Kentucky

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The unbridled spirit of Kentucky has shown that people with disabilities are able to succeed in their careers here in the Bluegrass State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kentucky’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.26%
Change from
2014 to 2015
4,425,092
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
421,948
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.06%
Change from
2014 to 2015
115,577
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.33%
Change from
2014 to 2015
27.39%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.53%
Change from
2014 to 2015
74.82%

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 4,395,295 4,413,457 4,425,092
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 422,201 432,038 421,948
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 113,422 117,959 115,577
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,668,703 1,676,468 1,691,633
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 26.86% 27.30% 27.39%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 73.67% 74.42% 74.82%
Overall unemployment rate. 8.00% 6.50% 5.30%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 27.20% 27.80% 26.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.10% 17.30% 16.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 355,666 371,865 363,593
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 379,115 389,540 374,702
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 659,107 685,650 663,187
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 54,655 55,490 54,903
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 10,187 8,818 10,314
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,269 2,980 2,106
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 3,401 2,894 2,772
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 13,513 12,386 13,210
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 1,674 1,446 1,784

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,281 4,400 4,644
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.40% 2.40% 2.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 209,584 208,016 203,175

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 15,267 15,521 17,429
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 41,121 41,512 44,630
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 93,880 93,101 96,818
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 16.30% 16.70% 18.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% N/A 1.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.40% 1.20% 0.70%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 0.30% 0.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 473 514 608
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 148 139 282
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A 224
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,223 6,023 6,431
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 43 43 37
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 26 27 25
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 60.00% 63.00% 68.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.59 0.61 0.56

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,360
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 11 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,160 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,691 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,741 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,611 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 146 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.10% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,547 5,455 5,268
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 327,096 323,767 321,459
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 363 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,408,000 $1,390,000 $4,377,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $23,567,000 $2,199,000 $4,556,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $43,792,000 $68,985,000 $70,671,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 16.00% 18.00% 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,212 6,773 5,776
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,582 884 579
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 27.40 29.50 15.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 71.80% 72.31% 73.15%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.73% 8.43% 8.22%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.90% 1.86% 1.86%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.07% 98.98% 99.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 19.80% 18.75% 18.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 55.70% 59.49% 58.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 65.80% 67.59% 67.82%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.90% 40.74% 39.74%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 788,499
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,104
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 421,644
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 85,649
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 507,293
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 538
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 97
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 635
AbilityOne wages (products). $3,841,069
AbilityOne wages (services). $901,392

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 28 36 20
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 2
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 29 37 22
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,790 2,400 1,152
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 99 99 161
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,889 2,499 1,313

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

The agency does accept this input and will briefly define this item. 

The SRC recommended that the agency be more specific when it comes to what other agencies will assist with education on and provision of supported employment services. The agency does accept this input and will add “and other agencies” after the Arc of Kentucky because we need to utilize more resources for education and funding of Supported Employment services, such as the Kentucky Association of Supporting Employment First (KYAPSE), the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (BHDDID), the Kentucky Rehabilitation Association (KRA), UK Human Development Institute, EKU Center of Excellence, most of the Comprehensive Care Centers in the state, and many Supported Employment providers. (Page 191)

5. The Supported Employment Branch works closely with Kentucky APSE (Association of People Supporting Employment First) and its committees, and the 874K Coalition (a statewide Disability Advocacy Group) in a unified effort to secure additional state dollars for supported employment extended services.

6. The Supported Employment Branch has been active in the development/improvement of Kentucky’s Medicaid Waivers to create workable systems for coordinating supported employment services for eligible participants. Expansion of the supports for Community Living Waiver (Kentucky’s Medicaid Waivers for individuals with Developmental Disabilities) and the Michelle P Waiver has resulted in increased referrals to OVR for supported employment services for mutually eligible participants. The self–determination and Participant Directed Services within Medicaid hold much promise for supported employment funding for extended services. A new Medicaid Waiver containing better service definitions and fee structures to support and fund supported employment services rolled out in 2014.

7. The Supported Employment Branch works cooperatively with the Arc of Kentucky, among other groups, such as the Kentucky Association of Supporting Employment First (KYAPSE), the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (BHDDID), the Kentucky Rehabilitation Association (KRA), UK Human Development Institute, EKU Center of Excellence, most of the Comprehensive Care Centers in the state, and many Supported Employment providers, to educate families about supported employment and enlist their assistance in impacting additional funds for supported employment. ( Page 206-207)

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services, maximizing the existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self–determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, providing training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and Providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. For example, an enhanced fee for Vocational Profile development has been developed, piloting and expansion of new programs through establishment projects, and training providers in the use of strategies for individualized services such as customized employment and systematic instruction. (Page 249)

The Kentucky Business Leadership Network, which is affiliated with the U. S. Business Leadership Network, is to promote enduring partnerships between business and industry and agencies that provide vocational support services for Kentuckians with disabilities (currently inactive but plans are place to reestablish the network). 

Community rehabilitation providers in the provision of employment services. 

Kentucky Association of Persons in Supporting Employment first whose mission is to “promote the improvement of Supported Employment services for persons with significant disabilities experiencing barriers to employment through education, advocacy, collaboration, policy change, elimination of barriers, empowerment and community participation”. OFB has a staff person serving on the State APSE board.

  • Department of Medicaid Services
  • Department of Community Based Services–Public Assistance Programs (Page 293)

State Conferences attended were: the State Association of Persons Supporting Employment first Conference in February, Governors EEO Conference in November, Eye Opening Symposium in October, Assistive Technology staff attended the University of Kentucky 12th Annual Institute in Assistive Technology in July (sponsored by the State programs under section 4 of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 KATS) and Independent Living and Older Blind Counselors attended the University of Kentucky Annual Summer Series on Aging in June, Kentucky Association of Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired (KAER) in March, Kentucky AHEAD in May, the Kentucky Career Center Youth Summit, the Kentucky Career Center Employer Conference and Kentucky Rehabilitation Association Conference in Louisville in September. (Page 325-325)

 

Customized Employment

(A)Study Findings Service Needs and Gaps Based on a thorough review of findings across the survey, interview, and agency data, the following service needs were identified for individuals with disabilities, including those with most significant disabilities. These are Job placement services (including supported employment and customized employment), Health care, including medical and mental health treatment, Benefits and financial planning, Supportive or ancillary services (e.g., transportation, housing),Long–term supports, and Transition services for students and youth/young adults. Comments from key informants who provide services within, or interface with, Kentucky’s medical and mental health systems, may serve to clarify the findings related to health care needs. The broad areas of concern related to the limited capacity of our healthcare system, geographic gaps, saturation of providers accepting particular types of insurance and high cost of co–pays making care unaffordable for some people. While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and resulting expanded number of Kentuckians with insurance coverage has improved the access to medication for many, informants noted that some serious needs still exist and likely will continue to exist because of a lack of capacity to provide care to those who need it. Particularly in more rural areas, respondents noted that some people must travel great lengths to find physical and mental health providers; others do not have access to transportation and thus are not able to receive sufficient care. Another issue identified by informants is related to the saturation of providers because finding treatment for individuals on Medicaid is difficult as providers have capped the number of patients that they will accept. Finally, while more residents have health insurance, copays are often not affordable and thus individuals still do not seek out treatment because of financial strain. Supported Employment and capacity of CRP providers is another major focus of the needs assessment. To this end, an interesting finding was that several OVR districts appear to have limited options when it comes to CRP providers. Four districts (Elizabethtown, Madisonville, West Liberty, and Whitesburg) (Page 228)

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services, maximizing the existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self–determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, providing training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and Providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. For example, an enhanced fee for Vocational Profile development has been developed, piloting and expansion of new programs through establishment projects, and training providers in the use of strategies for individualized services such as customized employment and systematic instruction. (Page 249)

Needs/Concerns 

  • Increasing the types of available jobs through customized employment and job development
  • Transportation options for underserved counties of Kentucky
  • Vocational case management to address home, family and personal issues
  • Availability of assistive technology that responds to the changing needs of today’s information based workplace
  • Assessment for the need for benefits counseling and/or personal finance management
  • Increased need for work based learning or community based work experience 

Recommendations/Strategies 

  • Increase agency capacity to provide job placement services through establishment grants for Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) to offer customized employment services, job coaching, job development, and transition age work experiences. (Page 331)

 

Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Kentucky assesses the overall effectiveness of the workforce investment system in relation to the strategic vision and goals of the WorkSmart Kentucky and Economic Competitiveness plans, seeking integration of activities and information from all the core programs. The ultimate goal is to increase the long–term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment, to improve services to employers and demonstrate continuous improvement. Kentucky will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with Section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), and continuous improvement of the career center. (Page 77)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

Accessibility is addressed on several levels and venues in the KCC. Given that OFB and OVR staffs are housed in many of the career center offices and are a central part of the workforce programs, there is a heightened sense of assuring this topic is addressed. Accessibility is a part of the required certification process under II. Career Center (office) Management: Physical Infrastructure and Accessibility. The standards that apply to this are as follows: (Page 90)

A) IN GENERAL—The local board may designate and direct the activities of standing committees to provide information and to assist the local board in carrying out activities under this section. Such standing committees shall be chaired by a member of the local board, may include other members of the local board, and shall include other individuals appointed by the local board who are not members of the local board and who the local board determines have appropriate experience and expertise. At a minimum, the local board may designate each of the following:

  1. A standing committee to provide information and assist with operational and other issues relating to the one-stop delivery system, which may include members representatives of the one-stop partners.
  2. A standing committee to provide information and to assist with planning, operational, and other issues relating to the provision of services to youth, which shall include community based organizations with a demonstrated record of success in serving eligible youth.
  3. A standing committee to provide information and to assist with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, including issues relating to compliance with section 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding providing programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the one-stop delivery system, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing supports for or accommodations to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. (Page 114)
DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Project CASE is a collaborative effort between state vocational rehabilitation agencies, adult education, secondary and post–secondary education, career centers, employers and other partners to demonstrate how career pathways can help individuals with disabilities acquire the marketable skills and attain recognized credentials that lead to employment in high–demand occupations. In Kentucky, two pilot projects are planned in the Metro Louisville and Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) regions; these will engage seven and 23 counties respectively. (Page 64)

Workforce Preparation 

KYAE has recently completed hosting train-the-trainer events and has provided an online curricular resource to all programs in order to enhance their contextualized workforce preparation services.

The initiative initially started with an employability skills pilot in which participating program staff were trained to contextualize standards-based, academic instruction with employability skills that had been vetted through focus groups, including an employer focus group.

The recently introduced online curricular resource represents a partnership investment by KYAE and DWI of WIA Workforce Incentive Funds, renewing a contract for Worldwide Interactive Network’s (WIN) online curricula courseware. The product not only provides WorkKeys/NCRC preparation, but “soft” skills (essential) and CCRS-based curricula tracks. Along with the administration of badge-supported curricula and assessments, the essential skills track concludes with a Kentucky Essential Skills Certificate (KESC). Additionally, this online courseware is available to other state agencies with the exception of K-12 - where school districts may avail themselves to alternate courseware licenses. (Page 169)

2. The Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) and OVR partnered together, and in 2010, Kentucky became the 12th state to participate in the Dartmouth College, Johnson and Johnson, Supported Employment Initiative to demonstrate the effectiveness of the IPS model for supported employment (Individualized Placement and Support, an Evidence–Based Practice). The first local pilot projects were launched prior to the close of 2010. Through the Dartmouth Project, a new SE funding partner was added when the Greater Cincinnati Health Foundation provided funding for 2 of the local pilots in Northern KY. IPS Supported Employment now includes all 14 Kentucky Community Mental Health Centers. In FY 2016 the partnership with Behavioral Health continues with the addition of 5 IPS sites outside of the Community Mental Health Centers and 2 sites serving those with substance abuse. (Page 206)

10. The Supported Employment Branch staff participates frequently in IEP and Transition Planning meeting for individuals, and in broader scope with Special Education planning units throughout the commonwealth to develop supported employment services for students exiting schools. Again, additional dollars will be needed for extended services in order to adequately serve the students. A pilot project began in 2010 to demonstrate the effectiveness of Supported Employment/Community Rehabilitation Programs agencies working together with Post–Secondary Education programs to include people with developmental disabilities in classes and other college campus activities. This program has now become permanent and has 3 Comprehensive Transition Programs (Page 207)

(3) Beginning in 2010, OVR has partnered with the Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) to implement the Individual Placement Service (IPS) Model, an evidenced based practice in Supported Employment for consumers with severe mental illness. The program started with four pilots and has grown to include all 14 Comprehensive Mental Health Centers (CMHC). In 2015, DBH provided OVR with $250,000 to issue a Request for Proposals to select five pilot sites to implement IPS outside of the CMHCs. It provided an additional $100,000 to implement IPS for consumers with Substance Abuse.

OVR serves on numerous councils that also have representation from the Department for Medicaid Services, DIDD and DBH, including the Commonwealth Council for Developmental Disabilities (Page 212-213)

Skills Enhancement Training (SET) process the new employees receive an overview of the agency mission, philosophy, values, federal and state laws, appropriations, budget and planning, eligibility, assessment, vocational goal development, plan development, pre–employment transition services, confidentiality and ethics, services, supported employment, rehabilitation technology, diversity, disability awareness, Social Security Administration (SSA), Ticket to Work, Workforce Investment Opportunities Act (WIOA), common measures and information, personal care attendants and topics on specific disabilities. Training programs for all staff emphasize informed consumer choice and maximizing consumer direction of individualized rehabilitation plans. In prior years particular importance was placed upon the 1998 Amendments, but the content has now changed to reflect the passage of WIOA. Information regarding to current research is disseminated to all staff via formal training opportunities as well as through other technological resources such as the Internet and email. The agency has a dedicated website for training information delivery to all employees which includes a portal to information on the agency, required trainings for employees, a training calendar and announcements regarding upcoming training initiatives. The agency also encourages staff to utilize the webinars offered through other entities both within and outside of state government. The information for registration and participation is disseminated via email to all staff. One partner in this endeavor is the Human Development Institute (HDI) from the University of Kentucky. In addition to our work with HDI on the Supported Employment Training Project the employees also utilize the webinar series topics offered by them during a spring, summer and fall training program on topics related to the rehabilitation field and specific disabilities. The rehabilitation counselor mentor program was implemented in June 2002 with pilot programs in six districts. There are currently 27 counselors that have been through the training program that serve as mentors in 10 out of 15 districts. Annual recruitment is conducted to increase the number of available mentors and annual training is implemented to assure that they are prepared for their role. Beyond the formal annual training there are other training opportunities provided to continually develop their skills in the program to assure that the needs of the new employees are being addressed. This is also an opportunity to keep them aware of current policies and laws that impact the agency and their work with the employees. College and university level classes have been an integral element in staff career development. The agency has strongly encouraged continuing education to meet CSPD standards and in the past has provided tuition assistance for staff to pursue degrees at the master level. The program is currently suspended due to the loss of the In–Service Training Grants as well as budgetary constraints within the state. The agency will continue to encourage employees to utilize the CSPD grants at the universities to help them achieve their academic goals in rehabilitation. As appropriate the agency will continue to support employee advancement through reclassifications within state government. Instances include academic achievement leading to skill and knowledge increase directly related to their job that will allow them to assume additional duties to reflect their increased skills and expertise. The agency continues to see the retirement of agency leaders and is cognizant of the need for leadership succession. The agency has utilized various opportunities to achieve this goal, including coordinating with the Kentucky Association of Rehabilitation Leadership to provide training to current and future leaders. Three sessions were provided during intensive workshops on leadership topics. The Academy of Leadership Exploration and Preparedness program (ALEAP) is designed to provide staff with opportunities to learn about and develop foundational skills. This is a collaborative program with both OVR and OFB. Staff first must participate in the prerequisite required courses (online and classroom setting of 50–60 hours of instruction) through the State Personnel Governmental Services Center. ALEAP II consists of three face to face sessions on a variety of leadership topics and the completion of a project. (Page 224)

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services, maximizing the existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self–determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, providing training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and Providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. For example, an enhanced fee for Vocational Profile development has been developed, piloting and expansion of new programs through establishment projects, and training providers in the use of strategies for individualized services such as customized employment and systematic instruction. (Page 249)

Supported employment offers more than just the assistance needed to find and learn a job. It provides the necessary ongoing support to help an individual maintain employment. Kentucky has identified 85 supported employment providers throughout the state. Individualized strategies are also utilized to arrange for supported employment services outside of "organized programs" when necessary (i.e. coworkers at the job site may provide support paid for with various resources; independent supported employment specialists may be hired, etc.). More than three–fourths of Kentucky’s 120 counties have access to supported employment programs. The lack of accessible and dependable transportation often limits access to supported job opportunities. Extended support services are provided by each local supported employment program utilizing funds from a myriad of sources, including the Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) , the Kentucky Council on Developmental Disabilities, city and county government, United Way, fund–raising campaigns, PASS funding, Medicaid, Supports for Community Living Waiver funds, Michelle P waiver funds and other resources. Most programs utilize a combination of funding sources for the provision of extended support services. Natural supports are encouraged (such as co–worker, peer, etc.) and are carefully monitored by the supported employment provider. Kentucky OVR’s partner, the Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID), has developed a new Medicaid Waiver that would more adequately fund supported employment services for people with developmental disabilities. The new Supports for Community Living Waiver 2 (SCL2) was rolled out during the 2014 calendar year. It has increased the fee structure and modified the service definitions for supported employment. Kentucky’s supported employment programs have primarily served individuals with intellectual disability and individuals with chronic mental illness. This is largely due to greater availability of funding for extended support for these two groups. Individuals with other disabilities are served if funding for extended support is available and if the supported employment provider has the expertise to meet that individual’s needs for employment training and support. Kentucky has become the 12th state to participate in the Evidence –Based, Johnson and Johnson sponsored, Supported Employment Initiative via Dartmouth College. The goal is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model for supported employment for people with serious mental illness throughout Kentucky. In July 2011, four sites in Kentucky began pilot site implementation. In 2012, two sites were added. In 2013, three sites were added. In 2014 BHDDID required that all Community Mental Health Centers implement the IPS program as one of the four evidence based practices required in their state plan. A Statewide Coordinator, employed through the University of Kentucky, Human Development Institute, oversees the pilot sites. A second coordinator was hired in late 2013. The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Behavioral Health collaborate as Team Leading agencies for the project. The Kentucky Association for Persons in Supported Employment (KY APSE) has been successful in creating greater supported employment awareness among the legislators in Kentucky’s General Assembly. (Page 270)

No current plan to hire additional staff, instead focusing on training of current staff and cross utilization of staff from other departments. Training existing staff is continuing quarterly. Recent quarterly training has emphasized BTQ standards. Annual training was completed August 22 – 24, 2016, which included all staff and cross utilized staff. Staff realignment occurred to merge functions, improve collaboration and efficiencies. Cross departmental utilization is occurring by utilizing of one lower authority appeal (referee) and six higher authority appeals staff (commission writers) to assist with adjudicating cases. The realignment allowed the branch to move staff into positions that better fit their skill sets. The cross utilization of staff allows the branch extra staff to utilize during times of seasonal increases in the volume of issues. The training will increase staff performance on resolving issues, provided clearly defined expectations of performance, and increase the inefficiency of the staff in resolving issues which will lead to more timely first payments. Unemployment Insurance is requesting a regulation change that will adjust the employers 15 day protest period to respond to a notice of initial claim and notice of potential benefit charges. This will remove the barrier of employers waiting 15 days to respond to adjudicators. These more timely employer responses will result in less time needed to resolve issues and quicker first payment promptness. This will reduce claimants having to wait to request first payment until the 16th day after filing an initial claim is filed. In addition to all of the changes, the branch has also implemented of a new pilot program which began on August 2, 2016. The new program utilizes a split chargeability issue system. The performance of the staff participating in the pilot program will be measured against the performance of staff not involved in the pilot program to determine if the program is effective in reducing the promptness of first payments. Budgetary constraints for UI IT development as well as prioritization of IT projects, delayed final development and implementation. Ongoing analysis and movement toward mainframe independence are factors in considering the order in which projects are completed and resources, both financial and staffing, are allocated. The new enhancements to the functionality to the internal claim intake system were not completed until early 2016. Since implementation fourteen help desk tickets have been created to improve the newly implemented system. Monitoring and assessment will be accomplished through daily, weekly and monthly reports reflecting issues received, issues worked and remaining issues. These reports will include a comparison of the pilot program data with the non-pilot program data. Monthly Interstate Section team meetings will be held to assess existing efforts and results and discuss improvements. (Page 429)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

We currently have in place five other innovative programs that provide high school students with a variety of work–based learning, financial literacy, self–advocacy training, job exploration, career counseling, and workplace readiness training opportunities that exist in the community with employers, in our rehabilitation center, and in post–secondary institutions.

The Summer Youth Boot Camp Program focuses on job exploration, workplace readiness training, and self–advocacy and is held at the Charles W. McDowell Center in Louisville. It is an intensive four week program based on the work of Dr. Karen Wolffe that introduces employability skills to transition aged individuals. The curriculum is specific to individuals that are blind or visually impaired.

The Summer Work Experience Program is in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Providers. CRPs are paid to find work experiences in competitive integrated settings for transition aged individuals. The work experiences last six to eight weeks and the students are paid by the Office for the Blind for the time worked. The goals of the work experience are to provide community based career exploration and the opportunity to practice work readiness skills. It is also hoped that by participating in the work experience program, employers will be open to providing more opportunities for individuals who are blind or visually impaired in their communities. (Page 310) 

Benefits

Existing legacy case management systems across WIOA Title I, Wagner Peyser, Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education are disparate and insular: Currently, the Office of Employment and Training (OET), the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Office for the Blind (OFB) are supported by insular case management systems that respond to requests for the following programs: 

  • Wagner Peyser Labor Exchange (Employ Kentucky Operating System - EKOS)
  • Unemployment Insurance – both benefits and tax/collections (Mainframe and Kentucky’s Electronic Workplace for Employment Services – KEWES)
  • Veterans Program
  • Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Program
  • National Emergency Grants
  • High Growth Job Training
  • Foreign Labor Certification
  • Health Care Tax Credit System
  • Trade Adjustment Act
  • Work Opportunities Tax Credit
  • Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA)
  • Student data
  • Customer records, services provided and costs of services for individuals with disabilities and blindness – Case Management System (CMS)
  • Social Security Reimbursement tracking and processing
  • Social Security Ticket to Work assignment tracking and processing (Page 67- 68)

The Case Management System (CMS) supports consumer case management activities, authorizes related payment transactions, generates reports/report information and contains a Social Security Reimbursement subsystem for all Title IV consumers, both for OFB and OVR. Consumer information, including confidential medical information, is collected to open a case within the respective agency. Agency services are based on the signed Individualized Plan for Employment between consumer and agency counselor. The system can attach scanned case documents, record staff provided services, staff activities, track comparable benefits, track consumer education and 

Training advancements. There is a Social Security Reimbursement module within CMS that enables each respective agency to seek reimbursement for the cost of the services provided to agency consumers receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. There is a Maximus module that generates files that are submitted to Social Security for the Ticket to Work program and tracks responses and ticket assignments. In July 2016, Kentucky ceased WIA data collection and reporting and began working to implement WIOA data collection and reporting requirements in addition to other USDOE and state reporting. CMS is a staff only application with a web front end. An interface exists between CMS and eMARS, the state’s payment system, to enable processing of payments to, and refunds from, vendors. The system is Section 508 and Bobby compliant and staff use screen readers such as JAWS, ZoomText and WindowEyes, as well as speech recognition software such as Dragon Naturally Speaking. (Page 68-69)

A local area may request Rapid Response funding in the form of Dislocation Grants and Additional Assistance Grants to serve potentially TAA–eligible worker groups in the same manner it requests funds for all other worker groups. The only difference is that Additional Assistance funding can’t be used to fund training once a worker group is covered by a TAA certification. If a TAA petition is certified, the state’s TAA program is responsible for identifying individuals potentially eligible under the certification through worker lists supplied by the employer and/or UI claimant information. 

The TAA program then uses a standard mailer to contact the potentially eligible individuals, inviting them to attend a Trade Orientation Session to learn about program benefits and register. At Trade Orientation Sessions. (Page 129)

The vocational rehabilitation programs use a case management system called Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment (AWARE) that is specifically designed for vocational rehabilitation programs. This system enables counselors to manage cases, managers to monitor cases, and the agency to prepare and submit required reports to RSA in a timely manner. All client data is captured and maintained in the AWARE case management system, such as information on client employment outcomes, including position title, employer, wages, hours, benefits, etc., and is provided to the Rehabilitation Services Administration, U. S. Department of Education through quarterly and annual reports. The company that programs the software will revise the system to produce any WIOA required data. Due to the especially strict confidentiality requirements imposed by the Rehabilitation Act and the sensitive nature of information about disabilities and medical conditions, the case management system is a closed system, accessible only by authorized employees. NMDWS has established a data sharing agreement to provide necessary wage data to support the programs’ activities. (Page 112)

These individuals work together to ensure that companies receive unified and coordinated information and services related to their workforce development needs. The KSN allows for the bringing together of the workforce and economic development programs and resources, thus providing a variety of ways to build workforce skills and ease training costs for employers. Through such options as reimbursable grants and tax credits for classroom training, on–the–job training, tuition and certification training, train–the–trainer travel, and entry level and skills upgrade training; Kentucky has resources that allow flexible and customizable training specific to company needs. Early in 2016, KSN partners will gain access to a Customer Relationship Management system based on a Sales Force platform. Phase 1 will allow for shared access to employer contact and needs, and Phase 2 later in 2016–2017 will add the capacity for KSN partners to add and assess employer programs and resources via the Sales Force application. OVR, in conjunction with the Kentucky Office for the Blind and Office of Employment and Training, hosted an Employer Summit in 2015 to highlight the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities as well as the OFCCP regulation requirements. The event was well received with numerous employers seeking additional information on working with the two rehabilitation agencies. This outreach and education with Employers and Businesses across the commonwealth will continue with additional summits convened in regional locations to attract a more diverse employer customer base. The Workforce Partners recognize the regional differences as well as workforce needs and will hold Employer Summits focused specific to the regional sectors and incorporate the post–secondary education institutions as a conduit to meeting the talent pipeline demands. The Statewide Council for Vocational Rehabilitation (SCVR), Kentucky’s State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), includes several employers and a representative of the Workforce Investment Board who provide important input on agency policy and activities related to employment. OVR, in conjunction with SCVR, conducts a Job Placement Month annually in October which includes many events around the state that promote collaboration with employers. Regional Employer Recognition Awards are given out during the month to employers who have hired OVR consumers. OVR will also continue to partner with local initiatives like Project SEARCH in Northern Kentucky and the Coalition for Workforce Diversity in Louisville to identify and educate employers willing to develop new programs specifically designed to focus on hiring and training individuals with disabilities. (Page 210)

 (A) Study Findings Service Needs and Gaps Based on a thorough review of findings across the survey, interview, and agency data, the following service needs were identified for individuals with disabilities, including those with most significant disabilities. These are Job placement services (including supported employment and customized employment), Health care, including medical and mental health treatment, Benefits and financial planning, Supportive or ancillary services (e.g., transportation, housing), Long–term supports, and Transition services for students and youth / young adults. Comments from key informants who provide services within, or interface with, Kentucky’s medical and mental health systems, may serve to clarify the findings related to health care needs. The broad areas of concern related to the limited capacity of our healthcare system, geographic gaps, saturation of providers accepting particular types of insurance and high cost of co–pays making care unaffordable for some people. While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and resulting expanded number of Kentuckians with insurance coverage has improved the access to medication for many, informants noted that some serious needs still exist and likely will continue to exist because of a lack of capacity to provide care to those who need it. Particularly in more rural areas, respondents noted that some people must travel great lengths to find physical and mental health providers; others do not have access to transportation and thus are not able to receive sufficient care. Another issue identified by informants is related to the saturation of providers because finding treatment for individuals on Medicaid is difficult as providers have capped the number of patients that they will accept. Finally, while more residents have health insurance, copays are often not affordable and thus individuals still do not seek out treatment because of financial strain. Supported Employment and capacity of CRP providers is another major focus of the needs assessment. (Page 228) 

Services to individuals with disabilities provided by Community Rehabilitation Programs. These issues are anticipated as in–demand service and service needs for CRPs in the next three years. These are Job Placement Services, Transition Services, Skills Training, and Supported Employment Services. ESTABLISHMENT GRANTS This Update to the previous CSNA assessed the need to develop, establish and improve community rehabilitation programs, referred to as establishment projects. OVR surveyed staff, consumers and partners on the use of establishment grants to develop innovative programming. The survey asked if there is a need for OVR to fund establishment projects to maximize relationships with employers, improve outcomes and services for transition youth, improve outcomes and services for Social Security recipients, improve outcomes and services for individuals with behavioral health issues, develop supported employment programs in areas of the state where they currently do not exist, and improve outcomes and services for ex–offenders. Item 1 directly addresses the need for more job placement services and also the continuing prominence of ‘Employer Attitudinal Barriers’ as a barrier to employment. Item 2 directly addresses the need for transition services. Item 3 is designed to address the need for more benefits planning assistance. Item 5 addresses the continuing need for more supported employment services, particularly in some areas of the state. Items 4 and 6 address serving the two populations of consumers identified by both vocational rehabilitation counselors and community rehabilitation programs as the largest growing populations they have seen over the previous three years. Counselors were asked to evaluate the importance of several areas of need for establishment projects, including service needs, such as supported employment and employer relationships, as well as services targeting particular populations, such as transition youth and social security recipients. ( Page 223)

Measure: To meet or exceed customer satisfaction rating from the previous year

GOAL II: To provide Pre–employment transition services (Pre–ETS) to Transition Students (ages 14–21) and other transition services to Transition Youth (ages–16–24) to assist them with transition from high school into competitive integrated employment or post–secondary training.

Measure: To provide specific and specialized services to at least 60% of both transition students and transition youth 

GOAL III: Provide information concerning benefits planning and financial planning in order to promote inclusion, integration, and empowerment of individuals with the most significant and significant disabilities.

Measure: All applicants who receive SSA benefits will receive information on benefits planning and at least 50% of them will receive a benefits analysis. (Page 234)

  • Evaluate the current transition program to determine trends and needs
  • Expand the capacity of the agency to provide Pre–ETS services
  • Expand Pre–ETS to transition students (ages 14–21) and other transition services to youth (ages 16–24)
  • Offer benefits planning for individuals with disabilities who are Social Security recipients
  • Provide information on financial education and asset development
  • Enhance job placement services
  • Provide supported employment services that lead to competitive integrated employment and improve the number of successful outcomes for supported employment cases across the state
  • Develop and apply a process for implementing requirements under Section 511 (Page 236)

According to data from the 2012 American Community Survey, published in the annual Compendium of Disability Statistics, 17.0% of Kentucky civilians living in the community report having a disability, including 15.5% of residents of working age (18–64). This is higher than the national average (12.3% all, 10.2% working age). The rate of Kentuckians reporting a disability remained relatively stable from 2011 through 2012, growing at 1.1% (on par with the national average of 1.2%). Only 27% of individuals in Kentucky with disabilities are employed. Kentucky and Arkansas share the second highest percentage of individuals with disabilities. Kentucky also shares a second place ranking with Arkansas and Louisiana in percentage of individuals who fall below the poverty line at 17.3%. According to the Social Security Administration, 192,721 Kentuckians receive blind and disabled Supplemental Security Income benefits. The Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI), in 2007, reported the percentage of SSI recipients in Kentucky who were working was 2.7% compared to the national percentage of 7.6% (ICI, 2007). In 2007, Kentucky also had 160,122 Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. These statistics provide a description of the potentially high demand for OVR services based on the number of individuals in the state with disabilities. A review of internal OVR data that was used to develop a Personnel Plan in 2011 indicated that as the average caseload size increases, the rehabilitation rate tends to decrease. (Page 239-240)

G.   Partner with SOAR to increase transportation options in the Appalachian region;

H.   Partner with the Medicaid Brokerage System;

I.   Provide Benefits Planning and Analysis as an option when it comes to addressing health insurance concerns. 

Goal 2: To provide Pre–employment transition services (Pre–ETS) to Transition Students (ages 14–21) and other transition services to Youth (ages 16–24) to assist them with transition from high school into competitive integrated employment or post–secondary training. (Page 251)

School to Work Transition

(2) As a means of providing Pre–Employment Transition Services, OVR will work with partner agencies in Workforce Development to identify existing apprenticeship programs with employers with which OVR may partner to focus on incorporating students and youth with disabilities into the programs. We do work with the Office of Autism in order to understand how to assist youth on the spectrum with attaining and maintaining employment. A model program focused on creating apprenticeship opportunities for students and youth with disabilities will be developed in such a manner as to be replicated in urban and rural areas alike. This will expand employment opportunities for all the youth and students with disabilities in Kentucky. OVR will continue to participate in an Annual Youth Summit, which provides the opportunity for youth and students with disabilities to meet employers, educators, and service providers. OVR plans to continuously expand the summit to provide employers an opportunity to meet with potential employees or apprenticeship participants. (Page 210)

Data Collection

TBCM builds on the functional alignment within the centers and focuses on providing services to job seekers in a consistent, coordinated and efficient way. The systems and tools used in the TBCM approach reinforce functional alignment and integrated service delivery within the centers and among partner agencies. To strengthen this project, Kentucky’s consultant coordinated activities in recognition of and alignment with other key actions in the WorkSmart Kentucky Strategic Plan including Kentucky Career Center Customer Flow, Kentucky Career Center Certification, and Partner for Success and Workforce Academy. Services to Employers are aligned among the core partners through the Business Services teams of the Kentucky Skills Network. Since the implementation of the WorkSmart Kentucky Strategic Plan, a priority has been developing unified and collaborative approach to service delivery in our business services model. It is critical that all the government agencies working to meet the employment needs of business and industry work together taking a solutions-based approach to meeting their needs. This is being done through regional Business Services Teams. WIOA Performance Outcomes Measures Group is a work group made up of the core partners to develop cross-program common measures and address all issues and concerns regarding data collection and reporting. The group is facilitated by the Kentucky Center for Workforce Statistics (KCEWS). The Partner for Success initiative brought together all agencies in the Department of Workforce Investment to develop a unified approach to delivering services. The goal was to create networking opportunities, create awareness of the services each partnering agency delivers and assemble the full array of services delivered to customers in a manner that is efficient, effective and holistic. A top priority of the current Governor’s Discretionary Budget is to advance the work of training of state staff and partners. The new effort will build on previous Workforce Academy curriculum that provided training for all partners at every level of the system. Training has been and will continue to be held regionally inclusive of local level staff covering topics such as WIOA implementation, customer flow, local labor market information, transformational leadership and system transformation. (Page 56)

Existing legacy case management systems across WIOA Title I, Wagner Peyser, Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education are disparate and insular: Currently, the Office of Employment and Training (OET), the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Office for the Blind (OFB) are supported by insular case management systems that respond to requests for the following programs: 

  • Wagner Peyser Labor Exchange (Employ Kentucky Operating System - EKOS)
  • Unemployment Insurance – both benefits and tax/collections (Mainframe and Kentucky’s Electronic Workplace for Employment Services – KEWES)
  • Veterans Program
  • Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Program
  • National Emergency Grants
  • High Growth Job Training
  • Foreign Labor Certification
  • Health Care Tax Credit System
  • Trade Adjustment Act
  • Work Opportunities Tax Credit
  • Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA)
  • Student data
  • Customer records, services provided and costs of services for individuals with disabilities and blindness (Page 67)

There is a Maximus module that generates files that are submitted to Social Security for the Ticket to Work program and tracks responses and ticket assignments. In July 2016, Kentucky ceased WIA data collection and reporting and began working to implement WIOA data collection and reporting requirements in addition to other USDOE and state reporting. CMS is a staff only application with a web front end. An interface exists between CMS and eMARS, the state’s payment system, to enable processing of payments to, and refunds from, vendors. The system is Section 508 and Bobby compliant and staff use screen readers such as JAWS, ZoomText and WindowEyes, as well as speech recognition software such as Dragon Naturally Speaking.

