Kentucky

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The unbridled spirit of Kentucky has shown that people with disabilities are able to succeed in their careers here in the Bluegrass State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kentucky’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.39%
Change from
2016 to 2017
4,454,189
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.2%
Change from
2016 to 2017
430,265
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.06%
Change from
2016 to 2017
129,954
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-0.86%
Change from
2016 to 2017
30.20%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.15%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.32%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 4,425,092 4,436,974 4,454,189
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 421,948 439,748 430,265
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 115,577 133,926 129,954
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,691,633 1,689,336 1,711,997
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 27.39% 30.46% 30.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.82% 75.44% 76.32%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.30% 5.00% 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 26.60% 27.40% 26.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.90% 16.50% 15.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 363,593 378,456 379,509
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 374,702 400,707 385,766
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 663,187 697,898 688,909
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 54,903 55,587 52,490
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 10,314 14,699 12,879
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,106 2,616 2,948
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,772 4,209 3,865
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 13,210 14,927 13,803
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,784 3,578 3,029

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,644 5,010 5,114
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.60% 2.90% 3.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 206,175 203,471 199,178

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 17,429 19,709 19,654
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 44,630 46,712 45,046
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 96,818 96,862 85,368
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 18.00% 20.30% 23.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.40% 1.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.70% 0.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50% 0.80% 0.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 608 577 658
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 282 299 309
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 224 338 366
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,223 6,023 6,431
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 43 37 472
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 27 25 209
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00% 68.00% 44.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.61 0.56 4.72

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,438
10,181
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 18 15 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,754 2,607 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,389 1,945 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,720 2,276 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,447 3,174 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 110 164 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.30% 33.90% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,455 5,268 4,625
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 323,767 321,459 315,423
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A 483 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 391 337 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $4,377,000 $3,128,000 $7,396,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $11,298,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $4,556,000 $8,244,000 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $70,671,000 $65,073,000 $60,568,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 10.00% 10.00% 30.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 5,726 6,035 5,228
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 1,002
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 579 786 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 15.40 14.40 60.60

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.15% 73.73% 73.81%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.22% 8.28% 8.31%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.86% 1.68% 1.72%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.19% 98.41% 97.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 18.43% 18.02% 18.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.17% 60.94% 59.39%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.82% 69.06% 68.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 39.74% 42.92% 41.31%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 788,499
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,104
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 421,644
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 85,649
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 507,293
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 538
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 97
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 635
AbilityOne wages (products). $3,841,069
AbilityOne wages (services). $901,392

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 20 22 25
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 2 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 22 24 26
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,152 1,340 1,564
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 161 161 73
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,313 1,501 1,637

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~The CRP Branch works closely with Kentucky APSE (Association of People Supporting Employment First) and its committees, and the 874K Coalition (a statewide Disability Advocacy Group) in a unified effort to secure additional state dollars for supported employment extended services. (Page 155) Title I

The CRP Branch works cooperatively with the Arc of Kentucky, among other groups, such as the Kentucky Association of Supporting Employment First (KYAPSE), the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (BHDDID), the Kentucky Rehabilitation Association (KRA), UK Human Development Institute, EKU Center of Excellence, most of the Comprehensive Care Centers in the state, and many Supported Employment providers, to educate families about supported employment and enlist their assistance in impacting additional funds for supported employment. (Page 156) Title I

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services. (Page 209) Title I
 

Customized Employment

~~Information regarding these potential funding sources is updated and shared by the Supported Employment Branch on a statewide basis to encourage increased funding for all phases of supported employment. 12. The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set. (Page 156) Title I

Training opportunities for staff on new policies related to customized employment and person-centered planning have occurred in statewide, regional, district, and local office training events. A statewide survey addressing the need of customized SE services has been given, as a means to continue to identify need for training as well as to identify the need for this valuable service. (Page 221)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Kentucky issued a statewide co—enrollment policy in 2015. Co—enrollment allows partners to leverage resources while providing a more comprehensive service delivery strategy that meets the needs of customers with several barriers to employment. All adults and dislocated workers who receive KCC services other than self—service and informational activities must be registered and considered a participant for WIOA Title I services. (Page 17) Title I

The WorkSmart Kentucky plan demonstrates a commitment to leveraging state and federal resources focused on workforce investment across state government. The process to develop the strategic plan involved all board members representing a variety of agencies, businesses and community partners. Focus groups consisting of business people, customers and staff were conducted. Each of the 25 action steps included in the WorkSmart plan is grounded in partnerships across state government. (Page 30) Title I

Information regarding these potential funding sources is updated and shared by the Supported Employment Branch on a statewide basis to encourage increased funding for all phases of supported employment. 12. The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set. (Page 156) Title I

The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation is pursuing a collaborative effort between the KY Department of Behavioral Health, the University of Kentucky and Eastern Kentucky University, to leverage funding for the continuation of state IPS Trainer and Fidelity Monitoring services. These services are a vital component to this evidenced-based practice of IPS supported employment services. These elements are vital to the continued support, growth and fidelity of the various programs throughout the state. (Page 161) Title I

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services. OVR will continue to maximize existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self—determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, provide training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. Currently, meetings are ongoing with the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and intellectual Disabilities to strengthen the partnership by leveraging funding to expand IPS SE services in unserved areas, as well as exploring possibilities of implementing IPS services for individuals with intellectual disabilities, which would be one of the first endeavors for this evidenced based practice. (Page 209) Title IV

Objective 5.2: Increase available resources & seek to leverage funding, staff resources, in—kind and programmatic support & other forms of assistance from partners.
OFB will collaborate with other statewide partners increasing their capacity to serve individuals with disabilities, and will refer eligible individuals who can benefit from the resources and services available at no cost.
OFB staff will provide training for Career Center Partner Staff to increase knowledge and confidence in working with individuals who are blind and visually impaired.
Report of Progress:
A plan for marketing to eye physicians was developed and implemented. The main focus is the Spring Optometric Association Annual meeting event held annually. OFB identifies staff with lower referrals from eye physicians through WEBI reports and they are targeted to attend the event for networking purposes. Though the conference we receive a list of eye physicians throughout the state that is then distributed to staff for marketing and outreach purposes.
Through the Career Pathways Grant OFB has made a lot of progress in collaboration with statewide partners to increase capacity in serving individuals. Project CASE Career Pathways Coordinators provided all the liaison and coordination services for the following STEM Camps, which were held in Eastern Kentucky on the campuses of Big Sandy Community and Technical College, Southeast Community and Technical College, and Hazard Community and Technical College. The grant has allowed for enhanced connections with the system initiatives in the local workforce areas. (Page 230) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

We currently have in place five other innovative programs that provide high school students with a variety of work–based learning, financial literacy, self–advocacy training, job exploration, career counseling, and workplace readiness training opportunities that exist in the community with employers, in our rehabilitation center, and in post–secondary institutions.

The Summer Youth Boot Camp Program focuses on job exploration, workplace readiness training, and self–advocacy and is held at the Charles W. McDowell Center in Louisville. It is an intensive four week program based on the work of Dr. Karen Wolffe that introduces employability skills to transition aged individuals. The curriculum is specific to individuals that are blind or visually impaired.

The Summer Work Experience Program is in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Providers. CRPs are paid to find work experiences in competitive integrated settings for transition aged individuals. The work experiences last six to eight weeks and the students are paid by the Office for the Blind for the time worked. The goals of the work experience are to provide community based career exploration and the opportunity to practice work readiness skills. It is also hoped that by participating in the work experience program, employers will be open to providing more opportunities for individuals who are blind or visually impaired in their communities. (Page 310) 

School to Work Transition

~~Service coordination activities may also include resource information about vocational rehabilitation, presentations, handouts, and staff development. The counselor works in a collaborative team process along with the local education agency to develop the transition services section of the Individualized Education Program (IEP) and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for transitioning students. Both the IEP and IPE will include, if appropriate, a statement of interagency responsibilities or any needed linkages by which the responsibilities of other entities are satisfied. (Pages 151-152) Title I

VR counselors attend transition related meetings as early at age 14 and act as a consultant in the student’s IEP. Early contact and intervention not only saves the VR counselor considerable time and effort, it allows the student and parents the opportunity to plan a realistic vocational path that will lead them to the vocational goal of their choice. VR counselors shall attend student IEP meetings starting at age 14.
The school system will continue to have the primary responsibility for accommodations and student’s educational needs. Once the student graduates OVR will become the primary agent. It is mandatory that the IPE be developed with the student 90 days after eligibility or prior to graduation, whichever comes first.
An IPE is developed for each student determined eligible and that meets the current order of selection for vocational rehabilitation services. The IPE should address the student’s pre-employment transition services needs in the areas of job exploration counseling, work based learning experiences, counseling regarding post-secondary training opportunities, workplace readiness training to assist in the development of social and independent living skills, and instruction in self-advocacy. (Pages 152-153) Title I

Provisions under the cooperative agreement include: 1. Process for making student referrals to the OVR; 2. Determination of eligibility for OVR services; 3. Joint sharing and use of evaluations and assessments; 4. Planning and development of individualized programs (IEP and IPE) as a collaborative team process; 5. Role of educational personnel in transition planning; 6. Role of the OVR counselor in outreach to, identification of, and transition planning for eligible students with disabilities; 7. Use of memoranda of agreement (MOA) at the local level to facilitate and coordinate transition services for secondary students with disabilities; 8. State coordination with agencies in the provision of transition services inclusive of pre — employment transition services; 9. A comprehensive system of personnel development for qualified personnel responsible for transition services; 10. Determination of lead agencies; 11. Financial responsibilities; 12. Status of services for an individual student/consumer during a dispute; 13. Agency dispute resolution; 14. Due process for the individual student/consumer. 15. Memoranda of Agreements at the Local Level. (Page 153) Title I

The CWTP is designed to provide pre-employment transition services to all students with disabilities and provide transition services to assist VR eligible students with the most significant disabilities in transitioning from high school to competitive integrated employment. Student employment coordinators, funded by the local education agency, refer students to OVR in order to provide pre—employment transition services during their final three years of school. 
During this time, should the student need individualized transition services, counselors work with the employment coordinators to ensure that community vocational services provided lead to the completion of an individualized vocational evaluation and the development of individualized programs (IEP and IPE) to ensure successful transitioning from high school to post school activities, including employment. Upon completion of the IPE, further community—based vocational services are provided to the student in the form of training for the planned vocational goal. The desired outcome for participants in the CWTP Transition Services is a post—school outcome or paid employment. 
Outreach to students also occurs through OVR’s contractual agreements with the Kentucky Career and Technical Educational College System and the nine Special Education Cooperatives for pre-employment transition services. (Page 154) Title I

An IPE is developed for each student determined eligible and that meets the current order of selection for vocational rehabilitation services. The IPE should address the student’s pre-employment transition services needs in the areas of job exploration counseling, work based learning experiences, counseling regarding post-secondary training opportunities, workplace readiness training to assist in the development of social and independent living skills, and instruction in self-advocacy. (Page 153) Title I

A variety of partnerships are needed in order to market the benefits of a variety of earn and learn opportunities, including registered apprenticeships to Kentucky business for individuals with disabilities including youth and students with disabilities. OFB will work with its existing partnerships among workforce, economic development, education and business entities in fostering work based learning opportunities. (Page 158) Title I

The CWTP is designed to provide pre-employment transition services to all students with disabilities and provide transition services to assist VR eligible students with the most significant disabilities in transitioning from high school to competitive integrated employment. There will be a Supported Employment Consulting fee available with the Community Work Transition program for seamless transition into competitive integrated employment. There are specific programs i n place with specialized services for the blind and visually impaired. The PATH Program focuses on job exploration, workplace readiness training, and self-advocacy and is an intensive three week program based on the work of Dr. Karen Wolffe that introduces employability skills to students with disabilities. The curriculum is specific to individuals that are blind or visually impaired. The Summer Work Experience Program is in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Providers. CRPs are paid to find work experiences in competitive integrated settings for transition aged individuals. The goals of the work experience are to provide community based career exploration and the opportunity to practice work readiness skills. It is also hoped that by participating in the work experience program, employers will be open to providing more opportunities for individuals who are blind or visually impaired in their communities. The Summer Work Program is in collaboration with the Kentucky School for the Blind, Kentucky Kingdom, the American Printing House for the Blind, and the Louisville Zoo. The World of Work Program is another program in which the OFB and KSB provide work based learning experiences to students. The program provides competitive integrated work experiences to students that attend the Kentucky School for the Blind. The INSIGHT Post-Secondary Preparation Program is held each summer at Morehead State University. Students are able to participate in college classes, live in the dorm, and participate in social activities both on and off campus during this eight day program. They receive counseling on post-secondary opportunities and are taught the self-advocacy skills necessary to succeed in a post-secondary environment along with workplace readiness skills. (Page 159) Title I

Rehabilitation counselors work collaboratively with the special education cooperatives, high school education teachers, local directors of special education, and job coaches for students transitioning from high school into employment. OVR Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors attend IEP and ARC meetings working with the team in establishing a vocational goal. This assures the development of the students IPE in conjunction with the vocational rehabilitation IEP. OVR provides support to teaching instructors, school staff and job coaches regarding rehabilitation issues and other areas of expertise such as Assistive Technology to ensure successful placements. Often rural schools do not have the needed resources; therefore OVR staff offer their expertise based on the individual needs of the student working closely with all staff involved with IDEA.  (Page 181) Title I

gain this year, VI teachers indicated that their expectations in working with a counselor are mainly to provide resources for the student/family, and to include the counselor as part of the student’s IEP team. However, overall the survey indicated that the VI teachers expect greater involvement in the provision of guidance and counseling, training, the employment proves and career counseling. These beliefs may indicate a need to not only affirm our own commitment to early involvement in planning, but to find new ways to stay involved and easily accessible. VI teachers gave positive ratings to OFB”s counseling staff in areas such as knowledge, rapport building ability, and ability to connect to needed vocational services such as training, job search and placement, including post-secondary education as well the development of strong appropriate vocational goals. (Page 192) Title IV

WIOA allows KY OVR to address these particular issues by allocating funds for pre-employment transition services. WIOA mandates 15% of all federal funds be set aside to provide pre-employment
Page 196transition services. Indications of post-school success are broken into categories in ‘Predictors of Post-School Success in Taxonomy 2.0. (Test, et al., 2009) clearly noting areas where Vocational Rehabilitation may play vital roles. The predictors are (possible VR role in parentheses): Student Development (assessment, employment skills attainment, supports), Student-focused planning (IEP development ant IPE participation), and Family engagement (family involvement, family empowerment, and family preparation), Program Structures (strategic planning, high expectation, and high involvement), Interagency Collaboration (collaborative framework, and collaborative service delivery). (Pages 195-196) Title IV

All training programs at the Carl D. Perkins Vocational Training Center (CDPVTC) have associated work based learning experiences in the local community. The agency is always pursuing other collaborative activities to provide Pre-ETS, and we have made at least 9 proposals to Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). These proposals are in the process of being implemented. The contract was completed and renewed for a partnership with the Kentucky Partnership for Families and Children to sponsor students to attend the KPFC Youth Parent Conference. The PepNet2 project grant has ended related to partnerships with the school system and KDE to improve transition outcomes for students who are deaf and hard of hearing. This population, however, will be the focus of a Co-Op contact as a targeted population. (Pages 219-220) Title IV

Goal 6: To engage youth, parents, high schools, and other transition specialists in exploring and planning career choices that connect to a full range of post—secondary options for training, career development, and competitive integrated employment.
Objective 6.1: To improve the number, quality, and rate of employment outcomes for youth and students participating in Transition services.
Strategies
VR Counseling Staff, school counseling and teaching staff, and VI teachers statewide will collaborate to achieve earlier involvement of OFB counselors in IEP development of vocational goals. OFB transition policies and practices used to guide the implementation and continuous improvement of services leading to employment will be based on the gathering and tracking data through the case management system. (Page 230) Title IV

Objective 6.3: Enhance student awareness of enrollment in transition programs
Promote summer transition programs through innovative marketing strategies in order to increase referrals. Implementation of marketing strategies to VI teachers, students and their families.
Report of Progress:
Path a summer transition program for students ages 14-21 who are blind and visually impaired was held at the Charles W. McDowell Center in Louisville during July. There were 16 students in attendance. Students participated in classes teaching blindness skills such as orientation and mobility, assistive technology and braille. Additionally, the curriculum had a focus on pre-employability skills such as local labor market information, career pathways, financial literacy and interest inventories. Students went off site for employment site tours and participated in recreational activities that provided for many their first exposure to those kinds of events. (Pages 230-231) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~In October 2015, Kentucky was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR—eligible individuals, including youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized post—secondary credentials necessary to secure competitive, integrated employment in high—demand, high—quality occupations.
This five—year grant award of nearly $4.4 million is named Project CASE (Creating Access to Successful Employment). Project CASE has strong support from the leadership of OVR, OET, KYAE and the Department of Education. Title IV

