer goals and priorities, and services provided; development of effective progress measures; time and caseload management techniques; financial accountability cultural competence; accountable decision-making; expertise related to disability populations served (specifically persons who are blind or visually impaired, persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, persons with mental illness, and persons with head injury); leadership development; use of comparable benefits; basic benefits counseling issues surrounding employment; use of Kansas specific labor market trends and demands; and, effective career counseling and guidance related to employment as the avenue to self-reliance.(Page 236)
Annually about 10% of the total persons served (Status 02-24 +32) receive supported employment services. Individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, significant intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injury are among the primary populations receiving supported employment services. Their services are characterized by:
• The need for community-based work assessments or job tryouts in competitive, integrated employment so that individuals who have not previously worked can explore jobs that are a good match for their skills and interests.
• The importance of an individualized approach in connecting these individuals with: available social service and disability-related services; transportation; benefits counseling; and natural support networks in their home communities.
• The need for employability or soft skill training on issues such as self-advocacy, communications, taking direction from employers, getting along with co-workers and customer service.
• The need for specific job skill training matched with current and projected labor market needs. (Page 251)
1.9  The number of KRS SSI recipients and SSDI beneficiaries for whom KRS receives reimbursement funding. To meet this standard, the individuals must achieve the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months.
1.10  The number of VR consumers receiving qualified benefits counseling.
Goal 2: KRS will emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities and improve the outreach and outcomes for transition-aged students.
Strategies for Goal 2:
KRS will implement the following strategies:
A. Build and maintain VR capacity to deliver Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS).
B. Build partnerships with school transition personnel to encourage those career-focused and work-based experiences are incorporated into transition Individual Education Plans and to increase referrals of PETS-eligible students to the VR program. (Page 269)
KRS will also:
• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so that consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 278)
Identified in the FFY 2015 Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Plan. These highlights are based on FFY 2015 indicators.
• A total of 1,345 Kansans with disabilities achieved stable employment as a result of VR services, earning an average of $9.88 an hour. VR consumers achieved employment in high-wage, high-demand jobs, for example: more than $40 an hour as an Information Technology Systems Administrator and numerous placements of more than $30 an hour in the nursing field.
• The percent of individuals who reported their own earnings as the largest source of support at the time of vocational rehabilitation (VR) case closure was 72.4%, 57% higher than at application. This represents a significant milestone toward increased self-reliance.
• The number of successful employment outcomes after participating in post-secondary education was 242. This indicator represents a significant quality measure as increased education and technical training often lead to higher-wage, career track positions and therefore increased self-reliance.
• KRS receives reimbursement funds from the Social Security Administration for consumers who are recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or beneficiaries of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) when those individuals work at the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months. In FFY 2015, reimbursement funds received by the agency totaled $1,123,976.
• Providing employment-focused services for transition youth is a priority for KRS. KRS has traditionally defined transition youth as persons who are age 21 or younger at the time of application). Under WIOA, the definition of youth is inclusive of persons aged 14 through 24. When youth achieve an early attachment to employment and all of its advantages, the likelihood of their reliance on public benefits through their lifetime is reduced. (Page 286)
FFY 2015: Service providers: 5.72; educators: 4.72; general advocates category not surveyed.
Indicator 2.7: Average expended per rehabilitation for the life of the case. FFY 2015: $6,464
Indicator 2.8: Annual number of persons served (status 02-24 +32). FFY 2015: 11,419
Indicator 2.9: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.10: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services provided through one-stop workforce centers. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.11: Rehabilitation rate of persons referred to placement or supported employment providers.
FFY 2015: 54%
Indicator 2.12: The average wage achieved by persons referred to placement or supported employment providers. (Page 289)
For the purpose of promoting the hiring and retention of veterans, Workforce Center staff will provide and facilitate a full range of employment and training services. LVER staff will advocate for veterans to employers and seek other opportunities with business and industry, community based organizations, and contractors of all kinds, to include federal contractors. All Workforce Center staff, as well as LVER staff, will work together to plan and participate in job fairs to promote the hiring of veterans and eligible persons. LVER staff will communicate job fair participation opportunities and the benefits of attending job fairs, to employers and federal contractors. LVERs will also make contact with unions, apprenticeship programs and the business community to promote employment and training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons, and furthermore promote credentialing and training opportunities with training providers and credentialing bodies. (Page 320)
Improving SCSEP Services Kansas is posting a Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) to assure the upcoming grant period will focus on strategies to improve and better achieve the goals of SCSEP. The strategies will include the following action steps:
• Increase recruitment and enrollment to increase the number of active participants. This focus will include reaching out to community organizations and other senior service providers to provide information on the SCSEP program and its’ benefits.
• Focus participant training towards employment skills acquisition as guided by IEP, TAD and assessment results based on labor market needs, Training will include short–term training classes, education and WORKReady! Certification. SCSEP will also insure that participants are receiving the job notification list that is generated by the One–Stop so that participants are better informed about area job openings.
• Increase follow–up contact with participants exited for unsubsidized employment to address employment and life issues to help maintain employment.
• Insure all most–in–need measures are accurately and timely entered into SPARQ.
• Create host agency skill development training and tracking to be reviewed with participant and agency quarterly based on each individuals IEP.
• Reinforce the goal of SCSEP program with participants, e.g. unsubsidized employment, at each contact. (Page 339)
 