Kentucky Adult Education Reporting System The Kentucky Adult Education Reporting System (KAERS) is a nationally-recognized student management system designed and maintained through Kentucky Adult Education and the Council on Postsecondary Education. It is used by all Title II adult education programs to record programmatic, student and fiscal agent information with a student portal for students to view their data and online curriculum. KAERS also has a reporting tool used to enhance program performance, a real-time student tracking function, and integrates external data sources. Data from KAERS is submitted, on a regular basis, to the Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) and KCEWS. (Page 69)

OVR subcontracted with the University of Kentucky Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling Program to conduct the triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) in the Fall and Spring of 2014–2015. The current study was designed to identify service needs, trends in service needs, disability populations who are underserved, trends in disability populations, and recommendations for OVR. Prior to conducting the needs assessment, the research team reviewed data collection instruments from the 2011–2012 iteration. OVR senior staff provided assistance with revisions and updates to the surveys, making improvements to clarity and ensuring that questions would elicit the kind of information that is needed for strategic planning. OVR staff also assisted with survey dissemination, making sure that the survey reached current and previous customers, staff and counselors, and key workforce partners. As a result of these efforts, response rates for the present CSNA iteration were on par with and in some cases exceeded previous needs assessment surveys. In addition to survey data, RSA 911 case data from FY 2011–2013, state–level population data, and interview data from 21 Key Informants who work in areas of disability and public service throughout the state were analyzed. This information was meant to provide context as well as additional areas of consideration for OVR strategic planning efforts. (Page 228)

In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We anticipate that the current system will be able to collect the necessary data beginning 7/1/2016 and produce accurate reports for common measures reporting. (Page 235)

The purchase or licensing of other systems that would meet both the needs of the two vocational rehabilitation agencies and those of common measure reporting are being considered. Additionally, the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, Department of Workforce Investment is exploring the feasibility of purchasing or leasing a single system for all of the data collection needs of the Department including the Office of Employment and Training, OFB, and OVR. The ability to capture the performance accountability measures common to all Kentucky Workforce Investment agencies is currently a work in progress. The Department for Workforce Investment (DW), in partnership with a current federal grant, is testing the potential implementation of software that may have the capacity to capture all customer flow information within DWI. The nationally recognized software is currently being customized to the specific needs of DWI agencies and training has staff has been implemented. Also being tested is the capacity of the software to allow for totally paperless consumer files, the ability of the customer/job seeker to access their information from a website for the purposes of updating information, providing information required by the various agencies and having direct access to employment opportunities in their area. DWI will continue to pilot the use of this system with the ultimate goal of transferring all DWI agencies to a common casework system within two years. Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. There have at least been some conversations concerning paperless case pilot projects. In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We anticipate that the current system will be able to collect the necessary data beginning 7/1/2016 and produce accurate reports prior to the due dates for Rehabilitation Services Administration and common measures reporting. Once a baseline is determined and the relationship between services, partnerships, etc. and successful outcomes and measurable progress is analyzed, strategies will be developed to improve the performance outcomes. (Page 260)

Additionally, the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, Department of Workforce Investment is exploring the feasibility of purchasing or leasing a single system for all of the data collection needs of the Department including the Office of Employment and Training, Office for the Blind and Office of Vocational Rehabilitation.

Early in 2016 Kentucky Skills Network partners will gain access to a Customer Relationship Management system based on a SalesForce platform. Phase 1 will allow for shared access to employer contact and needs, and Phase 2 later in 2016–2017 will add the capacity for KSN partners to add and assess employer programs and resources via the SalesForce application.

Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. (Page 336)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Low Income Services provided to low-income individuals are reflected in Kentucky’s WIOA Priority of Service policy that provides guidance on the service requirement for Title I Adults for both individualized career services and training services. Priority applies to recipients of public assistance, other low-income individuals and individuals who are basic skills deficient. A low-income individual is defined in Section 3(36) means an individual who: Eligible WIOA in-school youth must be low-income, unless a local area applies the 5 percent low-income exception. WIOA out-of-school youth are not required to be low-income unless the barrier requires additional assistance to enter or complete an education program or hold employment or is a recipient of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent and is basic skills deficient or an English language learner. Service priorities for all populations with barriers to employment The WorkSmart Kentucky Plan has driven significant changes and improvements in the workforce system since 2010, as well as informed other related strategic initiatives like Kentucky’s participation in the NGA Talent Pipeline Academy. The following 2010-13 goals will continue to inform and guide the system during this transition period and to build career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment. To provide determining factors for the goals of Kentucky’s strategic plan, a series of objectives was developed. Each set of objectives supports a specific goal and provides the framework for the development of action steps as well as a basis for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of this plan. Align Kentucky’s workforce development system with its education objectives. 

  • Increase communication and collaboration between workforce boards and boards of education, technical education, post-secondary education and economic development;
  • Increase the number of post-secondary and work ready high school graduates;
  • Promote educational options, including technical education, two-year and four-year college, apprenticeships and specialty training to younger students;
  • Increase awareness of educational and skills requirements for high-demand jobs, as well as those in emerging industries; and
  • Establish the concept of life-long learning as a norm in the 21st century. Align Kentucky’s workforce development system with economic development strategies.
  • Increase communication and collaboration between workforce boards and economic development agencies;
  • Develop “rapid response” framework for new jobs based on model for layoffs;
  • Refine and promote evolving methods of projecting jobs and training needs of the future; and
  • Increase opportunities for entrepreneurship in a culture of innovation. (Page 37)

 

Career Pathways

KCC partners will work closely with Department of Community Based Services (DCBS) to assure customers have knowledge and access to needed resources. One–stop partners are directly involved with two Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) grant initiatives with DCBS. Paths to Promise (P2P) is a pilot program with a robust research component serving eight counties in Eastern Kentucky. The pilot includes moving eligible students into AOKY career pathways. The subsequent allocation of employment and training funds will be dedicated to providing support services to students pursuing education and training in urban areas across the state.

The core partner agencies will coordinate and better align services with Criminal Justice agencies in serving ex–offenders. OVR and OFB work closely with this target population in providing services, supports and referrals to other programs as needed. (Page 58)

Project CASE is a collaborative effort between state vocational rehabilitation agencies, adult education, secondary and post–secondary education, career centers, employers and other partners to demonstrate how career pathways can help individuals with disabilities acquire the marketable skills and attain recognized credentials that lead to employment in high–demand occupations. In Kentucky, two pilot projects are planned in the Metro Louisville and Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) regions; these will engage seven and 23 counties respectively. (Page 64)

J. Participate in Project CASE, a five–year, RSA–funded grant to the Office for the Blind (OFB) to identify and recruit eligible consumers from OFB and the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) in the Kentuckiana Works and EKCEP Kentucky Career Center areas to pursue career pathways in Information Technology, Manufacturing, Industrial Technology, and the Healthcare, Nursing, and Allied Health fields and provide those consumers with a variety of supports, including job placement assistance after completion of training;

K. Coordinate Rapid Responses to all major community job losses statewide along with other center partners; (Page 255)

A federal Career Pathways grant recently received by the Kentucky Office for the Blind (OFB) from the Rehabilitation Services Administration. OVR will collaborate with OFB on assisting consumers in three career pathways (healthcare, manufacturing, and information technology) in two of Kentucky Career Centers, Kentuckian Works in the Louisville metropolitan area and the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) in rural Appalachia. (Page 263)

Workforce Development Boards: OFB VR counselors actively participate on their local Workforce Development Board’s Youth and One Stop committees to enhance and make accessible the programs and services for transition age consumers. Through Project CASE, a program developed from the use of Federal grant funding through the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the Office for the Blind will have stronger coordination and collaboration with the Youth Career Centers and other Kentucky Career Centers. Partnering with Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) and KentuckianaWorks in the hiring of Career Pathway Coordinators, and in cross–agency training of staff on career pathways for students with disabilities, Project CASE will ensure sustained partnerships. (Page 300)

All the Disability Coordinators in this survey have an expectation that OVR counselors will provide needed assistive technology for post–secondary students. Percentages were high among responses that goals and expectations of working with an OVR counselor included provision of orientation and mobility services, resources for the student/family, vocational/career counseling, open and regular communication, assistance with training/college funding, and assistance with employment upon graduation. While we may help provide financial assistance for tuition and assistive devices, the true strength of our agency is in the vocational counseling services we provide on an individual basis. We must work to remain active counselors, ensuring that students are getting opportunities for work experiences, internships, and apprenticeships through the Career Pathways program. (Page 338)

In order to assure the coordination of services to facilitate the transition students from school to postsecondary life (including the receipt of VR services, postsecondary education, competitive integrated employment, and pre–employment transition services) OFB utilizes the following process. The VR Counselor is responsible for the schools located in their assigned county areas. Counselors work with school staff to identify potentially eligible students assuring that they are given the opportunity to apply for services starting at age 14. While the student is enrolled in school, the VR Counselor works with school staff to ensure the student receives the needed services to aid in the transition to post–secondary life. Services include but are not limited to pre–employment transition services, other VR services and programming offered by OFB, and other services specific to transition aged students by school districts and other entities. VR Counselors provide individualized services and where gaps in services are identified staff work to developed new and innovative services in the students’ home area to better serve this population. One project that aligns with this area in serving students is Project CASE (Creating Access to Successful Employment). In October 2015, the Kentucky Office for the Blind/Kentucky Career Center was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR–eligible individuals, including students and youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized postsecondary credentials necessary to secure competitive integrated employment in high–demand, high–quality occupations. Creating Access to Successful Employment (CASE) will help ensure that individuals with disabilities, even at the secondary school level, are not left out of participating in these existing initiatives, and can prepare for and obtain jobs in high–wage and high–demand occupations.

The goals and strategies of this five year project and the evaluation plan for it strongly aligns with the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA. (Page 365 &366)

The plan has served as a blueprint for transforming Kentucky’s workforce services focused on adapting to the changing needs of employers to create a demand–driven, business–led, solutions–based publicly funded talent development system for the Commonwealth. Over the next four years, the new Administration will work with the new Kentucky Workforce Innovation Board on a new strategic plan and new goals. The new plan and goals will inform subsequent modifications of this State Plan and of course the continuing transformation of Kentucky’s workforce system through innovative practices which enhance sustainable economic and job growth to improve the lives of Kentuckians. Kentucky strategies have and will continue to support WIOA’s focus on low income adults and youth who have limited skills, lack work experience, and face other barriers to economic success. Vocational Rehabilitation is a full and actively engaged partner in Kentucky in the workforce system. OFB and OVR are actively engaged in the planning process, on committees and staff serves as project directors on some of the KWIB initiatives. They are advocates in the workforce system for individuals with disabilities. Please refer to the Vocational Rehabilitation section of this combined plan for a comprehensive listing of goals and strategies. (Page 367)

Employment Networks

Kentucky’s employment website. 

  • The Kentucky Employment Network (KEN) works with UI customers who are profiled as likely to exhaust UI benefits. KEN consists of a workshop that informs the customer of the programs available through the Kentucky Career Center.
  • Re–employment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) works with UI customers who are profiled as likely to exhaust UI benefits. The grant activities consist of a Kentucky Career Center orientation, job search overview, Individual Employment Plan (IEP) and referral to job services.
  • The KCCGO! Dislocated Worker Grant has offered the opportunity to leverage key KWIB strategic plan initiatives including Unified Business Services, Career Center Certification and Sector Strategies and focus those improvements intensively on the long–term unemployed. The KCCGO! grant made available $4,775,418 to local workforce development areas to provide re–employment services including training costs for OJTs, Internships, Registered Apprenticeships, Accelerating Opportunity Scholarships, Work Experience/Tryout Employment, Customized Training, and other training in targeted sectors.(Page 152)

 

 

Displaying 1 - 10 of 54

Transition Services for Students with Disabilities - 10/12/2017

“For many students with disabilities the success of this transition from school to adult life depends on teamwork and collaboration between the schools and community resources. As one such resource, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation works closely with the Kentucky Department of Education to assist eligible students with disabilities to identify, plan for, and achieve their vocational goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Supported Employment Training Project - 07/01/2017

The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation has played a vital role in the establishment and implementation of supported employment services in the Commonwealth. Through partnerships with agencies, organizations and funding services for persons with severe disabilities, the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation is able to assist many people who have a supported employment goal in achieving positive employment outcomes.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

State Plan Under Title XIX of the Social Security Act - 04/06/2017

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Kentucky's Medicaid program.

 

The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act, such as:

-Methods of Administration

-Eligibility

-Services Covered

-Quality Control

-Fiscal Reimbursements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supports for Community Living Waiver - 03/29/2017

~~“SCL Waiver renewal officially approved by CMS! - (Mar. 29, 2017) - The Department for Medicaid Services (DMS) has been notified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) of the official renewal of the Supports for Community Living (SCL) Medicaid Waiver to be implemented April 1, 2017. The SCL waiver renewal period is effective March 1, 2017 through February 28, 2022.

Beginning April 1, 2017, providers shall implement SCL regulations 907 KAR 12:010 and 907 KAR 12:020 that were dated effective June 3, 2016.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mission Statement of the Kentucky Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities - 02/10/2017

~~“Mission StatementIt is the mission of the Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DDID) to empower each person to realize his or her place in the community as a citizen of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. To accomplish this mission, DDID will partner with and support persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities, families, advocates, stakeholders and government agencies….

EmploymentIndividuals of working age are employable: employment is life-enriching.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

State Medicaid Plan Amendments - 01/19/2017

~~“This page is a resource for Kentucky Medicaid State Plan Amendments.  It has information on the amendments starting with 2008 .”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Labor Cabinet Receives $896,600 Apprenticeship Grant” - 10/24/2016

“The U.S. Dept. of Labor has announced over $50.5 million in grant awards to 37 states to help expand apprenticeship opportunities across the U.S. – including $896,600 for Kentucky. The proposal calls for a workforce pipeline to be created in Kentucky, increasing the number of Registered Apprentices by 1,300 individuals, including women, minorities, 16-24 year olds, individuals age 45+ or older, veterans, and people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Kentucky Department of Education “Career and Technical Education” - 10/06/2016

“Mission: The mission of Career and Technical Education is to assist schools in providing students with skills necessary for a successful transition to postsecondary education or work and a desire for life-long learning in a global society.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Request for a Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver - 08/24/2016

“Kentucky HEALTH is an innovative, transformative healthcare program designed to not only stabilize the program financially, but to also improve the health outcomes and overall quality of life for all members. This demonstration waiver seeks to evaluate new policies and program elements designed to engage members in their healthcare and provide the necessary education and tools required to achieve long term health and an improved quality of life. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Assistive Technology Service Network “A Guide to Assistive Technology Funding in Kentucky 15th Edition” - 08/01/2016

“…the services of the ATRCs include, but are not limited to: Assistive Technology Services for Early Intervention, K-12 and Post-secondary school, Employment, Transition, Independent Living, leisure or recreation; Loan Library of Assistive Devices, adaptive equipment and toys; Demonstrations of assistive technology devices; Funding information, Assistance and Referral; Assessments and Evaluations for AT; Vocational assessments; Consultations on appropriate technologies; Workplace AT; Environmental Controls; Recycled Computers and Assistive Technology Devices; Training and Technical Assistance on and about AT.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Statute 42.0146 - Certification Program for Disabled Veteran-Owned Businesses - 07/15/2016

Office of Equal Employment Opportunity and Contract Compliance—Oversight of certification program for disabled veteran-owned businesses—Administrative regulations 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky ABLE Act S.B. 179 - 04/05/2016

Signed by the Governor on April  5, 2016

AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities.

Amend KRS 205.200 to disregard any amount in an ABLE account, any contributions to an ABLE account, and any distribution from an ABLE account for qualified expenses for the purposes of determining an individual's eligibility for a means-tested public assistance program and the amount of assistance or benefits the individual is eligible to receive under the program; direct the State Treasurer, the Secretary of the Finance and Administration Cabinet, the Executive Director of the Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Executive Director of the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority to work cooperatively to seek all available sources of funding, determine the best plan of action related to ABLE accounts, and report to the Legislative Research Commission on or before December 31, 2016.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Transition Services for Students with Disabilities - 10/12/2017

“For many students with disabilities the success of this transition from school to adult life depends on teamwork and collaboration between the schools and community resources. As one such resource, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation works closely with the Kentucky Department of Education to assist eligible students with disabilities to identify, plan for, and achieve their vocational goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Supported Employment Training Project - 07/01/2017

The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation has played a vital role in the establishment and implementation of supported employment services in the Commonwealth. Through partnerships with agencies, organizations and funding services for persons with severe disabilities, the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation is able to assist many people who have a supported employment goal in achieving positive employment outcomes.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Mission Statement of the Kentucky Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities - 02/10/2017

~~“Mission StatementIt is the mission of the Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DDID) to empower each person to realize his or her place in the community as a citizen of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. To accomplish this mission, DDID will partner with and support persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities, families, advocates, stakeholders and government agencies….

EmploymentIndividuals of working age are employable: employment is life-enriching.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Labor Cabinet Receives $896,600 Apprenticeship Grant” - 10/24/2016

“The U.S. Dept. of Labor has announced over $50.5 million in grant awards to 37 states to help expand apprenticeship opportunities across the U.S. – including $896,600 for Kentucky. The proposal calls for a workforce pipeline to be created in Kentucky, increasing the number of Registered Apprentices by 1,300 individuals, including women, minorities, 16-24 year olds, individuals age 45+ or older, veterans, and people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Kentucky Department of Education “Career and Technical Education” - 10/06/2016

“Mission: The mission of Career and Technical Education is to assist schools in providing students with skills necessary for a successful transition to postsecondary education or work and a desire for life-long learning in a global society.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation “Order of Selection Letter to Community Partners” - 06/30/2016

“Last year the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and its partners assisted almost 40,000 Kentuckians on their path toward gainful employment. However, the continuing demand, escalating costs, and a shortfall in matchable state dollars now further limit our ability to provide services to all persons eligible for our services. When a public vocational rehabilitation program like OVR cannot serve everyone who is eligible, federal law requires that it invoke what is called an Order of Selection.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Kentucky Department of Education “Transition” - 10/09/2015

The ultimate goal of the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE), Division of Learning Services is the successful transition of all students from school to post-school activities - whether postsecondary education, vocational training, integrated employment, continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living or community participation. We also recognize that many other transitions occur over the course of the life of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Customized Employment in Kentucky (video) - 07/28/2015

The seven-minute video profiles three employees with developmental disabilities who are working in their community, in jobs which are a good fit for them, and in which their contributions are valued by their employer. The common thread in these stories is that the jobs were “customized,” a process in which employer needs are matched with the talents, interests and contributions of individual job seekers

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Kentucky Unified State Plan 2012-2017 - 12/10/2012

“The Commonwealth is committed to ensuring that individuals with disabilities have all available service opportunities. The system’s service philosophy is that job seekers with disabilities are served by workforce staff in the same manner as any other job seekers. Where additional support or expertise is needed, OVR staff will assist. Many of the individuals with disabilities seeking services at one-stop sites are veterans and thus receive one-on-one assistance from DVOP specialists in addition to the broad array of services otherwise available. Cross-training for staff system-wide is promoted to ensure a seamless continuum of services. To facilitate universal access, one-stop resource areas are equipped with a variety of assistive technology tools, including large computer monitors, low vision readers, screen reading software, TTY, and adjustable work stations. In addition, career center staff is available at all sites to orient customers to these resources and to assist them throughout the service experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Supported Employment Training Project “Customized Employment, Self-Employment, and Employment First”

~~“This page focuses on information for job seekers or their family members -- people exploring the possibility of supported employment, as well as those already receiving services who need additional information. Other parts of our Supported Employment Training Project (SETP) web site are designed primarily for people providing supported employment services. There are many hyperlinks within this page…

What is the “Employment First” agenda? This is a movement that's taken root in a number of states -- centered around raising expectations, acknowledging the profound significance of employment opportunity and seeking employment as a first option. (Establishing a National Employment First Agenda, and APSE Statement on Employment First - October 2010)”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Kentucky Assistive Technology Service Network “A Guide to Assistive Technology Funding in Kentucky 15th Edition” - 08/01/2016

“…the services of the ATRCs include, but are not limited to: Assistive Technology Services for Early Intervention, K-12 and Post-secondary school, Employment, Transition, Independent Living, leisure or recreation; Loan Library of Assistive Devices, adaptive equipment and toys; Demonstrations of assistive technology devices; Funding information, Assistance and Referral; Assessments and Evaluations for AT; Vocational assessments; Consultations on appropriate technologies; Workplace AT; Environmental Controls; Recycled Computers and Assistive Technology Devices; Training and Technical Assistance on and about AT.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Perkins Center (Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation)

“The Perkins Center is a division of the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the vast majority of our consumers are referred by OVR Counselors located in several cities and towns across the Commonwealth….One of the main reasons for the creation of the Perkins Center was to enable Kentuckians with disabilities to obtain all the services they would need to become employed... The Center currently operates several programs and services that enable consumers to achieve their vocational goals”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities (CCDD) is a group of citizens, appointed by the governor to serves as a leading catalyst for systems change for individuals and families living with developmental disabilities…[The CCDD] mission “is to create systemic change in Kentucky that empowers individuals to achieve full citizenship and inclusion in the community through capacity building and advocacy”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP)

“The Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP) is a collaborative effort between participating local school districts, the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE), Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR), and the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky (HDI).

“The CBWTP is designed to provide a positive beginning in the world of work for students in special education during their last two years of high school. The goal for the CBWTP is students with disabilities will graduate from high school with positive employment outcomes, working in an integrated work setting with competitive pay.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Assistive Technology Services Network

The KATS Network is the Kentucky Assistive Technology program operating within its lead agency, the Office Vocational Rehabilitation, Education Cabinet. The KATS Network collaborates with and provides support for several Assistive Technology Resource Centers around Kentucky. Currently there are five such Centers which provide information and support to consumers, educators, parents, and others who are in need of information, assistive technology, or related services.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Assistive Technology Loan Corporation

“Working with its lending partner, Fifth Third Bank, KATLC can provide loans for modified vehicles, hearing aids, adapted computers, mobility devices, augmentative communication devices or any other type of equipment or home modification that will improve the quality of life or increase the independence of Kentuckians with disabilities.

“Established by state statute in 1996, KATLC is governed by a seven-member Board of Directors…. The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation currently provides staff support to the Board of Directors and the KATLC program.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky PACE (Preparing Adults for Competitive Employment)

“The Pace Training Program is a community-based job training program offered by the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. The program is an integral component of job placement services that offers short-term job training. The trainee will receive a training stipend while working at the program site, which is paid by the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation.   “Pace Training Program services are designed for the consumer who has been found eligible and whose vocational goal is competitive employment.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Kentucky Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P)

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P) provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. [Their] work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kentucky Money Follows the Person - 11/17/2010

[Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration Grant]… facilitates transition of and provides sustainable community based services to individuals who choose to move from Medicaid funded long term care settings (ICFs/MR and nursing facilities) into the community.”   “Those who transition must meet the criteria for services through one of three (3) transition waivers. Those waivers will provide transition and community based services to individuals who fall into one of the following groups: Individuals who are elderly and/or physically disabled; individuals who have mental retardation and a developmental disability; or individuals who have an acquired brain injury.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

"Customized Employment in Kentucky” Video Premiering at 25th Anniversary of the ADA Celebration - 07/29/2015

“Just in time for the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the University of Kentucky Human Development Institute announced the debut of their new video, ‘Customized Employment in Kentucky’…    The seven-minute video profiles three employees with developmental disabilities who are working in their community, in jobs which are a good fit for them, and in which their contributions are valued by their employer. The common thread in these stories is that the jobs were “customized,” a process in which employer needs are matched with the talents, interests and contributions of individual job seekers.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

“Toolbox for Employment: Customized Self-Employment and Benefits Planning” - 11/12/2013

~~“TThis is a presentation on methods that a person might use as a guide to becoming self-employed.“Business AND Benefits PlanningGo hand in handStarts with Discovery–DPG™Have to understand the interaction of income from wage and/or self-employment on public benefit systemsWhat public benefit systems are being received now?SSA, Medicaid, DD Waivers – CILA? Home Based Support?, DRS Home Services” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

“2017 Supported Employment Leadership Series” –Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky

“12 days of high quality supported employment professional development provide the foundation for the SE Leadership Series… Participants will study ways of connecting discovery with targeted job development, informational interviews, job analysis/needs analysis, customized employment, and specific representational considerations and strategies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Supported Employment Training Project “Newly Designed Supported Employment Leadership Series”

What's new?

12 days not required - Participation in all 4 leadership events is encouraged. The content areas are designed to be sequential and cumulative. However, for some, participation in all 12 days may not be possible. Therefore, participants may select any combination of the 4 events. (Check event descriptions for prerequisite requirements and recommendations.) Because the same schedule will be offered annually, it will be possible, for example, to participate in Parts 1 and 2 in 2016, and then Parts 3 and 4 in 2017. Three certifications will be offered - For the first time, a performance-based supported employment certification will be available in Kentucky. Historically, much of the content offered in our SE Leadership Series has been derived from Marc Gold & Associates (MG&A) and our Supported Employment Training Project (SETP) has a long-standing cooperative relationship with Mike Callahan and other MG&A colleagues. This year, we're formalizing an arrangement with MG&A by offering three certifications: 1-Systematic Instruction, 2-Discovery, and 3-Job Development.   

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Kentucky APSE “Training/Continuing Education”

This page is a resource for various traning and continuing education programs that are available in Kentucky. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services “Peer Support Specialist Curriculum Approval Process”

The Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) will approve the following curricula for Peer Support Specialists (PSS): Adult Peer Support Specialist, Family Peer Support Specialist, Youth Peer Support Specialist, and Kentucky Family Leadership Academy, as established in the Kentucky Administrative Regulations.

The regulations provide the curriculum applicant with an understanding of the requirements for peer support specialists—both eligibility and training—and specifically speak to the elements of a "training curriculum" and the training requirements (testing of the trainee and evaluation of the trainers). View these regulations in Related Links.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Supported Employment Training Project

About Us Having a job represents much more than earning a salary. Employment, including the kind of work one performs, influences one's personal identity, sense of belonging, and place in the world. Furthermore, employment represents one primary way of expressing the inherent human need to contribute – doing something that matters. Yet all too often the significance of employment for people with disabilities has been unrecognized, ignored, or minimized.Supported employment is designed to promote personalized employment opportunities for people with disabilities when they need support to:

Discover personal interests and contributions,Find or negotiate a job that fits things people like to do and do well,Become established as valued employees; andPursue job advancements.

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. Our work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. Please contact mtyree@uky.edu to make suggestions or request additional information. Many documents on this site are only available in PDF format

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities State Plan for Federal Fiscal Years 2017-2021

Goal #2- The capacity of systems that serve all people will be improved so that people with developmental disabilities will have increased access to opportunities for greater independence and integration

Objective 2-B (Employment): By 2021, the Council will support the efforts of at least 10 organizations to expand competitive, integrated employment for individuals with developmental disabilities by employing or assisting  more individuals with developmental disabilities in obtaining  jobs in the communities

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: Self-Employment Guide

This webpage offers information on and resources for self-employment. It orients job seekers on where to start the self-employment process and contains links to relevant resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky Educational Collaborative for State Agency Children Resource Guide

“This resource book came about because several young people who had lived in parental and foster homes their entire lives realized they were facing life after high school in a nursing facility because of lack of available adult supports in the community and confusion about how to get them.    “As a result, P&A brought together staff of several agencies to figure out how to help people find the transition services they needed. The group pooled their knowledge about available programs to put together a resource book that could be used by young people with disabilities in foster care to transition successfully to adulthood.    “Although the original purpose of this book was to help kids in foster care, it can be used by young people with disabilities anywhere who are looking at life after high school.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

State Plan Under Title XIX of the Social Security Act - 04/06/2017

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Kentucky's Medicaid program.

 

The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act, such as:

-Methods of Administration

-Eligibility

-Services Covered

-Quality Control

-Fiscal Reimbursements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supports for Community Living Waiver - 03/29/2017

~~“SCL Waiver renewal officially approved by CMS! - (Mar. 29, 2017) - The Department for Medicaid Services (DMS) has been notified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) of the official renewal of the Supports for Community Living (SCL) Medicaid Waiver to be implemented April 1, 2017. The SCL waiver renewal period is effective March 1, 2017 through February 28, 2022.