Project CASE activities are consistent with the section 101(d) of WIOA, with focus on improved alignment of federal programs to strengthen the capacity of state workforce systems to meet emerging employers’ needs with appropriately skilled and credentialed individuals. Project CASE provides a solid strategy for providing individuals with disabilities who face barriers to employment with workforce investment activities, education and supportive services to enter and retain employment.
Career Pathways initiatives in Kentucky over the past decade have created partnerships between industry and education at the secondary and post—secondary levels, and forged important links to strengthen local economies. Project CASE will help ensure that individuals with disabilities, even at the secondary school level, are not left out of participating in these existing initiatives and can prepare for and obtain jobs in high—wage, high—demand occupations. (Page 32) Title I

Project CASE is a collaborative effort between state vocational rehabilitation agencies, adult education, secondary and post—secondary education, career centers, employers and other partners to demonstrate how career pathways can help individuals with disabilities acquire the marketable skills and attain recognized credentials that lead to employment in high—demand occupations. In Kentucky, two pilot projects are planned in the Metro Louisville and Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) regions; these will engage seven and 23 counties respectively. (Page 44) Title I

Through Project CASE, a program developed from the use of Federal grant funding through the Rehabilitation Services Administration, OVR has stronger coordination and collaboration with the Youth Career Centers and other Kentucky Career Centers. Partnering with Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) and KentuckianaWorks in the hiring of Career Pathway Coordinators, and in cross-agency training of staff on career pathways for students with disabilities, Project CASE will ensure sustained partnerships. (Pages 150-151) Title I
One project that aligns with this area in serving students is Project CASE (Creating Access to Successful Employment). In October 2015, the Kentucky Office for the Blind/Kentucky Career Center was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR-eligible individuals, including students and youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized postsecondary credentials necessary to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations. Creating Access to Successful Employment (CASE) will help ensure that individuals with disabilities, even at the secondary school level, are not left out of participating in these existing initiatives, and can prepare for and obtain jobs in high-wage and high-demand occupations.  (Page 212) Title IV

A federal Career Pathways grant recently received by the Kentucky Office for the Blind (OFB) from the Rehabilitation Services Administration. OVR will collaborate with OFB on assisting consumers in three career pathways (healthcare, manufacturing, and information technology) in two of Kentucky Career Centers, Kentuckian Works in the Louisville metropolitan area and the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) in rural Appalachia.  (Page 217) Title IV

Apprenticeship
OVR can work with consumers on internships, apprenticeships, and on—the—job training arrangements as additional options on the career pathway to employment. These options allow individuals to train while being actual employees. (Page 20) Title I A variety of partnerships are needed in order to market the benefits of a variety of earn and learn opportunities, including registered apprenticeships to Kentucky business for individuals with disabilities including youth and students with disabilities. OFB will work with its existing partnerships among workforce, economic development, education and business entities in fostering work based learning opportunities. (Page 158) Title I As a means of providing Pre—Employment Transition Services, OVR will work with partner agencies in Workforce Development to identify existing apprenticeship programs with employers with which OVR may partner to focus on incorporating students and youth with disabilities into the programs. The Kentucky Apprenticeship program recently moved from the Department of Labor to Workforce. OVR partners with the Office of Autism in order to understand how to assist youth on the spectrum with attaining and maintaining employment. A model program focused on creating apprenticeship opportunities for students and youth with disabilities will be developed in such a manner as to be replicated in urban and rural areas alike. This will expand employment opportunities for all the youth with disabilities in Kentucky. (Page 159) Title I
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Existing legacy case management systems across WIOA Title I, Wagner Peyser, Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education are disparate and insular: Currently, the Office of Employment and Training (OET) and the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) are supported by insular case management systems that respond to requests for the following programs: • Wagner Peyser Labor Exchange (Employ Kentucky Operating System - EKOS) • Unemployment Insurance — both benefits and tax/collections (Mainframe and Kentucky’s Electronic Workplace for Employment Services — KEWES) • Veterans Program • Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Program • National Emergency Grants • High Growth Job Training • Foreign Labor Certification • Health Care Tax Credit System • Trade Adjustment Act • Work Opportunities Tax Credit • Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) • Student data • Customer records, services provided and costs of services for individuals with disabilities and blindness — Case Management System — CMS • Social Security Reimbursement tracking and processing • Social Security Ticket to Work assignment tracking and processing  (Pages 45-46) Title I

There is a Social Security Reimbursement module within CMS that enables each respective agency to seek reimbursement for the cost of the services provided to agency consumers receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. There is a Maximus module that generates files that are submitted to Social Security for the Ticket to Work program and tracks responses and ticket assignments. In July 2016, Kentucky ceased WIA data collection and reporting and began working to implement WIOA data collection and reporting requirements in addition to other USDOE and state reporting. CMS is a staff only application with a web front end. An interface exists between CMS and eMARS, the state’s payment system, to enable processing of payments to, and refunds from, vendors. The system is Section 508 and Bobby compliant and staff use screen readers such as JAWS, ZoomText and WindowEyes, as well as speech recognition software such as Dragon Naturally Speaking.  (Page 46-47) Title I

OFB continues to provide training on the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 as well as training on the ADA, Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act (TWWIIA). Central office and other support staff as well as members of the State Rehabilitation Council will be included in all appropriate HRD activities. OFB is vested in using technology and is actively identifying potential web-based training programs that will allow staff the opportunity to utilize these alternative training methods for increased professional development. (Pages 178-179) Title I

GOAL III: Provide information concerning benefits planning and financial planning in order to promote inclusion, integration, and empowerment of individuals with the most significant and significant disabilities. We have written and passed a new policy on Benefits Planning and Analysis. A fact sheet has been developed for resources in benefits planning that will be given to OVR consumers at time of eligibility or later in the case if they begin receiving Social Security benefits. We are also 8 months in on the SGA project, which gives benefits planning to individuals with SSI and seeks to help them gain competitive integrated employment. OVR services are completed in an expedited fashion in order to insure quicker service provision. The agency has developed a Spanish version of the Benefits Planning fact sheet to make it more accessible. The staff has been trained on Disability Benefits 101(DB101) an electronic system to help with benefits planning. It was launched in December of 2017. As of 2017, the agency is keeping the fee for a Benefits Analysis at $450, but we are hoping the use of DB101 will cut down on the authorization for a benefits analysis. The agency is also hoping that benefits counseling is provided earlier in the process and planning of a case. The agency is also encouraging Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and non-profit providers to consider providing benefits planning services. The agency is encouraging the CRPs and non-profit providers to participate in “Introduction to Social Security Disability Benefits, Work Incentives, and Employment Support Programs” offered by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in hopes that some staff might become interested in pursuing certification to provide those services. (Page 220) Title IV

The WIPA Program for one half of the state is just now up and running. GOAL IV: To provide job placement and supported employment services in order for consumers with significant and most significant disabilities respectively to attain competitive integrated employment. IMPEDIMENTS: No impediments at this time (Page 232) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Goal 2: Work-Based Learning Infrastructure — Create a state-level framework to facilitate employer engagement in work-based learning and ensure consistency in definitions used across the education and training continuum partners regarding definition. • define it • governance structure that is partnership-based • standardized continuum • asset map • identify best practices at every level • create Kentucky model • implement and model • communication strategy (Page 28) Title I

In addition to leveraging and expanding the KSN effort, Kentucky expects a great deal of new activity assessing and addressing employer needs via existing partnerships with business organizations like the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, and most importantly, through new strategies and initiatives crafted by the new administration. (Page 40) Title I

OVR employs fourteen job placement specialists across the state. These specialists are responsible for developing relationships with local employers to facilitate the placement of OVR consumers into competitive integrated employment. Employer engagement activities may include: 1) technical assistance to employers on hiring individuals with disabilities; 2) disability awareness training 3) ongoing and regular contact with employers 4) attending meetings of local Chambers of Commerce, Society of Human Resource Managers (SHRM), and other business related groups; and 5) no cost accessibility surveys to employers. OVR employs a statewide Job Placement Coordinator who coordinates all job placement activities. This staff member trains new job placement specialists, provides technical assistance to the job placement specialists and to districts where there are no job placement specialists, pursues agency—wide relationships with large employers, and acts as the agency contact for the National NET and TAP programs managed by CSAVR. (Page 157) Title I

The Kentucky Skills Network (KSN) is a partnership of local and state workforce development organizations dedicated to providing proactive business services and industry skills development. Through local “Business Service Teams” the KSN has laid a foundation for coordinated employer services that will be leveraged in the coming four years. (Page 157) Title IV

In October 2015, the Kentucky Office for the Blind/Kentucky Career Center was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR-eligible individuals, including youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized postsecondary credentials necessary to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations. Under this project employer engagement is a goal area. For all five years of the grant staff will conduct employer engagement activities such as regional employer conferences in the two project target areas on a variety of topics. 

The Statewide Council for Vocational Rehabilitation (SCVR), Kentucky’s State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), includes several employers and a representative of the Workforce Investment Board who provide important input on agency policy and activities related to employment. OVR, in conjunction with SCVR, conducts a Job Placement Month annually in October which includes many events around the state that promote collaboration with employers. Regional Employer Recognition Awards are given out during the month to employers who have hired OVR consumers. OVR will also continue to partner with local initiatives like Project SEARCH in Northern Kentucky and the Coalition for Workforce Diversity in Louisville, Lexington, Ashland, and Mayfield to identify and educate employers willing to develop new programs specifically designed to focus on hiring and training individuals with disabilities. (Page 158) Title I

Goal 4: Recruit, employ, retain and train the most qualified and highly skilled rehabilitation staff which reflects employment focused, job driven outcomes.
Objective 4.1: Increase the skills and competency levels of all rehabilitation staff statewide. Strategies Maximize training funds to support staff in professional training and development activities. Provide quality training statewide that is job specific and targeted to address any deficiencies identified in quality assurance reviews or training needs assessments. Provide job—driven training that promotes skill enhance and employer engagement. (Page 224) Title IV

LVER staff indirectly serve veterans through direct business outreach to promote the hiring of qualified veterans and obtain job orders for review of potential cross—match with veterans seeking employment. (Page 252) Title IV

Data Collection
Kentucky will build a workforce investment system assessment that combines the results of the independent review and the collection of common performance measures and aligns those results with program improvements and innovations. Basic service delivery performance standards will be set to continuously improve. New comprehensive WIOA service delivery ideas and standards will be added over time to help ensure that common measure and customer satisfaction results go up over time. Kentucky will add to this basic approach and develop broader continuous improvement activities for across the workforce system. (Page 29) Title I Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We anticipate that the current system will be able to collect the necessary data beginning 7/1/2016 and produce accurate reports prior to the due dates for Rehabilitation Services Administration and common measures reporting. (Page 213) Title IV Objective 4.2: Improve services to underserved populations within the blind and visually impaired community, including substance abuse, mental health, and criminal background. Strategies Participate in cross training's with agencies who provide services to treat mental illness, substance abuse to provide all professionals a better understanding of the unique services necessary to improve outcomes for consumers. Collaborate with criminal justice agencies to promote better understanding of issues that impact employment for consumers with backgrounds. Reports of Progress: Given budget constraints progress on this goal area was limited. Staff were provided training for those areas through quality assurance reviews deficiencies were identified and areas of concern voiced by staff through the training assessment were prevalent. Trainings occurred for changes in the case management system for 911 fields as well as on Pre-employment Transition Services. The Cabinet sponsored cross training for the area or team building. There was no progress for the area of substance abuse, mental health or criminal backgrounds. (Page 224) Title IV The Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, Department of Workforce Investment is currently working to develop a single system for all of the data collection needs of the Department including the Office of Employment and Training, Office for the Blind and Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. This system is being developed in phases. The current system has been edited to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We will continue to make changes identified as necessary to correct or improve that process. We anticipate that the new system will be available for OVR/OFB by 12/31/2019.KEE Suite is the integrated case management system being developed for state agencies (OVR, OFB, OET, CHFS, Adult Ed, WIOA, etc.) to streamline services for program participants in the Commonwealth. It is currently planned to replace OVR/OFB’s current case management system in the fall of 2019. We are in the beginning planning stages for the VR specific portion of the system. All information entered into the system will be shared on Permission based guidelines, set by the Agency(s) based on State and Federal Law. Shared Personally Identifiable Information (PII) that will be available to the participating partners in this system will be Common basic information requested and collected from the participant by each partner to streamline and simplify the process for the participant instead of the participant being required to answer and supply the same information multiple times, and to facilitate the federal reporting of the WIOA required Common Measures. VR specific data and records will be secured by access restrictions in place based on need to know. Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. Once a baseline is determined and the relationship between services, partnerships, etc. and successful outcomes and measurable progress is analyzed, strategies will be developed to improve the performance outcomes. (Page 236) Title IV
511

~~In relation to Section 511 of WIOA, it was asked whether the agency was a 14C certificate holder, and their current knowledge about this legislation. In summary, they were asked to list their agency if they had a need for further training. The CRP survey was sent to the 54 CRPs authorized as vendors for KYOVR or KYOFB with 34 actually initiating and completing the survey, for a 63% completion rate. Of the respondents, 53% (18) had provided services to KYOVR or KYOFB consumers for five years or less and 21% (7) had provided services for more than 20 years. When inquired, 38% (13) of the respondents stated their agency received less than 10 referrals per year. In regards to size of the agency, 53% (18) had less than 10 staff and 21% (7) reported more than 50 employees. Based on the fact that there was at least 1 response in all choices of the demographic questions it was felt that a variety of CRPs are represented in the survey responses. (Page 194) Title IV