School to Work Transition

~~A priority target population for End-Dependence Kansas is youth transitioning from school to work. End-Dependence Kansas, coupled with outreach for Pre-Employment Transition Services and Section 511 services to divert youth from direct entry into sub-minimum wage work, will expand supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Significant training and technical assistance will be focused on improved communication with students and youth with disabilities encouraging competitive integrated employment. Also, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Education, KRS will offer opportunities for training and technical assistance for school personnel to learn and understand the needs of students and youth pursuing employment rather than services only, to establish and implement the soft skills and employment preparedness skills needed by employers and how and when to complete a referral to the VR program. In addition to these strategies, KRS will work collaboratively to assure Title I youth services are readily available to students and youth with disabilities to enjoy work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, career exploration and coaching, etc. (Page 278)

Data Collection

~~(1) (A) The Commerce workforce system uses the America’s Job Link Alliance Management Information System to meet all of the requirements of US Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration for data collection and reporting. The AJLA system in Kansas, www.kansasworks.com also provides the public with access to labor market information, connects to postsecondary training programs and performance outcomes by training program. The AJLA system provides case management tools and creates participant records and can be used for payment for services and cost allocation of services. Employers may enter job postings in KANSASWORKS.com in addition to finding qualified applicants for jobs. Today, there are 35,524 job postings and 9021 resumes in KANSASWORKS.com. (Page 88)
Data-collection and reporting processes are consistent throughout each local area; data is validated as required by US DOL. Commerce has policies related to data collection and reporting processes required for each local workforce system, including Data and Information Collection and Maintenance, Record Maintenance and Retention, Eligibility Determination and Documentation, Fiscal Manual, and the State Performance Accountability System. All current and draft policies can be found at http://kwpolicies.kansascommerce.com/Pages/Default.aspx
VR will collect and report data necessary for the common accountability measures identified in WIOA, the quarterly state-specific data measures identified in the Performance Indicators operational elements, the data necessary for the extensive metrics included in the goals and priorities section of the VR Services Portion of the Combined State Plan, and the data necessary for evaluation and continuous improvement. (Page 89)
5. System and program accessibility: Data will be disaggregated by those with significant barriers to employment, including those with disabilities to allow local and state policy makers to evaluate the services provided to those individuals.
Measurement of success with these stated operational elements or activities will be attributed to the successful development of inter-agency data sharing agreements and related linkages of systems as a result of data sharing. All partners will monitor of data collection and validate data.
With a Round 3 Workforce Data Quality Initiative grant (WDQI), Regents, Commerce, and Labor have collaborated to create an interoperable data system. The Kansas WDQI Round 5 grant includes Vocational Rehabilitation to build on the work already in progress and create a system which will support the reduction of duplicative data collection. (Page 90)
KRS will also:
• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so that consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 278)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~• Direct work with individuals with disabilities in a setting such as an independent living center;
• Direct service or advocacy activities that provide such individual with experience and skills in working with individuals with disabilities; or
• Direct experience in competitive integrated employment environments as an employer, as a small business owner or operator, or in self-employment, or other experience in human resources or recruitment, or experience in supervising employees, training, or other activities (Page 233)
 