Beginning April 1, 2017, providers shall implement SCL regulations 907 KAR 12:010 and 907 KAR 12:020 that were dated effective June 3, 2016.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State Medicaid Plan Amendments - 01/19/2017

~~“This page is a resource for Kentucky Medicaid State Plan Amendments.  It has information on the amendments starting with 2008 .”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Request for a Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver - 08/24/2016

“Kentucky HEALTH is an innovative, transformative healthcare program designed to not only stabilize the program financially, but to also improve the health outcomes and overall quality of life for all members. This demonstration waiver seeks to evaluate new policies and program elements designed to engage members in their healthcare and provide the necessary education and tools required to achieve long term health and an improved quality of life. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Michelle P (0475.R01.00) - 07/15/2016

Provides adult day health, case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, assessment/reassessment, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, specialized medical equipment and supplies, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/MR/DD ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky DOE ESEA Flexibility Request - 03/31/2015

“The Kentucky State Department of Education’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 9, 2012.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky HCBS Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

On March 17, 2014, updated Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) final rules became effective in the Federal Register for 1915(c) waivers, 1915(i) state plan services, and 1915(k) community first choice state plan option . As they pertain to 1915(c) waivers, these rules include requirements for several areas of HCBS: all residential and non-residential settings, provider- owned residential settings, person-centered planning process, service plan requirements, and conflict-free case management.    The goal of the HCBS final rules is to improve the services rendered to HCBS participants and to maximize the opportunities to receive services in integrated settings and realize the benefits of community living. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is allowing five years (until March 17, 2019) for states and providers to transition into compliance with the all settings and provider-owned settings requirements.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Money Follows the Person - 11/17/2010

[Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration Grant]… facilitates transition of and provides sustainable community based services to individuals who choose to move from Medicaid funded long term care settings (ICFs/MR and nursing facilities) into the community.”   “Those who transition must meet the criteria for services through one of three (3) transition waivers. Those waivers will provide transition and community based services to individuals who fall into one of the following groups: Individuals who are elderly and/or physically disabled; individuals who have mental retardation and a developmental disability; or individuals who have an acquired brain injury.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Supports for Community Living (0314.R03.00) - 09/01/2010

Provides case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, residential support level I, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, FMS, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, residential support level II, specialized medical equipment and supplies, technology assisted level I residential support, vehicle adaptation for individuals w ID/DD individuals ages 3 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

KY HCBS Waiver (0144.R05.00) - 07/01/2010

Provides adult day health, case management, homemaker, personal care, respite, OT, PT, speech therapy, financial management services, goods and services, home and community supports, support broker, assessment/reassessment, attendant care, environmental and minor home adaptation for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The unbridled spirit of Kentucky has shown that people with disabilities are able to succeed in their careers here in the Bluegrass State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kentucky’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.26%
Change from
2014 to 2015
4,425,092
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
421,948
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.06%
Change from
2014 to 2015
115,577
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.33%
Change from
2014 to 2015
27.39%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.53%
Change from
2014 to 2015
74.82%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 4,395,295 4,413,457 4,425,092
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 422,201 432,038 421,948
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 113,422 117,959 115,577
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,668,703 1,676,468 1,691,633
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 26.86% 27.30% 27.39%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 73.67% 74.42% 74.82%
Overall unemployment rate. 8.00% 6.50% 5.30%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 27.20% 27.80% 26.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.10% 17.30% 16.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 355,666 371,865 363,593
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 379,115 389,540 374,702
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 659,107 685,650 663,187
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 54,655 55,490 54,903
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 10,187 8,818 10,314
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,269 2,980 2,106
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 3,401 2,894 2,772
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 13,513 12,386 13,210
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 1,674 1,446 1,784

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,281 4,400 4,644
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.40% 2.40% 2.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 209,584 208,016 203,175

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 15,267 15,521 17,429
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 41,121 41,512 44,630
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 93,880 93,101 96,818
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 16.30% 16.70% 18.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% N/A 1.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.40% 1.20% 0.70%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 0.30% 0.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 473 514 608
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 148 139 282
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A 224
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,223 6,023 6,431
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 43 43 37
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 26 27 25
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 60.00% 63.00% 68.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.59 0.61 0.56

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,360
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 11 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,160 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,691 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,741 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,611 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 146 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.10% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,547 5,455 5,268
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 327,096 323,767 321,459
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 363 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,408,000 $1,390,000 $4,377,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $23,567,000 $2,199,000 $4,556,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $43,792,000 $68,985,000 $70,671,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 16.00% 18.00% 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,212 6,773 5,776
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,582 884 579
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 27.40 29.50 15.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 71.80% 72.31% 73.15%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.73% 8.43% 8.22%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.90% 1.86% 1.86%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.07% 98.98% 99.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 19.80% 18.75% 18.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 55.70% 59.49% 58.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 65.80% 67.59% 67.82%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.90% 40.74% 39.74%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 788,499
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,104
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 421,644
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 85,649
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 507,293
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 538
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 97
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 635
AbilityOne wages (products). $3,841,069
AbilityOne wages (services). $901,392

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 28 36 20
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 2
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 29 37 22
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,790 2,400 1,152
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 99 99 161
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,889 2,499 1,313

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

The agency does accept this input and will briefly define this item. 

The SRC recommended that the agency be more specific when it comes to what other agencies will assist with education on and provision of supported employment services. The agency does accept this input and will add “and other agencies” after the Arc of Kentucky because we need to utilize more resources for education and funding of Supported Employment services, such as the Kentucky Association of Supporting Employment First (KYAPSE), the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (BHDDID), the Kentucky Rehabilitation Association (KRA), UK Human Development Institute, EKU Center of Excellence, most of the Comprehensive Care Centers in the state, and many Supported Employment providers. (Page 191)

5. The Supported Employment Branch works closely with Kentucky APSE (Association of People Supporting Employment First) and its committees, and the 874K Coalition (a statewide Disability Advocacy Group) in a unified effort to secure additional state dollars for supported employment extended services.

6. The Supported Employment Branch has been active in the development/improvement of Kentucky’s Medicaid Waivers to create workable systems for coordinating supported employment services for eligible participants. Expansion of the supports for Community Living Waiver (Kentucky’s Medicaid Waivers for individuals with Developmental Disabilities) and the Michelle P Waiver has resulted in increased referrals to OVR for supported employment services for mutually eligible participants. The self–determination and Participant Directed Services within Medicaid hold much promise for supported employment funding for extended services. A new Medicaid Waiver containing better service definitions and fee structures to support and fund supported employment services rolled out in 2014.

7. The Supported Employment Branch works cooperatively with the Arc of Kentucky, among other groups, such as the Kentucky Association of Supporting Employment First (KYAPSE), the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (BHDDID), the Kentucky Rehabilitation Association (KRA), UK Human Development Institute, EKU Center of Excellence, most of the Comprehensive Care Centers in the state, and many Supported Employment providers, to educate families about supported employment and enlist their assistance in impacting additional funds for supported employment. ( Page 206-207)

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services, maximizing the existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self–determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, providing training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and Providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. For example, an enhanced fee for Vocational Profile development has been developed, piloting and expansion of new programs through establishment projects, and training providers in the use of strategies for individualized services such as customized employment and systematic instruction. (Page 249)

The Kentucky Business Leadership Network, which is affiliated with the U. S. Business Leadership Network, is to promote enduring partnerships between business and industry and agencies that provide vocational support services for Kentuckians with disabilities (currently inactive but plans are place to reestablish the network). 

Community rehabilitation providers in the provision of employment services. 

Kentucky Association of Persons in Supporting Employment first whose mission is to “promote the improvement of Supported Employment services for persons with significant disabilities experiencing barriers to employment through education, advocacy, collaboration, policy change, elimination of barriers, empowerment and community participation”. OFB has a staff person serving on the State APSE board.

  • Department of Medicaid Services
  • Department of Community Based Services–Public Assistance Programs (Page 293)

State Conferences attended were: the State Association of Persons Supporting Employment first Conference in February, Governors EEO Conference in November, Eye Opening Symposium in October, Assistive Technology staff attended the University of Kentucky 12th Annual Institute in Assistive Technology in July (sponsored by the State programs under section 4 of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 KATS) and Independent Living and Older Blind Counselors attended the University of Kentucky Annual Summer Series on Aging in June, Kentucky Association of Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired (KAER) in March, Kentucky AHEAD in May, the Kentucky Career Center Youth Summit, the Kentucky Career Center Employer Conference and Kentucky Rehabilitation Association Conference in Louisville in September. (Page 325-325)

 

Customized Employment

(A)Study Findings Service Needs and Gaps Based on a thorough review of findings across the survey, interview, and agency data, the following service needs were identified for individuals with disabilities, including those with most significant disabilities. These are Job placement services (including supported employment and customized employment), Health care, including medical and mental health treatment, Benefits and financial planning, Supportive or ancillary services (e.g., transportation, housing),Long–term supports, and Transition services for students and youth/young adults. Comments from key informants who provide services within, or interface with, Kentucky’s medical and mental health systems, may serve to clarify the findings related to health care needs. The broad areas of concern related to the limited capacity of our healthcare system, geographic gaps, saturation of providers accepting particular types of insurance and high cost of co–pays making care unaffordable for some people. While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and resulting expanded number of Kentuckians with insurance coverage has improved the access to medication for many, informants noted that some serious needs still exist and likely will continue to exist because of a lack of capacity to provide care to those who need it. Particularly in more rural areas, respondents noted that some people must travel great lengths to find physical and mental health providers; others do not have access to transportation and thus are not able to receive sufficient care. Another issue identified by informants is related to the saturation of providers because finding treatment for individuals on Medicaid is difficult as providers have capped the number of patients that they will accept. Finally, while more residents have health insurance, copays are often not affordable and thus individuals still do not seek out treatment because of financial strain. Supported Employment and capacity of CRP providers is another major focus of the needs assessment. To this end, an interesting finding was that several OVR districts appear to have limited options when it comes to CRP providers. Four districts (Elizabethtown, Madisonville, West Liberty, and Whitesburg) (Page 228)

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services, maximizing the existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self–determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, providing training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and Providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. For example, an enhanced fee for Vocational Profile development has been developed, piloting and expansion of new programs through establishment projects, and training providers in the use of strategies for individualized services such as customized employment and systematic instruction. (Page 249)

Needs/Concerns 

  • Increasing the types of available jobs through customized employment and job development
  • Transportation options for underserved counties of Kentucky
  • Vocational case management to address home, family and personal issues
  • Availability of assistive technology that responds to the changing needs of today’s information based workplace
  • Assessment for the need for benefits counseling and/or personal finance management
  • Increased need for work based learning or community based work experience 

Recommendations/Strategies 

  • Increase agency capacity to provide job placement services through establishment grants for Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) to offer customized employment services, job coaching, job development, and transition age work experiences. (Page 331)

 

Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Kentucky assesses the overall effectiveness of the workforce investment system in relation to the strategic vision and goals of the WorkSmart Kentucky and Economic Competitiveness plans, seeking integration of activities and information from all the core programs. The ultimate goal is to increase the long–term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment, to improve services to employers and demonstrate continuous improvement. Kentucky will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with Section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), and continuous improvement of the career center. (Page 77)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

Accessibility is addressed on several levels and venues in the KCC. Given that OFB and OVR staffs are housed in many of the career center offices and are a central part of the workforce programs, there is a heightened sense of assuring this topic is addressed. Accessibility is a part of the required certification process under II. Career Center (office) Management: Physical Infrastructure and Accessibility. The standards that apply to this are as follows: (Page 90)

A) IN GENERAL—The local board may designate and direct the activities of standing committees to provide information and to assist the local board in carrying out activities under this section. Such standing committees shall be chaired by a member of the local board, may include other members of the local board, and shall include other individuals appointed by the local board who are not members of the local board and who the local board determines have appropriate experience and expertise. At a minimum, the local board may designate each of the following:

  1. A standing committee to provide information and assist with operational and other issues relating to the one-stop delivery system, which may include members representatives of the one-stop partners.
  2. A standing committee to provide information and to assist with planning, operational, and other issues relating to the provision of services to youth, which shall include community based organizations with a demonstrated record of success in serving eligible youth.
  3. A standing committee to provide information and to assist with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, including issues relating to compliance with section 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding providing programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the one-stop delivery system, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing supports for or accommodations to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. (Page 114)
DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Project CASE is a collaborative effort between state vocational rehabilitation agencies, adult education, secondary and post–secondary education, career centers, employers and other partners to demonstrate how career pathways can help individuals with disabilities acquire the marketable skills and attain recognized credentials that lead to employment in high–demand occupations. In Kentucky, two pilot projects are planned in the Metro Louisville and Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) regions; these will engage seven and 23 counties respectively. (Page 64)

Workforce Preparation 

KYAE has recently completed hosting train-the-trainer events and has provided an online curricular resource to all programs in order to enhance their contextualized workforce preparation services.

The initiative initially started with an employability skills pilot in which participating program staff were trained to contextualize standards-based, academic instruction with employability skills that had been vetted through focus groups, including an employer focus group.

The recently introduced online curricular resource represents a partnership investment by KYAE and DWI of WIA Workforce Incentive Funds, renewing a contract for Worldwide Interactive Network’s (WIN) online curricula courseware. The product not only provides WorkKeys/NCRC preparation, but “soft” skills (essential) and CCRS-based curricula tracks. Along with the administration of badge-supported curricula and assessments, the essential skills track concludes with a Kentucky Essential Skills Certificate (KESC). Additionally, this online courseware is available to other state agencies with the exception of K-12 - where school districts may avail themselves to alternate courseware licenses. (Page 169)

2. The Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) and OVR partnered together, and in 2010, Kentucky became the 12th state to participate in the Dartmouth College, Johnson and Johnson, Supported Employment Initiative to demonstrate the effectiveness of the IPS model for supported employment (Individualized Placement and Support, an Evidence–Based Practice). The first local pilot projects were launched prior to the close of 2010. Through the Dartmouth Project, a new SE funding partner was added when the Greater Cincinnati Health Foundation provided funding for 2 of the local pilots in Northern KY. IPS Supported Employment now includes all 14 Kentucky Community Mental Health Centers. In FY 2016 the partnership with Behavioral Health continues with the addition of 5 IPS sites outside of the Community Mental Health Centers and 2 sites serving those with substance abuse. (Page 206)

10. The Supported Employment Branch staff participates frequently in IEP and Transition Planning meeting for individuals, and in broader scope with Special Education planning units throughout the commonwealth to develop supported employment services for students exiting schools. Again, additional dollars will be needed for extended services in order to adequately serve the students. A pilot project began in 2010 to demonstrate the effectiveness of Supported Employment/Community Rehabilitation Programs agencies working together with Post–Secondary Education programs to include people with developmental disabilities in classes and other college campus activities. This program has now become permanent and has 3 Comprehensive Transition Programs (Page 207)

(3) Beginning in 2010, OVR has partnered with the Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) to implement the Individual Placement Service (IPS) Model, an evidenced based practice in Supported Employment for consumers with severe mental illness. The program started with four pilots and has grown to include all 14 Comprehensive Mental Health Centers (CMHC). In 2015, DBH provided OVR with $250,000 to issue a Request for Proposals to select five pilot sites to implement IPS outside of the CMHCs. It provided an additional $100,000 to implement IPS for consumers with Substance Abuse.

OVR serves on numerous councils that also have representation from the Department for Medicaid Services, DIDD and DBH, including the Commonwealth Council for Developmental Disabilities (Page 212-213)

Skills Enhancement Training (SET) process the new employees receive an overview of the agency mission, philosophy, values, federal and state laws, appropriations, budget and planning, eligibility, assessment, vocational goal development, plan development, pre–employment transition services, confidentiality and ethics, services, supported employment, rehabilitation technology, diversity, disability awareness, Social Security Administration (SSA), Ticket to Work, Workforce Investment Opportunities Act (WIOA), common measures and information, personal care attendants and topics on specific disabilities. Training programs for all staff emphasize informed consumer choice and maximizing consumer direction of individualized rehabilitation plans. In prior years particular importance was placed upon the 1998 Amendments, but the content has now changed to reflect the passage of WIOA. Information regarding to current research is disseminated to all staff via formal training opportunities as well as through other technological resources such as the Internet and email. The agency has a dedicated website for training information delivery to all employees which includes a portal to information on the agency, required trainings for employees, a training calendar and announcements regarding upcoming training initiatives. The agency also encourages staff to utilize the webinars offered through other entities both within and outside of state government. The information for registration and participation is disseminated via email to all staff. One partner in this endeavor is the Human Development Institute (HDI) from the University of Kentucky. In addition to our work with HDI on the Supported Employment Training Project the employees also utilize the webinar series topics offered by them during a spring, summer and fall training program on topics related to the rehabilitation field and specific disabilities. The rehabilitation counselor mentor program was implemented in June 2002 with pilot programs in six districts. There are currently 27 counselors that have been through the training program that serve as mentors in 10 out of 15 districts. Annual recruitment is conducted to increase the number of available mentors and annual training is implemented to assure that they are prepared for their role. Beyond the formal annual training there are other training opportunities provided to continually develop their skills in the program to assure that the needs of the new employees are being addressed. This is also an opportunity to keep them aware of current policies and laws that impact the agency and their work with the employees. College and university level classes have been an integral element in staff career development. The agency has strongly encouraged continuing education to meet CSPD standards and in the past has provided tuition assistance for staff to pursue degrees at the master level. The program is currently suspended due to the loss of the In–Service Training Grants as well as budgetary constraints within the state. The agency will continue to encourage employees to utilize the CSPD grants at the universities to help them achieve their academic goals in rehabilitation. As appropriate the agency will continue to support employee advancement through reclassifications within state government. Instances include academic achievement leading to skill and knowledge increase directly related to their job that will allow them to assume additional duties to reflect their increased skills and expertise. The agency continues to see the retirement of agency leaders and is cognizant of the need for leadership succession. The agency has utilized various opportunities to achieve this goal, including coordinating with the Kentucky Association of Rehabilitation Leadership to provide training to current and future leaders. Three sessions were provided during intensive workshops on leadership topics. The Academy of Leadership Exploration and Preparedness program (ALEAP) is designed to provide staff with opportunities to learn about and develop foundational skills. This is a collaborative program with both OVR and OFB. Staff first must participate in the prerequisite required courses (online and classroom setting of 50–60 hours of instruction) through the State Personnel Governmental Services Center. ALEAP II consists of three face to face sessions on a variety of leadership topics and the completion of a project. (Page 224)

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services, maximizing the existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self–determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, providing training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and Providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. For example, an enhanced fee for Vocational Profile development has been developed, piloting and expansion of new programs through establishment projects, and training providers in the use of strategies for individualized services such as customized employment and systematic instruction. (Page 249)

Supported employment offers more than just the assistance needed to find and learn a job. It provides the necessary ongoing support to help an individual maintain employment. Kentucky has identified 85 supported employment providers throughout the state. Individualized strategies are also utilized to arrange for supported employment services outside of "organized programs" when necessary (i.e. coworkers at the job site may provide support paid for with various resources; independent supported employment specialists may be hired, etc.). More than three–fourths of Kentucky’s 120 counties have access to supported employment programs. The lack of accessible and dependable transportation often limits access to supported job opportunities. Extended support services are provided by each local supported employment program utilizing funds from a myriad of sources, including the Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) , the Kentucky Council on Developmental Disabilities, city and county government, United Way, fund–raising campaigns, PASS funding, Medicaid, Supports for Community Living Waiver funds, Michelle P waiver funds and other resources. Most programs utilize a combination of funding sources for the provision of extended support services. Natural supports are encouraged (such as co–worker, peer, etc.) and are carefully monitored by the supported employment provider. Kentucky OVR’s partner, the Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID), has developed a new Medicaid Waiver that would more adequately fund supported employment services for people with developmental disabilities. The new Supports for Community Living Waiver 2 (SCL2) was rolled out during the 2014 calendar year. It has increased the fee structure and modified the service definitions for supported employment. Kentucky’s supported employment programs have primarily served individuals with intellectual disability and individuals with chronic mental illness. This is largely due to greater availability of funding for extended support for these two groups. Individuals with other disabilities are served if funding for extended support is available and if the supported employment provider has the expertise to meet that individual’s needs for employment training and support. Kentucky has become the 12th state to participate in the Evidence –Based, Johnson and Johnson sponsored, Supported Employment Initiative via Dartmouth College. The goal is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model for supported employment for people with serious mental illness throughout Kentucky. In July 2011, four sites in Kentucky began pilot site implementation. In 2012, two sites were added. In 2013, three sites were added. In 2014 BHDDID required that all Community Mental Health Centers implement the IPS program as one of the four evidence based practices required in their state plan. A Statewide Coordinator, employed through the University of Kentucky, Human Development Institute, oversees the pilot sites. A second coordinator was hired in late 2013. The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Behavioral Health collaborate as Team Leading agencies for the project. The Kentucky Association for Persons in Supported Employment (KY APSE) has been successful in creating greater supported employment awareness among the legislators in Kentucky’s General Assembly. (Page 270)

No current plan to hire additional staff, instead focusing on training of current staff and cross utilization of staff from other departments. Training existing staff is continuing quarterly. Recent quarterly training has emphasized BTQ standards. Annual training was completed August 22 – 24, 2016, which included all staff and cross utilized staff. Staff realignment occurred to merge functions, improve collaboration and efficiencies. Cross departmental utilization is occurring by utilizing of one lower authority appeal (referee) and six higher authority appeals staff (commission writers) to assist with adjudicating cases. The realignment allowed the branch to move staff into positions that better fit their skill sets. The cross utilization of staff allows the branch extra staff to utilize during times of seasonal increases in the volume of issues. The training will increase staff performance on resolving issues, provided clearly defined expectations of performance, and increase the inefficiency of the staff in resolving issues which will lead to more timely first payments. Unemployment Insurance is requesting a regulation change that will adjust the employers 15 day protest period to respond to a notice of initial claim and notice of potential benefit charges. This will remove the barrier of employers waiting 15 days to respond to adjudicators. These more timely employer responses will result in less time needed to resolve issues and quicker first payment promptness. This will reduce claimants having to wait to request first payment until the 16th day after filing an initial claim is filed. In addition to all of the changes, the branch has also implemented of a new pilot program which began on August 2, 2016. The new program utilizes a split chargeability issue system. The performance of the staff participating in the pilot program will be measured against the performance of staff not involved in the pilot program to determine if the program is effective in reducing the promptness of first payments. Budgetary constraints for UI IT development as well as prioritization of IT projects, delayed final development and implementation. Ongoing analysis and movement toward mainframe independence are factors in considering the order in which projects are completed and resources, both financial and staffing, are allocated. The new enhancements to the functionality to the internal claim intake system were not completed until early 2016. Since implementation fourteen help desk tickets have been created to improve the newly implemented system. Monitoring and assessment will be accomplished through daily, weekly and monthly reports reflecting issues received, issues worked and remaining issues. These reports will include a comparison of the pilot program data with the non-pilot program data. Monthly Interstate Section team meetings will be held to assess existing efforts and results and discuss improvements. (Page 429)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

We currently have in place five other innovative programs that provide high school students with a variety of work–based learning, financial literacy, self–advocacy training, job exploration, career counseling, and workplace readiness training opportunities that exist in the community with employers, in our rehabilitation center, and in post–secondary institutions.

The Summer Youth Boot Camp Program focuses on job exploration, workplace readiness training, and self–advocacy and is held at the Charles W. McDowell Center in Louisville. It is an intensive four week program based on the work of Dr. Karen Wolffe that introduces employability skills to transition aged individuals. The curriculum is specific to individuals that are blind or visually impaired.

The Summer Work Experience Program is in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Providers. CRPs are paid to find work experiences in competitive integrated settings for transition aged individuals. The work experiences last six to eight weeks and the students are paid by the Office for the Blind for the time worked. The goals of the work experience are to provide community based career exploration and the opportunity to practice work readiness skills. It is also hoped that by participating in the work experience program, employers will be open to providing more opportunities for individuals who are blind or visually impaired in their communities. (Page 310) 

Benefits

Existing legacy case management systems across WIOA Title I, Wagner Peyser, Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education are disparate and insular: Currently, the Office of Employment and Training (OET), the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Office for the Blind (OFB) are supported by insular case management systems that respond to requests for the following programs: 

  • Wagner Peyser Labor Exchange (Employ Kentucky Operating System - EKOS)
  • Unemployment Insurance – both benefits and tax/collections (Mainframe and Kentucky’s Electronic Workplace for Employment Services – KEWES)
  • Veterans Program
  • Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Program
  • National Emergency Grants
  • High Growth Job Training
  • Foreign Labor Certification
  • Health Care Tax Credit System
  • Trade Adjustment Act
  • Work Opportunities Tax Credit
  • Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA)
  • Student data
  • Customer records, services provided and costs of services for individuals with disabilities and blindness – Case Management System (CMS)
  • Social Security Reimbursement tracking and processing
  • Social Security Ticket to Work assignment tracking and processing (Page 67- 68)

The Case Management System (CMS) supports consumer case management activities, authorizes related payment transactions, generates reports/report information and contains a Social Security Reimbursement subsystem for all Title IV consumers, both for OFB and OVR. Consumer information, including confidential medical information, is collected to open a case within the respective agency. Agency services are based on the signed Individualized Plan for Employment between consumer and agency counselor. The system can attach scanned case documents, record staff provided services, staff activities, track comparable benefits, track consumer education and 

Training advancements. There is a Social Security Reimbursement module within CMS that enables each respective agency to seek reimbursement for the cost of the services provided to agency consumers receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. There is a Maximus module that generates files that are submitted to Social Security for the Ticket to Work program and tracks responses and ticket assignments. In July 2016, Kentucky ceased WIA data collection and reporting and began working to implement WIOA data collection and reporting requirements in addition to other USDOE and state reporting. CMS is a staff only application with a web front end. An interface exists between CMS and eMARS, the state’s payment system, to enable processing of payments to, and refunds from, vendors. The system is Section 508 and Bobby compliant and staff use screen readers such as JAWS, ZoomText and WindowEyes, as well as speech recognition software such as Dragon Naturally Speaking. (Page 68-69)

A local area may request Rapid Response funding in the form of Dislocation Grants and Additional Assistance Grants to serve potentially TAA–eligible worker groups in the same manner it requests funds for all other worker groups. The only difference is that Additional Assistance funding can’t be used to fund training once a worker group is covered by a TAA certification. If a TAA petition is certified, the state’s TAA program is responsible for identifying individuals potentially eligible under the certification through worker lists supplied by the employer and/or UI claimant information. 

The TAA program then uses a standard mailer to contact the potentially eligible individuals, inviting them to attend a Trade Orientation Session to learn about program benefits and register. At Trade Orientation Sessions. (Page 129)

The vocational rehabilitation programs use a case management system called Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment (AWARE) that is specifically designed for vocational rehabilitation programs. This system enables counselors to manage cases, managers to monitor cases, and the agency to prepare and submit required reports to RSA in a timely manner. All client data is captured and maintained in the AWARE case management system, such as information on client employment outcomes, including position title, employer, wages, hours, benefits, etc., and is provided to the Rehabilitation Services Administration, U. S. Department of Education through quarterly and annual reports. The company that programs the software will revise the system to produce any WIOA required data. Due to the especially strict confidentiality requirements imposed by the Rehabilitation Act and the sensitive nature of information about disabilities and medical conditions, the case management system is a closed system, accessible only by authorized employees. NMDWS has established a data sharing agreement to provide necessary wage data to support the programs’ activities. (Page 112)

These individuals work together to ensure that companies receive unified and coordinated information and services related to their workforce development needs. The KSN allows for the bringing together of the workforce and economic development programs and resources, thus providing a variety of ways to build workforce skills and ease training costs for employers. Through such options as reimbursable grants and tax credits for classroom training, on–the–job training, tuition and certification training, train–the–trainer travel, and entry level and skills upgrade training; Kentucky has resources that allow flexible and customizable training specific to company needs. Early in 2016, KSN partners will gain access to a Customer Relationship Management system based on a Sales Force platform. Phase 1 will allow for shared access to employer contact and needs, and Phase 2 later in 2016–2017 will add the capacity for KSN partners to add and assess employer programs and resources via the Sales Force application. OVR, in conjunction with the Kentucky Office for the Blind and Office of Employment and Training, hosted an Employer Summit in 2015 to highlight the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities as well as the OFCCP regulation requirements. The event was well received with numerous employers seeking additional information on working with the two rehabilitation agencies. This outreach and education with Employers and Businesses across the commonwealth will continue with additional summits convened in regional locations to attract a more diverse employer customer base. The Workforce Partners recognize the regional differences as well as workforce needs and will hold Employer Summits focused specific to the regional sectors and incorporate the post–secondary education institutions as a conduit to meeting the talent pipeline demands. The Statewide Council for Vocational Rehabilitation (SCVR), Kentucky’s State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), includes several employers and a representative of the Workforce Investment Board who provide important input on agency policy and activities related to employment. OVR, in conjunction with SCVR, conducts a Job Placement Month annually in October which includes many events around the state that promote collaboration with employers. Regional Employer Recognition Awards are given out during the month to employers who have hired OVR consumers. OVR will also continue to partner with local initiatives like Project SEARCH in Northern Kentucky and the Coalition for Workforce Diversity in Louisville to identify and educate employers willing to develop new programs specifically designed to focus on hiring and training individuals with disabilities. (Page 210)

 (A) Study Findings Service Needs and Gaps Based on a thorough review of findings across the survey, interview, and agency data, the following service needs were identified for individuals with disabilities, including those with most significant disabilities. These are Job placement services (including supported employment and customized employment), Health care, including medical and mental health treatment, Benefits and financial planning, Supportive or ancillary services (e.g., transportation, housing), Long–term supports, and Transition services for students and youth / young adults. Comments from key informants who provide services within, or interface with, Kentucky’s medical and mental health systems, may serve to clarify the findings related to health care needs. The broad areas of concern related to the limited capacity of our healthcare system, geographic gaps, saturation of providers accepting particular types of insurance and high cost of co–pays making care unaffordable for some people. While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and resulting expanded number of Kentuckians with insurance coverage has improved the access to medication for many, informants noted that some serious needs still exist and likely will continue to exist because of a lack of capacity to provide care to those who need it. Particularly in more rural areas, respondents noted that some people must travel great lengths to find physical and mental health providers; others do not have access to transportation and thus are not able to receive sufficient care. Another issue identified by informants is related to the saturation of providers because finding treatment for individuals on Medicaid is difficult as providers have capped the number of patients that they will accept. Finally, while more residents have health insurance, copays are often not affordable and thus individuals still do not seek out treatment because of financial strain. Supported Employment and capacity of CRP providers is another major focus of the needs assessment. (Page 228) 

Services to individuals with disabilities provided by Community Rehabilitation Programs. These issues are anticipated as in–demand service and service needs for CRPs in the next three years. These are Job Placement Services, Transition Services, Skills Training, and Supported Employment Services. ESTABLISHMENT GRANTS This Update to the previous CSNA assessed the need to develop, establish and improve community rehabilitation programs, referred to as establishment projects. OVR surveyed staff, consumers and partners on the use of establishment grants to develop innovative programming. The survey asked if there is a need for OVR to fund establishment projects to maximize relationships with employers, improve outcomes and services for transition youth, improve outcomes and services for Social Security recipients, improve outcomes and services for individuals with behavioral health issues, develop supported employment programs in areas of the state where they currently do not exist, and improve outcomes and services for ex–offenders. Item 1 directly addresses the need for more job placement services and also the continuing prominence of ‘Employer Attitudinal Barriers’ as a barrier to employment. Item 2 directly addresses the need for transition services. Item 3 is designed to address the need for more benefits planning assistance. Item 5 addresses the continuing need for more supported employment services, particularly in some areas of the state. Items 4 and 6 address serving the two populations of consumers identified by both vocational rehabilitation counselors and community rehabilitation programs as the largest growing populations they have seen over the previous three years. Counselors were asked to evaluate the importance of several areas of need for establishment projects, including service needs, such as supported employment and employer relationships, as well as services targeting particular populations, such as transition youth and social security recipients. ( Page 223)

Measure: To meet or exceed customer satisfaction rating from the previous year

GOAL II: To provide Pre–employment transition services (Pre–ETS) to Transition Students (ages 14–21) and other transition services to Transition Youth (ages–16–24) to assist them with transition from high school into competitive integrated employment or post–secondary training.

Measure: To provide specific and specialized services to at least 60% of both transition students and transition youth 

GOAL III: Provide information concerning benefits planning and financial planning in order to promote inclusion, integration, and empowerment of individuals with the most significant and significant disabilities.

Measure: All applicants who receive SSA benefits will receive information on benefits planning and at least 50% of them will receive a benefits analysis. (Page 234)

  • Evaluate the current transition program to determine trends and needs
  • Expand the capacity of the agency to provide Pre–ETS services
  • Expand Pre–ETS to transition students (ages 14–21) and other transition services to youth (ages 16–24)
  • Offer benefits planning for individuals with disabilities who are Social Security recipients
  • Provide information on financial education and asset development
  • Enhance job placement services
  • Provide supported employment services that lead to competitive integrated employment and improve the number of successful outcomes for supported employment cases across the state
  • Develop and apply a process for implementing requirements under Section 511 (Page 236)

According to data from the 2012 American Community Survey, published in the annual Compendium of Disability Statistics, 17.0% of Kentucky civilians living in the community report having a disability, including 15.5% of residents of working age (18–64). This is higher than the national average (12.3% all, 10.2% working age). The rate of Kentuckians reporting a disability remained relatively stable from 2011 through 2012, growing at 1.1% (on par with the national average of 1.2%). Only 27% of individuals in Kentucky with disabilities are employed. Kentucky and Arkansas share the second highest percentage of individuals with disabilities. Kentucky also shares a second place ranking with Arkansas and Louisiana in percentage of individuals who fall below the poverty line at 17.3%. According to the Social Security Administration, 192,721 Kentuckians receive blind and disabled Supplemental Security Income benefits. The Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI), in 2007, reported the percentage of SSI recipients in Kentucky who were working was 2.7% compared to the national percentage of 7.6% (ICI, 2007). In 2007, Kentucky also had 160,122 Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. These statistics provide a description of the potentially high demand for OVR services based on the number of individuals in the state with disabilities. A review of internal OVR data that was used to develop a Personnel Plan in 2011 indicated that as the average caseload size increases, the rehabilitation rate tends to decrease. (Page 239-240)

G.   Partner with SOAR to increase transportation options in the Appalachian region;

H.   Partner with the Medicaid Brokerage System;

I.   Provide Benefits Planning and Analysis as an option when it comes to addressing health insurance concerns. 

Goal 2: To provide Pre–employment transition services (Pre–ETS) to Transition Students (ages 14–21) and other transition services to Youth (ages 16–24) to assist them with transition from high school into competitive integrated employment or post–secondary training. (Page 251)

School to Work Transition

(2) As a means of providing Pre–Employment Transition Services, OVR will work with partner agencies in Workforce Development to identify existing apprenticeship programs with employers with which OVR may partner to focus on incorporating students and youth with disabilities into the programs. We do work with the Office of Autism in order to understand how to assist youth on the spectrum with attaining and maintaining employment. A model program focused on creating apprenticeship opportunities for students and youth with disabilities will be developed in such a manner as to be replicated in urban and rural areas alike. This will expand employment opportunities for all the youth and students with disabilities in Kentucky. OVR will continue to participate in an Annual Youth Summit, which provides the opportunity for youth and students with disabilities to meet employers, educators, and service providers. OVR plans to continuously expand the summit to provide employers an opportunity to meet with potential employees or apprenticeship participants. (Page 210)

Data Collection

TBCM builds on the functional alignment within the centers and focuses on providing services to job seekers in a consistent, coordinated and efficient way. The systems and tools used in the TBCM approach reinforce functional alignment and integrated service delivery within the centers and among partner agencies. To strengthen this project, Kentucky’s consultant coordinated activities in recognition of and alignment with other key actions in the WorkSmart Kentucky Strategic Plan including Kentucky Career Center Customer Flow, Kentucky Career Center Certification, and Partner for Success and Workforce Academy. Services to Employers are aligned among the core partners through the Business Services teams of the Kentucky Skills Network. Since the implementation of the WorkSmart Kentucky Strategic Plan, a priority has been developing unified and collaborative approach to service delivery in our business services model. It is critical that all the government agencies working to meet the employment needs of business and industry work together taking a solutions-based approach to meeting their needs. This is being done through regional Business Services Teams. WIOA Performance Outcomes Measures Group is a work group made up of the core partners to develop cross-program common measures and address all issues and concerns regarding data collection and reporting. The group is facilitated by the Kentucky Center for Workforce Statistics (KCEWS). The Partner for Success initiative brought together all agencies in the Department of Workforce Investment to develop a unified approach to delivering services. The goal was to create networking opportunities, create awareness of the services each partnering agency delivers and assemble the full array of services delivered to customers in a manner that is efficient, effective and holistic. A top priority of the current Governor’s Discretionary Budget is to advance the work of training of state staff and partners. The new effort will build on previous Workforce Academy curriculum that provided training for all partners at every level of the system. Training has been and will continue to be held regionally inclusive of local level staff covering topics such as WIOA implementation, customer flow, local labor market information, transformational leadership and system transformation. (Page 56)

Existing legacy case management systems across WIOA Title I, Wagner Peyser, Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education are disparate and insular: Currently, the Office of Employment and Training (OET), the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Office for the Blind (OFB) are supported by insular case management systems that respond to requests for the following programs: 

  • Wagner Peyser Labor Exchange (Employ Kentucky Operating System - EKOS)
  • Unemployment Insurance – both benefits and tax/collections (Mainframe and Kentucky’s Electronic Workplace for Employment Services – KEWES)
  • Veterans Program
  • Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Program
  • National Emergency Grants
  • High Growth Job Training
  • Foreign Labor Certification
  • Health Care Tax Credit System
  • Trade Adjustment Act
  • Work Opportunities Tax Credit
  • Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA)
  • Student data
  • Customer records, services provided and costs of services for individuals with disabilities and blindness (Page 67)

There is a Maximus module that generates files that are submitted to Social Security for the Ticket to Work program and tracks responses and ticket assignments. In July 2016, Kentucky ceased WIA data collection and reporting and began working to implement WIOA data collection and reporting requirements in addition to other USDOE and state reporting. CMS is a staff only application with a web front end. An interface exists between CMS and eMARS, the state’s payment system, to enable processing of payments to, and refunds from, vendors. The system is Section 508 and Bobby compliant and staff use screen readers such as JAWS, ZoomText and WindowEyes, as well as speech recognition software such as Dragon Naturally Speaking.