GOAL V: To implement Section 511 of WIOA. We have team together to look at the best way of implementing this process. We will target students who are not usually referred to OVR while in school, but would have been sent straight to the Sheltered Workshop once out of School, for an early referral to OVR to go through the VR process. Youths out of school but younger than 24 will be referred to an OVR counselor to go through the VR Process. Letters will go out to all 14C Programs in Kentucky in the spring of 2016 explaining section 511 and VR’s involvement in the process. Each 14C will be visited by one of the 3 SE Consultants. Educational groups will be set up for all the current employees of the 14C facilities about career exploration and community integrated employment. These will be done every 6 months for the 1st two years and annually thereafter. A Section 511 team was created and fulfilled identified goals. Communication with 14c holders occurred to provide education on Section 511. A Section 511 video was developed for consumers to view to meet the career counseling mandate. Career counseling participation and completion documents are collected and reviewed to ensure requirements are met. Ongoing monitoring continues by CRP consultants. Input continues to be gathered and communication continues to occur and information is collected during trainings, meetings and focus groups. Process implementation was provided to educate CRP’s on Section 511, and to ensure career counseling is provided to consumers. Effective communication and monitoring continues to occur to ensure consumer needs and requirements are met. Documentation is obtained from the CRP Branch as it relates to refusal of services. (Page 221) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
OVR will have stronger coordination and collaboration with the Youth Career Center offices and other Kentucky Career Center offices in the EKCEP and KentuckianaWorks regions. Adult Education is an active partner in CASE providing supports through the AOKY program. Accelerating Opportunity is aimed at creating effective pathways to credentials for low-skilled adults (testing at a sixth-12th academic grade level) so they can earn the credentials they need to get a family sustaining job. The initiative seeks to reform how education is delivered to low-skilled adults by integrating basic skills education with technical training while providing wrap around services that include instructional and career supports for adult learners. The initiative is informed by I-BEST, an accelerated, integrated instructional model in which adult education and technical instructors work together in the classroom. Career and Technical Education is closely aligned with the project as well. Kentucky will use funds to ensure that all youth program elements are made available to youth. The state supports the local workforce areas in designing youth programs tailored to the needs of in-school and out-of-school youth in local communities. Local areas encourage youth to use one-stop services as needed. Areas have designed special referral processes for youth who come into one-stops and one area has developed a one-stop career center specifically for youth. Vocational Rehabilitation staff will provide high quality services and communication to transition students and youth, provide accurate and timely information related to work incentives and long-term supports for Social Security recipients, increase and improve job placement options and opportunities for persons served, strengthen and expand competitive integrated employment opportunities by implementing Section 511 of WIOA, improve programmatic and physical accessibility to workforce investment system partners and career center offices, communicate and cooperate with workforce partners on accountability measures discussed in Section 116 of WIOA and seek to meet the standards of WIOA, expand opportunities for increased services, such as supported employment, provide options for transportation and information related to medical services available to consumers, and provide a more timely and efficient process for accessing services. (Pages 37-38) Title I Kentucky assesses the overall effectiveness of the workforce investment system in relation to the strategic vision and goals of the WorkSmart Kentucky and Economic Competitiveness plans, seeking integration of activities and information from all the core programs. The ultimate goal is to increase the long—term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment, to improve services to employers and demonstrate continuous improvement. Kentucky will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with Section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), and continuous improvement of the career center. (Page 51) Title I Accessibility is addressed on several levels and venues in the KCC. Given that OVR staffs are housed in many of the career center offices and are a central part of the workforce programs, there is a heightened sense of assuring this topic is addressed. Accessibility is a part of the required certification process under II. Career Center (office) Management: Physical Infrastructure and Accessibility. The standards that apply to this are as follows: Standard 1: Career Center offices are accessible so that all customers can fully use services and resources. (ADA compliant checklist) KCC offices: • are fully ADA compliant; • are feasible (As new center locations are selected, KCC offices are located in areas that are convenient for their customers, close to major highways, on public transportation routes, centrally—located, close to heavily—trafficked areas such as malls and shopping centers, etc.); • provide assistive technology to assist customers with disabilities (visual, hearing or physical) so they can access computers and other KCC resources/services; • evaluate assistive technology annually to ensure that it is up—to—date and fully functioning. • provide free parking and inclusive parking spaces that are adequate for the average level of customer traffic, especially for individuals with disabilities; and • make services accessible to customers who have language and literacy barriers (non—English speakers or individuals with hearing impairments, disabilities or literacy/reading barriers). For assistive technology, the objective is to design a computer workstation/kiosk that can be used by individuals with the widest possible range of abilities and/or circumstances. Kentucky follows the guidelines set forth by the Job Accommodation Network, One—Stop Disability Resource Manual. All Kentucky Career Center offices are expected to ensure universal access to programs and activities for all eligible individuals. Kentucky has taken steps to ensure equitable access to and participation in federally funded programs for all consumers and for agency staff regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or age. OET will comply with the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Public Law 101—336, and applicable federal regulations relating there to prohibiting discrimination against otherwise qualified disabled individuals under any program or activity and adhere to the U.S. Department of Labor Final Rule on Federal Executive Order 11246. (Page 61) Title I GEPA section 427—Special Needs/Barriers to participation Kentucky recently completed the RFA process for services under WIOA. As part of that RFA process, each applicant was directed to address the thirteen AFLEA considerations. Consideration number two addresses special needs populations and barriers. KYAE Skills U weighted heavily the responses provided in the considerations in the selection of applicants for service. Applicants addressed how they will serve special needs populations Page 135and students with barriers through ADA compliance, Office of Rehabilitation (OVR) assessment on physical disabilities, assistive technologies and other reasonable accommodations as well as partnerships with state agencies that provide support services to students with barriers or special needs. All programs have been supplied with the Burlington English product as one tool to use with non-English speaking students. In addition, all local programs sign contracts and affidavits that cover Title IX and affirm they will not discriminate on the basis of age, color, race or any protected class under Title VI and VII of the Civil Right Act of 1964, Age discrimination Act of 1975, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and all applicable laws which prohibit discrimination. Programs are continually monitored by state staff of Administration and Accountability and on a rotating basis participate in an agreed upon procedures audit by the State Auditor of Public Accounts as to the terms of the contract. State employees are encouraged to express their concerns regarding existing or potential barriers or prohibitions to equal employment opportunity due to race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, ancestry, veteran status, and disability in accordance with state and federal laws. EEO assistance is available by contacting the Human Resources EEO Counselor/Coordinator or the State EEO Coordinator. (Page 134) Title I OVR employs fourteen job placement specialists across the state. These specialists are responsible for developing relationships with local employers to facilitate the placement of OVR consumers into competitive integrated employment. Employer engagement activities may include: 1) technical assistance to employers on hiring individuals with disabilities; 2) disability awareness training 3) ongoing and regular contact with employers 4) attending meetings of local Chambers of Commerce, Society of Human Resource Managers (SHRM), and other business related groups; and 5) no cost accessibility surveys to employers. (Page 157) Title I The agency has also worked diligently with other state agencies to bring web-designs created by state entities into compliance with accessibility laws. This is an ongoing process and the agency will continue to push for changes necessary to make all state government technology and software systems fully accessible. (Page 176) Title I Goal 2: continue to monitor and explore additional strategies to improve CRP service quality and compliance Strategies: Involve job coaches with transition students by the last semester of school; Strategies: Train staff on new policies related to customized employment and person—centered planning; Strategies: Require notes to be submitted by Supported Employment Providers by the 5th day of each month. Strategies: Continued monitoring by the Section 511 Implementation Team to insure agency compliance to WIOA requirements related to OVR relationships with sheltered workshops; (Page 199) Title IV
Vets
Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) is a $2.4 million grant administered by OET with staff located in the Kentucky Career Center offices statewide. Those who are both veterans and ex-offenders fall within a category specified to be served under this grant. Currently, the state coordinator receives a monthly list of every incarcerated veteran in Kentucky from the Department of Corrections; those in local jails and state facilities, with their release dates. The nearest disabled veterans outreach program specialist (DVOP) reaches out to these individuals to offer re-entry employment preparation and support services prior to release, when possible. After release, JVSG staff work with the each individual from their KCC office. KCC partners with the Department of Corrections (DOC) and Adult Education to provide training and assessments toward achieving a National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC) for anyone during incarceration. On Jan. 1, 2016, DOC began offering 30 days of “good time” off on sentences of individuals who earn an NCRC. After release, KCC offers a complete portfolio of services to ex-offenders. As a population with barriers to employment, they are entitled to additional WIOA services facilitated OET’s NCRC coordinator. Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) - A special tax credit is available to employers who hire qualified ex-felons. The qualified ex-felon is an individual who has been convicted of a felony or released from incarceration for a felony conviction within 12 months prior to the individual’s start date. (Page 25) Title IV Veterans Each career center office, along with each of the 10 local areas, provides “Priority of Service” to veterans for all Department of Labor funded programs. Each customer entering the local office receives a questionnaire that is used to determine whether the customer is priority-of-service eligible. If the customer is an eligible “covered person,” he/she receives a fact sheet listing all of the services and programs along with the program’s qualifications, which must abide by the Priority of Service mandate. The covered person is then seen by the first available staff person or referred to the disabled veterans program specialists if they are determined to have one of the significant barriers to employment as specified by the appropriate veterans program letters. Additionally, Kentucky’s Focus Career system automatically contacts veterans matched to new job orders 24 hours before non-veterans. (Page 26-27) Title I Eligible veterans and eligible persons who are determined to have a significant barrier to employment, as defined in VPL 03-14 changes 1 and 2 or most current guidance, are referred to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program specialist (DVOP). Additionally, any eligible veterans or eligible persons who are part of a designated additional population by the Assistant Secretary, as defined in VPL 04-14 or current guidance, will be referred to the DVOP. These referrals will be made following an initial identification of an SBE through the registration process. Customers registering electronically using Kentucky’s Focus Career module will be asked a series of questions to determine if they are priority of service eligible. If they are identified as a covered person, they are presented with a screen defining priority of service and directed to their local career center for further information on services and programs. (Page 60) Initial contact at a KCC visited by a veteran and other eligible person will be by an intake/assessment customer service staff member. This person will provide the veteran with a self—assessment form that determines if the individual is qualified as having Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE), and is to be referred to a DVOP specialist. OET will continue to emphasize and train KCC staff to identify those who are already in the system seeking services, those entering the KCC and those found by the DVOP conducting outreach that are consistent with these target populations. These targeted populations include: • special disabled or disabled veterans, as defined in 38 USC §4211(1) and (3); • homeless veterans and those veterans who are at—risk of becoming homeless (any individual or family who is fleeing, or is attempting to flee, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, or other dangerous or life-threatening conditions in the individual’s or family’s current housing situation, including where the health and safety of children are jeopardized, and who have no other residence and lack the resources or support networks to obtain other permanent housing); • recently—separated service member, as defined in 38 USC §4211(6); • ex—offenders, as defined by WIOA Section 101(38); • veterans lacking a high school diploma or equivalent; • low—income veterans, as defined by WIOA Section 101(36); • 18 to 24 year—old veterans, as directed by the assistant director for Veterans Employment and Training (ASVET) in Veterans Program Letter (VPL) 04—14; • transitioning service members assessed as not meeting the Career Readiness Standards, as documented on DD2958 and active duty services members being involuntarily separated through a service reduction in force as described in (VPL) 07—14; and • wounded, ill or injured service members receiving treatment at a military treatment facility or a warrior transition unit and the spouses and family caregivers of such wounded, ill or injured service members as described in (VPL) 08—14. (Page 250) Title IV DVOP specialists provide intensive services to veterans with SBEs, other eligible veterans, and other eligible persons as specified by 38 USC §4103A, and at the direction of the ASVET through guidance contained in VPL 03—14, VPL 03—14 Change 1, VPL 03—14 Change 2, VPL 04—14, VPL 07—14 and VPL 08—14. DVOP specialists will provide a full array of employment, training and placement services to those veterans with one or more SBEs. DVOP specialists will also facilitate services through an effective case management strategy. DVOP specialists conduct an assessment, and provide services to veterans and eligible persons to include: • evaluation of skill levels and needs; • development of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) to identify employment goals, appropriate objectives, and appropriate combination of services for the participant to achieve the employment goals; • coordination of supportive services with applicable providers; • assistance to KCC partners in providing services to veterans on a priority basis; and • conducting outreach to identify those veterans and other eligible persons, ensuring they receive appropriate intensive services, case management and other workforce services necessary to re— turn to meaningful, sustainable employment. LVER staff perform only those duties specified in 38 USC §4104(b), in accordance with guidance promulgated at VPL 03—14. These are related to direct outreach with businesses, and facilitation within the state’s employment service delivery system. LVER staff is assigned duties that promote veterans to businesses, business associations, and business groups. When business outreach is primarily conducted by a Business Services Team, the LVER will be included as an active member. Additional LVER activities and services include, but are not limited to the following: • planning and participating in job and career fairs; • coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs, businesses and business organizations to promote employment and training programs for veterans; • informing federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans; • promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and • conducting veterans’ programs training for all KCC staff. (Page 250) Title I Service delivery is conducted through an integrated delivery system within the KCC structure. Crosstrained, responsive customer service teams throughout the Commonwealth provide effective services. Upon arrival to a KCC, veterans with SBEs will be identified using a self—assessment form and if eligible they will be referred to the DVOP specialist for further assessment, services and intensive case management as required. LVER staff work with the Business Services Team to promote the hiring of veterans to employers. LVERs are key members of the Business Services Teams, providing information on current employer job openings, assisting employers seeking to hire qualified veterans, and actively promoting job—ready veterans to employers. (Page 251) Title IV Kentucky possesses the capacity and capability to serve all veterans. DVOP Specialists, however, only serve those veterans with SBEs, and other targeted populations as directed by the Secretary. These include: • special disabled or disabled veterans, as defined in 38 USC §4211(1) and (3); • homeless veterans and those veterans who are at—risk of becoming homeless; • recently—separated service member, as defined in 38 USC §4211(6); • ex—offenders, as defined by WIOA Section 101(38); • veterans lacking a high school diploma or equivalent; • low Income veterans, as defined by WIOA Section 101(36); • 18— to 24—year—old veterans, as directed by the assistant director for Veterans Employment and Training (ASVET) in Veterans Program Letter (VPL) 04—14. • Transitioning service member assessed as not meeting the Career Readiness Standards, as documented on DD2958 and active duty services members being involuntarily separated through a service reduction in force as described in (VPL) 07—14; • Wounded, ill or injured service members receiving treatment at a military treatment facility or a warrior transition unit and the spouses and family caregivers of such wounded, ill or injured service members as described in (VPL) 08—14 ;• Chapter 31 VR&E veterans . LVER staff indirectly serve veterans through direct business outreach to promote the hiring of qualified veterans and obtain job orders for review of potential cross—match with veterans seeking employment. (Pages 251-252) Title IV All Workforce Investment Boards (WIB) and KCCs will ensure their plans provide strategies and policies for providing veterans and other eligible persons with priority of service. Policies implemented will ensure that veterans and other eligible persons are aware of their entitlement to priority of service, the array of programs and services available to them, and any eligibility requirements for those programs and/or services. (Page 252) Title IV All veterans and eligible persons will be provided local labor market information along with current training programs tailored to the economic sectors for that region by either the DVOP, KCC staff or partner agency staff. Upon completion of the training program, veterans will be registered into the Focus Career system for job matching and placement. Additionally, DVOP and KCC staff will provide referrals as required for all veterans completing training. Success will be measured by the number of veterans and eligible persons training enrollments, completion of training and employment outcomes. (Page 253) Title IV
Mental Health

~~Kentucky’s fourteen Regional Boards for Mental Health or Individuals with an Intellectual Disability are a primary source for extended services in KY. Cooperative budget planning is done between OVR and the Kentucky Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) so that state funds for all phases of supported employment can be sought by each agency. A cooperative agreement is also in place.

The Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) and OVR partnered together, and in 2010, Kentucky became the 12th state to participate in the Dartmouth College, Johnson and Johnson, Supported Employment Initiative to demonstrate the effectiveness of the IPS model for supported employment (Individualized Placement and Support, an Evidence—Based Practice). The first local pilot projects were launched prior to the close of 2010. Through the Dartmouth Project, a new SE funding partner was added when the Greater Cincinnati Health Foundation provided funding for 2 of the local pilots in Northern KY. IPS Supported Employment now includes all 13 Kentucky Community Mental Health Centers. In FY 2016 the partnership with Behavioral Health continues with the addition of 5 IPS sites outside of the Community Mental Health Centers and 2 sites serving those with substance abuse. (Page 155) Title I

The Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) is responsible for the administration of state and federally funded mental health and substance abuse treatment services throughout the commonwealth. Publicly-funded community services are provided for Kentuckians who have problems with mental health, developmental and intellectual disabilities, or substance abuse, through Kentucky’s 14 regional Boards for Mental Health or Individuals with an Intellectual Disability (Regional MHID Boards). Regional MHID Boards are private, nonprofit organizations established by KRS Chapter 210 which serve residents of a designated multi-county region. Regional MHID Boards are private, nonprofit organizations established by KRS Chapter 210 (see Related Links) which serve residents of a designated multi-county region. (Page 160) Title I

Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP’s) and other OVR staff both saw mental health counseling and treatment as one of the greatest unmet needs of consumers. Furthermore CRP’s increased the greatest in demand in the last 3 years to come from those with a diagnosis of Mental Illness (58.0% of respondents). Other OVR staff respondents indicated that psychological restoration was one of the services in greatest demand (35%). The identified need for mental health counseling and treatment has not been listed as the greatest need in the last few Comprehensive Needs Assessments. However, disability coordinators did indicate that mental health issues were a significant barrier for transition age youth as they exit the post-secondary educational setting. (Page 187) Title I

CRPs were asked to identify areas of ‘unmet need’ for their consumers. They indicated support services, mental health treatment and post-employment services were all ‘unmet needs’. When asked what CRP services they foresee an increase in the next 3 years they indicated Employment and retention, skills training and customized supported employment. (Page 195) Title IV

Objective 4.2: Improve services to underserved populations within the blind and visually impaired community, including substance abuse, mental health, and criminal background. Strategies Participate in cross training's with agencies who provide services to treat mental illness, substance abuse to provide all professionals a better understanding of the unique services necessary to improve outcomes for consumers. Collaborate with criminal justice agencies to promote better understanding of issues that impact employment for consumers with backgrounds. Reports of Progress: Given budget constraints progress on this goal area was limited. Staff were provided training for those areas through quality assurance reviews deficiencies were identified and areas of concern voiced by staff through the training assessment were prevalent. Trainings occurred for changes in the case management system for 911 fields as well as on Pre-employment Transition Services. The Cabinet sponsored cross training for the area or team building. There was no progress for the area of substance abuse, mental health or criminal backgrounds. (Page 224) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
Other federal, state, and local agencies related to the rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities such as the Department of Protection and Advocacy, Department of Probation and Parole, Department of Workers Compensation, Department of Disability Determination. (Page 147) Title I Kentucky has shifted focus in the Career Centers from Unemployment Insurance assistance to Employment Services. This shift has allowed Wagner Peyser staff to focus more on providing employment services to customers in a more individualized manner rather than the focus on claimant assistance. More emphasis has been placed career coaching with special emphasis on first time payment customers and RESEA customers. Kentucky currently has an outdated RESEA profile model which has hindered our ability to identify and engage all potential customers. (Page 276) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 66

Accessibility - 06/28/2019

~~“The Kentucky Department of Education is committed to making its electronic and information technologies accessible to individuals with disabilities by meeting or exceeding the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. 794d), as amended in 1998. Section 508 requires agencies to provide individuals with disabilities equal access to electronic information and data comparable to those who do not have disabilities unless an undue burden would be imposed on the agency. The Section 508 Standards are the technical requirements and criteria that are used to measure conformance within this law. More information on Section 508 and the technical standards can be found online.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Special Education Forms - Due Process - 06/24/2019

~~“This page contains downloads to special education forms commonly used by local school districts to document due process and implementation of appropriate programs…Included are state approved forms for the Referral, Consents, Individual Education Program (IEP), Conference Summary and other state approved special education forms.”  