Career Pathways

~~The State will implement sector strategies, as described, regarding identified economic regions found in Title IB, Section VI and career pathways already utilized in multiple workforce programs, including formula and competitive grant programs. Career pathways will prepare individuals to be successful in a full range of secondary or postsecondary options including registered apprenticeships. Career pathways will enable individuals to attain a high school equivalency certificate, where necessary, as well as at least one recognized postsecondary credential. Where practicable, career pathways will integrate education, training, and other services including counseling and workforce preparation activities in order to accelerate the educational and career advancement of individuals. Since 2011, Regents, employers and individual postsecondary institutions have worked together to develop career pathways in twenty–five aligned programs. Local Workforce Boards may also develop additional career pathways as required by local employers. Adult Education will collaborate with workforce partners in offering basic skills to registered apprenticeship participants and with colleges in offering concurrent enrollment and team–teaching in Adult Education and CTE programs. (Page 44)
Specific Strategy (Operational Element/Method/Activity) Recommended for Implementation: Collaborative youth services based on individual service strategies focused on skill development and career pathways. Work–based learning addresses a broad range of skills needs—both “soft” skills and technical skills. While this strategy makes work–based learning a priority, we recognize that it is not a panacea for all youth, and even when it is included in a youth’s individual service strategy, it will be supplemented with other forms of learning. Key elements of this strategy include:
• Paid work–based experiences. (Real Job)
• Summer employment partnerships
• Pre–apprenticeship opportunities
• Internships and job shadowing
• On the job training opportunities (Page 50)
Components of this strategy:
• To be effective, work experience must come in different forms. This includes, but is not limited to on–the–job training, summer employment programs, pre-apprenticeship opportunities, and internships/job shadowing.
• The importance of existing and continued development of career pathways that incorporate an element of work experience.
• The importance of locally identified career pathways.
• Continued education and training that includes, but is not limited to, achievement of the high school diploma or its equivalent, technical training, industry-recognized certificates, etc. that is included under all of the sections of WIOA.
• The specific requirements of Title I and Title IV. (Page 54)
Specific Strategy (Operational Element/Method/Activity) Recommended for Implementation: Collaborative youth services based on individual service strategies focused on skill development and career pathways. Work-based learning addresses a broad range of skills needs—both “soft” skills and technical skills. While this strategy makes work-based learning a priority, we recognize that it is not a panacea for all youth, and even when it is included in a youth’s individual service strategy, it will be supplemented with other forms of learning. Key elements of this strategy include:
• Paid work-based experiences (Real Job)
• Summer employment partnerships
• Pre-apprenticeship opportunities
• Internships and job shadowing
• On the job training opportunities (Page 147)
Local plans must address coordination with education and training options available in the local area, particularly education and training offered through community and technical colleges throughout the state. Education and training opportunities must be tied to the attainment of industry-recognized credentials along career pathways for demand occupations.
Career pathways provide a sequence of education and training that give youth a clear line-of-sight to an industry recognized credential and a career. WIOA requires that career pathways meet the workforce needs of the region or state, offer individuals the opportunity to earn at least one recognized post-secondary credential, provide contextual education concurrently with workforce preparation and training, and include counseling to support individuals in achieving their education and career goals. Accelerating Opportunity: Kansas (AO-K) enhances these required elements with classes that are team-taught by basic skills and CTE instructors, transcript post-secondary credit, wrap-around support services, and the opportunity to earn stackable credentials. Training (in all forms) must be tied to the types of job opportunities that are prevalent in the local area, and should be designed to develop skills that are in demand in the region. Skill development must be consistent with regional and statewide economic development strategies. Local areas’ employer engagement strategies should also include engaging economic development organizations. (Page 148)
• As a partner in the state workforce development system, KRS will have access to cross training and informational resources about economic development areas, workforce needs, career pathways, and sector strategies. The KRS Director is a member of the state workforce development board as well as all of the local workforce development boards. Regional Program Administrators for VR are involved in local area sub-committees and partnership councils. Through each of these entities, KRS staff are kept up-to-date about workforce issues. Then, in turn, all of this information is shared at both local and state levels with staff to enhance their understanding of employment opportunities, employer needs and workforce issues. KRS will partner on the state’s Workforce Innovation Fund grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to enhance cross training.
• KRS will provide a link on its staff-use website to the National Clearinghouse of Rehabilitation Training Material, and bring it to the attention of staff periodically. KRS also supports staff participation in nationally sponsored webinars related to vocational rehabilitation, competitive, integrated employment, and disability issues.
• The KRS Employer Development Specialist sends frequent updates to direct service staff statewide about specific job opportunities and employment trends. 
• KRS outsources most job placement services through its network of more than 100 community-based service providers.
• The End-Dependence Kansas initiative, described in detail in Section C1, focuses on the implementation of evidence-based and promising practices. Significant training and technical assistance will be provided to KRS staff and contracting agencies to enhance their skills to use these research-based strategies. (Page 235)
 Job Developers, utilizing current labor market information will seek out and develop relationships with businesses in growing industries and occupations. Potential employment and career opportunities for project participants in the industries projected to have the most growth will include but not be limited to a variety of options within schools, hospitals, home health care, temporary help services, food preparation and serving, cashiers and retail sales. Key steps to career pathways in all of these fields include: related community service assignment; job search skills workshops, relevant computer/technology training and certifications for food handlers, basic first aid, CPR, computer proficiency and any other training identified as increasing participant marketability for job attainment.
 Job Developers will develop lists of employers in the targeted industries focusing on creating and establishing innovative working relationships, particularly with those that have a special interest in (Page 339)
 