Kentucky Adult Education Reporting System The Kentucky Adult Education Reporting System (KAERS) is a nationally-recognized student management system designed and maintained through Kentucky Adult Education and the Council on Postsecondary Education. It is used by all Title II adult education programs to record programmatic, student and fiscal agent information with a student portal for students to view their data and online curriculum. KAERS also has a reporting tool used to enhance program performance, a real-time student tracking function, and integrates external data sources. Data from KAERS is submitted, on a regular basis, to the Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) and KCEWS. (Page 69)

OVR subcontracted with the University of Kentucky Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling Program to conduct the triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) in the Fall and Spring of 2014–2015. The current study was designed to identify service needs, trends in service needs, disability populations who are underserved, trends in disability populations, and recommendations for OVR. Prior to conducting the needs assessment, the research team reviewed data collection instruments from the 2011–2012 iteration. OVR senior staff provided assistance with revisions and updates to the surveys, making improvements to clarity and ensuring that questions would elicit the kind of information that is needed for strategic planning. OVR staff also assisted with survey dissemination, making sure that the survey reached current and previous customers, staff and counselors, and key workforce partners. As a result of these efforts, response rates for the present CSNA iteration were on par with and in some cases exceeded previous needs assessment surveys. In addition to survey data, RSA 911 case data from FY 2011–2013, state–level population data, and interview data from 21 Key Informants who work in areas of disability and public service throughout the state were analyzed. This information was meant to provide context as well as additional areas of consideration for OVR strategic planning efforts. (Page 228)

In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We anticipate that the current system will be able to collect the necessary data beginning 7/1/2016 and produce accurate reports for common measures reporting. (Page 235)

The purchase or licensing of other systems that would meet both the needs of the two vocational rehabilitation agencies and those of common measure reporting are being considered. Additionally, the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, Department of Workforce Investment is exploring the feasibility of purchasing or leasing a single system for all of the data collection needs of the Department including the Office of Employment and Training, OFB, and OVR. The ability to capture the performance accountability measures common to all Kentucky Workforce Investment agencies is currently a work in progress. The Department for Workforce Investment (DW), in partnership with a current federal grant, is testing the potential implementation of software that may have the capacity to capture all customer flow information within DWI. The nationally recognized software is currently being customized to the specific needs of DWI agencies and training has staff has been implemented. Also being tested is the capacity of the software to allow for totally paperless consumer files, the ability of the customer/job seeker to access their information from a website for the purposes of updating information, providing information required by the various agencies and having direct access to employment opportunities in their area. DWI will continue to pilot the use of this system with the ultimate goal of transferring all DWI agencies to a common casework system within two years. Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. There have at least been some conversations concerning paperless case pilot projects. In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We anticipate that the current system will be able to collect the necessary data beginning 7/1/2016 and produce accurate reports prior to the due dates for Rehabilitation Services Administration and common measures reporting. Once a baseline is determined and the relationship between services, partnerships, etc. and successful outcomes and measurable progress is analyzed, strategies will be developed to improve the performance outcomes. (Page 260)

Additionally, the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, Department of Workforce Investment is exploring the feasibility of purchasing or leasing a single system for all of the data collection needs of the Department including the Office of Employment and Training, Office for the Blind and Office of Vocational Rehabilitation.

Early in 2016 Kentucky Skills Network partners will gain access to a Customer Relationship Management system based on a SalesForce platform. Phase 1 will allow for shared access to employer contact and needs, and Phase 2 later in 2016–2017 will add the capacity for KSN partners to add and assess employer programs and resources via the SalesForce application.

Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. (Page 336)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Low Income Services provided to low-income individuals are reflected in Kentucky’s WIOA Priority of Service policy that provides guidance on the service requirement for Title I Adults for both individualized career services and training services. Priority applies to recipients of public assistance, other low-income individuals and individuals who are basic skills deficient. A low-income individual is defined in Section 3(36) means an individual who: Eligible WIOA in-school youth must be low-income, unless a local area applies the 5 percent low-income exception. WIOA out-of-school youth are not required to be low-income unless the barrier requires additional assistance to enter or complete an education program or hold employment or is a recipient of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent and is basic skills deficient or an English language learner. Service priorities for all populations with barriers to employment The WorkSmart Kentucky Plan has driven significant changes and improvements in the workforce system since 2010, as well as informed other related strategic initiatives like Kentucky’s participation in the NGA Talent Pipeline Academy. The following 2010-13 goals will continue to inform and guide the system during this transition period and to build career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment. To provide determining factors for the goals of Kentucky’s strategic plan, a series of objectives was developed. Each set of objectives supports a specific goal and provides the framework for the development of action steps as well as a basis for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of this plan. Align Kentucky’s workforce development system with its education objectives. 

  • Increase communication and collaboration between workforce boards and boards of education, technical education, post-secondary education and economic development;
  • Increase the number of post-secondary and work ready high school graduates;
  • Promote educational options, including technical education, two-year and four-year college, apprenticeships and specialty training to younger students;
  • Increase awareness of educational and skills requirements for high-demand jobs, as well as those in emerging industries; and
  • Establish the concept of life-long learning as a norm in the 21st century. Align Kentucky’s workforce development system with economic development strategies.
  • Increase communication and collaboration between workforce boards and economic development agencies;
  • Develop “rapid response” framework for new jobs based on model for layoffs;
  • Refine and promote evolving methods of projecting jobs and training needs of the future; and
  • Increase opportunities for entrepreneurship in a culture of innovation. (Page 37)

 

Career Pathways

KCC partners will work closely with Department of Community Based Services (DCBS) to assure customers have knowledge and access to needed resources. One–stop partners are directly involved with two Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) grant initiatives with DCBS. Paths to Promise (P2P) is a pilot program with a robust research component serving eight counties in Eastern Kentucky. The pilot includes moving eligible students into AOKY career pathways. The subsequent allocation of employment and training funds will be dedicated to providing support services to students pursuing education and training in urban areas across the state.

The core partner agencies will coordinate and better align services with Criminal Justice agencies in serving ex–offenders. OVR and OFB work closely with this target population in providing services, supports and referrals to other programs as needed. (Page 58)

Project CASE is a collaborative effort between state vocational rehabilitation agencies, adult education, secondary and post–secondary education, career centers, employers and other partners to demonstrate how career pathways can help individuals with disabilities acquire the marketable skills and attain recognized credentials that lead to employment in high–demand occupations. In Kentucky, two pilot projects are planned in the Metro Louisville and Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) regions; these will engage seven and 23 counties respectively. (Page 64)

J. Participate in Project CASE, a five–year, RSA–funded grant to the Office for the Blind (OFB) to identify and recruit eligible consumers from OFB and the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) in the Kentuckiana Works and EKCEP Kentucky Career Center areas to pursue career pathways in Information Technology, Manufacturing, Industrial Technology, and the Healthcare, Nursing, and Allied Health fields and provide those consumers with a variety of supports, including job placement assistance after completion of training;

K. Coordinate Rapid Responses to all major community job losses statewide along with other center partners; (Page 255)

A federal Career Pathways grant recently received by the Kentucky Office for the Blind (OFB) from the Rehabilitation Services Administration. OVR will collaborate with OFB on assisting consumers in three career pathways (healthcare, manufacturing, and information technology) in two of Kentucky Career Centers, Kentuckian Works in the Louisville metropolitan area and the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) in rural Appalachia. (Page 263)

Workforce Development Boards: OFB VR counselors actively participate on their local Workforce Development Board’s Youth and One Stop committees to enhance and make accessible the programs and services for transition age consumers. Through Project CASE, a program developed from the use of Federal grant funding through the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the Office for the Blind will have stronger coordination and collaboration with the Youth Career Centers and other Kentucky Career Centers. Partnering with Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) and KentuckianaWorks in the hiring of Career Pathway Coordinators, and in cross–agency training of staff on career pathways for students with disabilities, Project CASE will ensure sustained partnerships. (Page 300)

All the Disability Coordinators in this survey have an expectation that OVR counselors will provide needed assistive technology for post–secondary students. Percentages were high among responses that goals and expectations of working with an OVR counselor included provision of orientation and mobility services, resources for the student/family, vocational/career counseling, open and regular communication, assistance with training/college funding, and assistance with employment upon graduation. While we may help provide financial assistance for tuition and assistive devices, the true strength of our agency is in the vocational counseling services we provide on an individual basis. We must work to remain active counselors, ensuring that students are getting opportunities for work experiences, internships, and apprenticeships through the Career Pathways program. (Page 338)

In order to assure the coordination of services to facilitate the transition students from school to postsecondary life (including the receipt of VR services, postsecondary education, competitive integrated employment, and pre–employment transition services) OFB utilizes the following process. The VR Counselor is responsible for the schools located in their assigned county areas. Counselors work with school staff to identify potentially eligible students assuring that they are given the opportunity to apply for services starting at age 14. While the student is enrolled in school, the VR Counselor works with school staff to ensure the student receives the needed services to aid in the transition to post–secondary life. Services include but are not limited to pre–employment transition services, other VR services and programming offered by OFB, and other services specific to transition aged students by school districts and other entities. VR Counselors provide individualized services and where gaps in services are identified staff work to developed new and innovative services in the students’ home area to better serve this population. One project that aligns with this area in serving students is Project CASE (Creating Access to Successful Employment). In October 2015, the Kentucky Office for the Blind/Kentucky Career Center was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR–eligible individuals, including students and youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized postsecondary credentials necessary to secure competitive integrated employment in high–demand, high–quality occupations. Creating Access to Successful Employment (CASE) will help ensure that individuals with disabilities, even at the secondary school level, are not left out of participating in these existing initiatives, and can prepare for and obtain jobs in high–wage and high–demand occupations.

The goals and strategies of this five year project and the evaluation plan for it strongly aligns with the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA. (Page 365 &366)

The plan has served as a blueprint for transforming Kentucky’s workforce services focused on adapting to the changing needs of employers to create a demand–driven, business–led, solutions–based publicly funded talent development system for the Commonwealth. Over the next four years, the new Administration will work with the new Kentucky Workforce Innovation Board on a new strategic plan and new goals. The new plan and goals will inform subsequent modifications of this State Plan and of course the continuing transformation of Kentucky’s workforce system through innovative practices which enhance sustainable economic and job growth to improve the lives of Kentuckians. Kentucky strategies have and will continue to support WIOA’s focus on low income adults and youth who have limited skills, lack work experience, and face other barriers to economic success. Vocational Rehabilitation is a full and actively engaged partner in Kentucky in the workforce system. OFB and OVR are actively engaged in the planning process, on committees and staff serves as project directors on some of the KWIB initiatives. They are advocates in the workforce system for individuals with disabilities. Please refer to the Vocational Rehabilitation section of this combined plan for a comprehensive listing of goals and strategies. (Page 367)

Employment Networks

Kentucky’s employment website. 

  • The Kentucky Employment Network (KEN) works with UI customers who are profiled as likely to exhaust UI benefits. KEN consists of a workshop that informs the customer of the programs available through the Kentucky Career Center.
  • Re–employment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) works with UI customers who are profiled as likely to exhaust UI benefits. The grant activities consist of a Kentucky Career Center orientation, job search overview, Individual Employment Plan (IEP) and referral to job services.
  • The KCCGO! Dislocated Worker Grant has offered the opportunity to leverage key KWIB strategic plan initiatives including Unified Business Services, Career Center Certification and Sector Strategies and focus those improvements intensively on the long–term unemployed. The KCCGO! grant made available $4,775,418 to local workforce development areas to provide re–employment services including training costs for OJTs, Internships, Registered Apprenticeships, Accelerating Opportunity Scholarships, Work Experience/Tryout Employment, Customized Training, and other training in targeted sectors.(Page 152)

 

 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 54

Transition Services for Students with Disabilities - 10/12/2017

“For many students with disabilities the success of this transition from school to adult life depends on teamwork and collaboration between the schools and community resources. As one such resource, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation works closely with the Kentucky Department of Education to assist eligible students with disabilities to identify, plan for, and achieve their vocational goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Supported Employment Training Project - 07/01/2017

The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation has played a vital role in the establishment and implementation of supported employment services in the Commonwealth. Through partnerships with agencies, organizations and funding services for persons with severe disabilities, the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation is able to assist many people who have a supported employment goal in achieving positive employment outcomes.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

State Plan Under Title XIX of the Social Security Act - 04/06/2017

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Kentucky's Medicaid program.

 

The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act, such as:

-Methods of Administration

-Eligibility

-Services Covered

-Quality Control

-Fiscal Reimbursements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supports for Community Living Waiver - 03/29/2017

~~“SCL Waiver renewal officially approved by CMS! - (Mar. 29, 2017) - The Department for Medicaid Services (DMS) has been notified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) of the official renewal of the Supports for Community Living (SCL) Medicaid Waiver to be implemented April 1, 2017. The SCL waiver renewal period is effective March 1, 2017 through February 28, 2022.

Beginning April 1, 2017, providers shall implement SCL regulations 907 KAR 12:010 and 907 KAR 12:020 that were dated effective June 3, 2016.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mission Statement of the Kentucky Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities - 02/10/2017

~~“Mission StatementIt is the mission of the Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DDID) to empower each person to realize his or her place in the community as a citizen of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. To accomplish this mission, DDID will partner with and support persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities, families, advocates, stakeholders and government agencies….

EmploymentIndividuals of working age are employable: employment is life-enriching.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

State Medicaid Plan Amendments - 01/19/2017

~~“This page is a resource for Kentucky Medicaid State Plan Amendments.  It has information on the amendments starting with 2008 .”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Labor Cabinet Receives $896,600 Apprenticeship Grant” - 10/24/2016

“The U.S. Dept. of Labor has announced over $50.5 million in grant awards to 37 states to help expand apprenticeship opportunities across the U.S. – including $896,600 for Kentucky. The proposal calls for a workforce pipeline to be created in Kentucky, increasing the number of Registered Apprentices by 1,300 individuals, including women, minorities, 16-24 year olds, individuals age 45+ or older, veterans, and people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Kentucky Department of Education “Career and Technical Education” - 10/06/2016

“Mission: The mission of Career and Technical Education is to assist schools in providing students with skills necessary for a successful transition to postsecondary education or work and a desire for life-long learning in a global society.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Request for a Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver - 08/24/2016

“Kentucky HEALTH is an innovative, transformative healthcare program designed to not only stabilize the program financially, but to also improve the health outcomes and overall quality of life for all members. This demonstration waiver seeks to evaluate new policies and program elements designed to engage members in their healthcare and provide the necessary education and tools required to achieve long term health and an improved quality of life. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Assistive Technology Service Network “A Guide to Assistive Technology Funding in Kentucky 15th Edition” - 08/01/2016

“…the services of the ATRCs include, but are not limited to: Assistive Technology Services for Early Intervention, K-12 and Post-secondary school, Employment, Transition, Independent Living, leisure or recreation; Loan Library of Assistive Devices, adaptive equipment and toys; Demonstrations of assistive technology devices; Funding information, Assistance and Referral; Assessments and Evaluations for AT; Vocational assessments; Consultations on appropriate technologies; Workplace AT; Environmental Controls; Recycled Computers and Assistive Technology Devices; Training and Technical Assistance on and about AT.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Statute 42.0146 - Certification Program for Disabled Veteran-Owned Businesses - 07/15/2016

Office of Equal Employment Opportunity and Contract Compliance—Oversight of certification program for disabled veteran-owned businesses—Administrative regulations 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky ABLE Act S.B. 179 - 04/05/2016

Signed by the Governor on April  5, 2016

AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities.

Amend KRS 205.200 to disregard any amount in an ABLE account, any contributions to an ABLE account, and any distribution from an ABLE account for qualified expenses for the purposes of determining an individual's eligibility for a means-tested public assistance program and the amount of assistance or benefits the individual is eligible to receive under the program; direct the State Treasurer, the Secretary of the Finance and Administration Cabinet, the Executive Director of the Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Executive Director of the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority to work cooperatively to seek all available sources of funding, determine the best plan of action related to ABLE accounts, and report to the Legislative Research Commission on or before December 31, 2016.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Transition Services for Students with Disabilities - 10/12/2017

“For many students with disabilities the success of this transition from school to adult life depends on teamwork and collaboration between the schools and community resources. As one such resource, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation works closely with the Kentucky Department of Education to assist eligible students with disabilities to identify, plan for, and achieve their vocational goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Supported Employment Training Project - 07/01/2017

The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation has played a vital role in the establishment and implementation of supported employment services in the Commonwealth. Through partnerships with agencies, organizations and funding services for persons with severe disabilities, the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation is able to assist many people who have a supported employment goal in achieving positive employment outcomes.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Mission Statement of the Kentucky Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities - 02/10/2017

~~“Mission StatementIt is the mission of the Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DDID) to empower each person to realize his or her place in the community as a citizen of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. To accomplish this mission, DDID will partner with and support persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities, families, advocates, stakeholders and government agencies….

EmploymentIndividuals of working age are employable: employment is life-enriching.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Labor Cabinet Receives $896,600 Apprenticeship Grant” - 10/24/2016

“The U.S. Dept. of Labor has announced over $50.5 million in grant awards to 37 states to help expand apprenticeship opportunities across the U.S. – including $896,600 for Kentucky. The proposal calls for a workforce pipeline to be created in Kentucky, increasing the number of Registered Apprentices by 1,300 individuals, including women, minorities, 16-24 year olds, individuals age 45+ or older, veterans, and people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Kentucky Department of Education “Career and Technical Education” - 10/06/2016

“Mission: The mission of Career and Technical Education is to assist schools in providing students with skills necessary for a successful transition to postsecondary education or work and a desire for life-long learning in a global society.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation “Order of Selection Letter to Community Partners” - 06/30/2016

“Last year the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and its partners assisted almost 40,000 Kentuckians on their path toward gainful employment. However, the continuing demand, escalating costs, and a shortfall in matchable state dollars now further limit our ability to provide services to all persons eligible for our services. When a public vocational rehabilitation program like OVR cannot serve everyone who is eligible, federal law requires that it invoke what is called an Order of Selection.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Kentucky Department of Education “Transition” - 10/09/2015

The ultimate goal of the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE), Division of Learning Services is the successful transition of all students from school to post-school activities - whether postsecondary education, vocational training, integrated employment, continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living or community participation. We also recognize that many other transitions occur over the course of the life of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Customized Employment in Kentucky (video) - 07/28/2015

The seven-minute video profiles three employees with developmental disabilities who are working in their community, in jobs which are a good fit for them, and in which their contributions are valued by their employer. The common thread in these stories is that the jobs were “customized,” a process in which employer needs are matched with the talents, interests and contributions of individual job seekers

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Kentucky Unified State Plan 2012-2017 - 12/10/2012

“The Commonwealth is committed to ensuring that individuals with disabilities have all available service opportunities. The system’s service philosophy is that job seekers with disabilities are served by workforce staff in the same manner as any other job seekers. Where additional support or expertise is needed, OVR staff will assist. Many of the individuals with disabilities seeking services at one-stop sites are veterans and thus receive one-on-one assistance from DVOP specialists in addition to the broad array of services otherwise available. Cross-training for staff system-wide is promoted to ensure a seamless continuum of services. To facilitate universal access, one-stop resource areas are equipped with a variety of assistive technology tools, including large computer monitors, low vision readers, screen reading software, TTY, and adjustable work stations. In addition, career center staff is available at all sites to orient customers to these resources and to assist them throughout the service experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Supported Employment Training Project “Customized Employment, Self-Employment, and Employment First”

~~“This page focuses on information for job seekers or their family members -- people exploring the possibility of supported employment, as well as those already receiving services who need additional information. Other parts of our Supported Employment Training Project (SETP) web site are designed primarily for people providing supported employment services. There are many hyperlinks within this page…

What is the “Employment First” agenda? This is a movement that's taken root in a number of states -- centered around raising expectations, acknowledging the profound significance of employment opportunity and seeking employment as a first option. (Establishing a National Employment First Agenda, and APSE Statement on Employment First - October 2010)”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Kentucky Assistive Technology Service Network “A Guide to Assistive Technology Funding in Kentucky 15th Edition” - 08/01/2016

“…the services of the ATRCs include, but are not limited to: Assistive Technology Services for Early Intervention, K-12 and Post-secondary school, Employment, Transition, Independent Living, leisure or recreation; Loan Library of Assistive Devices, adaptive equipment and toys; Demonstrations of assistive technology devices; Funding information, Assistance and Referral; Assessments and Evaluations for AT; Vocational assessments; Consultations on appropriate technologies; Workplace AT; Environmental Controls; Recycled Computers and Assistive Technology Devices; Training and Technical Assistance on and about AT.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Perkins Center (Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation)

“The Perkins Center is a division of the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the vast majority of our consumers are referred by OVR Counselors located in several cities and towns across the Commonwealth….One of the main reasons for the creation of the Perkins Center was to enable Kentuckians with disabilities to obtain all the services they would need to become employed... The Center currently operates several programs and services that enable consumers to achieve their vocational goals”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities (CCDD) is a group of citizens, appointed by the governor to serves as a leading catalyst for systems change for individuals and families living with developmental disabilities…[The CCDD] mission “is to create systemic change in Kentucky that empowers individuals to achieve full citizenship and inclusion in the community through capacity building and advocacy”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP)

“The Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP) is a collaborative effort between participating local school districts, the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE), Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR), and the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky (HDI).

“The CBWTP is designed to provide a positive beginning in the world of work for students in special education during their last two years of high school. The goal for the CBWTP is students with disabilities will graduate from high school with positive employment outcomes, working in an integrated work setting with competitive pay.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Assistive Technology Services Network

The KATS Network is the Kentucky Assistive Technology program operating within its lead agency, the Office Vocational Rehabilitation, Education Cabinet. The KATS Network collaborates with and provides support for several Assistive Technology Resource Centers around Kentucky. Currently there are five such Centers which provide information and support to consumers, educators, parents, and others who are in need of information, assistive technology, or related services.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Assistive Technology Loan Corporation

“Working with its lending partner, Fifth Third Bank, KATLC can provide loans for modified vehicles, hearing aids, adapted computers, mobility devices, augmentative communication devices or any other type of equipment or home modification that will improve the quality of life or increase the independence of Kentuckians with disabilities.

“Established by state statute in 1996, KATLC is governed by a seven-member Board of Directors…. The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation currently provides staff support to the Board of Directors and the KATLC program.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky PACE (Preparing Adults for Competitive Employment)

“The Pace Training Program is a community-based job training program offered by the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. The program is an integral component of job placement services that offers short-term job training. The trainee will receive a training stipend while working at the program site, which is paid by the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation.   “Pace Training Program services are designed for the consumer who has been found eligible and whose vocational goal is competitive employment.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Kentucky Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P)

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P) provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. [Their] work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kentucky Money Follows the Person - 11/17/2010

[Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration Grant]… facilitates transition of and provides sustainable community based services to individuals who choose to move from Medicaid funded long term care settings (ICFs/MR and nursing facilities) into the community.”   “Those who transition must meet the criteria for services through one of three (3) transition waivers. Those waivers will provide transition and community based services to individuals who fall into one of the following groups: Individuals who are elderly and/or physically disabled; individuals who have mental retardation and a developmental disability; or individuals who have an acquired brain injury.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

"Customized Employment in Kentucky” Video Premiering at 25th Anniversary of the ADA Celebration - 07/29/2015

“Just in time for the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the University of Kentucky Human Development Institute announced the debut of their new video, ‘Customized Employment in Kentucky’…    The seven-minute video profiles three employees with developmental disabilities who are working in their community, in jobs which are a good fit for them, and in which their contributions are valued by their employer. The common thread in these stories is that the jobs were “customized,” a process in which employer needs are matched with the talents, interests and contributions of individual job seekers.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

“Toolbox for Employment: Customized Self-Employment and Benefits Planning” - 11/12/2013

~~“TThis is a presentation on methods that a person might use as a guide to becoming self-employed.“Business AND Benefits PlanningGo hand in handStarts with Discovery–DPG™Have to understand the interaction of income from wage and/or self-employment on public benefit systemsWhat public benefit systems are being received now?SSA, Medicaid, DD Waivers – CILA? Home Based Support?, DRS Home Services” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

“2017 Supported Employment Leadership Series” –Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky

“12 days of high quality supported employment professional development provide the foundation for the SE Leadership Series… Participants will study ways of connecting discovery with targeted job development, informational interviews, job analysis/needs analysis, customized employment, and specific representational considerations and strategies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Supported Employment Training Project “Newly Designed Supported Employment Leadership Series”

What's new?

12 days not required - Participation in all 4 leadership events is encouraged. The content areas are designed to be sequential and cumulative. However, for some, participation in all 12 days may not be possible. Therefore, participants may select any combination of the 4 events. (Check event descriptions for prerequisite requirements and recommendations.) Because the same schedule will be offered annually, it will be possible, for example, to participate in Parts 1 and 2 in 2016, and then Parts 3 and 4 in 2017. Three certifications will be offered - For the first time, a performance-based supported employment certification will be available in Kentucky. Historically, much of the content offered in our SE Leadership Series has been derived from Marc Gold & Associates (MG&A) and our Supported Employment Training Project (SETP) has a long-standing cooperative relationship with Mike Callahan and other MG&A colleagues. This year, we're formalizing an arrangement with MG&A by offering three certifications: 1-Systematic Instruction, 2-Discovery, and 3-Job Development.   

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Kentucky APSE “Training/Continuing Education”

This page is a resource for various traning and continuing education programs that are available in Kentucky. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services “Peer Support Specialist Curriculum Approval Process”

The Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) will approve the following curricula for Peer Support Specialists (PSS): Adult Peer Support Specialist, Family Peer Support Specialist, Youth Peer Support Specialist, and Kentucky Family Leadership Academy, as established in the Kentucky Administrative Regulations.

The regulations provide the curriculum applicant with an understanding of the requirements for peer support specialists—both eligibility and training—and specifically speak to the elements of a "training curriculum" and the training requirements (testing of the trainee and evaluation of the trainers). View these regulations in Related Links.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Supported Employment Training Project

About Us Having a job represents much more than earning a salary. Employment, including the kind of work one performs, influences one's personal identity, sense of belonging, and place in the world. Furthermore, employment represents one primary way of expressing the inherent human need to contribute – doing something that matters. Yet all too often the significance of employment for people with disabilities has been unrecognized, ignored, or minimized.Supported employment is designed to promote personalized employment opportunities for people with disabilities when they need support to:

Discover personal interests and contributions,Find or negotiate a job that fits things people like to do and do well,Become established as valued employees; andPursue job advancements.

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. Our work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. Please contact mtyree@uky.edu to make suggestions or request additional information. Many documents on this site are only available in PDF format

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities State Plan for Federal Fiscal Years 2017-2021

Goal #2- The capacity of systems that serve all people will be improved so that people with developmental disabilities will have increased access to opportunities for greater independence and integration

Objective 2-B (Employment): By 2021, the Council will support the efforts of at least 10 organizations to expand competitive, integrated employment for individuals with developmental disabilities by employing or assisting  more individuals with developmental disabilities in obtaining  jobs in the communities

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: Self-Employment Guide

This webpage offers information on and resources for self-employment. It orients job seekers on where to start the self-employment process and contains links to relevant resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky Educational Collaborative for State Agency Children Resource Guide

“This resource book came about because several young people who had lived in parental and foster homes their entire lives realized they were facing life after high school in a nursing facility because of lack of available adult supports in the community and confusion about how to get them.    “As a result, P&A brought together staff of several agencies to figure out how to help people find the transition services they needed. The group pooled their knowledge about available programs to put together a resource book that could be used by young people with disabilities in foster care to transition successfully to adulthood.    “Although the original purpose of this book was to help kids in foster care, it can be used by young people with disabilities anywhere who are looking at life after high school.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

State Plan Under Title XIX of the Social Security Act - 04/06/2017

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Kentucky's Medicaid program.

 

The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act, such as:

-Methods of Administration

-Eligibility

-Services Covered

-Quality Control

-Fiscal Reimbursements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supports for Community Living Waiver - 03/29/2017

~~“SCL Waiver renewal officially approved by CMS! - (Mar. 29, 2017) - The Department for Medicaid Services (DMS) has been notified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) of the official renewal of the Supports for Community Living (SCL) Medicaid Waiver to be implemented April 1, 2017. The SCL waiver renewal period is effective March 1, 2017 through February 28, 2022.