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP) - 06/18/2019

~~“The Community Work Transition Program is designed to provide a positive beginning in the world of work for students in special education during their last two years of high school. It is a cooperative effort between participating local school districts, the Kentucky Department of Education, the Kentucky Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Kentucky Department for the Blind, and HDI.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Express - 04/18/2019

~~“Veterans services

Our offices have local veterans employment representatives and disabled veteran outreach program specialists trained specifically to assist veterans with their employment and training needs.They work with other Kentucky Career Center staff members, the Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Department of Veterans Affairs and various other organizations in providing veterans with priority services designed to improve employability and career options. Services available to veterans can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Project CASE “Creating Access to Successful Employment” - 04/01/2019

“Project CASE in Kentucky intends to increase participation in Career Pathways for individuals with disabilities. Under Project CASE, we will build and expand on the current Career Pathways program components that align to the Kentucky Workforce Investment Board’s targeted sectors of Information Technology, Manufacturing and Industrial Technology, and Healthcare/Nursing & Allied Health, and examine what specific strategies or mix of strategies are most effective in serving individuals with disabilities.

The grant will provide direct services to individuals in the 7 counties of Metro Louisville (KentuckianaWorks) and more rural 23 counties of Eastern Kentucky (Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program- EKCEP).  This project will address new levels of outreach, and flexible and innovative training and postsecondary approaches for both students and youth.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Career Center Office for the Blind - 04/01/2019

~~“The mission of the Kentucky Office for the Blind is to provide opportunities for employment  and independence to people with visual disabilities in their homes, schools, workplaces and communities. Services are tailored to each individual’s strengths, abilities and interests.

Individualized services for eligible applicants can be found by accessing the web link. ":

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Special Education Services - 02/12/2019

~~“Welcome to the Division of IDEA implementation and Preschool.  This  site includes information on all aspects of special education programs in public schools.  We welcome your comments and suggestions.  If you need further assistance with finding information on special education programs in Kentucky's public schools, please contact us.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshots - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information on the RETAIN program in Kentucky including the amount of funding requested, the target population and the contact person

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Supported Employment Training Project “Newly Designed Supported Employment Leadership Series” - 01/01/2019

~~Supported Employment Training Project isa project of the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky. It announces its 2019 Supported Employment Leadership Series with more information about content and dates available by accessing the web link. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

WIOA STATE PLAN FOR THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY FY-2018 - 12/31/2018

~~“The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

HB 2 – Worker’s Compensation - 03/30/2018

“AN ACT relating to workers' compensation.

    Amend KRS 342.020 to limit the time period of payment of medical expenses for certain permanent partial disabilities to 780 weeks but provide a mechanism to apply for extended benefits; limit the number of drug screens for which the employer will be liable;

[…]

to indicate that an application for adjustment of claim for compensation for a cumulative trauma injury must be made within five years of the last injurious exposure to the cumulative trauma;

[…]

amend KRS 342.730 to increase average weekly wage caps; set time limits for total disability benefits paid to certain professional athletes; allow payment of temporary total disability benefits to be offset by gross income minus applicable taxes paid to an employee during a period of light-duty work or work in an alternative job position; provide an offset against temporary total disability benefits for salary continuation or wholly employer-funded disability retirement plans; indicate that benefits shall terminate when a plaintiff reaches age 67 or two years after the date of injury, whichever shall last occur;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Statute 42.0146 - Certification Program for Disabled Veteran-Owned Businesses - 07/15/2016

~~“The Office of Equal Employment Opportunity and Contract Compliance shall oversee a program that provides certification of a disabled veteran-owned business in order to encourage growth among businesses owned by disabled veterans within the state and assist those businesses in competing for work in other states that require certification by a statewide body. This certification does not provide a preference in state procurement, nor does it create a point system or set aside for disabled veteran-owned businesses.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky ABLE Act S.B. 179 - 04/05/2016

Signed by the Governor on April  5, 2016

AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities.

Amend KRS 205.200 to disregard any amount in an ABLE account, any contributions to an ABLE account, and any distribution from an ABLE account for qualified expenses for the purposes of determining an individual's eligibility for a means-tested public assistance program and the amount of assistance or benefits the individual is eligible to receive under the program; direct the State Treasurer, the Secretary of the Finance and Administration Cabinet, the Executive Director of the Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Executive Director of the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority to work cooperatively to seek all available sources of funding, determine the best plan of action related to ABLE accounts, and report to the Legislative Research Commission on or before December 31, 2016.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Gov. Bevin Unveils Final Report of Kentucky Work Matters Task Force and Signs Employment First Executive Order - 05/15/2018

~~“During today’s ceremony Gov. Bevin signed the Employment First executive order, recognizing that competitive integrated employment into the general workforce is the preferred outcome for citizens of all ages and levels of disability. He also announced formation of the Employment First Council to continue momentum on targeted areas of the task force’s report.

Highlights of the policy recommendations made by the Kentucky Work Matters Task Force include:•Streamlining occupational licensing for veterans to ensure they are given credit for similar training/experience they received in the military or in another state. (The recently enacted House Bill 319 will expedite occupational licensing for Kentucky veterans.)•Capitalizing on opportunities for the state to serve as model employer. (The Commonwealth is currently transitioning management of two large state cafeterias to the Kentucky Office for the Blind (OFB), providing job opportunities for the visually impaired.)•Increasing resources for the Fostering Success program, which provides job opportunities for youth aging out of the foster care system. (This year’s state budget included an increase of $375,000 per year to expand this program.)•Increasing general fund allocations to the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and Office for the Blind (OFB) to draw down full available federal match. (This year’s state budget increased total funding by more than $9 million for OVR and OFB, which will serve approximately 6,500 more clients.)•Partnering with school systems to ensure that students with disabilities are included in career readiness and development programs.”

“Promoting inclusive workforce policies requires coordination at all levels of government, with states having critical knowledge of economic and employment realities on the ground,” said Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Jennifer Sheehy. “We appreciate Gov. Bevin’s leadership on this issue and continue to encourage states to share their experience and insight.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Relating to Medicaid Expansion - 01/12/2018

“Now, therefore, I, Matthew G. Bevin, Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, by virtue of the authority vested in me by Section 69 of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, do hereby Order and Direct the following:

 

In the event one or more of the components of Kentucky’s Section 1115 Waiver and the accompanying Special Terms and Conditions are prohibited from being implemented pursuant to a final judgment issued by a court of competent jurisdiction, with all appeals of the judgment issued by a court of competent jurisdiction, with all appeals of the judgment having been exhausted or waived, the Secretary of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services and the Commissioner of the Department for Medicaid Services within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services are hereby directed to take the necessary actions to terminate Kentucky’s Medicaid expansion program no later than six months from the date on which all appeals of the judgment have been exhausted or waived, or otherwise as soon as legally practicable under the remaining terms or the Special Terms and Conditions, applicable statutes or regulations.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 25

Accessibility - 06/28/2019

~~“The Kentucky Department of Education is committed to making its electronic and information technologies accessible to individuals with disabilities by meeting or exceeding the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. 794d), as amended in 1998. Section 508 requires agencies to provide individuals with disabilities equal access to electronic information and data comparable to those who do not have disabilities unless an undue burden would be imposed on the agency. The Section 508 Standards are the technical requirements and criteria that are used to measure conformance within this law. More information on Section 508 and the technical standards can be found online.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Special Education Forms - Due Process - 06/24/2019

~~“This page contains downloads to special education forms commonly used by local school districts to document due process and implementation of appropriate programs…Included are state approved forms for the Referral, Consents, Individual Education Program (IEP), Conference Summary and other state approved special education forms.”  

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Veterans Express - 04/18/2019

~~“Veterans services

Our offices have local veterans employment representatives and disabled veteran outreach program specialists trained specifically to assist veterans with their employment and training needs.They work with other Kentucky Career Center staff members, the Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Department of Veterans Affairs and various other organizations in providing veterans with priority services designed to improve employability and career options. Services available to veterans can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Kentucky Career Center Office for the Blind - 04/01/2019

~~“The mission of the Kentucky Office for the Blind is to provide opportunities for employment  and independence to people with visual disabilities in their homes, schools, workplaces and communities. Services are tailored to each individual’s strengths, abilities and interests.

Individualized services for eligible applicants can be found by accessing the web link. ":

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Special Education Services - 02/12/2019

~~“Welcome to the Division of IDEA implementation and Preschool.  This  site includes information on all aspects of special education programs in public schools.  We welcome your comments and suggestions.  If you need further assistance with finding information on special education programs in Kentucky's public schools, please contact us.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshots - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information on the RETAIN program in Kentucky including the amount of funding requested, the target population and the contact person

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

WIOA STATE PLAN FOR THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY FY-2018 - 12/31/2018

~~“The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Working with Exceptional Children in CTE - 12/05/2018

~~‘The Office of Career and Technical Education collaborates with the Office of Teaching and Learning to ensure we have strategies that help us uphold our Mission for all students.Exceptional Children include Special Needs, English Learners, Gifted and Talented, Blind - VI and Deaf - HH students.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Veterans Employment, Training and Support Program - 12/05/2018

~~“KyVets is the Kentucky Veterans Employment Training and Support Program. KyVets provides resources and support to assist veterans across the commonwealth in obtaining gainful employment and training services. For more information, email KyVets@ky.gov

This page has links to resources to help veterans who are job seekers.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY GUIDLINES FOR KENTUCKY SCHOOLS - 12/01/2018

~~“The purpose of this document is to assist teachers and administrators in identifying and meeting student needs for assistive technology as provided by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and to offer specific directions on classroom implementation. It includes a thorough description of issues to consider from the start of screening through the provision of assistive technology and on-going evaluation of its use for educational purposes. Connections are given to related resources and programs which can enhance access and utilization of assistive technology. Until recently, there have been few materials available to help educators make critical decisions in the provision and application of assistive technology. This document represents a compilation of ideas and information devised by those in Kentucky and elsewhere who strive to use assistive technology to improve accessibility and acceptance for children and youth with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Kentucky Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP) - 06/18/2019

~~“The Community Work Transition Program is designed to provide a positive beginning in the world of work for students in special education during their last two years of high school. It is a cooperative effort between participating local school districts, the Kentucky Department of Education, the Kentucky Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Kentucky Department for the Blind, and HDI.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities - 10/18/2018

~~“We are an independent self-governing organization dedicated to advancing the inclusion  of Kentuckians in all facets of community life. The Council is part 56 national State and Territory Councils on Developmental Disabilities, all federally funded and mandated to advocate and create systems change for people with developmental disabilities.

We have a Council of 26 governor appointed citizens and seven Council staff. The Council develops a Five Year State Plan to meet goals in advocacy, capacity building and creating change. Working from the Five Year State Plan, the Council provides grants and contracts for innovative and sustainable projects that empower Kentuckians with Developmental Disabilities and their families. We assist in training initiatives and public policy strategies to educate lawmakers and policy makers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Assistive Technology Service Network “A Guide to Assistive Technology Funding in Kentucky 15th Edition” - 08/01/2016

“…the services of the ATRCs include, but are not limited to: Assistive Technology Services for Early Intervention, K-12 and Post-secondary school, Employment, Transition, Independent Living, leisure or recreation; Loan Library of Assistive Devices, adaptive equipment and toys; Demonstrations of assistive technology devices; Funding information, Assistance and Referral; Assessments and Evaluations for AT; Vocational assessments; Consultations on appropriate technologies; Workplace AT; Environmental Controls; Recycled Computers and Assistive Technology Devices; Training and Technical Assistance on and about AT.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Perkins Center (Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation)

“The Perkins Center is a division of the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the vast majority of our consumers are referred by OVR Counselors located in several cities and towns across the Commonwealth….One of the main reasons for the creation of the Perkins Center was to enable Kentuckians with disabilities to obtain all the services they would need to become employed... The Center currently operates several programs and services that enable consumers to achieve their vocational goals”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Assistive Technology Services Network

".

~The KATS Network is one of 56 statewide assistive technology programs federally funded under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998, as ammended in 2004.

The KATS Network’s mission is to make assistive technology (AT) information, devices and services easily obtainable for people of any age and/or disability. AT is any item or piece of equipment (both low-tech and high-tech) used to improve and/or maintain independence in the home, at work, school or play.

KATS Network Overview and ATRC Contact Information

Services we provide

The KATS Network provides access to AT through a network of five (5) Regional AT Resource Centers (ATRCs) across the state. The Regional ATRCs operate AT demonstration programs, lending libraries and AT reutilization programs. The KATS Network Coordinating Center and each of the ATRCs work cooperatively to provide outreach, information & referral services, and training on various AT topics. Technical Assistance and collaboration is also provided to state agencies and organizations to enhance the understanding of and access to AT and accessible information technology (IT).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Assistive Technology Loan Corporation

“Working with its lending partner, Fifth Third Bank, KATLC can provide loans for modified vehicles, hearing aids, adapted computers, mobility devices, augmentative communication devices or any other type of equipment or home modification that will improve the quality of life or increase the independence of Kentuckians with disabilities.

“Established by state statute in 1996, KATLC is governed by a seven-member Board of Directors…. The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation currently provides staff support to the Board of Directors and the KATLC program.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P)

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P) provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. [Their] work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Project CASE “Creating Access to Successful Employment” - 04/01/2019

“Project CASE in Kentucky intends to increase participation in Career Pathways for individuals with disabilities. Under Project CASE, we will build and expand on the current Career Pathways program components that align to the Kentucky Workforce Investment Board’s targeted sectors of Information Technology, Manufacturing and Industrial Technology, and Healthcare/Nursing & Allied Health, and examine what specific strategies or mix of strategies are most effective in serving individuals with disabilities.

The grant will provide direct services to individuals in the 7 counties of Metro Louisville (KentuckianaWorks) and more rural 23 counties of Eastern Kentucky (Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program- EKCEP).  This project will address new levels of outreach, and flexible and innovative training and postsecondary approaches for both students and youth.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Seed to Provide Support to the Kentucky Work Matters Task Force - 06/26/2017

“The State Exchange on Employment and Disability (SEED) at the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) is providing policy expertise to the new Kentucky Work Matters Task Force. SEED’s partners include the Council of State Governments and the National Conference of State Legislatures. ODEP Deputy Assistant Secretary Jennifer Sheehy joined Governor Matt Bevin for an announcement about this collaboration earlier this month at a press conference in Frankfort with federal and state officials and key stakeholders. The 23-member task force brings together key departments of Kentucky’s state government and private-sector representatives to address barriers to employment. It also promotes workforce inclusion among targeted constituencies, including people with disabilities, foster children, disabled veterans, and others.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AIDD Expands Partnerships in Integrated Employment - 10/06/2016

“ACL's Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Supported Employment Training Project “Newly Designed Supported Employment Leadership Series” - 01/01/2019

~~Supported Employment Training Project isa project of the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky. It announces its 2019 Supported Employment Leadership Series with more information about content and dates available by accessing the web link. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

"Customized Employment in Kentucky” Video Premiering at 25th Anniversary of the ADA Celebration - 07/29/2015

“Just in time for the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the University of Kentucky Human Development Institute announced the debut of their new video, ‘Customized Employment in Kentucky’…    The seven-minute video profiles three employees with developmental disabilities who are working in their community, in jobs which are a good fit for them, and in which their contributions are valued by their employer. The common thread in these stories is that the jobs were “customized,” a process in which employer needs are matched with the talents, interests and contributions of individual job seekers.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

“Toolbox for Employment: Customized Self-Employment and Benefits Planning” - 11/12/2013

~~“TThis is a presentation on methods that a person might use as a guide to becoming self-employed.“Business AND Benefits PlanningGo hand in handStarts with Discovery–DPG™Have to understand the interaction of income from wage and/or self-employment on public benefit systemsWhat public benefit systems are being received now?SSA, Medicaid, DD Waivers – CILA? Home Based Support?, DRS Home Services” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

“2018 Supported Employment Leadership Series” –Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky

“12 days of high quality supported employment professional development provide the foundation for the SE Leadership Series… Participants will study ways of connecting discovery with targeted job development, informational interviews, job analysis/needs analysis, customized employment, and specific representational considerations and strategies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky APSE “Training/Continuing Education”

This page is a resource for various traning and continuing education programs that are available in Kentucky. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services “Peer Support Specialist Curriculum Approval Process”

The Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) will approve the following curricula for Peer Support Specialists (PSS): Adult Peer Support Specialist, Family Peer Support Specialist, Youth Peer Support Specialist, and Kentucky Family Leadership Academy, as established in the Kentucky Administrative Regulations.