Employment Networks

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 305).

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 41

“Pre-Employment Services Being Offered to Youth with Disabilities “ - 10/02/2017

~~“As a result of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, DCF recently launched a new program, Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS), to further its efforts to help Kansans with disabilities gain meaningful employment. Pre-ETS was first launched in FY 2017, and its services are designed to help youth with disabilities get an early start at job exploration, assist students with disabilities in making the transition from secondary to post-secondary education/training and to empower them to realize their full potential.  

While many services are offered within Pre-ETS, Rehabilitation Services Director Michael Donnelly says that the program emphasizes the paid, work-based learning experiences”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Resource Guide - 08/12/2017

~~“The Kansas Resource Guide (KRG) is a collaborative effort to connect consumers with resources and services for women, infants, children, youth and people with disabilities in Kansas. The Kansas Resource phone and e-mail are answered Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., so consumers can access personalized assistance.

What you can find in the Navigational Tool Kit The Navigational Tool Kit is designed to assist consumers in finding needed resources and services in a fast and user friendly way. Simply clink on the appropriate button below to locate a list of local, state and national resources and services. Each resource has a description and a link to get to their website &/or list contact information to assist the consumer in locating the resource they want.

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM - 07/20/2017

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

“With a little help you can return home.Money Follows the Person (MFP) Program” - 06/21/2017

~~“If you live in a nursing home, the Money Follows the Person (MFP) program may be able to help you move home. The state of Kansas received grant money from The Centers for Medicare and MedicaidServices (CMS). This money is used to help people move out of nursing homes. The MFP provides Transition Coordination Services. That means the program will pay someone to help you with each step. It covers things like:• Finding an apartment or assisted living facility.• Filling out apartment applications.• Getting all the legal documents you need tomove into the community.• Paying up to a certain amount for householditems. You may need furniture, kitchen utensils,pots and pans, and bedding.• Paying up to a certain amount to make changesto your home. You may need a wheelchair rampor wider door ways. The bathroom may needmore space for grab bars for the tub or toilet.• Paying security deposits.• Finding the personal care that you need.Care may include help with bathing, goingto the bathroom, meals and housekeeping.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Project Search - Kansas - 06/10/2017