Beginning April 1, 2017, providers shall implement SCL regulations 907 KAR 12:010 and 907 KAR 12:020 that were dated effective June 3, 2016.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State Medicaid Plan Amendments - 01/19/2017

~~“This page is a resource for Kentucky Medicaid State Plan Amendments.  It has information on the amendments starting with 2008 .”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Request for a Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver - 08/24/2016

“Kentucky HEALTH is an innovative, transformative healthcare program designed to not only stabilize the program financially, but to also improve the health outcomes and overall quality of life for all members. This demonstration waiver seeks to evaluate new policies and program elements designed to engage members in their healthcare and provide the necessary education and tools required to achieve long term health and an improved quality of life. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Michelle P (0475.R01.00) - 07/15/2016

Provides adult day health, case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, assessment/reassessment, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, specialized medical equipment and supplies, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/MR/DD ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky DOE ESEA Flexibility Request - 03/31/2015

“The Kentucky State Department of Education’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 9, 2012.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky HCBS Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

On March 17, 2014, updated Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) final rules became effective in the Federal Register for 1915(c) waivers, 1915(i) state plan services, and 1915(k) community first choice state plan option . As they pertain to 1915(c) waivers, these rules include requirements for several areas of HCBS: all residential and non-residential settings, provider- owned residential settings, person-centered planning process, service plan requirements, and conflict-free case management.    The goal of the HCBS final rules is to improve the services rendered to HCBS participants and to maximize the opportunities to receive services in integrated settings and realize the benefits of community living. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is allowing five years (until March 17, 2019) for states and providers to transition into compliance with the all settings and provider-owned settings requirements.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Money Follows the Person - 11/17/2010

[Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration Grant]… facilitates transition of and provides sustainable community based services to individuals who choose to move from Medicaid funded long term care settings (ICFs/MR and nursing facilities) into the community.”   “Those who transition must meet the criteria for services through one of three (3) transition waivers. Those waivers will provide transition and community based services to individuals who fall into one of the following groups: Individuals who are elderly and/or physically disabled; individuals who have mental retardation and a developmental disability; or individuals who have an acquired brain injury.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Supports for Community Living (0314.R03.00) - 09/01/2010

Provides case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, residential support level I, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, FMS, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, residential support level II, specialized medical equipment and supplies, technology assisted level I residential support, vehicle adaptation for individuals w ID/DD individuals ages 3 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

KY HCBS Waiver (0144.R05.00) - 07/01/2010

Provides adult day health, case management, homemaker, personal care, respite, OT, PT, speech therapy, financial management services, goods and services, home and community supports, support broker, assessment/reassessment, attendant care, environmental and minor home adaptation for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The unbridled spirit of Kentucky has shown that people with disabilities are able to succeed in their careers here in the Bluegrass State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kentucky’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.26%
Change from
2014 to 2015
4,425,092
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
421,948
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.06%
Change from
2014 to 2015
115,577
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.33%
Change from
2014 to 2015
27.39%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.53%
Change from
2014 to 2015
74.82%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 4,395,295 4,413,457 4,425,092
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 422,201 432,038 421,948
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 113,422 117,959 115,577
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,668,703 1,676,468 1,691,633
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 26.86% 27.30% 27.39%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 73.67% 74.42% 74.82%
Overall unemployment rate. 8.00% 6.50% 5.30%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 27.20% 27.80% 26.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.10% 17.30% 16.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 355,666 371,865 363,593
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 379,115 389,540 374,702
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 659,107 685,650 663,187
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 54,655 55,490 54,903
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 10,187 8,818 10,314
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,269 2,980 2,106
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 3,401 2,894 2,772
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 13,513 12,386 13,210
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 1,674 1,446 1,784

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,281 4,400 4,644
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.40% 2.40% 2.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 209,584 208,016 203,175

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 15,267 15,521 17,429
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 41,121 41,512 44,630
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 93,880 93,101 96,818
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 16.30% 16.70% 18.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% N/A 1.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.40% 1.20% 0.70%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 0.30% 0.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 473 514 608
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 148 139 282
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A 224
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,223 6,023 6,431
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 43 43 37
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 26 27 25
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 60.00% 63.00% 68.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.59 0.61 0.56

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,360
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 11 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,160 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,691 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,741 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,611 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 146 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.10% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,547 5,455 5,268
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 327,096 323,767 321,459
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 363 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,408,000 $1,390,000 $4,377,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $23,567,000 $2,199,000 $4,556,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $43,792,000 $68,985,000 $70,671,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 16.00% 18.00% 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,212 6,773 5,776
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,582 884 579
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 27.40 29.50 15.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 71.80% 72.31% 73.15%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.73% 8.43% 8.22%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.90% 1.86% 1.86%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.07% 98.98% 99.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 19.80% 18.75% 18.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 55.70% 59.49% 58.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 65.80% 67.59% 67.82%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.90% 40.74% 39.74%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 788,499
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,104
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 421,644
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 85,649
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 507,293
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 538
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 97
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 635
AbilityOne wages (products). $3,841,069
AbilityOne wages (services). $901,392

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 28 36 20
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 2
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 29 37 22
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,790 2,400 1,152
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 99 99 161
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,889 2,499 1,313

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

The agency does accept this input and will briefly define this item. 

The SRC recommended that the agency be more specific when it comes to what other agencies will assist with education on and provision of supported employment services. The agency does accept this input and will add “and other agencies” after the Arc of Kentucky because we need to utilize more resources for education and funding of Supported Employment services, such as the Kentucky Association of Supporting Employment First (KYAPSE), the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (BHDDID), the Kentucky Rehabilitation Association (KRA), UK Human Development Institute, EKU Center of Excellence, most of the Comprehensive Care Centers in the state, and many Supported Employment providers. (Page 191)

5. The Supported Employment Branch works closely with Kentucky APSE (Association of People Supporting Employment First) and its committees, and the 874K Coalition (a statewide Disability Advocacy Group) in a unified effort to secure additional state dollars for supported employment extended services.

6. The Supported Employment Branch has been active in the development/improvement of Kentucky’s Medicaid Waivers to create workable systems for coordinating supported employment services for eligible participants. Expansion of the supports for Community Living Waiver (Kentucky’s Medicaid Waivers for individuals with Developmental Disabilities) and the Michelle P Waiver has resulted in increased referrals to OVR for supported employment services for mutually eligible participants. The self–determination and Participant Directed Services within Medicaid hold much promise for supported employment funding for extended services. A new Medicaid Waiver containing better service definitions and fee structures to support and fund supported employment services rolled out in 2014.

7. The Supported Employment Branch works cooperatively with the Arc of Kentucky, among other groups, such as the Kentucky Association of Supporting Employment First (KYAPSE), the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (BHDDID), the Kentucky Rehabilitation Association (KRA), UK Human Development Institute, EKU Center of Excellence, most of the Comprehensive Care Centers in the state, and many Supported Employment providers, to educate families about supported employment and enlist their assistance in impacting additional funds for supported employment. ( Page 206-207)

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services, maximizing the existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self–determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, providing training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and Providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. For example, an enhanced fee for Vocational Profile development has been developed, piloting and expansion of new programs through establishment projects, and training providers in the use of strategies for individualized services such as customized employment and systematic instruction. (Page 249)

The Kentucky Business Leadership Network, which is affiliated with the U. S. Business Leadership Network, is to promote enduring partnerships between business and industry and agencies that provide vocational support services for Kentuckians with disabilities (currently inactive but plans are place to reestablish the network). 

Community rehabilitation providers in the provision of employment services. 

Kentucky Association of Persons in Supporting Employment first whose mission is to “promote the improvement of Supported Employment services for persons with significant disabilities experiencing barriers to employment through education, advocacy, collaboration, policy change, elimination of barriers, empowerment and community participation”. OFB has a staff person serving on the State APSE board.

  • Department of Medicaid Services
  • Department of Community Based Services–Public Assistance Programs (Page 293)

State Conferences attended were: the State Association of Persons Supporting Employment first Conference in February, Governors EEO Conference in November, Eye Opening Symposium in October, Assistive Technology staff attended the University of Kentucky 12th Annual Institute in Assistive Technology in July (sponsored by the State programs under section 4 of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 KATS) and Independent Living and Older Blind Counselors attended the University of Kentucky Annual Summer Series on Aging in June, Kentucky Association of Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired (KAER) in March, Kentucky AHEAD in May, the Kentucky Career Center Youth Summit, the Kentucky Career Center Employer Conference and Kentucky Rehabilitation Association Conference in Louisville in September. (Page 325-325)

 

Customized Employment

(A)Study Findings Service Needs and Gaps Based on a thorough review of findings across the survey, interview, and agency data, the following service needs were identified for individuals with disabilities, including those with most significant disabilities. These are Job placement services (including supported employment and customized employment), Health care, including medical and mental health treatment, Benefits and financial planning, Supportive or ancillary services (e.g., transportation, housing),Long–term supports, and Transition services for students and youth/young adults. Comments from key informants who provide services within, or interface with, Kentucky’s medical and mental health systems, may serve to clarify the findings related to health care needs. The broad areas of concern related to the limited capacity of our healthcare system, geographic gaps, saturation of providers accepting particular types of insurance and high cost of co–pays making care unaffordable for some people. While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and resulting expanded number of Kentuckians with insurance coverage has improved the access to medication for many, informants noted that some serious needs still exist and likely will continue to exist because of a lack of capacity to provide care to those who need it. Particularly in more rural areas, respondents noted that some people must travel great lengths to find physical and mental health providers; others do not have access to transportation and thus are not able to receive sufficient care. Another issue identified by informants is related to the saturation of providers because finding treatment for individuals on Medicaid is difficult as providers have capped the number of patients that they will accept. Finally, while more residents have health insurance, copays are often not affordable and thus individuals still do not seek out treatment because of financial strain. Supported Employment and capacity of CRP providers is another major focus of the needs assessment. To this end, an interesting finding was that several OVR districts appear to have limited options when it comes to CRP providers. Four districts (Elizabethtown, Madisonville, West Liberty, and Whitesburg) (Page 228)

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services, maximizing the existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self–determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, providing training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and Providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. For example, an enhanced fee for Vocational Profile development has been developed, piloting and expansion of new programs through establishment projects, and training providers in the use of strategies for individualized services such as customized employment and systematic instruction. (Page 249)

Needs/Concerns 

  • Increasing the types of available jobs through customized employment and job development
  • Transportation options for underserved counties of Kentucky
  • Vocational case management to address home, family and personal issues
  • Availability of assistive technology that responds to the changing needs of today’s information based workplace
  • Assessment for the need for benefits counseling and/or personal finance management
  • Increased need for work based learning or community based work experience 

Recommendations/Strategies 

  • Increase agency capacity to provide job placement services through establishment grants for Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) to offer customized employment services, job coaching, job development, and transition age work experiences. (Page 331)

 

Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Kentucky assesses the overall effectiveness of the workforce investment system in relation to the strategic vision and goals of the WorkSmart Kentucky and Economic Competitiveness plans, seeking integration of activities and information from all the core programs. The ultimate goal is to increase the long–term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment, to improve services to employers and demonstrate continuous improvement. Kentucky will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with Section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), and continuous improvement of the career center. (Page 77)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

Accessibility is addressed on several levels and venues in the KCC. Given that OFB and OVR staffs are housed in many of the career center offices and are a central part of the workforce programs, there is a heightened sense of assuring this topic is addressed. Accessibility is a part of the required certification process under II. Career Center (office) Management: Physical Infrastructure and Accessibility. The standards that apply to this are as follows: (Page 90)

A) IN GENERAL—The local board may designate and direct the activities of standing committees to provide information and to assist the local board in carrying out activities under this section. Such standing committees shall be chaired by a member of the local board, may include other members of the local board, and shall include other individuals appointed by the local board who are not members of the local board and who the local board determines have appropriate experience and expertise. At a minimum, the local board may designate each of the following:

  1. A standing committee to provide information and assist with operational and other issues relating to the one-stop delivery system, which may include members representatives of the one-stop partners.
  2. A standing committee to provide information and to assist with planning, operational, and other issues relating to the provision of services to youth, which shall include community based organizations with a demonstrated record of success in serving eligible youth.
  3. A standing committee to provide information and to assist with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, including issues relating to compliance with section 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding providing programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the one-stop delivery system, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing supports for or accommodations to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. (Page 114)
DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Project CASE is a collaborative effort between state vocational rehabilitation agencies, adult education, secondary and post–secondary education, career centers, employers and other partners to demonstrate how career pathways can help individuals with disabilities acquire the marketable skills and attain recognized credentials that lead to employment in high–demand occupations. In Kentucky, two pilot projects are planned in the Metro Louisville and Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) regions; these will engage seven and 23 counties respectively. (Page 64)

Workforce Preparation 

KYAE has recently completed hosting train-the-trainer events and has provided an online curricular resource to all programs in order to enhance their contextualized workforce preparation services.

The initiative initially started with an employability skills pilot in which participating program staff were trained to contextualize standards-based, academic instruction with employability skills that had been vetted through focus groups, including an employer focus group.

The recently introduced online curricular resource represents a partnership investment by KYAE and DWI of WIA Workforce Incentive Funds, renewing a contract for Worldwide Interactive Network’s (WIN) online curricula courseware. The product not only provides WorkKeys/NCRC preparation, but “soft” skills (essential) and CCRS-based curricula tracks. Along with the administration of badge-supported curricula and assessments, the essential skills track concludes with a Kentucky Essential Skills Certificate (KESC). Additionally, this online courseware is available to other state agencies with the exception of K-12 - where school districts may avail themselves to alternate courseware licenses. (Page 169)

2. The Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) and OVR partnered together, and in 2010, Kentucky became the 12th state to participate in the Dartmouth College, Johnson and Johnson, Supported Employment Initiative to demonstrate the effectiveness of the IPS model for supported employment (Individualized Placement and Support, an Evidence–Based Practice). The first local pilot projects were launched prior to the close of 2010. Through the Dartmouth Project, a new SE funding partner was added when the Greater Cincinnati Health Foundation provided funding for 2 of the local pilots in Northern KY. IPS Supported Employment now includes all 14 Kentucky Community Mental Health Centers. In FY 2016 the partnership with Behavioral Health continues with the addition of 5 IPS sites outside of the Community Mental Health Centers and 2 sites serving those with substance abuse. (Page 206)

10. The Supported Employment Branch staff participates frequently in IEP and Transition Planning meeting for individuals, and in broader scope with Special Education planning units throughout the commonwealth to develop supported employment services for students exiting schools. Again, additional dollars will be needed for extended services in order to adequately serve the students. A pilot project began in 2010 to demonstrate the effectiveness of Supported Employment/Community Rehabilitation Programs agencies working together with Post–Secondary Education programs to include people with developmental disabilities in classes and other college campus activities. This program has now become permanent and has 3 Comprehensive Transition Programs (Page 207)

(3) Beginning in 2010, OVR has partnered with the Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) to implement the Individual Placement Service (IPS) Model, an evidenced based practice in Supported Employment for consumers with severe mental illness. The program started with four pilots and has grown to include all 14 Comprehensive Mental Health Centers (CMHC). In 2015, DBH provided OVR with $250,000 to issue a Request for Proposals to select five pilot sites to implement IPS outside of the CMHCs. It provided an additional $100,000 to implement IPS for consumers with Substance Abuse.

OVR serves on numerous councils that also have representation from the Department for Medicaid Services, DIDD and DBH, including the Commonwealth Council for Developmental Disabilities (Page 212-213)

Skills Enhancement Training (SET) process the new employees receive an overview of the agency mission, philosophy, values, federal and state laws, appropriations, budget and planning, eligibility, assessment, vocational goal development, plan development, pre–employment transition services, confidentiality and ethics, services, supported employment, rehabilitation technology, diversity, disability awareness, Social Security Administration (SSA), Ticket to Work, Workforce Investment Opportunities Act (WIOA), common measures and information, personal care attendants and topics on specific disabilities. Training programs for all staff emphasize informed consumer choice and maximizing consumer direction of individualized rehabilitation plans. In prior years particular importance was placed upon the 1998 Amendments, but the content has now changed to reflect the passage of WIOA. Information regarding to current research is disseminated to all staff via formal training opportunities as well as through other technological resources such as the Internet and email. The agency has a dedicated website for training information delivery to all employees which includes a portal to information on the agency, required trainings for employees, a training calendar and announcements regarding upcoming training initiatives. The agency also encourages staff to utilize the webinars offered through other entities both within and outside of state government. The information for registration and participation is disseminated via email to all staff. One partner in this endeavor is the Human Development Institute (HDI) from the University of Kentucky. In addition to our work with HDI on the Supported Employment Training Project the employees also utilize the webinar series topics offered by them during a spring, summer and fall training program on topics related to the rehabilitation field and specific disabilities. The rehabilitation counselor mentor program was implemented in June 2002 with pilot programs in six districts. There are currently 27 counselors that have been through the training program that serve as mentors in 10 out of 15 districts. Annual recruitment is conducted to increase the number of available mentors and annual training is implemented to assure that they are prepared for their role. Beyond the formal annual training there are other training opportunities provided to continually develop their skills in the program to assure that the needs of the new employees are being addressed. This is also an opportunity to keep them aware of current policies and laws that impact the agency and their work with the employees. College and university level classes have been an integral element in staff career development. The agency has strongly encouraged continuing education to meet CSPD standards and in the past has provided tuition assistance for staff to pursue degrees at the master level. The program is currently suspended due to the loss of the In–Service Training Grants as well as budgetary constraints within the state. The agency will continue to encourage employees to utilize the CSPD grants at the universities to help them achieve their academic goals in rehabilitation. As appropriate the agency will continue to support employee advancement through reclassifications within state government. Instances include academic achievement leading to skill and knowledge increase directly related to their job that will allow them to assume additional duties to reflect their increased skills and expertise. The agency continues to see the retirement of agency leaders and is cognizant of the need for leadership succession. The agency has utilized various opportunities to achieve this goal, including coordinating with the Kentucky Association of Rehabilitation Leadership to provide training to current and future leaders. Three sessions were provided during intensive workshops on leadership topics. The Academy of Leadership Exploration and Preparedness program (ALEAP) is designed to provide staff with opportunities to learn about and develop foundational skills. This is a collaborative program with both OVR and OFB. Staff first must participate in the prerequisite required courses (online and classroom setting of 50–60 hours of instruction) through the State Personnel Governmental Services Center. ALEAP II consists of three face to face sessions on a variety of leadership topics and the completion of a project. (Page 224)

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services, maximizing the existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self–determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, providing training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and Providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. For example, an enhanced fee for Vocational Profile development has been developed, piloting and expansion of new programs through establishment projects, and training providers in the use of strategies for individualized services such as customized employment and systematic instruction. (Page 249)

Supported employment offers more than just the assistance needed to find and learn a job. It provides the necessary ongoing support to help an individual maintain employment. Kentucky has identified 85 supported employment providers throughout the state. Individualized strategies are also utilized to arrange for supported employment services outside of "organized programs" when necessary (i.e. coworkers at the job site may provide support paid for with various resources; independent supported employment specialists may be hired, etc.). More than three–fourths of Kentucky’s 120 counties have access to supported employment programs. The lack of accessible and dependable transportation often limits access to supported job opportunities. Extended support services are provided by each local supported employment program utilizing funds from a myriad of sources, including the Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) , the Kentucky Council on Developmental Disabilities, city and county government, United Way, fund–raising campaigns, PASS funding, Medicaid, Supports for Community Living Waiver funds, Michelle P waiver funds and other resources. Most programs utilize a combination of funding sources for the provision of extended support services. Natural supports are encouraged (such as co–worker, peer, etc.) and are carefully monitored by the supported employment provider. Kentucky OVR’s partner, the Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID), has developed a new Medicaid Waiver that would more adequately fund supported employment services for people with developmental disabilities. The new Supports for Community Living Waiver 2 (SCL2) was rolled out during the 2014 calendar year. It has increased the fee structure and modified the service definitions for supported employment. Kentucky’s supported employment programs have primarily served individuals with intellectual disability and individuals with chronic mental illness. This is largely due to greater availability of funding for extended support for these two groups. Individuals with other disabilities are served if funding for extended support is available and if the supported employment provider has the expertise to meet that individual’s needs for employment training and support. Kentucky has become the 12th state to participate in the Evidence –Based, Johnson and Johnson sponsored, Supported Employment Initiative via Dartmouth College. The goal is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model for supported employment for people with serious mental illness throughout Kentucky. In July 2011, four sites in Kentucky began pilot site implementation. In 2012, two sites were added. In 2013, three sites were added. In 2014 BHDDID required that all Community Mental Health Centers implement the IPS program as one of the four evidence based practices required in their state plan. A Statewide Coordinator, employed through the University of Kentucky, Human Development Institute, oversees the pilot sites. A second coordinator was hired in late 2013. The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Behavioral Health collaborate as Team Leading agencies for the project. The Kentucky Association for Persons in Supported Employment (KY APSE) has been successful in creating greater supported employment awareness among the legislators in Kentucky’s General Assembly. (Page 270)

No current plan to hire additional staff, instead focusing on training of current staff and cross utilization of staff from other departments. Training existing staff is continuing quarterly. Recent quarterly training has emphasized BTQ standards. Annual training was completed August 22 – 24, 2016, which included all staff and cross utilized staff. Staff realignment occurred to merge functions, improve collaboration and efficiencies. Cross departmental utilization is occurring by utilizing of one lower authority appeal (referee) and six higher authority appeals staff (commission writers) to assist with adjudicating cases. The realignment allowed the branch to move staff into positions that better fit their skill sets. The cross utilization of staff allows the branch extra staff to utilize during times of seasonal increases in the volume of issues. The training will increase staff performance on resolving issues, provided clearly defined expectations of performance, and increase the inefficiency of the staff in resolving issues which will lead to more timely first payments. Unemployment Insurance is requesting a regulation change that will adjust the employers 15 day protest period to respond to a notice of initial claim and notice of potential benefit charges. This will remove the barrier of employers waiting 15 days to respond to adjudicators. These more timely employer responses will result in less time needed to resolve issues and quicker first payment promptness. This will reduce claimants having to wait to request first payment until the 16th day after filing an initial claim is filed. In addition to all of the changes, the branch has also implemented of a new pilot program which began on August 2, 2016. The new program utilizes a split chargeability issue system. The performance of the staff participating in the pilot program will be measured against the performance of staff not involved in the pilot program to determine if the program is effective in reducing the promptness of first payments. Budgetary constraints for UI IT development as well as prioritization of IT projects, delayed final development and implementation. Ongoing analysis and movement toward mainframe independence are factors in considering the order in which projects are completed and resources, both financial and staffing, are allocated. The new enhancements to the functionality to the internal claim intake system were not completed until early 2016. Since implementation fourteen help desk tickets have been created to improve the newly implemented system. Monitoring and assessment will be accomplished through daily, weekly and monthly reports reflecting issues received, issues worked and remaining issues. These reports will include a comparison of the pilot program data with the non-pilot program data. Monthly Interstate Section team meetings will be held to assess existing efforts and results and discuss improvements. (Page 429)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

We currently have in place five other innovative programs that provide high school students with a variety of work–based learning, financial literacy, self–advocacy training, job exploration, career counseling, and workplace readiness training opportunities that exist in the community with employers, in our rehabilitation center, and in post–secondary institutions.

The Summer Youth Boot Camp Program focuses on job exploration, workplace readiness training, and self–advocacy and is held at the Charles W. McDowell Center in Louisville. It is an intensive four week program based on the work of Dr. Karen Wolffe that introduces employability skills to transition aged individuals. The curriculum is specific to individuals that are blind or visually impaired.

The Summer Work Experience Program is in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Providers. CRPs are paid to find work experiences in competitive integrated settings for transition aged individuals. The work experiences last six to eight weeks and the students are paid by the Office for the Blind for the time worked. The goals of the work experience are to provide community based career exploration and the opportunity to practice work readiness skills. It is also hoped that by participating in the work experience program, employers will be open to providing more opportunities for individuals who are blind or visually impaired in their communities. (Page 310) 

Benefits

Existing legacy case management systems across WIOA Title I, Wagner Peyser, Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education are disparate and insular: Currently, the Office of Employment and Training (OET), the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Office for the Blind (OFB) are supported by insular case management systems that respond to requests for the following programs: 

  • Wagner Peyser Labor Exchange (Employ Kentucky Operating System - EKOS)
  • Unemployment Insurance – both benefits and tax/collections (Mainframe and Kentucky’s Electronic Workplace for Employment Services – KEWES)
  • Veterans Program
  • Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Program
  • National Emergency Grants
  • High Growth Job Training
  • Foreign Labor Certification
  • Health Care Tax Credit System
  • Trade Adjustment Act
  • Work Opportunities Tax Credit
  • Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA)
  • Student data
  • Customer records, services provided and costs of services for individuals with disabilities and blindness – Case Management System (CMS)
  • Social Security Reimbursement tracking and processing
  • Social Security Ticket to Work assignment tracking and processing (Page 67- 68)

The Case Management System (CMS) supports consumer case management activities, authorizes related payment transactions, generates reports/report information and contains a Social Security Reimbursement subsystem for all Title IV consumers, both for OFB and OVR. Consumer information, including confidential medical information, is collected to open a case within the respective agency. Agency services are based on the signed Individualized Plan for Employment between consumer and agency counselor. The system can attach scanned case documents, record staff provided services, staff activities, track comparable benefits, track consumer education and 

Training advancements. There is a Social Security Reimbursement module within CMS that enables each respective agency to seek reimbursement for the cost of the services provided to agency consumers receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. There is a Maximus module that generates files that are submitted to Social Security for the Ticket to Work program and tracks responses and ticket assignments. In July 2016, Kentucky ceased WIA data collection and reporting and began working to implement WIOA data collection and reporting requirements in addition to other USDOE and state reporting. CMS is a staff only application with a web front end. An interface exists between CMS and eMARS, the state’s payment system, to enable processing of payments to, and refunds from, vendors. The system is Section 508 and Bobby compliant and staff use screen readers such as JAWS, ZoomText and WindowEyes, as well as speech recognition software such as Dragon Naturally Speaking. (Page 68-69)

A local area may request Rapid Response funding in the form of Dislocation Grants and Additional Assistance Grants to serve potentially TAA–eligible worker groups in the same manner it requests funds for all other worker groups. The only difference is that Additional Assistance funding can’t be used to fund training once a worker group is covered by a TAA certification. If a TAA petition is certified, the state’s TAA program is responsible for identifying individuals potentially eligible under the certification through worker lists supplied by the employer and/or UI claimant information. 

The TAA program then uses a standard mailer to contact the potentially eligible individuals, inviting them to attend a Trade Orientation Session to learn about program benefits and register. At Trade Orientation Sessions. (Page 129)

The vocational rehabilitation programs use a case management system called Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment (AWARE) that is specifically designed for vocational rehabilitation programs. This system enables counselors to manage cases, managers to monitor cases, and the agency to prepare and submit required reports to RSA in a timely manner. All client data is captured and maintained in the AWARE case management system, such as information on client employment outcomes, including position title, employer, wages, hours, benefits, etc., and is provided to the Rehabilitation Services Administration, U. S. Department of Education through quarterly and annual reports. The company that programs the software will revise the system to produce any WIOA required data. Due to the especially strict confidentiality requirements imposed by the Rehabilitation Act and the sensitive nature of information about disabilities and medical conditions, the case management system is a closed system, accessible only by authorized employees. NMDWS has established a data sharing agreement to provide necessary wage data to support the programs’ activities. (Page 112)

These individuals work together to ensure that companies receive unified and coordinated information and services related to their workforce development needs. The KSN allows for the bringing together of the workforce and economic development programs and resources, thus providing a variety of ways to build workforce skills and ease training costs for employers. Through such options as reimbursable grants and tax credits for classroom training, on–the–job training, tuition and certification training, train–the–trainer travel, and entry level and skills upgrade training; Kentucky has resources that allow flexible and customizable training specific to company needs. Early in 2016, KSN partners will gain access to a Customer Relationship Management system based on a Sales Force platform. Phase 1 will allow for shared access to employer contact and needs, and Phase 2 later in 2016–2017 will add the capacity for KSN partners to add and assess employer programs and resources via the Sales Force application. OVR, in conjunction with the Kentucky Office for the Blind and Office of Employment and Training, hosted an Employer Summit in 2015 to highlight the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities as well as the OFCCP regulation requirements. The event was well received with numerous employers seeking additional information on working with the two rehabilitation agencies. This outreach and education with Employers and Businesses across the commonwealth will continue with additional summits convened in regional locations to attract a more diverse employer customer base. The Workforce Partners recognize the regional differences as well as workforce needs and will hold Employer Summits focused specific to the regional sectors and incorporate the post–secondary education institutions as a conduit to meeting the talent pipeline demands. The Statewide Council for Vocational Rehabilitation (SCVR), Kentucky’s State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), includes several employers and a representative of the Workforce Investment Board who provide important input on agency policy and activities related to employment. OVR, in conjunction with SCVR, conducts a Job Placement Month annually in October which includes many events around the state that promote collaboration with employers. Regional Employer Recognition Awards are given out during the month to employers who have hired OVR consumers. OVR will also continue to partner with local initiatives like Project SEARCH in Northern Kentucky and the Coalition for Workforce Diversity in Louisville to identify and educate employers willing to develop new programs specifically designed to focus on hiring and training individuals with disabilities. (Page 210)

 (A) Study Findings Service Needs and Gaps Based on a thorough review of findings across the survey, interview, and agency data, the following service needs were identified for individuals with disabilities, including those with most significant disabilities. These are Job placement services (including supported employment and customized employment), Health care, including medical and mental health treatment, Benefits and financial planning, Supportive or ancillary services (e.g., transportation, housing), Long–term supports, and Transition services for students and youth / young adults. Comments from key informants who provide services within, or interface with, Kentucky’s medical and mental health systems, may serve to clarify the findings related to health care needs. The broad areas of concern related to the limited capacity of our healthcare system, geographic gaps, saturation of providers accepting particular types of insurance and high cost of co–pays making care unaffordable for some people. While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and resulting expanded number of Kentuckians with insurance coverage has improved the access to medication for many, informants noted that some serious needs still exist and likely will continue to exist because of a lack of capacity to provide care to those who need it. Particularly in more rural areas, respondents noted that some people must travel great lengths to find physical and mental health providers; others do not have access to transportation and thus are not able to receive sufficient care. Another issue identified by informants is related to the saturation of providers because finding treatment for individuals on Medicaid is difficult as providers have capped the number of patients that they will accept. Finally, while more residents have health insurance, copays are often not affordable and thus individuals still do not seek out treatment because of financial strain. Supported Employment and capacity of CRP providers is another major focus of the needs assessment. (Page 228) 

Services to individuals with disabilities provided by Community Rehabilitation Programs. These issues are anticipated as in–demand service and service needs for CRPs in the next three years. These are Job Placement Services, Transition Services, Skills Training, and Supported Employment Services. ESTABLISHMENT GRANTS This Update to the previous CSNA assessed the need to develop, establish and improve community rehabilitation programs, referred to as establishment projects. OVR surveyed staff, consumers and partners on the use of establishment grants to develop innovative programming. The survey asked if there is a need for OVR to fund establishment projects to maximize relationships with employers, improve outcomes and services for transition youth, improve outcomes and services for Social Security recipients, improve outcomes and services for individuals with behavioral health issues, develop supported employment programs in areas of the state where they currently do not exist, and improve outcomes and services for ex–offenders. Item 1 directly addresses the need for more job placement services and also the continuing prominence of ‘Employer Attitudinal Barriers’ as a barrier to employment. Item 2 directly addresses the need for transition services. Item 3 is designed to address the need for more benefits planning assistance. Item 5 addresses the continuing need for more supported employment services, particularly in some areas of the state. Items 4 and 6 address serving the two populations of consumers identified by both vocational rehabilitation counselors and community rehabilitation programs as the largest growing populations they have seen over the previous three years. Counselors were asked to evaluate the importance of several areas of need for establishment projects, including service needs, such as supported employment and employer relationships, as well as services targeting particular populations, such as transition youth and social security recipients. ( Page 223)

Measure: To meet or exceed customer satisfaction rating from the previous year

GOAL II: To provide Pre–employment transition services (Pre–ETS) to Transition Students (ages 14–21) and other transition services to Transition Youth (ages–16–24) to assist them with transition from high school into competitive integrated employment or post–secondary training.

Measure: To provide specific and specialized services to at least 60% of both transition students and transition youth 

GOAL III: Provide information concerning benefits planning and financial planning in order to promote inclusion, integration, and empowerment of individuals with the most significant and significant disabilities.