The regulations provide the curriculum applicant with an understanding of the requirements for peer support specialists—both eligibility and training—and specifically speak to the elements of a "training curriculum" and the training requirements (testing of the trainee and evaluation of the trainers). View these regulations in Related Links.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Supported Employment Training Project

About Us Having a job represents much more than earning a salary. Employment, including the kind of work one performs, influences one's personal identity, sense of belonging, and place in the world. Furthermore, employment represents one primary way of expressing the inherent human need to contribute – doing something that matters. Yet all too often the significance of employment for people with disabilities has been unrecognized, ignored, or minimized.Supported employment is designed to promote personalized employment opportunities for people with disabilities when they need support to:

Discover personal interests and contributions,Find or negotiate a job that fits things people like to do and do well,Become established as valued employees; andPursue job advancements.

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. Our work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. Please contact mtyree@uky.edu to make suggestions or request additional information. Many documents on this site are only available in PDF format

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities State Plan for Federal Fiscal Years 2017-2021

Goal #2- The capacity of systems that serve all people will be improved so that people with developmental disabilities will have increased access to opportunities for greater independence and integration

Objective 2-B (Employment): By 2021, the Council will support the efforts of at least 10 organizations to expand competitive, integrated employment for individuals with developmental disabilities by employing or assisting  more individuals with developmental disabilities in obtaining  jobs in the communities

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: Self-Employment Guide

This webpage offers information on and resources for self-employment. It orients job seekers on where to start the self-employment process and contains links to relevant resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky Educational Collaborative for State Agency Children Resource Guide

“This resource book came about because several young people who had lived in parental and foster homes their entire lives realized they were facing life after high school in a nursing facility because of lack of available adult supports in the community and confusion about how to get them.    “As a result, P&A brought together staff of several agencies to figure out how to help people find the transition services they needed. The group pooled their knowledge about available programs to put together a resource book that could be used by young people with disabilities in foster care to transition successfully to adulthood.    “Although the original purpose of this book was to help kids in foster care, it can be used by young people with disabilities anywhere who are looking at life after high school.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Justice Department Settles Pregnancy and Disability Discrimination Lawsuit Against City of Florence, Kentucky - 10/26/2016

“The Justice Department filed a proposed consent decree with the city of Florence, Kentucky, to resolve a pregnancy and disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the department under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

 

According to the department's complaint, Florence discriminated against two pregnant police officers by denying both officers' requests for light duty.  The department alleges that Florence previously assigned light duty positions to employees who were temporarily unable to perform their regular job duties, regardless of why the employee needed light duty.  In April 2013, within months of a police officer's pregnancy-related light duty request, Florence limited light duty to employees with on-the-job injuries.  Florence also required that employees with non-work-related illnesses, injuries or conditions demonstrate that they had "no restrictions" before they could return to work.

 

Under the consent decree, which still must be approved by the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky, Florence will adopt new policies that allow accommodations, including light duty, for pregnant employees and employees with disabilities; establish an effective process for receiving and responding to employees' accommodation requests and discrimination complaints; and ensure the proper maintenance of employee medical records.  In addition, Florence will train all supervisors, administrators, officers and employees who participate in making personnel decisions related to light duty and other accommodation requests made pursuant to Title VII and the ADA.  Florence has also agreed to pay $135,000 in compensatory damages and attorney's fees as well as restore the paid leave that Officers Trischler and Riley were forced to use.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

Medicaid 1915(c) HCBS Waiver Redesign Project: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) - 12/14/2018

~~“The Department for Medicaid Services (the Department) on behalf of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (the Cabinet) is publishing this Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)document to provide timely updates and respond to stakeholder questions about redesign of the Cabinet’s 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waivers. The questions included in this FAQs document are a combination of submitted questions from stakeholders and anticipated questions identified by the Department.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State Plan Under Title XIX of the Social Security Act - 04/06/2017

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Kentucky's Medicaid program.

 

The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act, such as:

-Methods of Administration

-Eligibility

-Services Covered

-Quality Control

-Fiscal Reimbursements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supports for Community Living Waiver - 03/29/2017

~~“The Supports for Community Living (SCL) waiver provides Medicaid-paid services to adults and children with intellectual or developmental disabilities. These supports allow individuals to live at home rather than in an institutional setting.  “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State Medicaid Plan Amendments - 01/19/2017

~~“The Medicaid State Plan is an agreement between the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the federal government describing how we administer our Medicaid program. It gives assurance that Kentucky will abide by federal rules and may claim federal matching funds for its program.  The state plan sets out groups to be covered, services, methodologies for reimbursing providers and state program administrative activities.When Kentucky plans to make changes to its program policies or operations, the state Department for Medicaid Services must submit a state plan amendment (SPA) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. We also submit SPAs to request approval for program changes, make corrections or update our Medicaid plan with new information."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Request for a Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver - 08/24/2016

“Kentucky HEALTH is an innovative, transformative healthcare program designed to not only stabilize the program financially, but to also improve the health outcomes and overall quality of life for all members. This demonstration waiver seeks to evaluate new policies and program elements designed to engage members in their healthcare and provide the necessary education and tools required to achieve long term health and an improved quality of life. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Michelle P (0475.R02.00) - 07/15/2016

Provides adult day health, case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, assessment/reassessment, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, specialized medical equipment and supplies, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/MR/DD ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky DOE ESEA Flexibility Request - 03/31/2015

“The Kentucky State Department of Education’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 9, 2012.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky HCBS Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

On March 17, 2014, updated Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) final rules became effective in the Federal Register for 1915(c) waivers, 1915(i) state plan services, and 1915(k) community first choice state plan option . As they pertain to 1915(c) waivers, these rules include requirements for several areas of HCBS: all residential and non-residential settings, provider- owned residential settings, person-centered planning process, service plan requirements, and conflict-free case management.    The goal of the HCBS final rules is to improve the services rendered to HCBS participants and to maximize the opportunities to receive services in integrated settings and realize the benefits of community living. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is allowing five years (until March 17, 2019) for states and providers to transition into compliance with the all settings and provider-owned settings requirements.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Supports for Community Living (0314.R04.00) - 09/01/2010

Provides case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, residential support level I, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, FMS, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, residential support level II, specialized medical equipment and supplies, technology assisted level I residential support, vehicle adaptation for individuals w ID/DD individuals ages 3 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

KY HCBS Waiver (0144.R05.00) - 07/01/2010

Provides adult day health, case management, homemaker, personal care, respite, OT, PT, speech therapy, financial management services, goods and services, home and community supports, support broker, assessment/reassessment, attendant care, environmental and minor home adaptation for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The unbridled spirit of Kentucky has shown that people with disabilities are able to succeed in their careers here in the Bluegrass State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kentucky’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.39%
Change from
2016 to 2017
4,454,189
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.2%
Change from
2016 to 2017
430,265
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.06%
Change from
2016 to 2017
129,954
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-0.86%
Change from
2016 to 2017
30.20%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.15%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.32%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 4,425,092 4,436,974 4,454,189
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 421,948 439,748 430,265
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 115,577 133,926 129,954
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,691,633 1,689,336 1,711,997
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 27.39% 30.46% 30.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.82% 75.44% 76.32%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.30% 5.00% 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 26.60% 27.40% 26.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.90% 16.50% 15.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 363,593 378,456 379,509
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 374,702 400,707 385,766
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 663,187 697,898 688,909
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 54,903 55,587 52,490
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 10,314 14,699 12,879
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,106 2,616 2,948
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,772 4,209 3,865
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 13,210 14,927 13,803
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,784 3,578 3,029

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,644 5,010 5,114
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.60% 2.90% 3.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 206,175 203,471 199,178

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 17,429 19,709 19,654
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 44,630 46,712 45,046
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 96,818 96,862 85,368
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 18.00% 20.30% 23.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.40% 1.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.70% 0.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50% 0.80% 0.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 608 577 658
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 282 299 309
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 224 338 366
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,223 6,023 6,431
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 43 37 472
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 27 25 209
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00% 68.00% 44.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.61 0.56 4.72

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,438
10,181
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 18 15 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,754 2,607 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,389 1,945 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,720 2,276 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,447 3,174 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 110 164 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.30% 33.90% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,455 5,268 4,625
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 323,767 321,459 315,423
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A 483 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 391 337 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $4,377,000 $3,128,000 $7,396,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $11,298,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $4,556,000 $8,244,000 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $70,671,000 $65,073,000 $60,568,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 10.00% 10.00% 30.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 5,726 6,035 5,228
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 1,002
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 579 786 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 15.40 14.40 60.60

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.15% 73.73% 73.81%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.22% 8.28% 8.31%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.86% 1.68% 1.72%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.19% 98.41% 97.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 18.43% 18.02% 18.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.17% 60.94% 59.39%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.82% 69.06% 68.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 39.74% 42.92% 41.31%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 788,499
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,104
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 421,644
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 85,649
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 507,293
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 538
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 97
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 635
AbilityOne wages (products). $3,841,069
AbilityOne wages (services). $901,392

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 20 22 25
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 2 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 22 24 26
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,152 1,340 1,564
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 161 161 73
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,313 1,501 1,637

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~The CRP Branch works closely with Kentucky APSE (Association of People Supporting Employment First) and its committees, and the 874K Coalition (a statewide Disability Advocacy Group) in a unified effort to secure additional state dollars for supported employment extended services. (Page 155) Title I

The CRP Branch works cooperatively with the Arc of Kentucky, among other groups, such as the Kentucky Association of Supporting Employment First (KYAPSE), the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (BHDDID), the Kentucky Rehabilitation Association (KRA), UK Human Development Institute, EKU Center of Excellence, most of the Comprehensive Care Centers in the state, and many Supported Employment providers, to educate families about supported employment and enlist their assistance in impacting additional funds for supported employment. (Page 156) Title I

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services. (Page 209) Title I
 

Customized Employment

~~Information regarding these potential funding sources is updated and shared by the Supported Employment Branch on a statewide basis to encourage increased funding for all phases of supported employment. 12. The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set. (Page 156) Title I

Training opportunities for staff on new policies related to customized employment and person-centered planning have occurred in statewide, regional, district, and local office training events. A statewide survey addressing the need of customized SE services has been given, as a means to continue to identify need for training as well as to identify the need for this valuable service. (Page 221)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Kentucky issued a statewide co—enrollment policy in 2015. Co—enrollment allows partners to leverage resources while providing a more comprehensive service delivery strategy that meets the needs of customers with several barriers to employment. All adults and dislocated workers who receive KCC services other than self—service and informational activities must be registered and considered a participant for WIOA Title I services. (Page 17) Title I

The WorkSmart Kentucky plan demonstrates a commitment to leveraging state and federal resources focused on workforce investment across state government. The process to develop the strategic plan involved all board members representing a variety of agencies, businesses and community partners. Focus groups consisting of business people, customers and staff were conducted. Each of the 25 action steps included in the WorkSmart plan is grounded in partnerships across state government. (Page 30) Title I

Information regarding these potential funding sources is updated and shared by the Supported Employment Branch on a statewide basis to encourage increased funding for all phases of supported employment. 12. The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set. (Page 156) Title I

The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation is pursuing a collaborative effort between the KY Department of Behavioral Health, the University of Kentucky and Eastern Kentucky University, to leverage funding for the continuation of state IPS Trainer and Fidelity Monitoring services. These services are a vital component to this evidenced-based practice of IPS supported employment services. These elements are vital to the continued support, growth and fidelity of the various programs throughout the state. (Page 161) Title I

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services. OVR will continue to maximize existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self—determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, provide training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. Currently, meetings are ongoing with the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and intellectual Disabilities to strengthen the partnership by leveraging funding to expand IPS SE services in unserved areas, as well as exploring possibilities of implementing IPS services for individuals with intellectual disabilities, which would be one of the first endeavors for this evidenced based practice. (Page 209) Title IV

Objective 5.2: Increase available resources & seek to leverage funding, staff resources, in—kind and programmatic support & other forms of assistance from partners.
OFB will collaborate with other statewide partners increasing their capacity to serve individuals with disabilities, and will refer eligible individuals who can benefit from the resources and services available at no cost.
OFB staff will provide training for Career Center Partner Staff to increase knowledge and confidence in working with individuals who are blind and visually impaired.
Report of Progress:
A plan for marketing to eye physicians was developed and implemented. The main focus is the Spring Optometric Association Annual meeting event held annually. OFB identifies staff with lower referrals from eye physicians through WEBI reports and they are targeted to attend the event for networking purposes. Though the conference we receive a list of eye physicians throughout the state that is then distributed to staff for marketing and outreach purposes.
Through the Career Pathways Grant OFB has made a lot of progress in collaboration with statewide partners to increase capacity in serving individuals. Project CASE Career Pathways Coordinators provided all the liaison and coordination services for the following STEM Camps, which were held in Eastern Kentucky on the campuses of Big Sandy Community and Technical College, Southeast Community and Technical College, and Hazard Community and Technical College. The grant has allowed for enhanced connections with the system initiatives in the local workforce areas. (Page 230) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

We currently have in place five other innovative programs that provide high school students with a variety of work–based learning, financial literacy, self–advocacy training, job exploration, career counseling, and workplace readiness training opportunities that exist in the community with employers, in our rehabilitation center, and in post–secondary institutions.

The Summer Youth Boot Camp Program focuses on job exploration, workplace readiness training, and self–advocacy and is held at the Charles W. McDowell Center in Louisville. It is an intensive four week program based on the work of Dr. Karen Wolffe that introduces employability skills to transition aged individuals. The curriculum is specific to individuals that are blind or visually impaired.