~~“High School Transition Program:”Project SEARCH came to Kansas in 2010 with the first class of interns beginning in the fall of 2011. After the sixth year of implementation, over 350 Kansans have participated in Project SEARCH. 70 percent of those interns have secured competitive employment.90 interns have been selected for the 2017-2018 year.There are 13 host business sites in Kansas:• University of Kansas, Lawrence• Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Lawrence• Butler Community College, El Dorado• Susan B Allen Memorial Hospital, El Dorado• Newton Medical Center, Newton• Salina Regional Health Center, Salina• Via Christi Hospital, Wichita• Sedgwick County Government, Wichita• McConnell Air Force Base, Derby• Johnson County Government, Olathe• Embassy Suites, Olathe• Tabor College, Hillsboro• Cintas, Wichita” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

KanCare Section 1115 DemonstrationProject No. 11-W-00283/7 - 05/31/2017

~~“The current KanCare demonstration expires on December 31, 2017. Pursuant to Section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) is requesting a one-year extension of the current KanCare demonstration, including the Uncompensated Care (UC) Pool and the Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Pool. The requested extension period is January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018. KDHE is not requesting any changes to the demonstration for the one-year extension period.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Medicaid: A Primer 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~KanCare operates under concurrent waivers—a set of Section 1915(c) waivers for HCBS and a Section 1115 demonstration that created KanCare and allows—among other things—the mandatory enrollment of nearly all covered populations in managed care for most services. The current KanCare demonstration is approved through the end of calendar year 2017, and the state may request it be extended. Renewals require specific actions to ensure transparency, including public meetings.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Accommodations Manual 2016-17 Rev. January 2017 - 01/01/2017

~~“2. Accommodations listed on the following pages are acceptable for the general population, ELL students, and for students with IEPs or Section 504 Plans. All accommodations used for state assessments must be used by the student during instruction on a regular basis, as well as on classroom assessments.3. Students with an IEP or Section 504 Plan or ELL plan must have accommodations specified within the plan, for use both on the Kansas Assessment Programs (KAP) and on a regular basis for classroom instruction, assignments and tests.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services ”HCBS Providers – Financial Template” - 09/22/2016

“The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has contracted with Optumas, an actuary and consulting firm, to study the adequacy of Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) service payment rates. To assist with that study, Optumas has developed a financial template to be completed by all HCBS service providers.… The template requests information on your organization’s revenue, expenses, and service delivery count. The goal of requesting this information is to assess the profit/loss position for HCBS providers and use that information to make a statement on the adequacy of HCBS service reimbursement. Revenue and service information submitted in this template will be validated against Medicaid encounter data.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and Oversight Commission (HB 2336) - 04/29/2015

“HB 2336 creates the Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The bill requires state programs and services that support employment of persons with disabilities to consider, as their first option, competitive and integrated employment for persons with disabilities. The bill does not require an employer to give preference to hiring persons with a disability.   “The bill requires all state agencies to follow the policy for employment by coordinating and collaborating efforts among agencies. In addition, agencies may share data and information whenever possible across systems in order to track progress. State agencies may adopt rules and regulations to implement the Act.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Kansas ABLE Program (HB 2216) - 04/16/2015

"There is hereby established an enabling savings program and such program shall be known and may be cited as the Kansas ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] savings program. The purpose of the Kansas ABLE savings program is to authorize the establishment of savings accounts empowering individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability and to provide guidelines for the maintenance of such accounts."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission Senate substitute for HB 2150 - 07/01/2013

“Senate Sub. for HB 2150 revises the size and responsibilities for the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The Commission increases from five members to seven members. The Governor appoints the two additional members, with one having disability employment experience and the other having business employment experience. The bill repeals the requirement that the one member currently appointed by the Governor not be a state employee.   “The bill repeals the responsibilities of the Commission to establish measurable goals and objectives for the State of Kansas and track the progress of state agencies implementing the Employment First Initiative. The Commission must work with state agencies and nongovernmental organizations to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain employment. The Commission may educate state agencies and stakeholders about the Initiative.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas HB 2453: Bidding Preferences for Businesses Employing Individuals with Disabilities - 07/01/2012

This legislation, signed into law by Governor Brownback in 2012, places responsibility for operating the “Kansas Bidders Preference Program” within Kansas Department of Administration In this program, which provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities, a certified business gets certain benefits and advantages when bidding on state contracts. To be certified, a business must meet several requirements, including having at least 20% of their workforce comprised of qualified people with disabilities. This provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

44-1136. Kansas Employment First Initiative Act: Definitions & Policy D