Measure: All applicants who receive SSA benefits will receive information on benefits planning and at least 50% of them will receive a benefits analysis. (Page 234)

  • Evaluate the current transition program to determine trends and needs
  • Expand the capacity of the agency to provide Pre–ETS services
  • Expand Pre–ETS to transition students (ages 14–21) and other transition services to youth (ages 16–24)
  • Offer benefits planning for individuals with disabilities who are Social Security recipients
  • Provide information on financial education and asset development
  • Enhance job placement services
  • Provide supported employment services that lead to competitive integrated employment and improve the number of successful outcomes for supported employment cases across the state
  • Develop and apply a process for implementing requirements under Section 511 (Page 236)

According to data from the 2012 American Community Survey, published in the annual Compendium of Disability Statistics, 17.0% of Kentucky civilians living in the community report having a disability, including 15.5% of residents of working age (18–64). This is higher than the national average (12.3% all, 10.2% working age). The rate of Kentuckians reporting a disability remained relatively stable from 2011 through 2012, growing at 1.1% (on par with the national average of 1.2%). Only 27% of individuals in Kentucky with disabilities are employed. Kentucky and Arkansas share the second highest percentage of individuals with disabilities. Kentucky also shares a second place ranking with Arkansas and Louisiana in percentage of individuals who fall below the poverty line at 17.3%. According to the Social Security Administration, 192,721 Kentuckians receive blind and disabled Supplemental Security Income benefits. The Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI), in 2007, reported the percentage of SSI recipients in Kentucky who were working was 2.7% compared to the national percentage of 7.6% (ICI, 2007). In 2007, Kentucky also had 160,122 Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. These statistics provide a description of the potentially high demand for OVR services based on the number of individuals in the state with disabilities. A review of internal OVR data that was used to develop a Personnel Plan in 2011 indicated that as the average caseload size increases, the rehabilitation rate tends to decrease. (Page 239-240)

G.   Partner with SOAR to increase transportation options in the Appalachian region;

H.   Partner with the Medicaid Brokerage System;

I.   Provide Benefits Planning and Analysis as an option when it comes to addressing health insurance concerns. 

Goal 2: To provide Pre–employment transition services (Pre–ETS) to Transition Students (ages 14–21) and other transition services to Youth (ages 16–24) to assist them with transition from high school into competitive integrated employment or post–secondary training. (Page 251)

School to Work Transition

(2) As a means of providing Pre–Employment Transition Services, OVR will work with partner agencies in Workforce Development to identify existing apprenticeship programs with employers with which OVR may partner to focus on incorporating students and youth with disabilities into the programs. We do work with the Office of Autism in order to understand how to assist youth on the spectrum with attaining and maintaining employment. A model program focused on creating apprenticeship opportunities for students and youth with disabilities will be developed in such a manner as to be replicated in urban and rural areas alike. This will expand employment opportunities for all the youth and students with disabilities in Kentucky. OVR will continue to participate in an Annual Youth Summit, which provides the opportunity for youth and students with disabilities to meet employers, educators, and service providers. OVR plans to continuously expand the summit to provide employers an opportunity to meet with potential employees or apprenticeship participants. (Page 210)

Data Collection

TBCM builds on the functional alignment within the centers and focuses on providing services to job seekers in a consistent, coordinated and efficient way. The systems and tools used in the TBCM approach reinforce functional alignment and integrated service delivery within the centers and among partner agencies. To strengthen this project, Kentucky’s consultant coordinated activities in recognition of and alignment with other key actions in the WorkSmart Kentucky Strategic Plan including Kentucky Career Center Customer Flow, Kentucky Career Center Certification, and Partner for Success and Workforce Academy. Services to Employers are aligned among the core partners through the Business Services teams of the Kentucky Skills Network. Since the implementation of the WorkSmart Kentucky Strategic Plan, a priority has been developing unified and collaborative approach to service delivery in our business services model. It is critical that all the government agencies working to meet the employment needs of business and industry work together taking a solutions-based approach to meeting their needs. This is being done through regional Business Services Teams. WIOA Performance Outcomes Measures Group is a work group made up of the core partners to develop cross-program common measures and address all issues and concerns regarding data collection and reporting. The group is facilitated by the Kentucky Center for Workforce Statistics (KCEWS). The Partner for Success initiative brought together all agencies in the Department of Workforce Investment to develop a unified approach to delivering services. The goal was to create networking opportunities, create awareness of the services each partnering agency delivers and assemble the full array of services delivered to customers in a manner that is efficient, effective and holistic. A top priority of the current Governor’s Discretionary Budget is to advance the work of training of state staff and partners. The new effort will build on previous Workforce Academy curriculum that provided training for all partners at every level of the system. Training has been and will continue to be held regionally inclusive of local level staff covering topics such as WIOA implementation, customer flow, local labor market information, transformational leadership and system transformation. (Page 56)

Existing legacy case management systems across WIOA Title I, Wagner Peyser, Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education are disparate and insular: Currently, the Office of Employment and Training (OET), the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Office for the Blind (OFB) are supported by insular case management systems that respond to requests for the following programs: 

  • Wagner Peyser Labor Exchange (Employ Kentucky Operating System - EKOS)
  • Unemployment Insurance – both benefits and tax/collections (Mainframe and Kentucky’s Electronic Workplace for Employment Services – KEWES)
  • Veterans Program
  • Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Program
  • National Emergency Grants
  • High Growth Job Training
  • Foreign Labor Certification
  • Health Care Tax Credit System
  • Trade Adjustment Act
  • Work Opportunities Tax Credit
  • Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA)
  • Student data
  • Customer records, services provided and costs of services for individuals with disabilities and blindness (Page 67)

There is a Maximus module that generates files that are submitted to Social Security for the Ticket to Work program and tracks responses and ticket assignments. In July 2016, Kentucky ceased WIA data collection and reporting and began working to implement WIOA data collection and reporting requirements in addition to other USDOE and state reporting. CMS is a staff only application with a web front end. An interface exists between CMS and eMARS, the state’s payment system, to enable processing of payments to, and refunds from, vendors. The system is Section 508 and Bobby compliant and staff use screen readers such as JAWS, ZoomText and WindowEyes, as well as speech recognition software such as Dragon Naturally Speaking.

Kentucky Adult Education Reporting System The Kentucky Adult Education Reporting System (KAERS) is a nationally-recognized student management system designed and maintained through Kentucky Adult Education and the Council on Postsecondary Education. It is used by all Title II adult education programs to record programmatic, student and fiscal agent information with a student portal for students to view their data and online curriculum. KAERS also has a reporting tool used to enhance program performance, a real-time student tracking function, and integrates external data sources. Data from KAERS is submitted, on a regular basis, to the Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) and KCEWS. (Page 69)

OVR subcontracted with the University of Kentucky Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling Program to conduct the triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) in the Fall and Spring of 2014–2015. The current study was designed to identify service needs, trends in service needs, disability populations who are underserved, trends in disability populations, and recommendations for OVR. Prior to conducting the needs assessment, the research team reviewed data collection instruments from the 2011–2012 iteration. OVR senior staff provided assistance with revisions and updates to the surveys, making improvements to clarity and ensuring that questions would elicit the kind of information that is needed for strategic planning. OVR staff also assisted with survey dissemination, making sure that the survey reached current and previous customers, staff and counselors, and key workforce partners. As a result of these efforts, response rates for the present CSNA iteration were on par with and in some cases exceeded previous needs assessment surveys. In addition to survey data, RSA 911 case data from FY 2011–2013, state–level population data, and interview data from 21 Key Informants who work in areas of disability and public service throughout the state were analyzed. This information was meant to provide context as well as additional areas of consideration for OVR strategic planning efforts. (Page 228)

In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We anticipate that the current system will be able to collect the necessary data beginning 7/1/2016 and produce accurate reports for common measures reporting. (Page 235)

The purchase or licensing of other systems that would meet both the needs of the two vocational rehabilitation agencies and those of common measure reporting are being considered. Additionally, the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, Department of Workforce Investment is exploring the feasibility of purchasing or leasing a single system for all of the data collection needs of the Department including the Office of Employment and Training, OFB, and OVR. The ability to capture the performance accountability measures common to all Kentucky Workforce Investment agencies is currently a work in progress. The Department for Workforce Investment (DW), in partnership with a current federal grant, is testing the potential implementation of software that may have the capacity to capture all customer flow information within DWI. The nationally recognized software is currently being customized to the specific needs of DWI agencies and training has staff has been implemented. Also being tested is the capacity of the software to allow for totally paperless consumer files, the ability of the customer/job seeker to access their information from a website for the purposes of updating information, providing information required by the various agencies and having direct access to employment opportunities in their area. DWI will continue to pilot the use of this system with the ultimate goal of transferring all DWI agencies to a common casework system within two years. Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. There have at least been some conversations concerning paperless case pilot projects. In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We anticipate that the current system will be able to collect the necessary data beginning 7/1/2016 and produce accurate reports prior to the due dates for Rehabilitation Services Administration and common measures reporting. Once a baseline is determined and the relationship between services, partnerships, etc. and successful outcomes and measurable progress is analyzed, strategies will be developed to improve the performance outcomes. (Page 260)

Additionally, the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, Department of Workforce Investment is exploring the feasibility of purchasing or leasing a single system for all of the data collection needs of the Department including the Office of Employment and Training, Office for the Blind and Office of Vocational Rehabilitation.

Early in 2016 Kentucky Skills Network partners will gain access to a Customer Relationship Management system based on a SalesForce platform. Phase 1 will allow for shared access to employer contact and needs, and Phase 2 later in 2016–2017 will add the capacity for KSN partners to add and assess employer programs and resources via the SalesForce application.

Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. (Page 336)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Low Income Services provided to low-income individuals are reflected in Kentucky’s WIOA Priority of Service policy that provides guidance on the service requirement for Title I Adults for both individualized career services and training services. Priority applies to recipients of public assistance, other low-income individuals and individuals who are basic skills deficient. A low-income individual is defined in Section 3(36) means an individual who: Eligible WIOA in-school youth must be low-income, unless a local area applies the 5 percent low-income exception. WIOA out-of-school youth are not required to be low-income unless the barrier requires additional assistance to enter or complete an education program or hold employment or is a recipient of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent and is basic skills deficient or an English language learner. Service priorities for all populations with barriers to employment The WorkSmart Kentucky Plan has driven significant changes and improvements in the workforce system since 2010, as well as informed other related strategic initiatives like Kentucky’s participation in the NGA Talent Pipeline Academy. The following 2010-13 goals will continue to inform and guide the system during this transition period and to build career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment. To provide determining factors for the goals of Kentucky’s strategic plan, a series of objectives was developed. Each set of objectives supports a specific goal and provides the framework for the development of action steps as well as a basis for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of this plan. Align Kentucky’s workforce development system with its education objectives. 

  • Increase communication and collaboration between workforce boards and boards of education, technical education, post-secondary education and economic development;
  • Increase the number of post-secondary and work ready high school graduates;
  • Promote educational options, including technical education, two-year and four-year college, apprenticeships and specialty training to younger students;
  • Increase awareness of educational and skills requirements for high-demand jobs, as well as those in emerging industries; and
  • Establish the concept of life-long learning as a norm in the 21st century. Align Kentucky’s workforce development system with economic development strategies.
  • Increase communication and collaboration between workforce boards and economic development agencies;
  • Develop “rapid response” framework for new jobs based on model for layoffs;
  • Refine and promote evolving methods of projecting jobs and training needs of the future; and
  • Increase opportunities for entrepreneurship in a culture of innovation. (Page 37)

 

Career Pathways

KCC partners will work closely with Department of Community Based Services (DCBS) to assure customers have knowledge and access to needed resources. One–stop partners are directly involved with two Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) grant initiatives with DCBS. Paths to Promise (P2P) is a pilot program with a robust research component serving eight counties in Eastern Kentucky. The pilot includes moving eligible students into AOKY career pathways. The subsequent allocation of employment and training funds will be dedicated to providing support services to students pursuing education and training in urban areas across the state.

The core partner agencies will coordinate and better align services with Criminal Justice agencies in serving ex–offenders. OVR and OFB work closely with this target population in providing services, supports and referrals to other programs as needed. (Page 58)

Project CASE is a collaborative effort between state vocational rehabilitation agencies, adult education, secondary and post–secondary education, career centers, employers and other partners to demonstrate how career pathways can help individuals with disabilities acquire the marketable skills and attain recognized credentials that lead to employment in high–demand occupations. In Kentucky, two pilot projects are planned in the Metro Louisville and Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) regions; these will engage seven and 23 counties respectively. (Page 64)

J. Participate in Project CASE, a five–year, RSA–funded grant to the Office for the Blind (OFB) to identify and recruit eligible consumers from OFB and the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) in the Kentuckiana Works and EKCEP Kentucky Career Center areas to pursue career pathways in Information Technology, Manufacturing, Industrial Technology, and the Healthcare, Nursing, and Allied Health fields and provide those consumers with a variety of supports, including job placement assistance after completion of training;

K. Coordinate Rapid Responses to all major community job losses statewide along with other center partners; (Page 255)

A federal Career Pathways grant recently received by the Kentucky Office for the Blind (OFB) from the Rehabilitation Services Administration. OVR will collaborate with OFB on assisting consumers in three career pathways (healthcare, manufacturing, and information technology) in two of Kentucky Career Centers, Kentuckian Works in the Louisville metropolitan area and the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) in rural Appalachia. (Page 263)

Workforce Development Boards: OFB VR counselors actively participate on their local Workforce Development Board’s Youth and One Stop committees to enhance and make accessible the programs and services for transition age consumers. Through Project CASE, a program developed from the use of Federal grant funding through the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the Office for the Blind will have stronger coordination and collaboration with the Youth Career Centers and other Kentucky Career Centers. Partnering with Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) and KentuckianaWorks in the hiring of Career Pathway Coordinators, and in cross–agency training of staff on career pathways for students with disabilities, Project CASE will ensure sustained partnerships. (Page 300)

All the Disability Coordinators in this survey have an expectation that OVR counselors will provide needed assistive technology for post–secondary students. Percentages were high among responses that goals and expectations of working with an OVR counselor included provision of orientation and mobility services, resources for the student/family, vocational/career counseling, open and regular communication, assistance with training/college funding, and assistance with employment upon graduation. While we may help provide financial assistance for tuition and assistive devices, the true strength of our agency is in the vocational counseling services we provide on an individual basis. We must work to remain active counselors, ensuring that students are getting opportunities for work experiences, internships, and apprenticeships through the Career Pathways program. (Page 338)

In order to assure the coordination of services to facilitate the transition students from school to postsecondary life (including the receipt of VR services, postsecondary education, competitive integrated employment, and pre–employment transition services) OFB utilizes the following process. The VR Counselor is responsible for the schools located in their assigned county areas. Counselors work with school staff to identify potentially eligible students assuring that they are given the opportunity to apply for services starting at age 14. While the student is enrolled in school, the VR Counselor works with school staff to ensure the student receives the needed services to aid in the transition to post–secondary life. Services include but are not limited to pre–employment transition services, other VR services and programming offered by OFB, and other services specific to transition aged students by school districts and other entities. VR Counselors provide individualized services and where gaps in services are identified staff work to developed new and innovative services in the students’ home area to better serve this population. One project that aligns with this area in serving students is Project CASE (Creating Access to Successful Employment). In October 2015, the Kentucky Office for the Blind/Kentucky Career Center was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR–eligible individuals, including students and youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized postsecondary credentials necessary to secure competitive integrated employment in high–demand, high–quality occupations. Creating Access to Successful Employment (CASE) will help ensure that individuals with disabilities, even at the secondary school level, are not left out of participating in these existing initiatives, and can prepare for and obtain jobs in high–wage and high–demand occupations.

The goals and strategies of this five year project and the evaluation plan for it strongly aligns with the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA. (Page 365 &366)

The plan has served as a blueprint for transforming Kentucky’s workforce services focused on adapting to the changing needs of employers to create a demand–driven, business–led, solutions–based publicly funded talent development system for the Commonwealth. Over the next four years, the new Administration will work with the new Kentucky Workforce Innovation Board on a new strategic plan and new goals. The new plan and goals will inform subsequent modifications of this State Plan and of course the continuing transformation of Kentucky’s workforce system through innovative practices which enhance sustainable economic and job growth to improve the lives of Kentuckians. Kentucky strategies have and will continue to support WIOA’s focus on low income adults and youth who have limited skills, lack work experience, and face other barriers to economic success. Vocational Rehabilitation is a full and actively engaged partner in Kentucky in the workforce system. OFB and OVR are actively engaged in the planning process, on committees and staff serves as project directors on some of the KWIB initiatives. They are advocates in the workforce system for individuals with disabilities. Please refer to the Vocational Rehabilitation section of this combined plan for a comprehensive listing of goals and strategies. (Page 367)

Employment Networks

Kentucky’s employment website. 

  • The Kentucky Employment Network (KEN) works with UI customers who are profiled as likely to exhaust UI benefits. KEN consists of a workshop that informs the customer of the programs available through the Kentucky Career Center.
  • Re–employment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) works with UI customers who are profiled as likely to exhaust UI benefits. The grant activities consist of a Kentucky Career Center orientation, job search overview, Individual Employment Plan (IEP) and referral to job services.
  • The KCCGO! Dislocated Worker Grant has offered the opportunity to leverage key KWIB strategic plan initiatives including Unified Business Services, Career Center Certification and Sector Strategies and focus those improvements intensively on the long–term unemployed. The KCCGO! grant made available $4,775,418 to local workforce development areas to provide re–employment services including training costs for OJTs, Internships, Registered Apprenticeships, Accelerating Opportunity Scholarships, Work Experience/Tryout Employment, Customized Training, and other training in targeted sectors.(Page 152)

 

 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 54

Transition Services for Students with Disabilities - 10/12/2017

“For many students with disabilities the success of this transition from school to adult life depends on teamwork and collaboration between the schools and community resources. As one such resource, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation works closely with the Kentucky Department of Education to assist eligible students with disabilities to identify, plan for, and achieve their vocational goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Supported Employment Training Project - 07/01/2017

The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation has played a vital role in the establishment and implementation of supported employment services in the Commonwealth. Through partnerships with agencies, organizations and funding services for persons with severe disabilities, the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation is able to assist many people who have a supported employment goal in achieving positive employment outcomes.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

State Plan Under Title XIX of the Social Security Act - 04/06/2017

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Kentucky's Medicaid program.

 

The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act, such as:

-Methods of Administration

-Eligibility

-Services Covered

-Quality Control

-Fiscal Reimbursements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supports for Community Living Waiver - 03/29/2017

~~“SCL Waiver renewal officially approved by CMS! - (Mar. 29, 2017) - The Department for Medicaid Services (DMS) has been notified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) of the official renewal of the Supports for Community Living (SCL) Medicaid Waiver to be implemented April 1, 2017. The SCL waiver renewal period is effective March 1, 2017 through February 28, 2022.

Beginning April 1, 2017, providers shall implement SCL regulations 907 KAR 12:010 and 907 KAR 12:020 that were dated effective June 3, 2016.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mission Statement of the Kentucky Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities - 02/10/2017

~~“Mission StatementIt is the mission of the Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DDID) to empower each person to realize his or her place in the community as a citizen of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. To accomplish this mission, DDID will partner with and support persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities, families, advocates, stakeholders and government agencies….

EmploymentIndividuals of working age are employable: employment is life-enriching.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

State Medicaid Plan Amendments - 01/19/2017

~~“This page is a resource for Kentucky Medicaid State Plan Amendments.  It has information on the amendments starting with 2008 .”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Labor Cabinet Receives $896,600 Apprenticeship Grant” - 10/24/2016

“The U.S. Dept. of Labor has announced over $50.5 million in grant awards to 37 states to help expand apprenticeship opportunities across the U.S. – including $896,600 for Kentucky. The proposal calls for a workforce pipeline to be created in Kentucky, increasing the number of Registered Apprentices by 1,300 individuals, including women, minorities, 16-24 year olds, individuals age 45+ or older, veterans, and people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Kentucky Department of Education “Career and Technical Education” - 10/06/2016

“Mission: The mission of Career and Technical Education is to assist schools in providing students with skills necessary for a successful transition to postsecondary education or work and a desire for life-long learning in a global society.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Request for a Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver - 08/24/2016

“Kentucky HEALTH is an innovative, transformative healthcare program designed to not only stabilize the program financially, but to also improve the health outcomes and overall quality of life for all members. This demonstration waiver seeks to evaluate new policies and program elements designed to engage members in their healthcare and provide the necessary education and tools required to achieve long term health and an improved quality of life. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Assistive Technology Service Network “A Guide to Assistive Technology Funding in Kentucky 15th Edition” - 08/01/2016

“…the services of the ATRCs include, but are not limited to: Assistive Technology Services for Early Intervention, K-12 and Post-secondary school, Employment, Transition, Independent Living, leisure or recreation; Loan Library of Assistive Devices, adaptive equipment and toys; Demonstrations of assistive technology devices; Funding information, Assistance and Referral; Assessments and Evaluations for AT; Vocational assessments; Consultations on appropriate technologies; Workplace AT; Environmental Controls; Recycled Computers and Assistive Technology Devices; Training and Technical Assistance on and about AT.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Statute 42.0146 - Certification Program for Disabled Veteran-Owned Businesses - 07/15/2016

Office of Equal Employment Opportunity and Contract Compliance—Oversight of certification program for disabled veteran-owned businesses—Administrative regulations 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky ABLE Act S.B. 179 - 04/05/2016

Signed by the Governor on April  5, 2016

AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities.

Amend KRS 205.200 to disregard any amount in an ABLE account, any contributions to an ABLE account, and any distribution from an ABLE account for qualified expenses for the purposes of determining an individual's eligibility for a means-tested public assistance program and the amount of assistance or benefits the individual is eligible to receive under the program; direct the State Treasurer, the Secretary of the Finance and Administration Cabinet, the Executive Director of the Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Executive Director of the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority to work cooperatively to seek all available sources of funding, determine the best plan of action related to ABLE accounts, and report to the Legislative Research Commission on or before December 31, 2016.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Transition Services for Students with Disabilities - 10/12/2017

“For many students with disabilities the success of this transition from school to adult life depends on teamwork and collaboration between the schools and community resources. As one such resource, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation works closely with the Kentucky Department of Education to assist eligible students with disabilities to identify, plan for, and achieve their vocational goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Supported Employment Training Project - 07/01/2017

The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation has played a vital role in the establishment and implementation of supported employment services in the Commonwealth. Through partnerships with agencies, organizations and funding services for persons with severe disabilities, the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation is able to assist many people who have a supported employment goal in achieving positive employment outcomes.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Mission Statement of the Kentucky Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities - 02/10/2017

~~“Mission StatementIt is the mission of the Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DDID) to empower each person to realize his or her place in the community as a citizen of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. To accomplish this mission, DDID will partner with and support persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities, families, advocates, stakeholders and government agencies….

EmploymentIndividuals of working age are employable: employment is life-enriching.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Labor Cabinet Receives $896,600 Apprenticeship Grant” - 10/24/2016

“The U.S. Dept. of Labor has announced over $50.5 million in grant awards to 37 states to help expand apprenticeship opportunities across the U.S. – including $896,600 for Kentucky. The proposal calls for a workforce pipeline to be created in Kentucky, increasing the number of Registered Apprentices by 1,300 individuals, including women, minorities, 16-24 year olds, individuals age 45+ or older, veterans, and people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Kentucky Department of Education “Career and Technical Education” - 10/06/2016

“Mission: The mission of Career and Technical Education is to assist schools in providing students with skills necessary for a successful transition to postsecondary education or work and a desire for life-long learning in a global society.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation “Order of Selection Letter to Community Partners” - 06/30/2016

“Last year the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and its partners assisted almost 40,000 Kentuckians on their path toward gainful employment. However, the continuing demand, escalating costs, and a shortfall in matchable state dollars now further limit our ability to provide services to all persons eligible for our services. When a public vocational rehabilitation program like OVR cannot serve everyone who is eligible, federal law requires that it invoke what is called an Order of Selection.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Kentucky Department of Education “Transition” - 10/09/2015

The ultimate goal of the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE), Division of Learning Services is the successful transition of all students from school to post-school activities - whether postsecondary education, vocational training, integrated employment, continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living or community participation. We also recognize that many other transitions occur over the course of the life of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Customized Employment in Kentucky (video) - 07/28/2015

The seven-minute video profiles three employees with developmental disabilities who are working in their community, in jobs which are a good fit for them, and in which their contributions are valued by their employer. The common thread in these stories is that the jobs were “customized,” a process in which employer needs are matched with the talents, interests and contributions of individual job seekers

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Kentucky Unified State Plan 2012-2017 - 12/10/2012

“The Commonwealth is committed to ensuring that individuals with disabilities have all available service opportunities. The system’s service philosophy is that job seekers with disabilities are served by workforce staff in the same manner as any other job seekers. Where additional support or expertise is needed, OVR staff will assist. Many of the individuals with disabilities seeking services at one-stop sites are veterans and thus receive one-on-one assistance from DVOP specialists in addition to the broad array of services otherwise available. Cross-training for staff system-wide is promoted to ensure a seamless continuum of services. To facilitate universal access, one-stop resource areas are equipped with a variety of assistive technology tools, including large computer monitors, low vision readers, screen reading software, TTY, and adjustable work stations. In addition, career center staff is available at all sites to orient customers to these resources and to assist them throughout the service experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Supported Employment Training Project “Customized Employment, Self-Employment, and Employment First”

~~“This page focuses on information for job seekers or their family members -- people exploring the possibility of supported employment, as well as those already receiving services who need additional information. Other parts of our Supported Employment Training Project (SETP) web site are designed primarily for people providing supported employment services. There are many hyperlinks within this page…

What is the “Employment First” agenda? This is a movement that's taken root in a number of states -- centered around raising expectations, acknowledging the profound significance of employment opportunity and seeking employment as a first option. (Establishing a National Employment First Agenda, and APSE Statement on Employment First - October 2010)”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Kentucky Assistive Technology Service Network “A Guide to Assistive Technology Funding in Kentucky 15th Edition” - 08/01/2016

“…the services of the ATRCs include, but are not limited to: Assistive Technology Services for Early Intervention, K-12 and Post-secondary school, Employment, Transition, Independent Living, leisure or recreation; Loan Library of Assistive Devices, adaptive equipment and toys; Demonstrations of assistive technology devices; Funding information, Assistance and Referral; Assessments and Evaluations for AT; Vocational assessments; Consultations on appropriate technologies; Workplace AT; Environmental Controls; Recycled Computers and Assistive Technology Devices; Training and Technical Assistance on and about AT.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Perkins Center (Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation)

“The Perkins Center is a division of the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the vast majority of our consumers are referred by OVR Counselors located in several cities and towns across the Commonwealth….One of the main reasons for the creation of the Perkins Center was to enable Kentuckians with disabilities to obtain all the services they would need to become employed... The Center currently operates several programs and services that enable consumers to achieve their vocational goals”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities (CCDD) is a group of citizens, appointed by the governor to serves as a leading catalyst for systems change for individuals and families living with developmental disabilities…[The CCDD] mission “is to create systemic change in Kentucky that empowers individuals to achieve full citizenship and inclusion in the community through capacity building and advocacy”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP)

“The Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP) is a collaborative effort between participating local school districts, the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE), Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR), and the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky (HDI).

“The CBWTP is designed to provide a positive beginning in the world of work for students in special education during their last two years of high school. The goal for the CBWTP is students with disabilities will graduate from high school with positive employment outcomes, working in an integrated work setting with competitive pay.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Assistive Technology Services Network

The KATS Network is the Kentucky Assistive Technology program operating within its lead agency, the Office Vocational Rehabilitation, Education Cabinet. The KATS Network collaborates with and provides support for several Assistive Technology Resource Centers around Kentucky. Currently there are five such Centers which provide information and support to consumers, educators, parents, and others who are in need of information, assistive technology, or related services.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Assistive Technology Loan Corporation

“Working with its lending partner, Fifth Third Bank, KATLC can provide loans for modified vehicles, hearing aids, adapted computers, mobility devices, augmentative communication devices or any other type of equipment or home modification that will improve the quality of life or increase the independence of Kentuckians with disabilities.

“Established by state statute in 1996, KATLC is governed by a seven-member Board of Directors…. The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation currently provides staff support to the Board of Directors and the KATLC program.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky PACE (Preparing Adults for Competitive Employment)

“The Pace Training Program is a community-based job training program offered by the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. The program is an integral component of job placement services that offers short-term job training. The trainee will receive a training stipend while working at the program site, which is paid by the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation.   “Pace Training Program services are designed for the consumer who has been found eligible and whose vocational goal is competitive employment.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Kentucky Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P)

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P) provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. [Their] work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kentucky Money Follows the Person - 11/17/2010

[Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration Grant]… facilitates transition of and provides sustainable community based services to individuals who choose to move from Medicaid funded long term care settings (ICFs/MR and nursing facilities) into the community.”   “Those who transition must meet the criteria for services through one of three (3) transition waivers. Those waivers will provide transition and community based services to individuals who fall into one of the following groups: Individuals who are elderly and/or physically disabled; individuals who have mental retardation and a developmental disability; or individuals who have an acquired brain injury.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

"Customized Employment in Kentucky” Video Premiering at 25th Anniversary of the ADA Celebration - 07/29/2015

“Just in time for the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the University of Kentucky Human Development Institute announced the debut of their new video, ‘Customized Employment in Kentucky’…    The seven-minute video profiles three employees with developmental disabilities who are working in their community, in jobs which are a good fit for them, and in which their contributions are valued by their employer. The common thread in these stories is that the jobs were “customized,” a process in which employer needs are matched with the talents, interests and contributions of individual job seekers.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

“Toolbox for Employment: Customized Self-Employment and Benefits Planning” - 11/12/2013

~~“TThis is a presentation on methods that a person might use as a guide to becoming self-employed.“Business AND Benefits PlanningGo hand in handStarts with Discovery–DPG™Have to understand the interaction of income from wage and/or self-employment on public benefit systemsWhat public benefit systems are being received now?SSA, Medicaid, DD Waivers – CILA? Home Based Support?, DRS Home Services” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

“2017 Supported Employment Leadership Series” –Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky

“12 days of high quality supported employment professional development provide the foundation for the SE Leadership Series… Participants will study ways of connecting discovery with targeted job development, informational interviews, job analysis/needs analysis, customized employment, and specific representational considerations and strategies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Supported Employment Training Project “Newly Designed Supported Employment Leadership Series”

What's new?

12 days not required - Participation in all 4 leadership events is encouraged. The content areas are designed to be sequential and cumulative. However, for some, participation in all 12 days may not be possible. Therefore, participants may select any combination of the 4 events. (Check event descriptions for prerequisite requirements and recommendations.) Because the same schedule will be offered annually, it will be possible, for example, to participate in Parts 1 and 2 in 2016, and then Parts 3 and 4 in 2017. Three certifications will be offered - For the first time, a performance-based supported employment certification will be available in Kentucky. Historically, much of the content offered in our SE Leadership Series has been derived from Marc Gold & Associates (MG&A) and our Supported Employment Training Project (SETP) has a long-standing cooperative relationship with Mike Callahan and other MG&A colleagues. This year, we're formalizing an arrangement with MG&A by offering three certifications: 1-Systematic Instruction, 2-Discovery, and 3-Job Development.   

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Kentucky APSE “Training/Continuing Education”

This page is a resource for various traning and continuing education programs that are available in Kentucky. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services “Peer Support Specialist Curriculum Approval Process”

The Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) will approve the following curricula for Peer Support Specialists (PSS): Adult Peer Support Specialist, Family Peer Support Specialist, Youth Peer Support Specialist, and Kentucky Family Leadership Academy, as established in the Kentucky Administrative Regulations.

The regulations provide the curriculum applicant with an understanding of the requirements for peer support specialists—both eligibility and training—and specifically speak to the elements of a "training curriculum" and the training requirements (testing of the trainee and evaluation of the trainers). View these regulations in Related Links.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Supported Employment Training Project

About Us Having a job represents much more than earning a salary. Employment, including the kind of work one performs, influences one's personal identity, sense of belonging, and place in the world. Furthermore, employment represents one primary way of expressing the inherent human need to contribute – doing something that matters. Yet all too often the significance of employment for people with disabilities has been unrecognized, ignored, or minimized.Supported employment is designed to promote personalized employment opportunities for people with disabilities when they need support to:

Discover personal interests and contributions,Find or negotiate a job that fits things people like to do and do well,Become established as valued employees; andPursue job advancements.

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. Our work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. Please contact mtyree@uky.edu to make suggestions or request additional information. Many documents on this site are only available in PDF format

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities State Plan for Federal Fiscal Years 2017-2021

Goal #2- The capacity of systems that serve all people will be improved so that people with developmental disabilities will have increased access to opportunities for greater independence and integration

Objective 2-B (Employment): By 2021, the Council will support the efforts of at least 10 organizations to expand competitive, integrated employment for individuals with developmental disabilities by employing or assisting  more individuals with developmental disabilities in obtaining  jobs in the communities

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: Self-Employment Guide

This webpage offers information on and resources for self-employment. It orients job seekers on where to start the self-employment process and contains links to relevant resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky Educational Collaborative for State Agency Children Resource Guide

“This resource book came about because several young people who had lived in parental and foster homes their entire lives realized they were facing life after high school in a nursing facility because of lack of available adult supports in the community and confusion about how to get them.    “As a result, P&A brought together staff of several agencies to figure out how to help people find the transition services they needed. The group pooled their knowledge about available programs to put together a resource book that could be used by young people with disabilities in foster care to transition successfully to adulthood.    “Although the original purpose of this book was to help kids in foster care, it can be used by young people with disabilities anywhere who are looking at life after high school.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

State Plan Under Title XIX of the Social Security Act - 04/06/2017

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Kentucky's Medicaid program.

 

The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act, such as:

-Methods of Administration

-Eligibility

-Services Covered

-Quality Control

-Fiscal Reimbursements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supports for Community Living Waiver - 03/29/2017

~~“SCL Waiver renewal officially approved by CMS! - (Mar. 29, 2017) - The Department for Medicaid Services (DMS) has been notified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) of the official renewal of the Supports for Community Living (SCL) Medicaid Waiver to be implemented April 1, 2017. The SCL waiver renewal period is effective March 1, 2017 through February 28, 2022.

Beginning April 1, 2017, providers shall implement SCL regulations 907 KAR 12:010 and 907 KAR 12:020 that were dated effective June 3, 2016.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State Medicaid Plan Amendments - 01/19/2017

~~“This page is a resource for Kentucky Medicaid State Plan Amendments.  It has information on the amendments starting with 2008 .”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Request for a Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver - 08/24/2016

“Kentucky HEALTH is an innovative, transformative healthcare program designed to not only stabilize the program financially, but to also improve the health outcomes and overall quality of life for all members. This demonstration waiver seeks to evaluate new policies and program elements designed to engage members in their healthcare and provide the necessary education and tools required to achieve long term health and an improved quality of life. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Michelle P (0475.R01.00) - 07/15/2016

Provides adult day health, case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, assessment/reassessment, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, specialized medical equipment and supplies, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/MR/DD ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky DOE ESEA Flexibility Request - 03/31/2015

“The Kentucky State Department of Education’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 9, 2012.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky HCBS Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

On March 17, 2014, updated Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) final rules became effective in the Federal Register for 1915(c) waivers, 1915(i) state plan services, and 1915(k) community first choice state plan option . As they pertain to 1915(c) waivers, these rules include requirements for several areas of HCBS: all residential and non-residential settings, provider- owned residential settings, person-centered planning process, service plan requirements, and conflict-free case management.    The goal of the HCBS final rules is to improve the services rendered to HCBS participants and to maximize the opportunities to receive services in integrated settings and realize the benefits of community living. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is allowing five years (until March 17, 2019) for states and providers to transition into compliance with the all settings and provider-owned settings requirements.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Money Follows the Person - 11/17/2010

[Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration Grant]… facilitates transition of and provides sustainable community based services to individuals who choose to move from Medicaid funded long term care settings (ICFs/MR and nursing facilities) into the community.”   “Those who transition must meet the criteria for services through one of three (3) transition waivers. Those waivers will provide transition and community based services to individuals who fall into one of the following groups: Individuals who are elderly and/or physically disabled; individuals who have mental retardation and a developmental disability; or individuals who have an acquired brain injury.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Supports for Community Living (0314.R03.00) - 09/01/2010

Provides case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, residential support level I, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, FMS, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, residential support level II, specialized medical equipment and supplies, technology assisted level I residential support, vehicle adaptation for individuals w ID/DD individuals ages 3 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

KY HCBS Waiver (0144.R05.00) - 07/01/2010

Provides adult day health, case management, homemaker, personal care, respite, OT, PT, speech therapy, financial management services, goods and services, home and community supports, support broker, assessment/reassessment, attendant care, environmental and minor home adaptation for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The unbridled spirit of Kentucky has shown that people with disabilities are able to succeed in their careers here in the Bluegrass State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kentucky’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.26%
Change from
2014 to 2015
4,425,092
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
421,948
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.06%
Change from
2014 to 2015
115,577
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.33%
Change from
2014 to 2015
27.39%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.53%
Change from
2014 to 2015
74.82%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 4,425,092
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 421,948
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 115,577
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,691,633
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 27.39%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.82%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.30%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 26.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 363,593
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 374,702
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 663,187
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 54,903
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 10,314
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,106
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,772
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 13,210
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 1,784

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,644
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 203,175

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 17,429
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 44,630
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 96,818
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 18.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 608
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 282
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 224
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,431
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 37
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 25
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 68.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.56

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,268
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 321,459
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $4,377,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $4,556,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $70,671,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 5,776
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 579
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 15.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.15%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.22%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.86%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 18.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.82%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 39.74%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 788,499
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,104
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 421,644
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 85,649
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 507,293
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 538
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 97
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 635
AbilityOne wages (products). $3,841,069
AbilityOne wages (services). $901,392

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 20
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 22
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,152
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 161
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,313

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

The agency does accept this input and will briefly define this item. 