The Summer Work Experience Program is in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Providers. CRPs are paid to find work experiences in competitive integrated settings for transition aged individuals. The work experiences last six to eight weeks and the students are paid by the Office for the Blind for the time worked. The goals of the work experience are to provide community based career exploration and the opportunity to practice work readiness skills. It is also hoped that by participating in the work experience program, employers will be open to providing more opportunities for individuals who are blind or visually impaired in their communities. (Page 310) 

School to Work Transition

~~Service coordination activities may also include resource information about vocational rehabilitation, presentations, handouts, and staff development. The counselor works in a collaborative team process along with the local education agency to develop the transition services section of the Individualized Education Program (IEP) and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for transitioning students. Both the IEP and IPE will include, if appropriate, a statement of interagency responsibilities or any needed linkages by which the responsibilities of other entities are satisfied. (Pages 151-152) Title I

VR counselors attend transition related meetings as early at age 14 and act as a consultant in the student’s IEP. Early contact and intervention not only saves the VR counselor considerable time and effort, it allows the student and parents the opportunity to plan a realistic vocational path that will lead them to the vocational goal of their choice. VR counselors shall attend student IEP meetings starting at age 14.
The school system will continue to have the primary responsibility for accommodations and student’s educational needs. Once the student graduates OVR will become the primary agent. It is mandatory that the IPE be developed with the student 90 days after eligibility or prior to graduation, whichever comes first.
An IPE is developed for each student determined eligible and that meets the current order of selection for vocational rehabilitation services. The IPE should address the student’s pre-employment transition services needs in the areas of job exploration counseling, work based learning experiences, counseling regarding post-secondary training opportunities, workplace readiness training to assist in the development of social and independent living skills, and instruction in self-advocacy. (Pages 152-153) Title I

Provisions under the cooperative agreement include: 1. Process for making student referrals to the OVR; 2. Determination of eligibility for OVR services; 3. Joint sharing and use of evaluations and assessments; 4. Planning and development of individualized programs (IEP and IPE) as a collaborative team process; 5. Role of educational personnel in transition planning; 6. Role of the OVR counselor in outreach to, identification of, and transition planning for eligible students with disabilities; 7. Use of memoranda of agreement (MOA) at the local level to facilitate and coordinate transition services for secondary students with disabilities; 8. State coordination with agencies in the provision of transition services inclusive of pre — employment transition services; 9. A comprehensive system of personnel development for qualified personnel responsible for transition services; 10. Determination of lead agencies; 11. Financial responsibilities; 12. Status of services for an individual student/consumer during a dispute; 13. Agency dispute resolution; 14. Due process for the individual student/consumer. 15. Memoranda of Agreements at the Local Level. (Page 153) Title I

The CWTP is designed to provide pre-employment transition services to all students with disabilities and provide transition services to assist VR eligible students with the most significant disabilities in transitioning from high school to competitive integrated employment. Student employment coordinators, funded by the local education agency, refer students to OVR in order to provide pre—employment transition services during their final three years of school. 
During this time, should the student need individualized transition services, counselors work with the employment coordinators to ensure that community vocational services provided lead to the completion of an individualized vocational evaluation and the development of individualized programs (IEP and IPE) to ensure successful transitioning from high school to post school activities, including employment. Upon completion of the IPE, further community—based vocational services are provided to the student in the form of training for the planned vocational goal. The desired outcome for participants in the CWTP Transition Services is a post—school outcome or paid employment. 
Outreach to students also occurs through OVR’s contractual agreements with the Kentucky Career and Technical Educational College System and the nine Special Education Cooperatives for pre-employment transition services. (Page 154) Title I

An IPE is developed for each student determined eligible and that meets the current order of selection for vocational rehabilitation services. The IPE should address the student’s pre-employment transition services needs in the areas of job exploration counseling, work based learning experiences, counseling regarding post-secondary training opportunities, workplace readiness training to assist in the development of social and independent living skills, and instruction in self-advocacy. (Page 153) Title I

A variety of partnerships are needed in order to market the benefits of a variety of earn and learn opportunities, including registered apprenticeships to Kentucky business for individuals with disabilities including youth and students with disabilities. OFB will work with its existing partnerships among workforce, economic development, education and business entities in fostering work based learning opportunities. (Page 158) Title I

The CWTP is designed to provide pre-employment transition services to all students with disabilities and provide transition services to assist VR eligible students with the most significant disabilities in transitioning from high school to competitive integrated employment. There will be a Supported Employment Consulting fee available with the Community Work Transition program for seamless transition into competitive integrated employment. There are specific programs i n place with specialized services for the blind and visually impaired. The PATH Program focuses on job exploration, workplace readiness training, and self-advocacy and is an intensive three week program based on the work of Dr. Karen Wolffe that introduces employability skills to students with disabilities. The curriculum is specific to individuals that are blind or visually impaired. The Summer Work Experience Program is in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Providers. CRPs are paid to find work experiences in competitive integrated settings for transition aged individuals. The goals of the work experience are to provide community based career exploration and the opportunity to practice work readiness skills. It is also hoped that by participating in the work experience program, employers will be open to providing more opportunities for individuals who are blind or visually impaired in their communities. The Summer Work Program is in collaboration with the Kentucky School for the Blind, Kentucky Kingdom, the American Printing House for the Blind, and the Louisville Zoo. The World of Work Program is another program in which the OFB and KSB provide work based learning experiences to students. The program provides competitive integrated work experiences to students that attend the Kentucky School for the Blind. The INSIGHT Post-Secondary Preparation Program is held each summer at Morehead State University. Students are able to participate in college classes, live in the dorm, and participate in social activities both on and off campus during this eight day program. They receive counseling on post-secondary opportunities and are taught the self-advocacy skills necessary to succeed in a post-secondary environment along with workplace readiness skills. (Page 159) Title I

Rehabilitation counselors work collaboratively with the special education cooperatives, high school education teachers, local directors of special education, and job coaches for students transitioning from high school into employment. OVR Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors attend IEP and ARC meetings working with the team in establishing a vocational goal. This assures the development of the students IPE in conjunction with the vocational rehabilitation IEP. OVR provides support to teaching instructors, school staff and job coaches regarding rehabilitation issues and other areas of expertise such as Assistive Technology to ensure successful placements. Often rural schools do not have the needed resources; therefore OVR staff offer their expertise based on the individual needs of the student working closely with all staff involved with IDEA.  (Page 181) Title I

gain this year, VI teachers indicated that their expectations in working with a counselor are mainly to provide resources for the student/family, and to include the counselor as part of the student’s IEP team. However, overall the survey indicated that the VI teachers expect greater involvement in the provision of guidance and counseling, training, the employment proves and career counseling. These beliefs may indicate a need to not only affirm our own commitment to early involvement in planning, but to find new ways to stay involved and easily accessible. VI teachers gave positive ratings to OFB”s counseling staff in areas such as knowledge, rapport building ability, and ability to connect to needed vocational services such as training, job search and placement, including post-secondary education as well the development of strong appropriate vocational goals. (Page 192) Title IV

WIOA allows KY OVR to address these particular issues by allocating funds for pre-employment transition services. WIOA mandates 15% of all federal funds be set aside to provide pre-employment
Page 196transition services. Indications of post-school success are broken into categories in ‘Predictors of Post-School Success in Taxonomy 2.0. (Test, et al., 2009) clearly noting areas where Vocational Rehabilitation may play vital roles. The predictors are (possible VR role in parentheses): Student Development (assessment, employment skills attainment, supports), Student-focused planning (IEP development ant IPE participation), and Family engagement (family involvement, family empowerment, and family preparation), Program Structures (strategic planning, high expectation, and high involvement), Interagency Collaboration (collaborative framework, and collaborative service delivery). (Pages 195-196) Title IV

All training programs at the Carl D. Perkins Vocational Training Center (CDPVTC) have associated work based learning experiences in the local community. The agency is always pursuing other collaborative activities to provide Pre-ETS, and we have made at least 9 proposals to Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). These proposals are in the process of being implemented. The contract was completed and renewed for a partnership with the Kentucky Partnership for Families and Children to sponsor students to attend the KPFC Youth Parent Conference. The PepNet2 project grant has ended related to partnerships with the school system and KDE to improve transition outcomes for students who are deaf and hard of hearing. This population, however, will be the focus of a Co-Op contact as a targeted population. (Pages 219-220) Title IV

Goal 6: To engage youth, parents, high schools, and other transition specialists in exploring and planning career choices that connect to a full range of post—secondary options for training, career development, and competitive integrated employment.
Objective 6.1: To improve the number, quality, and rate of employment outcomes for youth and students participating in Transition services.
Strategies
VR Counseling Staff, school counseling and teaching staff, and VI teachers statewide will collaborate to achieve earlier involvement of OFB counselors in IEP development of vocational goals. OFB transition policies and practices used to guide the implementation and continuous improvement of services leading to employment will be based on the gathering and tracking data through the case management system. (Page 230) Title IV

Objective 6.3: Enhance student awareness of enrollment in transition programs
Promote summer transition programs through innovative marketing strategies in order to increase referrals. Implementation of marketing strategies to VI teachers, students and their families.
Report of Progress:
Path a summer transition program for students ages 14-21 who are blind and visually impaired was held at the Charles W. McDowell Center in Louisville during July. There were 16 students in attendance. Students participated in classes teaching blindness skills such as orientation and mobility, assistive technology and braille. Additionally, the curriculum had a focus on pre-employability skills such as local labor market information, career pathways, financial literacy and interest inventories. Students went off site for employment site tours and participated in recreational activities that provided for many their first exposure to those kinds of events. (Pages 230-231) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~In October 2015, Kentucky was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR—eligible individuals, including youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized post—secondary credentials necessary to secure competitive, integrated employment in high—demand, high—quality occupations.
This five—year grant award of nearly $4.4 million is named Project CASE (Creating Access to Successful Employment). Project CASE has strong support from the leadership of OVR, OET, KYAE and the Department of Education. Title IV

Project CASE activities are consistent with the section 101(d) of WIOA, with focus on improved alignment of federal programs to strengthen the capacity of state workforce systems to meet emerging employers’ needs with appropriately skilled and credentialed individuals. Project CASE provides a solid strategy for providing individuals with disabilities who face barriers to employment with workforce investment activities, education and supportive services to enter and retain employment.
Career Pathways initiatives in Kentucky over the past decade have created partnerships between industry and education at the secondary and post—secondary levels, and forged important links to strengthen local economies. Project CASE will help ensure that individuals with disabilities, even at the secondary school level, are not left out of participating in these existing initiatives and can prepare for and obtain jobs in high—wage, high—demand occupations. (Page 32) Title I

Project CASE is a collaborative effort between state vocational rehabilitation agencies, adult education, secondary and post—secondary education, career centers, employers and other partners to demonstrate how career pathways can help individuals with disabilities acquire the marketable skills and attain recognized credentials that lead to employment in high—demand occupations. In Kentucky, two pilot projects are planned in the Metro Louisville and Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) regions; these will engage seven and 23 counties respectively. (Page 44) Title I

Through Project CASE, a program developed from the use of Federal grant funding through the Rehabilitation Services Administration, OVR has stronger coordination and collaboration with the Youth Career Centers and other Kentucky Career Centers. Partnering with Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) and KentuckianaWorks in the hiring of Career Pathway Coordinators, and in cross-agency training of staff on career pathways for students with disabilities, Project CASE will ensure sustained partnerships. (Pages 150-151) Title I
One project that aligns with this area in serving students is Project CASE (Creating Access to Successful Employment). In October 2015, the Kentucky Office for the Blind/Kentucky Career Center was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR-eligible individuals, including students and youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized postsecondary credentials necessary to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations. Creating Access to Successful Employment (CASE) will help ensure that individuals with disabilities, even at the secondary school level, are not left out of participating in these existing initiatives, and can prepare for and obtain jobs in high-wage and high-demand occupations.  (Page 212) Title IV

A federal Career Pathways grant recently received by the Kentucky Office for the Blind (OFB) from the Rehabilitation Services Administration. OVR will collaborate with OFB on assisting consumers in three career pathways (healthcare, manufacturing, and information technology) in two of Kentucky Career Centers, Kentuckian Works in the Louisville metropolitan area and the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) in rural Appalachia.  (Page 217) Title IV

Apprenticeship
OVR can work with consumers on internships, apprenticeships, and on—the—job training arrangements as additional options on the career pathway to employment. These options allow individuals to train while being actual employees. (Page 20) Title I A variety of partnerships are needed in order to market the benefits of a variety of earn and learn opportunities, including registered apprenticeships to Kentucky business for individuals with disabilities including youth and students with disabilities. OFB will work with its existing partnerships among workforce, economic development, education and business entities in fostering work based learning opportunities. (Page 158) Title I As a means of providing Pre—Employment Transition Services, OVR will work with partner agencies in Workforce Development to identify existing apprenticeship programs with employers with which OVR may partner to focus on incorporating students and youth with disabilities into the programs. The Kentucky Apprenticeship program recently moved from the Department of Labor to Workforce. OVR partners with the Office of Autism in order to understand how to assist youth on the spectrum with attaining and maintaining employment. A model program focused on creating apprenticeship opportunities for students and youth with disabilities will be developed in such a manner as to be replicated in urban and rural areas alike. This will expand employment opportunities for all the youth with disabilities in Kentucky. (Page 159) Title I
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Existing legacy case management systems across WIOA Title I, Wagner Peyser, Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education are disparate and insular: Currently, the Office of Employment and Training (OET) and the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) are supported by insular case management systems that respond to requests for the following programs: • Wagner Peyser Labor Exchange (Employ Kentucky Operating System - EKOS) • Unemployment Insurance — both benefits and tax/collections (Mainframe and Kentucky’s Electronic Workplace for Employment Services — KEWES) • Veterans Program • Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Program • National Emergency Grants • High Growth Job Training • Foreign Labor Certification • Health Care Tax Credit System • Trade Adjustment Act • Work Opportunities Tax Credit • Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) • Student data • Customer records, services provided and costs of services for individuals with disabilities and blindness — Case Management System — CMS • Social Security Reimbursement tracking and processing • Social Security Ticket to Work assignment tracking and processing  (Pages 45-46) Title I

There is a Social Security Reimbursement module within CMS that enables each respective agency to seek reimbursement for the cost of the services provided to agency consumers receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. There is a Maximus module that generates files that are submitted to Social Security for the Ticket to Work program and tracks responses and ticket assignments. In July 2016, Kentucky ceased WIA data collection and reporting and began working to implement WIOA data collection and reporting requirements in addition to other USDOE and state reporting. CMS is a staff only application with a web front end. An interface exists between CMS and eMARS, the state’s payment system, to enable processing of payments to, and refunds from, vendors. The system is Section 508 and Bobby compliant and staff use screen readers such as JAWS, ZoomText and WindowEyes, as well as speech recognition software such as Dragon Naturally Speaking.  (Page 46-47) Title I

OFB continues to provide training on the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 as well as training on the ADA, Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act (TWWIIA). Central office and other support staff as well as members of the State Rehabilitation Council will be included in all appropriate HRD activities. OFB is vested in using technology and is actively identifying potential web-based training programs that will allow staff the opportunity to utilize these alternative training methods for increased professional development. (Pages 178-179) Title I

GOAL III: Provide information concerning benefits planning and financial planning in order to promote inclusion, integration, and empowerment of individuals with the most significant and significant disabilities. We have written and passed a new policy on Benefits Planning and Analysis. A fact sheet has been developed for resources in benefits planning that will be given to OVR consumers at time of eligibility or later in the case if they begin receiving Social Security benefits. We are also 8 months in on the SGA project, which gives benefits planning to individuals with SSI and seeks to help them gain competitive integrated employment. OVR services are completed in an expedited fashion in order to insure quicker service provision. The agency has developed a Spanish version of the Benefits Planning fact sheet to make it more accessible. The staff has been trained on Disability Benefits 101(DB101) an electronic system to help with benefits planning. It was launched in December of 2017. As of 2017, the agency is keeping the fee for a Benefits Analysis at $450, but we are hoping the use of DB101 will cut down on the authorization for a benefits analysis. The agency is also hoping that benefits counseling is provided earlier in the process and planning of a case. The agency is also encouraging Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and non-profit providers to consider providing benefits planning services. The agency is encouraging the CRPs and non-profit providers to participate in “Introduction to Social Security Disability Benefits, Work Incentives, and Employment Support Programs” offered by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in hopes that some staff might become interested in pursuing certification to provide those services. (Page 220) Title IV

The WIPA Program for one half of the state is just now up and running. GOAL IV: To provide job placement and supported employment services in order for consumers with significant and most significant disabilities respectively to attain competitive integrated employment. IMPEDIMENTS: No impediments at this time (Page 232) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Goal 2: Work-Based Learning Infrastructure — Create a state-level framework to facilitate employer engagement in work-based learning and ensure consistency in definitions used across the education and training continuum partners regarding definition. • define it • governance structure that is partnership-based • standardized continuum • asset map • identify best practices at every level • create Kentucky model • implement and model • communication strategy (Page 28) Title I

In addition to leveraging and expanding the KSN effort, Kentucky expects a great deal of new activity assessing and addressing employer needs via existing partnerships with business organizations like the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, and most importantly, through new strategies and initiatives crafted by the new administration. (Page 40) Title I

OVR employs fourteen job placement specialists across the state. These specialists are responsible for developing relationships with local employers to facilitate the placement of OVR consumers into competitive integrated employment. Employer engagement activities may include: 1) technical assistance to employers on hiring individuals with disabilities; 2) disability awareness training 3) ongoing and regular contact with employers 4) attending meetings of local Chambers of Commerce, Society of Human Resource Managers (SHRM), and other business related groups; and 5) no cost accessibility surveys to employers. OVR employs a statewide Job Placement Coordinator who coordinates all job placement activities. This staff member trains new job placement specialists, provides technical assistance to the job placement specialists and to districts where there are no job placement specialists, pursues agency—wide relationships with large employers, and acts as the agency contact for the National NET and TAP programs managed by CSAVR. (Page 157) Title I

The Kentucky Skills Network (KSN) is a partnership of local and state workforce development organizations dedicated to providing proactive business services and industry skills development. Through local “Business Service Teams” the KSN has laid a foundation for coordinated employer services that will be leveraged in the coming four years. (Page 157) Title IV

In October 2015, the Kentucky Office for the Blind/Kentucky Career Center was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR-eligible individuals, including youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized postsecondary credentials necessary to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations. Under this project employer engagement is a goal area. For all five years of the grant staff will conduct employer engagement activities such as regional employer conferences in the two project target areas on a variety of topics. 

The Statewide Council for Vocational Rehabilitation (SCVR), Kentucky’s State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), includes several employers and a representative of the Workforce Investment Board who provide important input on agency policy and activities related to employment. OVR, in conjunction with SCVR, conducts a Job Placement Month annually in October which includes many events around the state that promote collaboration with employers. Regional Employer Recognition Awards are given out during the month to employers who have hired OVR consumers. OVR will also continue to partner with local initiatives like Project SEARCH in Northern Kentucky and the Coalition for Workforce Diversity in Louisville, Lexington, Ashland, and Mayfield to identify and educate employers willing to develop new programs specifically designed to focus on hiring and training individuals with disabilities. (Page 158) Title I

Goal 4: Recruit, employ, retain and train the most qualified and highly skilled rehabilitation staff which reflects employment focused, job driven outcomes.
Objective 4.1: Increase the skills and competency levels of all rehabilitation staff statewide. Strategies Maximize training funds to support staff in professional training and development activities. Provide quality training statewide that is job specific and targeted to address any deficiencies identified in quality assurance reviews or training needs assessments. Provide job—driven training that promotes skill enhance and employer engagement. (Page 224) Title IV

LVER staff indirectly serve veterans through direct business outreach to promote the hiring of qualified veterans and obtain job orders for review of potential cross—match with veterans seeking employment. (Page 252) Title IV

Data Collection
Kentucky will build a workforce investment system assessment that combines the results of the independent review and the collection of common performance measures and aligns those results with program improvements and innovations. Basic service delivery performance standards will be set to continuously improve. New comprehensive WIOA service delivery ideas and standards will be added over time to help ensure that common measure and customer satisfaction results go up over time. Kentucky will add to this basic approach and develop broader continuous improvement activities for across the workforce system. (Page 29) Title I Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We anticipate that the current system will be able to collect the necessary data beginning 7/1/2016 and produce accurate reports prior to the due dates for Rehabilitation Services Administration and common measures reporting. (Page 213) Title IV Objective 4.2: Improve services to underserved populations within the blind and visually impaired community, including substance abuse, mental health, and criminal background. Strategies Participate in cross training's with agencies who provide services to treat mental illness, substance abuse to provide all professionals a better understanding of the unique services necessary to improve outcomes for consumers. Collaborate with criminal justice agencies to promote better understanding of issues that impact employment for consumers with backgrounds. Reports of Progress: Given budget constraints progress on this goal area was limited. Staff were provided training for those areas through quality assurance reviews deficiencies were identified and areas of concern voiced by staff through the training assessment were prevalent. Trainings occurred for changes in the case management system for 911 fields as well as on Pre-employment Transition Services. The Cabinet sponsored cross training for the area or team building. There was no progress for the area of substance abuse, mental health or criminal backgrounds. (Page 224) Title IV The Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, Department of Workforce Investment is currently working to develop a single system for all of the data collection needs of the Department including the Office of Employment and Training, Office for the Blind and Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. This system is being developed in phases. The current system has been edited to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We will continue to make changes identified as necessary to correct or improve that process. We anticipate that the new system will be available for OVR/OFB by 12/31/2019.KEE Suite is the integrated case management system being developed for state agencies (OVR, OFB, OET, CHFS, Adult Ed, WIOA, etc.) to streamline services for program participants in the Commonwealth. It is currently planned to replace OVR/OFB’s current case management system in the fall of 2019. We are in the beginning planning stages for the VR specific portion of the system. All information entered into the system will be shared on Permission based guidelines, set by the Agency(s) based on State and Federal Law. Shared Personally Identifiable Information (PII) that will be available to the participating partners in this system will be Common basic information requested and collected from the participant by each partner to streamline and simplify the process for the participant instead of the participant being required to answer and supply the same information multiple times, and to facilitate the federal reporting of the WIOA required Common Measures. VR specific data and records will be secured by access restrictions in place based on need to know. Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. Once a baseline is determined and the relationship between services, partnerships, etc. and successful outcomes and measurable progress is analyzed, strategies will be developed to improve the performance outcomes. (Page 236) Title IV
511

~~In relation to Section 511 of WIOA, it was asked whether the agency was a 14C certificate holder, and their current knowledge about this legislation. In summary, they were asked to list their agency if they had a need for further training. The CRP survey was sent to the 54 CRPs authorized as vendors for KYOVR or KYOFB with 34 actually initiating and completing the survey, for a 63% completion rate. Of the respondents, 53% (18) had provided services to KYOVR or KYOFB consumers for five years or less and 21% (7) had provided services for more than 20 years. When inquired, 38% (13) of the respondents stated their agency received less than 10 referrals per year. In regards to size of the agency, 53% (18) had less than 10 staff and 21% (7) reported more than 50 employees. Based on the fact that there was at least 1 response in all choices of the demographic questions it was felt that a variety of CRPs are represented in the survey responses. (Page 194) Title IV

GOAL V: To implement Section 511 of WIOA. We have team together to look at the best way of implementing this process. We will target students who are not usually referred to OVR while in school, but would have been sent straight to the Sheltered Workshop once out of School, for an early referral to OVR to go through the VR process. Youths out of school but younger than 24 will be referred to an OVR counselor to go through the VR Process. Letters will go out to all 14C Programs in Kentucky in the spring of 2016 explaining section 511 and VR’s involvement in the process. Each 14C will be visited by one of the 3 SE Consultants. Educational groups will be set up for all the current employees of the 14C facilities about career exploration and community integrated employment. These will be done every 6 months for the 1st two years and annually thereafter. A Section 511 team was created and fulfilled identified goals. Communication with 14c holders occurred to provide education on Section 511. A Section 511 video was developed for consumers to view to meet the career counseling mandate. Career counseling participation and completion documents are collected and reviewed to ensure requirements are met. Ongoing monitoring continues by CRP consultants. Input continues to be gathered and communication continues to occur and information is collected during trainings, meetings and focus groups. Process implementation was provided to educate CRP’s on Section 511, and to ensure career counseling is provided to consumers. Effective communication and monitoring continues to occur to ensure consumer needs and requirements are met. Documentation is obtained from the CRP Branch as it relates to refusal of services. (Page 221) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
OVR will have stronger coordination and collaboration with the Youth Career Center offices and other Kentucky Career Center offices in the EKCEP and KentuckianaWorks regions. Adult Education is an active partner in CASE providing supports through the AOKY program. Accelerating Opportunity is aimed at creating effective pathways to credentials for low-skilled adults (testing at a sixth-12th academic grade level) so they can earn the credentials they need to get a family sustaining job. The initiative seeks to reform how education is delivered to low-skilled adults by integrating basic skills education with technical training while providing wrap around services that include instructional and career supports for adult learners. The initiative is informed by I-BEST, an accelerated, integrated instructional model in which adult education and technical instructors work together in the classroom. Career and Technical Education is closely aligned with the project as well. Kentucky will use funds to ensure that all youth program elements are made available to youth. The state supports the local workforce areas in designing youth programs tailored to the needs of in-school and out-of-school youth in local communities. Local areas encourage youth to use one-stop services as needed. Areas have designed special referral processes for youth who come into one-stops and one area has developed a one-stop career center specifically for youth. Vocational Rehabilitation staff will provide high quality services and communication to transition students and youth, provide accurate and timely information related to work incentives and long-term supports for Social Security recipients, increase and improve job placement options and opportunities for persons served, strengthen and expand competitive integrated employment opportunities by implementing Section 511 of WIOA, improve programmatic and physical accessibility to workforce investment system partners and career center offices, communicate and cooperate with workforce partners on accountability measures discussed in Section 116 of WIOA and seek to meet the standards of WIOA, expand opportunities for increased services, such as supported employment, provide options for transportation and information related to medical services available to consumers, and provide a more timely and efficient process for accessing services. (Pages 37-38) Title I Kentucky assesses the overall effectiveness of the workforce investment system in relation to the strategic vision and goals of the WorkSmart Kentucky and Economic Competitiveness plans, seeking integration of activities and information from all the core programs. The ultimate goal is to increase the long—term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment, to improve services to employers and demonstrate continuous improvement. Kentucky will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with Section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), and continuous improvement of the career center. (Page 51) Title I Accessibility is addressed on several levels and venues in the KCC. Given that OVR staffs are housed in many of the career center offices and are a central part of the workforce programs, there is a heightened sense of assuring this topic is addressed. Accessibility is a part of the required certification process under II. Career Center (office) Management: Physical Infrastructure and Accessibility. The standards that apply to this are as follows: Standard 1: Career Center offices are accessible so that all customers can fully use services and resources. (ADA compliant checklist) KCC offices: • are fully ADA compliant; • are feasible (As new center locations are selected, KCC offices are located in areas that are convenient for their customers, close to major highways, on public transportation routes, centrally—located, close to heavily—trafficked areas such as malls and shopping centers, etc.); • provide assistive technology to assist customers with disabilities (visual, hearing or physical) so they can access computers and other KCC resources/services; • evaluate assistive technology annually to ensure that it is up—to—date and fully functioning. • provide free parking and inclusive parking spaces that are adequate for the average level of customer traffic, especially for individuals with disabilities; and • make services accessible to customers who have language and literacy barriers (non—English speakers or individuals with hearing impairments, disabilities or literacy/reading barriers). For assistive technology, the objective is to design a computer workstation/kiosk that can be used by individuals with the widest possible range of abilities and/or circumstances. Kentucky follows the guidelines set forth by the Job Accommodation Network, One—Stop Disability Resource Manual. All Kentucky Career Center offices are expected to ensure universal access to programs and activities for all eligible individuals. Kentucky has taken steps to ensure equitable access to and participation in federally funded programs for all consumers and for agency staff regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or age. OET will comply with the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Public Law 101—336, and applicable federal regulations relating there to prohibiting discrimination against otherwise qualified disabled individuals under any program or activity and adhere to the U.S. Department of Labor Final Rule on Federal Executive Order 11246. (Page 61) Title I GEPA section 427—Special Needs/Barriers to participation Kentucky recently completed the RFA process for services under WIOA. As part of that RFA process, each applicant was directed to address the thirteen AFLEA considerations. Consideration number two addresses special needs populations and barriers. KYAE Skills U weighted heavily the responses provided in the considerations in the selection of applicants for service. Applicants addressed how they will serve special needs populations Page 135and students with barriers through ADA compliance, Office of Rehabilitation (OVR) assessment on physical disabilities, assistive technologies and other reasonable accommodations as well as partnerships with state agencies that provide support services to students with barriers or special needs. All programs have been supplied with the Burlington English product as one tool to use with non-English speaking students. In addition, all local programs sign contracts and affidavits that cover Title IX and affirm they will not discriminate on the basis of age, color, race or any protected class under Title VI and VII of the Civil Right Act of 1964, Age discrimination Act of 1975, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and all applicable laws which prohibit discrimination. Programs are continually monitored by state staff of Administration and Accountability and on a rotating basis participate in an agreed upon procedures audit by the State Auditor of Public Accounts as to the terms of the contract. State employees are encouraged to express their concerns regarding existing or potential barriers or prohibitions to equal employment opportunity due to race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, ancestry, veteran status, and disability in accordance with state and federal laws. EEO assistance is available by contacting the Human Resources EEO Counselor/Coordinator or the State EEO Coordinator. (Page 134) Title I OVR employs fourteen job placement specialists across the state. These specialists are responsible for developing relationships with local employers to facilitate the placement of OVR consumers into competitive integrated employment. Employer engagement activities may include: 1) technical assistance to employers on hiring individuals with disabilities; 2) disability awareness training 3) ongoing and regular contact with employers 4) attending meetings of local Chambers of Commerce, Society of Human Resource Managers (SHRM), and other business related groups; and 5) no cost accessibility surveys to employers. (Page 157) Title I The agency has also worked diligently with other state agencies to bring web-designs created by state entities into compliance with accessibility laws. This is an ongoing process and the agency will continue to push for changes necessary to make all state government technology and software systems fully accessible. (Page 176) Title I Goal 2: continue to monitor and explore additional strategies to improve CRP service quality and compliance Strategies: Involve job coaches with transition students by the last semester of school; Strategies: Train staff on new policies related to customized employment and person—centered planning; Strategies: Require notes to be submitted by Supported Employment Providers by the 5th day of each month. Strategies: Continued monitoring by the Section 511 Implementation Team to insure agency compliance to WIOA requirements related to OVR relationships with sheltered workshops; (Page 199) Title IV
Vets
Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) is a $2.4 million grant administered by OET with staff located in the Kentucky Career Center offices statewide. Those who are both veterans and ex-offenders fall within a category specified to be served under this grant. Currently, the state coordinator receives a monthly list of every incarcerated veteran in Kentucky from the Department of Corrections; those in local jails and state facilities, with their release dates. The nearest disabled veterans outreach program specialist (DVOP) reaches out to these individuals to offer re-entry employment preparation and support services prior to release, when possible. After release, JVSG staff work with the each individual from their KCC office. KCC partners with the Department of Corrections (DOC) and Adult Education to provide training and assessments toward achieving a National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC) for anyone during incarceration. On Jan. 1, 2016, DOC began offering 30 days of “good time” off on sentences of individuals who earn an NCRC. After release, KCC offers a complete portfolio of services to ex-offenders. As a population with barriers to employment, they are entitled to additional WIOA services facilitated OET’s NCRC coordinator. Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) - A special tax credit is available to employers who hire qualified ex-felons. The qualified ex-felon is an individual who has been convicted of a felony or released from incarceration for a felony conviction within 12 months prior to the individual’s start date. (Page 25) Title IV Veterans Each career center office, along with each of the 10 local areas, provides “Priority of Service” to veterans for all Department of Labor funded programs. Each customer entering the local office receives a questionnaire that is used to determine whether the customer is priority-of-service eligible. If the customer is an eligible “covered person,” he/she receives a fact sheet listing all of the services and programs along with the program’s qualifications, which must abide by the Priority of Service mandate. The covered person is then seen by the first available staff person or referred to the disabled veterans program specialists if they are determined to have one of the significant barriers to employment as specified by the appropriate veterans program letters. Additionally, Kentucky’s Focus Career system automatically contacts veterans matched to new job orders 24 hours before non-veterans. (Page 26-27) Title I Eligible veterans and eligible persons who are determined to have a significant barrier to employment, as defined in VPL 03-14 changes 1 and 2 or most current guidance, are referred to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program specialist (DVOP). Additionally, any eligible veterans or eligible persons who are part of a designated additional population by the Assistant Secretary, as defined in VPL 04-14 or current guidance, will be referred to the DVOP. These referrals will be made following an initial identification of an SBE through the registration process. Customers registering electronically using Kentucky’s Focus Career module will be asked a series of questions to determine if they are priority of service eligible. If they are identified as a covered person, they are presented with a screen defining priority of service and directed to their local career center for further information on services and programs. (Page 60) Initial contact at a KCC visited by a veteran and other eligible person will be by an intake/assessment customer service staff member. This person will provide the veteran with a self—assessment form that determines if the individual is qualified as having Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE), and is to be referred to a DVOP specialist. OET will continue to emphasize and train KCC staff to identify those who are already in the system seeking services, those entering the KCC and those found by the DVOP conducting outreach that are consistent with these target populations. These targeted populations include: • special disabled or disabled veterans, as defined in 38 USC §4211(1) and (3); • homeless veterans and those veterans who are at—risk of becoming homeless (any individual or family who is fleeing, or is attempting to flee, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, or other dangerous or life-threatening conditions in the individual’s or family’s current housing situation, including where the health and safety of children are jeopardized, and who have no other residence and lack the resources or support networks to obtain other permanent housing); • recently—separated service member, as defined in 38 USC §4211(6); • ex—offenders, as defined by WIOA Section 101(38); • veterans lacking a high school diploma or equivalent; • low—income veterans, as defined by WIOA Section 101(36); • 18 to 24 year—old veterans, as directed by the assistant director for Veterans Employment and Training (ASVET) in Veterans Program Letter (VPL) 04—14; • transitioning service members assessed as not meeting the Career Readiness Standards, as documented on DD2958 and active duty services members being involuntarily separated through a service reduction in force as described in (VPL) 07—14; and • wounded, ill or injured service members receiving treatment at a military treatment facility or a warrior transition unit and the spouses and family caregivers of such wounded, ill or injured service members as described in (VPL) 08—14. (Page 250) Title IV DVOP specialists provide intensive services to veterans with SBEs, other eligible veterans, and other eligible persons as specified by 38 USC §4103A, and at the direction of the ASVET through guidance contained in VPL 03—14, VPL 03—14 Change 1, VPL 03—14 Change 2, VPL 04—14, VPL 07—14 and VPL 08—14. DVOP specialists will provide a full array of employment, training and placement services to those veterans with one or more SBEs. DVOP specialists will also facilitate services through an effective case management strategy. DVOP specialists conduct an assessment, and provide services to veterans and eligible persons to include: • evaluation of skill levels and needs; • development of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) to identify employment goals, appropriate objectives, and appropriate combination of services for the participant to achieve the employment goals; • coordination of supportive services with applicable providers; • assistance to KCC partners in providing services to veterans on a priority basis; and • conducting outreach to identify those veterans and other eligible persons, ensuring they receive appropriate intensive services, case management and other workforce services necessary to re— turn to meaningful, sustainable employment. LVER staff perform only those duties specified in 38 USC §4104(b), in accordance with guidance promulgated at VPL 03—14. These are related to direct outreach with businesses, and facilitation within the state’s employment service delivery system. LVER staff is assigned duties that promote veterans to businesses, business associations, and business groups. When business outreach is primarily conducted by a Business Services Team, the LVER will be included as an active member. Additional LVER activities and services include, but are not limited to the following: • planning and participating in job and career fairs; • coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs, businesses and business organizations to promote employment and training programs for veterans; • informing federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans; • promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and • conducting veterans’ programs training for all KCC staff. (Page 250) Title I Service delivery is conducted through an integrated delivery system within the KCC structure. Crosstrained, responsive customer service teams throughout the Commonwealth provide effective services. Upon arrival to a KCC, veterans with SBEs will be identified using a self—assessment form and if eligible they will be referred to the DVOP specialist for further assessment, services and intensive case management as required. LVER staff work with the Business Services Team to promote the hiring of veterans to employers. LVERs are key members of the Business Services Teams, providing information on current employer job openings, assisting employers seeking to hire qualified veterans, and actively promoting job—ready veterans to employers. (Page 251) Title IV Kentucky possesses the capacity and capability to serve all veterans. DVOP Specialists, however, only serve those veterans with SBEs, and other targeted populations as directed by the Secretary. These include: • special disabled or disabled veterans, as defined in 38 USC §4211(1) and (3); • homeless veterans and those veterans who are at—risk of becoming homeless; • recently—separated service member, as defined in 38 USC §4211(6); • ex—offenders, as defined by WIOA Section 101(38); • veterans lacking a high school diploma or equivalent; • low Income veterans, as defined by WIOA Section 101(36); • 18— to 24—year—old veterans, as directed by the assistant director for Veterans Employment and Training (ASVET) in Veterans Program Letter (VPL) 04—14. • Transitioning service member assessed as not meeting the Career Readiness Standards, as documented on DD2958 and active duty services members being involuntarily separated through a service reduction in force as described in (VPL) 07—14; • Wounded, ill or injured service members receiving treatment at a military treatment facility or a warrior transition unit and the spouses and family caregivers of such wounded, ill or injured service members as described in (VPL) 08—14 ;• Chapter 31 VR&E veterans . LVER staff indirectly serve veterans through direct business outreach to promote the hiring of qualified veterans and obtain job orders for review of potential cross—match with veterans seeking employment. (Pages 251-252) Title IV All Workforce Investment Boards (WIB) and KCCs will ensure their plans provide strategies and policies for providing veterans and other eligible persons with priority of service. Policies implemented will ensure that veterans and other eligible persons are aware of their entitlement to priority of service, the array of programs and services available to them, and any eligibility requirements for those programs and/or services. (Page 252) Title IV All veterans and eligible persons will be provided local labor market information along with current training programs tailored to the economic sectors for that region by either the DVOP, KCC staff or partner agency staff. Upon completion of the training program, veterans will be registered into the Focus Career system for job matching and placement. Additionally, DVOP and KCC staff will provide referrals as required for all veterans completing training. Success will be measured by the number of veterans and eligible persons training enrollments, completion of training and employment outcomes. (Page 253) Title IV
Mental Health