The SRC recommended that the agency be more specific when it comes to what other agencies will assist with education on and provision of supported employment services. The agency does accept this input and will add “and other agencies” after the Arc of Kentucky because we need to utilize more resources for education and funding of Supported Employment services, such as the Kentucky Association of Supporting Employment First (KYAPSE), the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (BHDDID), the Kentucky Rehabilitation Association (KRA), UK Human Development Institute, EKU Center of Excellence, most of the Comprehensive Care Centers in the state, and many Supported Employment providers. (Page 191)

5. The Supported Employment Branch works closely with Kentucky APSE (Association of People Supporting Employment First) and its committees, and the 874K Coalition (a statewide Disability Advocacy Group) in a unified effort to secure additional state dollars for supported employment extended services.

6. The Supported Employment Branch has been active in the development/improvement of Kentucky’s Medicaid Waivers to create workable systems for coordinating supported employment services for eligible participants. Expansion of the supports for Community Living Waiver (Kentucky’s Medicaid Waivers for individuals with Developmental Disabilities) and the Michelle P Waiver has resulted in increased referrals to OVR for supported employment services for mutually eligible participants. The self–determination and Participant Directed Services within Medicaid hold much promise for supported employment funding for extended services. A new Medicaid Waiver containing better service definitions and fee structures to support and fund supported employment services rolled out in 2014.

7. The Supported Employment Branch works cooperatively with the Arc of Kentucky, among other groups, such as the Kentucky Association of Supporting Employment First (KYAPSE), the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (BHDDID), the Kentucky Rehabilitation Association (KRA), UK Human Development Institute, EKU Center of Excellence, most of the Comprehensive Care Centers in the state, and many Supported Employment providers, to educate families about supported employment and enlist their assistance in impacting additional funds for supported employment. ( Page 206-207)

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services, maximizing the existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self–determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, providing training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and Providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. For example, an enhanced fee for Vocational Profile development has been developed, piloting and expansion of new programs through establishment projects, and training providers in the use of strategies for individualized services such as customized employment and systematic instruction. (Page 249)

The Kentucky Business Leadership Network, which is affiliated with the U. S. Business Leadership Network, is to promote enduring partnerships between business and industry and agencies that provide vocational support services for Kentuckians with disabilities (currently inactive but plans are place to reestablish the network). 

Community rehabilitation providers in the provision of employment services. 

Kentucky Association of Persons in Supporting Employment first whose mission is to “promote the improvement of Supported Employment services for persons with significant disabilities experiencing barriers to employment through education, advocacy, collaboration, policy change, elimination of barriers, empowerment and community participation”. OFB has a staff person serving on the State APSE board.

  • Department of Medicaid Services
  • Department of Community Based Services–Public Assistance Programs (Page 293)

State Conferences attended were: the State Association of Persons Supporting Employment first Conference in February, Governors EEO Conference in November, Eye Opening Symposium in October, Assistive Technology staff attended the University of Kentucky 12th Annual Institute in Assistive Technology in July (sponsored by the State programs under section 4 of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 KATS) and Independent Living and Older Blind Counselors attended the University of Kentucky Annual Summer Series on Aging in June, Kentucky Association of Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired (KAER) in March, Kentucky AHEAD in May, the Kentucky Career Center Youth Summit, the Kentucky Career Center Employer Conference and Kentucky Rehabilitation Association Conference in Louisville in September. (Page 325-325)

 

Customized Employment

(A)Study Findings Service Needs and Gaps Based on a thorough review of findings across the survey, interview, and agency data, the following service needs were identified for individuals with disabilities, including those with most significant disabilities. These are Job placement services (including supported employment and customized employment), Health care, including medical and mental health treatment, Benefits and financial planning, Supportive or ancillary services (e.g., transportation, housing),Long–term supports, and Transition services for students and youth/young adults. Comments from key informants who provide services within, or interface with, Kentucky’s medical and mental health systems, may serve to clarify the findings related to health care needs. The broad areas of concern related to the limited capacity of our healthcare system, geographic gaps, saturation of providers accepting particular types of insurance and high cost of co–pays making care unaffordable for some people. While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and resulting expanded number of Kentuckians with insurance coverage has improved the access to medication for many, informants noted that some serious needs still exist and likely will continue to exist because of a lack of capacity to provide care to those who need it. Particularly in more rural areas, respondents noted that some people must travel great lengths to find physical and mental health providers; others do not have access to transportation and thus are not able to receive sufficient care. Another issue identified by informants is related to the saturation of providers because finding treatment for individuals on Medicaid is difficult as providers have capped the number of patients that they will accept. Finally, while more residents have health insurance, copays are often not affordable and thus individuals still do not seek out treatment because of financial strain. Supported Employment and capacity of CRP providers is another major focus of the needs assessment. To this end, an interesting finding was that several OVR districts appear to have limited options when it comes to CRP providers. Four districts (Elizabethtown, Madisonville, West Liberty, and Whitesburg) (Page 228)

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services, maximizing the existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self–determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, providing training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and Providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. For example, an enhanced fee for Vocational Profile development has been developed, piloting and expansion of new programs through establishment projects, and training providers in the use of strategies for individualized services such as customized employment and systematic instruction. (Page 249)

Needs/Concerns 

  • Increasing the types of available jobs through customized employment and job development
  • Transportation options for underserved counties of Kentucky
  • Vocational case management to address home, family and personal issues
  • Availability of assistive technology that responds to the changing needs of today’s information based workplace
  • Assessment for the need for benefits counseling and/or personal finance management
  • Increased need for work based learning or community based work experience 

Recommendations/Strategies 

  • Increase agency capacity to provide job placement services through establishment grants for Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) to offer customized employment services, job coaching, job development, and transition age work experiences. (Page 331)

 

Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Kentucky assesses the overall effectiveness of the workforce investment system in relation to the strategic vision and goals of the WorkSmart Kentucky and Economic Competitiveness plans, seeking integration of activities and information from all the core programs. The ultimate goal is to increase the long–term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment, to improve services to employers and demonstrate continuous improvement. Kentucky will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with Section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), and continuous improvement of the career center. (Page 77)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

Accessibility is addressed on several levels and venues in the KCC. Given that OFB and OVR staffs are housed in many of the career center offices and are a central part of the workforce programs, there is a heightened sense of assuring this topic is addressed. Accessibility is a part of the required certification process under II. Career Center (office) Management: Physical Infrastructure and Accessibility. The standards that apply to this are as follows: (Page 90)

A) IN GENERAL—The local board may designate and direct the activities of standing committees to provide information and to assist the local board in carrying out activities under this section. Such standing committees shall be chaired by a member of the local board, may include other members of the local board, and shall include other individuals appointed by the local board who are not members of the local board and who the local board determines have appropriate experience and expertise. At a minimum, the local board may designate each of the following:

  1. A standing committee to provide information and assist with operational and other issues relating to the one-stop delivery system, which may include members representatives of the one-stop partners.
  2. A standing committee to provide information and to assist with planning, operational, and other issues relating to the provision of services to youth, which shall include community based organizations with a demonstrated record of success in serving eligible youth.
  3. A standing committee to provide information and to assist with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, including issues relating to compliance with section 188, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) regarding providing programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the one-stop delivery system, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing supports for or accommodations to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. (Page 114)
DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Project CASE is a collaborative effort between state vocational rehabilitation agencies, adult education, secondary and post–secondary education, career centers, employers and other partners to demonstrate how career pathways can help individuals with disabilities acquire the marketable skills and attain recognized credentials that lead to employment in high–demand occupations. In Kentucky, two pilot projects are planned in the Metro Louisville and Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) regions; these will engage seven and 23 counties respectively. (Page 64)

Workforce Preparation 

KYAE has recently completed hosting train-the-trainer events and has provided an online curricular resource to all programs in order to enhance their contextualized workforce preparation services.

The initiative initially started with an employability skills pilot in which participating program staff were trained to contextualize standards-based, academic instruction with employability skills that had been vetted through focus groups, including an employer focus group.

The recently introduced online curricular resource represents a partnership investment by KYAE and DWI of WIA Workforce Incentive Funds, renewing a contract for Worldwide Interactive Network’s (WIN) online curricula courseware. The product not only provides WorkKeys/NCRC preparation, but “soft” skills (essential) and CCRS-based curricula tracks. Along with the administration of badge-supported curricula and assessments, the essential skills track concludes with a Kentucky Essential Skills Certificate (KESC). Additionally, this online courseware is available to other state agencies with the exception of K-12 - where school districts may avail themselves to alternate courseware licenses. (Page 169)

2. The Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) and OVR partnered together, and in 2010, Kentucky became the 12th state to participate in the Dartmouth College, Johnson and Johnson, Supported Employment Initiative to demonstrate the effectiveness of the IPS model for supported employment (Individualized Placement and Support, an Evidence–Based Practice). The first local pilot projects were launched prior to the close of 2010. Through the Dartmouth Project, a new SE funding partner was added when the Greater Cincinnati Health Foundation provided funding for 2 of the local pilots in Northern KY. IPS Supported Employment now includes all 14 Kentucky Community Mental Health Centers. In FY 2016 the partnership with Behavioral Health continues with the addition of 5 IPS sites outside of the Community Mental Health Centers and 2 sites serving those with substance abuse. (Page 206)

10. The Supported Employment Branch staff participates frequently in IEP and Transition Planning meeting for individuals, and in broader scope with Special Education planning units throughout the commonwealth to develop supported employment services for students exiting schools. Again, additional dollars will be needed for extended services in order to adequately serve the students. A pilot project began in 2010 to demonstrate the effectiveness of Supported Employment/Community Rehabilitation Programs agencies working together with Post–Secondary Education programs to include people with developmental disabilities in classes and other college campus activities. This program has now become permanent and has 3 Comprehensive Transition Programs (Page 207)

(3) Beginning in 2010, OVR has partnered with the Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) to implement the Individual Placement Service (IPS) Model, an evidenced based practice in Supported Employment for consumers with severe mental illness. The program started with four pilots and has grown to include all 14 Comprehensive Mental Health Centers (CMHC). In 2015, DBH provided OVR with $250,000 to issue a Request for Proposals to select five pilot sites to implement IPS outside of the CMHCs. It provided an additional $100,000 to implement IPS for consumers with Substance Abuse.

OVR serves on numerous councils that also have representation from the Department for Medicaid Services, DIDD and DBH, including the Commonwealth Council for Developmental Disabilities (Page 212-213)

Skills Enhancement Training (SET) process the new employees receive an overview of the agency mission, philosophy, values, federal and state laws, appropriations, budget and planning, eligibility, assessment, vocational goal development, plan development, pre–employment transition services, confidentiality and ethics, services, supported employment, rehabilitation technology, diversity, disability awareness, Social Security Administration (SSA), Ticket to Work, Workforce Investment Opportunities Act (WIOA), common measures and information, personal care attendants and topics on specific disabilities. Training programs for all staff emphasize informed consumer choice and maximizing consumer direction of individualized rehabilitation plans. In prior years particular importance was placed upon the 1998 Amendments, but the content has now changed to reflect the passage of WIOA. Information regarding to current research is disseminated to all staff via formal training opportunities as well as through other technological resources such as the Internet and email. The agency has a dedicated website for training information delivery to all employees which includes a portal to information on the agency, required trainings for employees, a training calendar and announcements regarding upcoming training initiatives. The agency also encourages staff to utilize the webinars offered through other entities both within and outside of state government. The information for registration and participation is disseminated via email to all staff. One partner in this endeavor is the Human Development Institute (HDI) from the University of Kentucky. In addition to our work with HDI on the Supported Employment Training Project the employees also utilize the webinar series topics offered by them during a spring, summer and fall training program on topics related to the rehabilitation field and specific disabilities. The rehabilitation counselor mentor program was implemented in June 2002 with pilot programs in six districts. There are currently 27 counselors that have been through the training program that serve as mentors in 10 out of 15 districts. Annual recruitment is conducted to increase the number of available mentors and annual training is implemented to assure that they are prepared for their role. Beyond the formal annual training there are other training opportunities provided to continually develop their skills in the program to assure that the needs of the new employees are being addressed. This is also an opportunity to keep them aware of current policies and laws that impact the agency and their work with the employees. College and university level classes have been an integral element in staff career development. The agency has strongly encouraged continuing education to meet CSPD standards and in the past has provided tuition assistance for staff to pursue degrees at the master level. The program is currently suspended due to the loss of the In–Service Training Grants as well as budgetary constraints within the state. The agency will continue to encourage employees to utilize the CSPD grants at the universities to help them achieve their academic goals in rehabilitation. As appropriate the agency will continue to support employee advancement through reclassifications within state government. Instances include academic achievement leading to skill and knowledge increase directly related to their job that will allow them to assume additional duties to reflect their increased skills and expertise. The agency continues to see the retirement of agency leaders and is cognizant of the need for leadership succession. The agency has utilized various opportunities to achieve this goal, including coordinating with the Kentucky Association of Rehabilitation Leadership to provide training to current and future leaders. Three sessions were provided during intensive workshops on leadership topics. The Academy of Leadership Exploration and Preparedness program (ALEAP) is designed to provide staff with opportunities to learn about and develop foundational skills. This is a collaborative program with both OVR and OFB. Staff first must participate in the prerequisite required courses (online and classroom setting of 50–60 hours of instruction) through the State Personnel Governmental Services Center. ALEAP II consists of three face to face sessions on a variety of leadership topics and the completion of a project. (Page 224)

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services, maximizing the existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self–determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, providing training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and Providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. For example, an enhanced fee for Vocational Profile development has been developed, piloting and expansion of new programs through establishment projects, and training providers in the use of strategies for individualized services such as customized employment and systematic instruction. (Page 249)

Supported employment offers more than just the assistance needed to find and learn a job. It provides the necessary ongoing support to help an individual maintain employment. Kentucky has identified 85 supported employment providers throughout the state. Individualized strategies are also utilized to arrange for supported employment services outside of "organized programs" when necessary (i.e. coworkers at the job site may provide support paid for with various resources; independent supported employment specialists may be hired, etc.). More than three–fourths of Kentucky’s 120 counties have access to supported employment programs. The lack of accessible and dependable transportation often limits access to supported job opportunities. Extended support services are provided by each local supported employment program utilizing funds from a myriad of sources, including the Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) , the Kentucky Council on Developmental Disabilities, city and county government, United Way, fund–raising campaigns, PASS funding, Medicaid, Supports for Community Living Waiver funds, Michelle P waiver funds and other resources. Most programs utilize a combination of funding sources for the provision of extended support services. Natural supports are encouraged (such as co–worker, peer, etc.) and are carefully monitored by the supported employment provider. Kentucky OVR’s partner, the Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID), has developed a new Medicaid Waiver that would more adequately fund supported employment services for people with developmental disabilities. The new Supports for Community Living Waiver 2 (SCL2) was rolled out during the 2014 calendar year. It has increased the fee structure and modified the service definitions for supported employment. Kentucky’s supported employment programs have primarily served individuals with intellectual disability and individuals with chronic mental illness. This is largely due to greater availability of funding for extended support for these two groups. Individuals with other disabilities are served if funding for extended support is available and if the supported employment provider has the expertise to meet that individual’s needs for employment training and support. Kentucky has become the 12th state to participate in the Evidence –Based, Johnson and Johnson sponsored, Supported Employment Initiative via Dartmouth College. The goal is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model for supported employment for people with serious mental illness throughout Kentucky. In July 2011, four sites in Kentucky began pilot site implementation. In 2012, two sites were added. In 2013, three sites were added. In 2014 BHDDID required that all Community Mental Health Centers implement the IPS program as one of the four evidence based practices required in their state plan. A Statewide Coordinator, employed through the University of Kentucky, Human Development Institute, oversees the pilot sites. A second coordinator was hired in late 2013. The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Behavioral Health collaborate as Team Leading agencies for the project. The Kentucky Association for Persons in Supported Employment (KY APSE) has been successful in creating greater supported employment awareness among the legislators in Kentucky’s General Assembly. (Page 270)

No current plan to hire additional staff, instead focusing on training of current staff and cross utilization of staff from other departments. Training existing staff is continuing quarterly. Recent quarterly training has emphasized BTQ standards. Annual training was completed August 22 – 24, 2016, which included all staff and cross utilized staff. Staff realignment occurred to merge functions, improve collaboration and efficiencies. Cross departmental utilization is occurring by utilizing of one lower authority appeal (referee) and six higher authority appeals staff (commission writers) to assist with adjudicating cases. The realignment allowed the branch to move staff into positions that better fit their skill sets. The cross utilization of staff allows the branch extra staff to utilize during times of seasonal increases in the volume of issues. The training will increase staff performance on resolving issues, provided clearly defined expectations of performance, and increase the inefficiency of the staff in resolving issues which will lead to more timely first payments. Unemployment Insurance is requesting a regulation change that will adjust the employers 15 day protest period to respond to a notice of initial claim and notice of potential benefit charges. This will remove the barrier of employers waiting 15 days to respond to adjudicators. These more timely employer responses will result in less time needed to resolve issues and quicker first payment promptness. This will reduce claimants having to wait to request first payment until the 16th day after filing an initial claim is filed. In addition to all of the changes, the branch has also implemented of a new pilot program which began on August 2, 2016. The new program utilizes a split chargeability issue system. The performance of the staff participating in the pilot program will be measured against the performance of staff not involved in the pilot program to determine if the program is effective in reducing the promptness of first payments. Budgetary constraints for UI IT development as well as prioritization of IT projects, delayed final development and implementation. Ongoing analysis and movement toward mainframe independence are factors in considering the order in which projects are completed and resources, both financial and staffing, are allocated. The new enhancements to the functionality to the internal claim intake system were not completed until early 2016. Since implementation fourteen help desk tickets have been created to improve the newly implemented system. Monitoring and assessment will be accomplished through daily, weekly and monthly reports reflecting issues received, issues worked and remaining issues. These reports will include a comparison of the pilot program data with the non-pilot program data. Monthly Interstate Section team meetings will be held to assess existing efforts and results and discuss improvements. (Page 429)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

We currently have in place five other innovative programs that provide high school students with a variety of work–based learning, financial literacy, self–advocacy training, job exploration, career counseling, and workplace readiness training opportunities that exist in the community with employers, in our rehabilitation center, and in post–secondary institutions.

The Summer Youth Boot Camp Program focuses on job exploration, workplace readiness training, and self–advocacy and is held at the Charles W. McDowell Center in Louisville. It is an intensive four week program based on the work of Dr. Karen Wolffe that introduces employability skills to transition aged individuals. The curriculum is specific to individuals that are blind or visually impaired.

The Summer Work Experience Program is in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Providers. CRPs are paid to find work experiences in competitive integrated settings for transition aged individuals. The work experiences last six to eight weeks and the students are paid by the Office for the Blind for the time worked. The goals of the work experience are to provide community based career exploration and the opportunity to practice work readiness skills. It is also hoped that by participating in the work experience program, employers will be open to providing more opportunities for individuals who are blind or visually impaired in their communities. (Page 310) 

Benefits

Existing legacy case management systems across WIOA Title I, Wagner Peyser, Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education are disparate and insular: Currently, the Office of Employment and Training (OET), the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Office for the Blind (OFB) are supported by insular case management systems that respond to requests for the following programs: 

  • Wagner Peyser Labor Exchange (Employ Kentucky Operating System - EKOS)
  • Unemployment Insurance – both benefits and tax/collections (Mainframe and Kentucky’s Electronic Workplace for Employment Services – KEWES)
  • Veterans Program
  • Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Program
  • National Emergency Grants
  • High Growth Job Training
  • Foreign Labor Certification
  • Health Care Tax Credit System
  • Trade Adjustment Act
  • Work Opportunities Tax Credit
  • Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA)
  • Student data
  • Customer records, services provided and costs of services for individuals with disabilities and blindness – Case Management System (CMS)
  • Social Security Reimbursement tracking and processing
  • Social Security Ticket to Work assignment tracking and processing (Page 67- 68)

The Case Management System (CMS) supports consumer case management activities, authorizes related payment transactions, generates reports/report information and contains a Social Security Reimbursement subsystem for all Title IV consumers, both for OFB and OVR. Consumer information, including confidential medical information, is collected to open a case within the respective agency. Agency services are based on the signed Individualized Plan for Employment between consumer and agency counselor. The system can attach scanned case documents, record staff provided services, staff activities, track comparable benefits, track consumer education and 

Training advancements. There is a Social Security Reimbursement module within CMS that enables each respective agency to seek reimbursement for the cost of the services provided to agency consumers receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. There is a Maximus module that generates files that are submitted to Social Security for the Ticket to Work program and tracks responses and ticket assignments. In July 2016, Kentucky ceased WIA data collection and reporting and began working to implement WIOA data collection and reporting requirements in addition to other USDOE and state reporting. CMS is a staff only application with a web front end. An interface exists between CMS and eMARS, the state’s payment system, to enable processing of payments to, and refunds from, vendors. The system is Section 508 and Bobby compliant and staff use screen readers such as JAWS, ZoomText and WindowEyes, as well as speech recognition software such as Dragon Naturally Speaking. (Page 68-69)

A local area may request Rapid Response funding in the form of Dislocation Grants and Additional Assistance Grants to serve potentially TAA–eligible worker groups in the same manner it requests funds for all other worker groups. The only difference is that Additional Assistance funding can’t be used to fund training once a worker group is covered by a TAA certification. If a TAA petition is certified, the state’s TAA program is responsible for identifying individuals potentially eligible under the certification through worker lists supplied by the employer and/or UI claimant information. 

The TAA program then uses a standard mailer to contact the potentially eligible individuals, inviting them to attend a Trade Orientation Session to learn about program benefits and register. At Trade Orientation Sessions. (Page 129)

The vocational rehabilitation programs use a case management system called Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment (AWARE) that is specifically designed for vocational rehabilitation programs. This system enables counselors to manage cases, managers to monitor cases, and the agency to prepare and submit required reports to RSA in a timely manner. All client data is captured and maintained in the AWARE case management system, such as information on client employment outcomes, including position title, employer, wages, hours, benefits, etc., and is provided to the Rehabilitation Services Administration, U. S. Department of Education through quarterly and annual reports. The company that programs the software will revise the system to produce any WIOA required data. Due to the especially strict confidentiality requirements imposed by the Rehabilitation Act and the sensitive nature of information about disabilities and medical conditions, the case management system is a closed system, accessible only by authorized employees. NMDWS has established a data sharing agreement to provide necessary wage data to support the programs’ activities. (Page 112)

These individuals work together to ensure that companies receive unified and coordinated information and services related to their workforce development needs. The KSN allows for the bringing together of the workforce and economic development programs and resources, thus providing a variety of ways to build workforce skills and ease training costs for employers. Through such options as reimbursable grants and tax credits for classroom training, on–the–job training, tuition and certification training, train–the–trainer travel, and entry level and skills upgrade training; Kentucky has resources that allow flexible and customizable training specific to company needs. Early in 2016, KSN partners will gain access to a Customer Relationship Management system based on a Sales Force platform. Phase 1 will allow for shared access to employer contact and needs, and Phase 2 later in 2016–2017 will add the capacity for KSN partners to add and assess employer programs and resources via the Sales Force application. OVR, in conjunction with the Kentucky Office for the Blind and Office of Employment and Training, hosted an Employer Summit in 2015 to highlight the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities as well as the OFCCP regulation requirements. The event was well received with numerous employers seeking additional information on working with the two rehabilitation agencies. This outreach and education with Employers and Businesses across the commonwealth will continue with additional summits convened in regional locations to attract a more diverse employer customer base. The Workforce Partners recognize the regional differences as well as workforce needs and will hold Employer Summits focused specific to the regional sectors and incorporate the post–secondary education institutions as a conduit to meeting the talent pipeline demands. The Statewide Council for Vocational Rehabilitation (SCVR), Kentucky’s State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), includes several employers and a representative of the Workforce Investment Board who provide important input on agency policy and activities related to employment. OVR, in conjunction with SCVR, conducts a Job Placement Month annually in October which includes many events around the state that promote collaboration with employers. Regional Employer Recognition Awards are given out during the month to employers who have hired OVR consumers. OVR will also continue to partner with local initiatives like Project SEARCH in Northern Kentucky and the Coalition for Workforce Diversity in Louisville to identify and educate employers willing to develop new programs specifically designed to focus on hiring and training individuals with disabilities. (Page 210)

 (A) Study Findings Service Needs and Gaps Based on a thorough review of findings across the survey, interview, and agency data, the following service needs were identified for individuals with disabilities, including those with most significant disabilities. These are Job placement services (including supported employment and customized employment), Health care, including medical and mental health treatment, Benefits and financial planning, Supportive or ancillary services (e.g., transportation, housing), Long–term supports, and Transition services for students and youth / young adults. Comments from key informants who provide services within, or interface with, Kentucky’s medical and mental health systems, may serve to clarify the findings related to health care needs. The broad areas of concern related to the limited capacity of our healthcare system, geographic gaps, saturation of providers accepting particular types of insurance and high cost of co–pays making care unaffordable for some people. While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and resulting expanded number of Kentuckians with insurance coverage has improved the access to medication for many, informants noted that some serious needs still exist and likely will continue to exist because of a lack of capacity to provide care to those who need it. Particularly in more rural areas, respondents noted that some people must travel great lengths to find physical and mental health providers; others do not have access to transportation and thus are not able to receive sufficient care. Another issue identified by informants is related to the saturation of providers because finding treatment for individuals on Medicaid is difficult as providers have capped the number of patients that they will accept. Finally, while more residents have health insurance, copays are often not affordable and thus individuals still do not seek out treatment because of financial strain. Supported Employment and capacity of CRP providers is another major focus of the needs assessment. (Page 228) 

Services to individuals with disabilities provided by Community Rehabilitation Programs. These issues are anticipated as in–demand service and service needs for CRPs in the next three years. These are Job Placement Services, Transition Services, Skills Training, and Supported Employment Services. ESTABLISHMENT GRANTS This Update to the previous CSNA assessed the need to develop, establish and improve community rehabilitation programs, referred to as establishment projects. OVR surveyed staff, consumers and partners on the use of establishment grants to develop innovative programming. The survey asked if there is a need for OVR to fund establishment projects to maximize relationships with employers, improve outcomes and services for transition youth, improve outcomes and services for Social Security recipients, improve outcomes and services for individuals with behavioral health issues, develop supported employment programs in areas of the state where they currently do not exist, and improve outcomes and services for ex–offenders. Item 1 directly addresses the need for more job placement services and also the continuing prominence of ‘Employer Attitudinal Barriers’ as a barrier to employment. Item 2 directly addresses the need for transition services. Item 3 is designed to address the need for more benefits planning assistance. Item 5 addresses the continuing need for more supported employment services, particularly in some areas of the state. Items 4 and 6 address serving the two populations of consumers identified by both vocational rehabilitation counselors and community rehabilitation programs as the largest growing populations they have seen over the previous three years. Counselors were asked to evaluate the importance of several areas of need for establishment projects, including service needs, such as supported employment and employer relationships, as well as services targeting particular populations, such as transition youth and social security recipients. ( Page 223)

Measure: To meet or exceed customer satisfaction rating from the previous year

GOAL II: To provide Pre–employment transition services (Pre–ETS) to Transition Students (ages 14–21) and other transition services to Transition Youth (ages–16–24) to assist them with transition from high school into competitive integrated employment or post–secondary training.

Measure: To provide specific and specialized services to at least 60% of both transition students and transition youth 

GOAL III: Provide information concerning benefits planning and financial planning in order to promote inclusion, integration, and empowerment of individuals with the most significant and significant disabilities.

Measure: All applicants who receive SSA benefits will receive information on benefits planning and at least 50% of them will receive a benefits analysis. (Page 234)

  • Evaluate the current transition program to determine trends and needs
  • Expand the capacity of the agency to provide Pre–ETS services
  • Expand Pre–ETS to transition students (ages 14–21) and other transition services to youth (ages 16–24)
  • Offer benefits planning for individuals with disabilities who are Social Security recipients
  • Provide information on financial education and asset development
  • Enhance job placement services
  • Provide supported employment services that lead to competitive integrated employment and improve the number of successful outcomes for supported employment cases across the state
  • Develop and apply a process for implementing requirements under Section 511 (Page 236)

According to data from the 2012 American Community Survey, published in the annual Compendium of Disability Statistics, 17.0% of Kentucky civilians living in the community report having a disability, including 15.5% of residents of working age (18–64). This is higher than the national average (12.3% all, 10.2% working age). The rate of Kentuckians reporting a disability remained relatively stable from 2011 through 2012, growing at 1.1% (on par with the national average of 1.2%). Only 27% of individuals in Kentucky with disabilities are employed. Kentucky and Arkansas share the second highest percentage of individuals with disabilities. Kentucky also shares a second place ranking with Arkansas and Louisiana in percentage of individuals who fall below the poverty line at 17.3%. According to the Social Security Administration, 192,721 Kentuckians receive blind and disabled Supplemental Security Income benefits. The Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI), in 2007, reported the percentage of SSI recipients in Kentucky who were working was 2.7% compared to the national percentage of 7.6% (ICI, 2007). In 2007, Kentucky also had 160,122 Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. These statistics provide a description of the potentially high demand for OVR services based on the number of individuals in the state with disabilities. A review of internal OVR data that was used to develop a Personnel Plan in 2011 indicated that as the average caseload size increases, the rehabilitation rate tends to decrease. (Page 239-240)

G.   Partner with SOAR to increase transportation options in the Appalachian region;

H.   Partner with the Medicaid Brokerage System;

I.   Provide Benefits Planning and Analysis as an option when it comes to addressing health insurance concerns. 

Goal 2: To provide Pre–employment transition services (Pre–ETS) to Transition Students (ages 14–21) and other transition services to Youth (ages 16–24) to assist them with transition from high school into competitive integrated employment or post–secondary training. (Page 251)

School to Work Transition

(2) As a means of providing Pre–Employment Transition Services, OVR will work with partner agencies in Workforce Development to identify existing apprenticeship programs with employers with which OVR may partner to focus on incorporating students and youth with disabilities into the programs. We do work with the Office of Autism in order to understand how to assist youth on the spectrum with attaining and maintaining employment. A model program focused on creating apprenticeship opportunities for students and youth with disabilities will be developed in such a manner as to be replicated in urban and rural areas alike. This will expand employment opportunities for all the youth and students with disabilities in Kentucky. OVR will continue to participate in an Annual Youth Summit, which provides the opportunity for youth and students with disabilities to meet employers, educators, and service providers. OVR plans to continuously expand the summit to provide employers an opportunity to meet with potential employees or apprenticeship participants. (Page 210)

Data Collection

TBCM builds on the functional alignment within the centers and focuses on providing services to job seekers in a consistent, coordinated and efficient way. The systems and tools used in the TBCM approach reinforce functional alignment and integrated service delivery within the centers and among partner agencies. To strengthen this project, Kentucky’s consultant coordinated activities in recognition of and alignment with other key actions in the WorkSmart Kentucky Strategic Plan including Kentucky Career Center Customer Flow, Kentucky Career Center Certification, and Partner for Success and Workforce Academy. Services to Employers are aligned among the core partners through the Business Services teams of the Kentucky Skills Network. Since the implementation of the WorkSmart Kentucky Strategic Plan, a priority has been developing unified and collaborative approach to service delivery in our business services model. It is critical that all the government agencies working to meet the employment needs of business and industry work together taking a solutions-based approach to meeting their needs. This is being done through regional Business Services Teams. WIOA Performance Outcomes Measures Group is a work group made up of the core partners to develop cross-program common measures and address all issues and concerns regarding data collection and reporting. The group is facilitated by the Kentucky Center for Workforce Statistics (KCEWS). The Partner for Success initiative brought together all agencies in the Department of Workforce Investment to develop a unified approach to delivering services. The goal was to create networking opportunities, create awareness of the services each partnering agency delivers and assemble the full array of services delivered to customers in a manner that is efficient, effective and holistic. A top priority of the current Governor’s Discretionary Budget is to advance the work of training of state staff and partners. The new effort will build on previous Workforce Academy curriculum that provided training for all partners at every level of the system. Training has been and will continue to be held regionally inclusive of local level staff covering topics such as WIOA implementation, customer flow, local labor market information, transformational leadership and system transformation. (Page 56)

Existing legacy case management systems across WIOA Title I, Wagner Peyser, Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education are disparate and insular: Currently, the Office of Employment and Training (OET), the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Office for the Blind (OFB) are supported by insular case management systems that respond to requests for the following programs: 

  • Wagner Peyser Labor Exchange (Employ Kentucky Operating System - EKOS)
  • Unemployment Insurance – both benefits and tax/collections (Mainframe and Kentucky’s Electronic Workplace for Employment Services – KEWES)
  • Veterans Program
  • Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Program
  • National Emergency Grants
  • High Growth Job Training
  • Foreign Labor Certification
  • Health Care Tax Credit System
  • Trade Adjustment Act
  • Work Opportunities Tax Credit
  • Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA)
  • Student data
  • Customer records, services provided and costs of services for individuals with disabilities and blindness (Page 67)

There is a Maximus module that generates files that are submitted to Social Security for the Ticket to Work program and tracks responses and ticket assignments. In July 2016, Kentucky ceased WIA data collection and reporting and began working to implement WIOA data collection and reporting requirements in addition to other USDOE and state reporting. CMS is a staff only application with a web front end. An interface exists between CMS and eMARS, the state’s payment system, to enable processing of payments to, and refunds from, vendors. The system is Section 508 and Bobby compliant and staff use screen readers such as JAWS, ZoomText and WindowEyes, as well as speech recognition software such as Dragon Naturally Speaking.

Kentucky Adult Education Reporting System The Kentucky Adult Education Reporting System (KAERS) is a nationally-recognized student management system designed and maintained through Kentucky Adult Education and the Council on Postsecondary Education. It is used by all Title II adult education programs to record programmatic, student and fiscal agent information with a student portal for students to view their data and online curriculum. KAERS also has a reporting tool used to enhance program performance, a real-time student tracking function, and integrates external data sources. Data from KAERS is submitted, on a regular basis, to the Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) and KCEWS. (Page 69)

OVR subcontracted with the University of Kentucky Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling Program to conduct the triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) in the Fall and Spring of 2014–2015. The current study was designed to identify service needs, trends in service needs, disability populations who are underserved, trends in disability populations, and recommendations for OVR. Prior to conducting the needs assessment, the research team reviewed data collection instruments from the 2011–2012 iteration. OVR senior staff provided assistance with revisions and updates to the surveys, making improvements to clarity and ensuring that questions would elicit the kind of information that is needed for strategic planning. OVR staff also assisted with survey dissemination, making sure that the survey reached current and previous customers, staff and counselors, and key workforce partners. As a result of these efforts, response rates for the present CSNA iteration were on par with and in some cases exceeded previous needs assessment surveys. In addition to survey data, RSA 911 case data from FY 2011–2013, state–level population data, and interview data from 21 Key Informants who work in areas of disability and public service throughout the state were analyzed. This information was meant to provide context as well as additional areas of consideration for OVR strategic planning efforts. (Page 228)

In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We anticipate that the current system will be able to collect the necessary data beginning 7/1/2016 and produce accurate reports for common measures reporting. (Page 235)

The purchase or licensing of other systems that would meet both the needs of the two vocational rehabilitation agencies and those of common measure reporting are being considered. Additionally, the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, Department of Workforce Investment is exploring the feasibility of purchasing or leasing a single system for all of the data collection needs of the Department including the Office of Employment and Training, OFB, and OVR. The ability to capture the performance accountability measures common to all Kentucky Workforce Investment agencies is currently a work in progress. The Department for Workforce Investment (DW), in partnership with a current federal grant, is testing the potential implementation of software that may have the capacity to capture all customer flow information within DWI. The nationally recognized software is currently being customized to the specific needs of DWI agencies and training has staff has been implemented. Also being tested is the capacity of the software to allow for totally paperless consumer files, the ability of the customer/job seeker to access their information from a website for the purposes of updating information, providing information required by the various agencies and having direct access to employment opportunities in their area. DWI will continue to pilot the use of this system with the ultimate goal of transferring all DWI agencies to a common casework system within two years. Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. There have at least been some conversations concerning paperless case pilot projects. In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We anticipate that the current system will be able to collect the necessary data beginning 7/1/2016 and produce accurate reports prior to the due dates for Rehabilitation Services Administration and common measures reporting. Once a baseline is determined and the relationship between services, partnerships, etc. and successful outcomes and measurable progress is analyzed, strategies will be developed to improve the performance outcomes. (Page 260)

Additionally, the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, Department of Workforce Investment is exploring the feasibility of purchasing or leasing a single system for all of the data collection needs of the Department including the Office of Employment and Training, Office for the Blind and Office of Vocational Rehabilitation.

Early in 2016 Kentucky Skills Network partners will gain access to a Customer Relationship Management system based on a SalesForce platform. Phase 1 will allow for shared access to employer contact and needs, and Phase 2 later in 2016–2017 will add the capacity for KSN partners to add and assess employer programs and resources via the SalesForce application.

Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. (Page 336)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Low Income Services provided to low-income individuals are reflected in Kentucky’s WIOA Priority of Service policy that provides guidance on the service requirement for Title I Adults for both individualized career services and training services. Priority applies to recipients of public assistance, other low-income individuals and individuals who are basic skills deficient. A low-income individual is defined in Section 3(36) means an individual who: Eligible WIOA in-school youth must be low-income, unless a local area applies the 5 percent low-income exception. WIOA out-of-school youth are not required to be low-income unless the barrier requires additional assistance to enter or complete an education program or hold employment or is a recipient of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent and is basic skills deficient or an English language learner. Service priorities for all populations with barriers to employment The WorkSmart Kentucky Plan has driven significant changes and improvements in the workforce system since 2010, as well as informed other related strategic initiatives like Kentucky’s participation in the NGA Talent Pipeline Academy. The following 2010-13 goals will continue to inform and guide the system during this transition period and to build career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment. To provide determining factors for the goals of Kentucky’s strategic plan, a series of objectives was developed. Each set of objectives supports a specific goal and provides the framework for the development of action steps as well as a basis for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of this plan. Align Kentucky’s workforce development system with its education objectives. 

  • Increase communication and collaboration between workforce boards and boards of education, technical education, post-secondary education and economic development;
  • Increase the number of post-secondary and work ready high school graduates;
  • Promote educational options, including technical education, two-year and four-year college, apprenticeships and specialty training to younger students;
  • Increase awareness of educational and skills requirements for high-demand jobs, as well as those in emerging industries; and
  • Establish the concept of life-long learning as a norm in the 21st century. Align Kentucky’s workforce development system with economic development strategies.
  • Increase communication and collaboration between workforce boards and economic development agencies;
  • Develop “rapid response” framework for new jobs based on model for layoffs;
  • Refine and promote evolving methods of projecting jobs and training needs of the future; and
  • Increase opportunities for entrepreneurship in a culture of innovation. (Page 37)

 

Career Pathways

KCC partners will work closely with Department of Community Based Services (DCBS) to assure customers have knowledge and access to needed resources. One–stop partners are directly involved with two Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) grant initiatives with DCBS. Paths to Promise (P2P) is a pilot program with a robust research component serving eight counties in Eastern Kentucky. The pilot includes moving eligible students into AOKY career pathways. The subsequent allocation of employment and training funds will be dedicated to providing support services to students pursuing education and training in urban areas across the state.

The core partner agencies will coordinate and better align services with Criminal Justice agencies in serving ex–offenders. OVR and OFB work closely with this target population in providing services, supports and referrals to other programs as needed. (Page 58)

Project CASE is a collaborative effort between state vocational rehabilitation agencies, adult education, secondary and post–secondary education, career centers, employers and other partners to demonstrate how career pathways can help individuals with disabilities acquire the marketable skills and attain recognized credentials that lead to employment in high–demand occupations. In Kentucky, two pilot projects are planned in the Metro Louisville and Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) regions; these will engage seven and 23 counties respectively. (Page 64)

J. Participate in Project CASE, a five–year, RSA–funded grant to the Office for the Blind (OFB) to identify and recruit eligible consumers from OFB and the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) in the Kentuckiana Works and EKCEP Kentucky Career Center areas to pursue career pathways in Information Technology, Manufacturing, Industrial Technology, and the Healthcare, Nursing, and Allied Health fields and provide those consumers with a variety of supports, including job placement assistance after completion of training;

K. Coordinate Rapid Responses to all major community job losses statewide along with other center partners; (Page 255)

A federal Career Pathways grant recently received by the Kentucky Office for the Blind (OFB) from the Rehabilitation Services Administration. OVR will collaborate with OFB on assisting consumers in three career pathways (healthcare, manufacturing, and information technology) in two of Kentucky Career Centers, Kentuckian Works in the Louisville metropolitan area and the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) in rural Appalachia. (Page 263)

Workforce Development Boards: OFB VR counselors actively participate on their local Workforce Development Board’s Youth and One Stop committees to enhance and make accessible the programs and services for transition age consumers. Through Project CASE, a program developed from the use of Federal grant funding through the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the Office for the Blind will have stronger coordination and collaboration with the Youth Career Centers and other Kentucky Career Centers. Partnering with Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) and KentuckianaWorks in the hiring of Career Pathway Coordinators, and in cross–agency training of staff on career pathways for students with disabilities, Project CASE will ensure sustained partnerships. (Page 300)

All the Disability Coordinators in this survey have an expectation that OVR counselors will provide needed assistive technology for post–secondary students. Percentages were high among responses that goals and expectations of working with an OVR counselor included provision of orientation and mobility services, resources for the student/family, vocational/career counseling, open and regular communication, assistance with training/college funding, and assistance with employment upon graduation. While we may help provide financial assistance for tuition and assistive devices, the true strength of our agency is in the vocational counseling services we provide on an individual basis. We must work to remain active counselors, ensuring that students are getting opportunities for work experiences, internships, and apprenticeships through the Career Pathways program. (Page 338)

In order to assure the coordination of services to facilitate the transition students from school to postsecondary life (including the receipt of VR services, postsecondary education, competitive integrated employment, and pre–employment transition services) OFB utilizes the following process. The VR Counselor is responsible for the schools located in their assigned county areas. Counselors work with school staff to identify potentially eligible students assuring that they are given the opportunity to apply for services starting at age 14. While the student is enrolled in school, the VR Counselor works with school staff to ensure the student receives the needed services to aid in the transition to post–secondary life. Services include but are not limited to pre–employment transition services, other VR services and programming offered by OFB, and other services specific to transition aged students by school districts and other entities. VR Counselors provide individualized services and where gaps in services are identified staff work to developed new and innovative services in the students’ home area to better serve this population. One project that aligns with this area in serving students is Project CASE (Creating Access to Successful Employment). In October 2015, the Kentucky Office for the Blind/Kentucky Career Center was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR–eligible individuals, including students and youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized postsecondary credentials necessary to secure competitive integrated employment in high–demand, high–quality occupations. Creating Access to Successful Employment (CASE) will help ensure that individuals with disabilities, even at the secondary school level, are not left out of participating in these existing initiatives, and can prepare for and obtain jobs in high–wage and high–demand occupations.

The goals and strategies of this five year project and the evaluation plan for it strongly aligns with the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA. (Page 365 &366)

The plan has served as a blueprint for transforming Kentucky’s workforce services focused on adapting to the changing needs of employers to create a demand–driven, business–led, solutions–based publicly funded talent development system for the Commonwealth. Over the next four years, the new Administration will work with the new Kentucky Workforce Innovation Board on a new strategic plan and new goals. The new plan and goals will inform subsequent modifications of this State Plan and of course the continuing transformation of Kentucky’s workforce system through innovative practices which enhance sustainable economic and job growth to improve the lives of Kentuckians. Kentucky strategies have and will continue to support WIOA’s focus on low income adults and youth who have limited skills, lack work experience, and face other barriers to economic success. Vocational Rehabilitation is a full and actively engaged partner in Kentucky in the workforce system. OFB and OVR are actively engaged in the planning process, on committees and staff serves as project directors on some of the KWIB initiatives. They are advocates in the workforce system for individuals with disabilities. Please refer to the Vocational Rehabilitation section of this combined plan for a comprehensive listing of goals and strategies. (Page 367)

Employment Networks

Kentucky’s employment website. 

  • The Kentucky Employment Network (KEN) works with UI customers who are profiled as likely to exhaust UI benefits. KEN consists of a workshop that informs the customer of the programs available through the Kentucky Career Center.
  • Re–employment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) works with UI customers who are profiled as likely to exhaust UI benefits. The grant activities consist of a Kentucky Career Center orientation, job search overview, Individual Employment Plan (IEP) and referral to job services.
  • The KCCGO! Dislocated Worker Grant has offered the opportunity to leverage key KWIB strategic plan initiatives including Unified Business Services, Career Center Certification and Sector Strategies and focus those improvements intensively on the long–term unemployed. The KCCGO! grant made available $4,775,418 to local workforce development areas to provide re–employment services including training costs for OJTs, Internships, Registered Apprenticeships, Accelerating Opportunity Scholarships, Work Experience/Tryout Employment, Customized Training, and other training in targeted sectors.(Page 152)

 

 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 54

Transition Services for Students with Disabilities - 10/12/2017

“For many students with disabilities the success of this transition from school to adult life depends on teamwork and collaboration between the schools and community resources. As one such resource, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation works closely with the Kentucky Department of Education to assist eligible students with disabilities to identify, plan for, and achieve their vocational goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Supported Employment Training Project - 07/01/2017

The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation has played a vital role in the establishment and implementation of supported employment services in the Commonwealth. Through partnerships with agencies, organizations and funding services for persons with severe disabilities, the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation is able to assist many people who have a supported employment goal in achieving positive employment outcomes.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

State Plan Under Title XIX of the Social Security Act - 04/06/2017

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Kentucky's Medicaid program.

 

The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act, such as:

-Methods of Administration

-Eligibility

-Services Covered

-Quality Control

-Fiscal Reimbursements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supports for Community Living Waiver - 03/29/2017

~~“SCL Waiver renewal officially approved by CMS! - (Mar. 29, 2017) - The Department for Medicaid Services (DMS) has been notified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) of the official renewal of the Supports for Community Living (SCL) Medicaid Waiver to be implemented April 1, 2017. The SCL waiver renewal period is effective March 1, 2017 through February 28, 2022.

Beginning April 1, 2017, providers shall implement SCL regulations 907 KAR 12:010 and 907 KAR 12:020 that were dated effective June 3, 2016.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mission Statement of the Kentucky Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities - 02/10/2017

~~“Mission StatementIt is the mission of the Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DDID) to empower each person to realize his or her place in the community as a citizen of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. To accomplish this mission, DDID will partner with and support persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities, families, advocates, stakeholders and government agencies….

EmploymentIndividuals of working age are employable: employment is life-enriching.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

State Medicaid Plan Amendments - 01/19/2017

~~“This page is a resource for Kentucky Medicaid State Plan Amendments.  It has information on the amendments starting with 2008 .”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Labor Cabinet Receives $896,600 Apprenticeship Grant” - 10/24/2016

“The U.S. Dept. of Labor has announced over $50.5 million in grant awards to 37 states to help expand apprenticeship opportunities across the U.S. – including $896,600 for Kentucky. The proposal calls for a workforce pipeline to be created in Kentucky, increasing the number of Registered Apprentices by 1,300 individuals, including women, minorities, 16-24 year olds, individuals age 45+ or older, veterans, and people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Kentucky Department of Education “Career and Technical Education” - 10/06/2016

“Mission: The mission of Career and Technical Education is to assist schools in providing students with skills necessary for a successful transition to postsecondary education or work and a desire for life-long learning in a global society.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Request for a Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver - 08/24/2016

“Kentucky HEALTH is an innovative, transformative healthcare program designed to not only stabilize the program financially, but to also improve the health outcomes and overall quality of life for all members. This demonstration waiver seeks to evaluate new policies and program elements designed to engage members in their healthcare and provide the necessary education and tools required to achieve long term health and an improved quality of life. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Assistive Technology Service Network “A Guide to Assistive Technology Funding in Kentucky 15th Edition” - 08/01/2016

“…the services of the ATRCs include, but are not limited to: Assistive Technology Services for Early Intervention, K-12 and Post-secondary school, Employment, Transition, Independent Living, leisure or recreation; Loan Library of Assistive Devices, adaptive equipment and toys; Demonstrations of assistive technology devices; Funding information, Assistance and Referral; Assessments and Evaluations for AT; Vocational assessments; Consultations on appropriate technologies; Workplace AT; Environmental Controls; Recycled Computers and Assistive Technology Devices; Training and Technical Assistance on and about AT.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Statute 42.0146 - Certification Program for Disabled Veteran-Owned Businesses - 07/15/2016

Office of Equal Employment Opportunity and Contract Compliance—Oversight of certification program for disabled veteran-owned businesses—Administrative regulations 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky ABLE Act S.B. 179 - 04/05/2016

Signed by the Governor on April  5, 2016

AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities.

Amend KRS 205.200 to disregard any amount in an ABLE account, any contributions to an ABLE account, and any distribution from an ABLE account for qualified expenses for the purposes of determining an individual's eligibility for a means-tested public assistance program and the amount of assistance or benefits the individual is eligible to receive under the program; direct the State Treasurer, the Secretary of the Finance and Administration Cabinet, the Executive Director of the Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Executive Director of the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority to work cooperatively to seek all available sources of funding, determine the best plan of action related to ABLE accounts, and report to the Legislative Research Commission on or before December 31, 2016.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Transition Services for Students with Disabilities - 10/12/2017

“For many students with disabilities the success of this transition from school to adult life depends on teamwork and collaboration between the schools and community resources. As one such resource, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation works closely with the Kentucky Department of Education to assist eligible students with disabilities to identify, plan for, and achieve their vocational goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Supported Employment Training Project - 07/01/2017

The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation has played a vital role in the establishment and implementation of supported employment services in the Commonwealth. Through partnerships with agencies, organizations and funding services for persons with severe disabilities, the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation is able to assist many people who have a supported employment goal in achieving positive employment outcomes.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Mission Statement of the Kentucky Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities - 02/10/2017

~~“Mission StatementIt is the mission of the Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DDID) to empower each person to realize his or her place in the community as a citizen of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. To accomplish this mission, DDID will partner with and support persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities, families, advocates, stakeholders and government agencies….

EmploymentIndividuals of working age are employable: employment is life-enriching.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Labor Cabinet Receives $896,600 Apprenticeship Grant” - 10/24/2016

“The U.S. Dept. of Labor has announced over $50.5 million in grant awards to 37 states to help expand apprenticeship opportunities across the U.S. – including $896,600 for Kentucky. The proposal calls for a workforce pipeline to be created in Kentucky, increasing the number of Registered Apprentices by 1,300 individuals, including women, minorities, 16-24 year olds, individuals age 45+ or older, veterans, and people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Kentucky Department of Education “Career and Technical Education” - 10/06/2016

“Mission: The mission of Career and Technical Education is to assist schools in providing students with skills necessary for a successful transition to postsecondary education or work and a desire for life-long learning in a global society.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation “Order of Selection Letter to Community Partners” - 06/30/2016

“Last year the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and its partners assisted almost 40,000 Kentuckians on their path toward gainful employment. However, the continuing demand, escalating costs, and a shortfall in matchable state dollars now further limit our ability to provide services to all persons eligible for our services. When a public vocational rehabilitation program like OVR cannot serve everyone who is eligible, federal law requires that it invoke what is called an Order of Selection.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Kentucky Department of Education “Transition” - 10/09/2015

The ultimate goal of the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE), Division of Learning Services is the successful transition of all students from school to post-school activities - whether postsecondary education, vocational training, integrated employment, continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living or community participation. We also recognize that many other transitions occur over the course of the life of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Customized Employment in Kentucky (video) - 07/28/2015

The seven-minute video profiles three employees with developmental disabilities who are working in their community, in jobs which are a good fit for them, and in which their contributions are valued by their employer. The common thread in these stories is that the jobs were “customized,” a process in which employer needs are matched with the talents, interests and contributions of individual job seekers

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Kentucky Unified State Plan 2012-2017 - 12/10/2012

“The Commonwealth is committed to ensuring that individuals with disabilities have all available service opportunities. The system’s service philosophy is that job seekers with disabilities are served by workforce staff in the same manner as any other job seekers. Where additional support or expertise is needed, OVR staff will assist. Many of the individuals with disabilities seeking services at one-stop sites are veterans and thus receive one-on-one assistance from DVOP specialists in addition to the broad array of services otherwise available. Cross-training for staff system-wide is promoted to ensure a seamless continuum of services. To facilitate universal access, one-stop resource areas are equipped with a variety of assistive technology tools, including large computer monitors, low vision readers, screen reading software, TTY, and adjustable work stations. In addition, career center staff is available at all sites to orient customers to these resources and to assist them throughout the service experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Supported Employment Training Project “Customized Employment, Self-Employment, and Employment First”

~~“This page focuses on information for job seekers or their family members -- people exploring the possibility of supported employment, as well as those already receiving services who need additional information. Other parts of our Supported Employment Training Project (SETP) web site are designed primarily for people providing supported employment services. There are many hyperlinks within this page…

What is the “Employment First” agenda? This is a movement that's taken root in a number of states -- centered around raising expectations, acknowledging the profound significance of employment opportunity and seeking employment as a first option. (Establishing a National Employment First Agenda, and APSE Statement on Employment First - October 2010)”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Kentucky Assistive Technology Service Network “A Guide to Assistive Technology Funding in Kentucky 15th Edition” - 08/01/2016

“…the services of the ATRCs include, but are not limited to: Assistive Technology Services for Early Intervention, K-12 and Post-secondary school, Employment, Transition, Independent Living, leisure or recreation; Loan Library of Assistive Devices, adaptive equipment and toys; Demonstrations of assistive technology devices; Funding information, Assistance and Referral; Assessments and Evaluations for AT; Vocational assessments; Consultations on appropriate technologies; Workplace AT; Environmental Controls; Recycled Computers and Assistive Technology Devices; Training and Technical Assistance on and about AT.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Perkins Center (Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation)

“The Perkins Center is a division of the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the vast majority of our consumers are referred by OVR Counselors located in several cities and towns across the Commonwealth….One of the main reasons for the creation of the Perkins Center was to enable Kentuckians with disabilities to obtain all the services they would need to become employed... The Center currently operates several programs and services that enable consumers to achieve their vocational goals”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities (CCDD) is a group of citizens, appointed by the governor to serves as a leading catalyst for systems change for individuals and families living with developmental disabilities…[The CCDD] mission “is to create systemic change in Kentucky that empowers individuals to achieve full citizenship and inclusion in the community through capacity building and advocacy”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP)

“The Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP) is a collaborative effort between participating local school districts, the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE), Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR), and the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky (HDI).

“The CBWTP is designed to provide a positive beginning in the world of work for students in special education during their last two years of high school. The goal for the CBWTP is students with disabilities will graduate from high school with positive employment outcomes, working in an integrated work setting with competitive pay.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Assistive Technology Services Network

The KATS Network is the Kentucky Assistive Technology program operating within its lead agency, the Office Vocational Rehabilitation, Education Cabinet. The KATS Network collaborates with and provides support for several Assistive Technology Resource Centers around Kentucky. Currently there are five such Centers which provide information and support to consumers, educators, parents, and others who are in need of information, assistive technology, or related services.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Assistive Technology Loan Corporation

“Working with its lending partner, Fifth Third Bank, KATLC can provide loans for modified vehicles, hearing aids, adapted computers, mobility devices, augmentative communication devices or any other type of equipment or home modification that will improve the quality of life or increase the independence of Kentuckians with disabilities.

“Established by state statute in 1996, KATLC is governed by a seven-member Board of Directors…. The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation currently provides staff support to the Board of Directors and the KATLC program.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky PACE (Preparing Adults for Competitive Employment)

“The Pace Training Program is a community-based job training program offered by the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. The program is an integral component of job placement services that offers short-term job training. The trainee will receive a training stipend while working at the program site, which is paid by the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation.   “Pace Training Program services are designed for the consumer who has been found eligible and whose vocational goal is competitive employment.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Kentucky Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P)

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P) provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. [Their] work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kentucky Money Follows the Person - 11/17/2010

[Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration Grant]… facilitates transition of and provides sustainable community based services to individuals who choose to move from Medicaid funded long term care settings (ICFs/MR and nursing facilities) into the community.”   “Those who transition must meet the criteria for services through one of three (3) transition waivers. Those waivers will provide transition and community based services to individuals who fall into one of the following groups: Individuals who are elderly and/or physically disabled; individuals who have mental retardation and a developmental disability; or individuals who have an acquired brain injury.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

"Customized Employment in Kentucky” Video Premiering at 25th Anniversary of the ADA Celebration - 07/29/2015

“Just in time for the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the University of Kentucky Human Development Institute announced the debut of their new video, ‘Customized Employment in Kentucky’…    The seven-minute video profiles three employees with developmental disabilities who are working in their community, in jobs which are a good fit for them, and in which their contributions are valued by their employer. The common thread in these stories is that the jobs were “customized,” a process in which employer needs are matched with the talents, interests and contributions of individual job seekers.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

“Toolbox for Employment: Customized Self-Employment and Benefits Planning” - 11/12/2013

~~“TThis is a presentation on methods that a person might use as a guide to becoming self-employed.“Business AND Benefits PlanningGo hand in handStarts with Discovery–DPG™Have to understand the interaction of income from wage and/or self-employment on public benefit systemsWhat public benefit systems are being received now?SSA, Medicaid, DD Waivers – CILA? Home Based Support?, DRS Home Services” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

“2017 Supported Employment Leadership Series” –Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky

“12 days of high quality supported employment professional development provide the foundation for the SE Leadership Series… Participants will study ways of connecting discovery with targeted job development, informational interviews, job analysis/needs analysis, customized employment, and specific representational considerations and strategies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Supported Employment Training Project “Newly Designed Supported Employment Leadership Series”

What's new?

12 days not required - Participation in all 4 leadership events is encouraged. The content areas are designed to be sequential and cumulative. However, for some, participation in all 12 days may not be possible. Therefore, participants may select any combination of the 4 events. (Check event descriptions for prerequisite requirements and recommendations.) Because the same schedule will be offered annually, it will be possible, for example, to participate in Parts 1 and 2 in 2016, and then Parts 3 and 4 in 2017. Three certifications will be offered - For the first time, a performance-based supported employment certification will be available in Kentucky. Historically, much of the content offered in our SE Leadership Series has been derived from Marc Gold & Associates (MG&A) and our Supported Employment Training Project (SETP) has a long-standing cooperative relationship with Mike Callahan and other MG&A colleagues. This year, we're formalizing an arrangement with MG&A by offering three certifications: 1-Systematic Instruction, 2-Discovery, and 3-Job Development.   

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Kentucky APSE “Training/Continuing Education”

This page is a resource for various traning and continuing education programs that are available in Kentucky. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services “Peer Support Specialist Curriculum Approval Process”

The Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) will approve the following curricula for Peer Support Specialists (PSS): Adult Peer Support Specialist, Family Peer Support Specialist, Youth Peer Support Specialist, and Kentucky Family Leadership Academy, as established in the Kentucky Administrative Regulations.

The regulations provide the curriculum applicant with an understanding of the requirements for peer support specialists—both eligibility and training—and specifically speak to the elements of a "training curriculum" and the training requirements (testing of the trainee and evaluation of the trainers). View these regulations in Related Links.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Supported Employment Training Project

About Us Having a job represents much more than earning a salary. Employment, including the kind of work one performs, influences one's personal identity, sense of belonging, and place in the world. Furthermore, employment represents one primary way of expressing the inherent human need to contribute – doing something that matters. Yet all too often the significance of employment for people with disabilities has been unrecognized, ignored, or minimized.Supported employment is designed to promote personalized employment opportunities for people with disabilities when they need support to:

Discover personal interests and contributions,Find or negotiate a job that fits things people like to do and do well,Become established as valued employees; andPursue job advancements.

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. Our work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. Please contact mtyree@uky.edu to make suggestions or request additional information. Many documents on this site are only available in PDF format

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities State Plan for Federal Fiscal Years 2017-2021

Goal #2- The capacity of systems that serve all people will be improved so that people with developmental disabilities will have increased access to opportunities for greater independence and integration

Objective 2-B (Employment): By 2021, the Council will support the efforts of at least 10 organizations to expand competitive, integrated employment for individuals with developmental disabilities by employing or assisting  more individuals with developmental disabilities in obtaining  jobs in the communities

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: Self-Employment Guide

This webpage offers information on and resources for self-employment. It orients job seekers on where to start the self-employment process and contains links to relevant resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky Educational Collaborative for State Agency Children Resource Guide

“This resource book came about because several young people who had lived in parental and foster homes their entire lives realized they were facing life after high school in a nursing facility because of lack of available adult supports in the community and confusion about how to get them.    “As a result, P&A brought together staff of several agencies to figure out how to help people find the transition services they needed. The group pooled their knowledge about available programs to put together a resource book that could be used by young people with disabilities in foster care to transition successfully to adulthood.    “Although the original purpose of this book was to help kids in foster care, it can be used by young people with disabilities anywhere who are looking at life after high school.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

State Plan Under Title XIX of the Social Security Act - 04/06/2017

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Kentucky's Medicaid program.

 

The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act, such as:

-Methods of Administration

-Eligibility

-Services Covered

-Quality Control

-Fiscal Reimbursements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supports for Community Living Waiver - 03/29/2017

~~“SCL Waiver renewal officially approved by CMS! - (Mar. 29, 2017) - The Department for Medicaid Services (DMS) has been notified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) of the official renewal of the Supports for Community Living (SCL) Medicaid Waiver to be implemented April 1, 2017. The SCL waiver renewal period is effective March 1, 2017 through February 28, 2022.

Beginning April 1, 2017, providers shall implement SCL regulations 907 KAR 12:010 and 907 KAR 12:020 that were dated effective June 3, 2016.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State Medicaid Plan Amendments - 01/19/2017

~~“This page is a resource for Kentucky Medicaid State Plan Amendments.  It has information on the amendments starting with 2008 .”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Request for a Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver - 08/24/2016

“Kentucky HEALTH is an innovative, transformative healthcare program designed to not only stabilize the program financially, but to also improve the health outcomes and overall quality of life for all members. This demonstration waiver seeks to evaluate new policies and program elements designed to engage members in their healthcare and provide the necessary education and tools required to achieve long term health and an improved quality of life. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Michelle P (0475.R01.00) - 07/15/2016

Provides adult day health, case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, assessment/reassessment, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, specialized medical equipment and supplies, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/MR/DD ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky DOE ESEA Flexibility Request - 03/31/2015

“The Kentucky State Department of Education’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 9, 2012.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky HCBS Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

On March 17, 2014, updated Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) final rules became effective in the Federal Register for 1915(c) waivers, 1915(i) state plan services, and 1915(k) community first choice state plan option . As they pertain to 1915(c) waivers, these rules include requirements for several areas of HCBS: all residential and non-residential settings, provider- owned residential settings, person-centered planning process, service plan requirements, and conflict-free case management.    The goal of the HCBS final rules is to improve the services rendered to HCBS participants and to maximize the opportunities to receive services in integrated settings and realize the benefits of community living. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is allowing five years (until March 17, 2019) for states and providers to transition into compliance with the all settings and provider-owned settings requirements.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Money Follows the Person - 11/17/2010

[Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration Grant]… facilitates transition of and provides sustainable community based services to individuals who choose to move from Medicaid funded long term care settings (ICFs/MR and nursing facilities) into the community.”   “Those who transition must meet the criteria for services through one of three (3) transition waivers. Those waivers will provide transition and community based services to individuals who fall into one of the following groups: Individuals who are elderly and/or physically disabled; individuals who have mental retardation and a developmental disability; or individuals who have an acquired brain injury.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Supports for Community Living (0314.R03.00) - 09/01/2010

Provides case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, residential support level I, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, FMS, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, residential support level II, specialized medical equipment and supplies, technology assisted level I residential support, vehicle adaptation for individuals w ID/DD individuals ages 3 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

KY HCBS Waiver (0144.R05.00) - 07/01/2010

Provides adult day health, case management, homemaker, personal care, respite, OT, PT, speech therapy, financial management services, goods and services, home and community supports, support broker, assessment/reassessment, attendant care, environmental and minor home adaptation for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

The unbridled spirit of Kentucky has shown that people with disabilities are able to succeed in their careers here in the Bluegrass State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kentucky’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.26%
Change from
2014 to 2015
4,425,092
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
421,948
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.06%
Change from
2014 to 2015
115,577
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.33%
Change from
2014 to 2015
27.39%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.53%
Change from
2014 to 2015
74.82%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 4,425,092
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 421,948
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 115,577
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,691,633
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 27.39%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.82%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.30%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 26.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 363,593
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 374,702
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 663,187
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 54,903
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 10,314
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,106
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,772
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 13,210
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 1,784

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,644
Percentage