~~Kentucky’s fourteen Regional Boards for Mental Health or Individuals with an Intellectual Disability are a primary source for extended services in KY. Cooperative budget planning is done between OVR and the Kentucky Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) so that state funds for all phases of supported employment can be sought by each agency. A cooperative agreement is also in place.

The Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) and OVR partnered together, and in 2010, Kentucky became the 12th state to participate in the Dartmouth College, Johnson and Johnson, Supported Employment Initiative to demonstrate the effectiveness of the IPS model for supported employment (Individualized Placement and Support, an Evidence—Based Practice). The first local pilot projects were launched prior to the close of 2010. Through the Dartmouth Project, a new SE funding partner was added when the Greater Cincinnati Health Foundation provided funding for 2 of the local pilots in Northern KY. IPS Supported Employment now includes all 13 Kentucky Community Mental Health Centers. In FY 2016 the partnership with Behavioral Health continues with the addition of 5 IPS sites outside of the Community Mental Health Centers and 2 sites serving those with substance abuse. (Page 155) Title I

The Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) is responsible for the administration of state and federally funded mental health and substance abuse treatment services throughout the commonwealth. Publicly-funded community services are provided for Kentuckians who have problems with mental health, developmental and intellectual disabilities, or substance abuse, through Kentucky’s 14 regional Boards for Mental Health or Individuals with an Intellectual Disability (Regional MHID Boards). Regional MHID Boards are private, nonprofit organizations established by KRS Chapter 210 which serve residents of a designated multi-county region. Regional MHID Boards are private, nonprofit organizations established by KRS Chapter 210 (see Related Links) which serve residents of a designated multi-county region. (Page 160) Title I

Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP’s) and other OVR staff both saw mental health counseling and treatment as one of the greatest unmet needs of consumers. Furthermore CRP’s increased the greatest in demand in the last 3 years to come from those with a diagnosis of Mental Illness (58.0% of respondents). Other OVR staff respondents indicated that psychological restoration was one of the services in greatest demand (35%). The identified need for mental health counseling and treatment has not been listed as the greatest need in the last few Comprehensive Needs Assessments. However, disability coordinators did indicate that mental health issues were a significant barrier for transition age youth as they exit the post-secondary educational setting. (Page 187) Title I

CRPs were asked to identify areas of ‘unmet need’ for their consumers. They indicated support services, mental health treatment and post-employment services were all ‘unmet needs’. When asked what CRP services they foresee an increase in the next 3 years they indicated Employment and retention, skills training and customized supported employment. (Page 195) Title IV

Objective 4.2: Improve services to underserved populations within the blind and visually impaired community, including substance abuse, mental health, and criminal background. Strategies Participate in cross training's with agencies who provide services to treat mental illness, substance abuse to provide all professionals a better understanding of the unique services necessary to improve outcomes for consumers. Collaborate with criminal justice agencies to promote better understanding of issues that impact employment for consumers with backgrounds. Reports of Progress: Given budget constraints progress on this goal area was limited. Staff were provided training for those areas through quality assurance reviews deficiencies were identified and areas of concern voiced by staff through the training assessment were prevalent. Trainings occurred for changes in the case management system for 911 fields as well as on Pre-employment Transition Services. The Cabinet sponsored cross training for the area or team building. There was no progress for the area of substance abuse, mental health or criminal backgrounds. (Page 224) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
Other federal, state, and local agencies related to the rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities such as the Department of Protection and Advocacy, Department of Probation and Parole, Department of Workers Compensation, Department of Disability Determination. (Page 147) Title I Kentucky has shifted focus in the Career Centers from Unemployment Insurance assistance to Employment Services. This shift has allowed Wagner Peyser staff to focus more on providing employment services to customers in a more individualized manner rather than the focus on claimant assistance. More emphasis has been placed career coaching with special emphasis on first time payment customers and RESEA customers. Kentucky currently has an outdated RESEA profile model which has hindered our ability to identify and engage all potential customers. (Page 276) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 66

Accessibility - 06/28/2019

~~“The Kentucky Department of Education is committed to making its electronic and information technologies accessible to individuals with disabilities by meeting or exceeding the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. 794d), as amended in 1998. Section 508 requires agencies to provide individuals with disabilities equal access to electronic information and data comparable to those who do not have disabilities unless an undue burden would be imposed on the agency. The Section 508 Standards are the technical requirements and criteria that are used to measure conformance within this law. More information on Section 508 and the technical standards can be found online.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Special Education Forms - Due Process - 06/24/2019

~~“This page contains downloads to special education forms commonly used by local school districts to document due process and implementation of appropriate programs…Included are state approved forms for the Referral, Consents, Individual Education Program (IEP), Conference Summary and other state approved special education forms.”  

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP) - 06/18/2019

~~“The Community Work Transition Program is designed to provide a positive beginning in the world of work for students in special education during their last two years of high school. It is a cooperative effort between participating local school districts, the Kentucky Department of Education, the Kentucky Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Kentucky Department for the Blind, and HDI.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Express - 04/18/2019

~~“Veterans services

Our offices have local veterans employment representatives and disabled veteran outreach program specialists trained specifically to assist veterans with their employment and training needs.They work with other Kentucky Career Center staff members, the Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Department of Veterans Affairs and various other organizations in providing veterans with priority services designed to improve employability and career options. Services available to veterans can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Project CASE “Creating Access to Successful Employment” - 04/01/2019

“Project CASE in Kentucky intends to increase participation in Career Pathways for individuals with disabilities. Under Project CASE, we will build and expand on the current Career Pathways program components that align to the Kentucky Workforce Investment Board’s targeted sectors of Information Technology, Manufacturing and Industrial Technology, and Healthcare/Nursing & Allied Health, and examine what specific strategies or mix of strategies are most effective in serving individuals with disabilities.

The grant will provide direct services to individuals in the 7 counties of Metro Louisville (KentuckianaWorks) and more rural 23 counties of Eastern Kentucky (Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program- EKCEP).  This project will address new levels of outreach, and flexible and innovative training and postsecondary approaches for both students and youth.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Career Center Office for the Blind - 04/01/2019

~~“The mission of the Kentucky Office for the Blind is to provide opportunities for employment  and independence to people with visual disabilities in their homes, schools, workplaces and communities. Services are tailored to each individual’s strengths, abilities and interests.

Individualized services for eligible applicants can be found by accessing the web link. ":

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Special Education Services - 02/12/2019

~~“Welcome to the Division of IDEA implementation and Preschool.  This  site includes information on all aspects of special education programs in public schools.  We welcome your comments and suggestions.  If you need further assistance with finding information on special education programs in Kentucky's public schools, please contact us.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshots - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information on the RETAIN program in Kentucky including the amount of funding requested, the target population and the contact person

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Supported Employment Training Project “Newly Designed Supported Employment Leadership Series” - 01/01/2019

~~Supported Employment Training Project isa project of the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky. It announces its 2019 Supported Employment Leadership Series with more information about content and dates available by accessing the web link. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

WIOA STATE PLAN FOR THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY FY-2018 - 12/31/2018

~~“The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

HB 2 – Worker’s Compensation - 03/30/2018

“AN ACT relating to workers' compensation.

    Amend KRS 342.020 to limit the time period of payment of medical expenses for certain permanent partial disabilities to 780 weeks but provide a mechanism to apply for extended benefits; limit the number of drug screens for which the employer will be liable;

[…]

to indicate that an application for adjustment of claim for compensation for a cumulative trauma injury must be made within five years of the last injurious exposure to the cumulative trauma;

[…]

amend KRS 342.730 to increase average weekly wage caps; set time limits for total disability benefits paid to certain professional athletes; allow payment of temporary total disability benefits to be offset by gross income minus applicable taxes paid to an employee during a period of light-duty work or work in an alternative job position; provide an offset against temporary total disability benefits for salary continuation or wholly employer-funded disability retirement plans; indicate that benefits shall terminate when a plaintiff reaches age 67 or two years after the date of injury, whichever shall last occur;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Statute 42.0146 - Certification Program for Disabled Veteran-Owned Businesses - 07/15/2016

~~“The Office of Equal Employment Opportunity and Contract Compliance shall oversee a program that provides certification of a disabled veteran-owned business in order to encourage growth among businesses owned by disabled veterans within the state and assist those businesses in competing for work in other states that require certification by a statewide body. This certification does not provide a preference in state procurement, nor does it create a point system or set aside for disabled veteran-owned businesses.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky ABLE Act S.B. 179 - 04/05/2016

Signed by the Governor on April  5, 2016

AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities.

Amend KRS 205.200 to disregard any amount in an ABLE account, any contributions to an ABLE account, and any distribution from an ABLE account for qualified expenses for the purposes of determining an individual's eligibility for a means-tested public assistance program and the amount of assistance or benefits the individual is eligible to receive under the program; direct the State Treasurer, the Secretary of the Finance and Administration Cabinet, the Executive Director of the Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Executive Director of the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority to work cooperatively to seek all available sources of funding, determine the best plan of action related to ABLE accounts, and report to the Legislative Research Commission on or before December 31, 2016.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Gov. Bevin Unveils Final Report of Kentucky Work Matters Task Force and Signs Employment First Executive Order - 05/15/2018

~~“During today’s ceremony Gov. Bevin signed the Employment First executive order, recognizing that competitive integrated employment into the general workforce is the preferred outcome for citizens of all ages and levels of disability. He also announced formation of the Employment First Council to continue momentum on targeted areas of the task force’s report.

Highlights of the policy recommendations made by the Kentucky Work Matters Task Force include:•Streamlining occupational licensing for veterans to ensure they are given credit for similar training/experience they received in the military or in another state. (The recently enacted House Bill 319 will expedite occupational licensing for Kentucky veterans.)•Capitalizing on opportunities for the state to serve as model employer. (The Commonwealth is currently transitioning management of two large state cafeterias to the Kentucky Office for the Blind (OFB), providing job opportunities for the visually impaired.)•Increasing resources for the Fostering Success program, which provides job opportunities for youth aging out of the foster care system. (This year’s state budget included an increase of $375,000 per year to expand this program.)•Increasing general fund allocations to the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and Office for the Blind (OFB) to draw down full available federal match. (This year’s state budget increased total funding by more than $9 million for OVR and OFB, which will serve approximately 6,500 more clients.)•Partnering with school systems to ensure that students with disabilities are included in career readiness and development programs.”

“Promoting inclusive workforce policies requires coordination at all levels of government, with states having critical knowledge of economic and employment realities on the ground,” said Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Jennifer Sheehy. “We appreciate Gov. Bevin’s leadership on this issue and continue to encourage states to share their experience and insight.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Relating to Medicaid Expansion - 01/12/2018

“Now, therefore, I, Matthew G. Bevin, Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, by virtue of the authority vested in me by Section 69 of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, do hereby Order and Direct the following:

 

In the event one or more of the components of Kentucky’s Section 1115 Waiver and the accompanying Special Terms and Conditions are prohibited from being implemented pursuant to a final judgment issued by a court of competent jurisdiction, with all appeals of the judgment issued by a court of competent jurisdiction, with all appeals of the judgment having been exhausted or waived, the Secretary of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services and the Commissioner of the Department for Medicaid Services within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services are hereby directed to take the necessary actions to terminate Kentucky’s Medicaid expansion program no later than six months from the date on which all appeals of the judgment have been exhausted or waived, or otherwise as soon as legally practicable under the remaining terms or the Special Terms and Conditions, applicable statutes or regulations.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 25

Accessibility - 06/28/2019

~~“The Kentucky Department of Education is committed to making its electronic and information technologies accessible to individuals with disabilities by meeting or exceeding the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. 794d), as amended in 1998. Section 508 requires agencies to provide individuals with disabilities equal access to electronic information and data comparable to those who do not have disabilities unless an undue burden would be imposed on the agency. The Section 508 Standards are the technical requirements and criteria that are used to measure conformance within this law. More information on Section 508 and the technical standards can be found online.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Special Education Forms - Due Process - 06/24/2019

~~“This page contains downloads to special education forms commonly used by local school districts to document due process and implementation of appropriate programs…Included are state approved forms for the Referral, Consents, Individual Education Program (IEP), Conference Summary and other state approved special education forms.”  

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Veterans Express - 04/18/2019

~~“Veterans services

Our offices have local veterans employment representatives and disabled veteran outreach program specialists trained specifically to assist veterans with their employment and training needs.They work with other Kentucky Career Center staff members, the Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Department of Veterans Affairs and various other organizations in providing veterans with priority services designed to improve employability and career options. Services available to veterans can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Kentucky Career Center Office for the Blind - 04/01/2019

~~“The mission of the Kentucky Office for the Blind is to provide opportunities for employment  and independence to people with visual disabilities in their homes, schools, workplaces and communities. Services are tailored to each individual’s strengths, abilities and interests.

Individualized services for eligible applicants can be found by accessing the web link. ":

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Special Education Services - 02/12/2019

~~“Welcome to the Division of IDEA implementation and Preschool.  This  site includes information on all aspects of special education programs in public schools.  We welcome your comments and suggestions.  If you need further assistance with finding information on special education programs in Kentucky's public schools, please contact us.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshots - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information on the RETAIN program in Kentucky including the amount of funding requested, the target population and the contact person

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

WIOA STATE PLAN FOR THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY FY-2018 - 12/31/2018

~~“The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Working with Exceptional Children in CTE - 12/05/2018

~~‘The Office of Career and Technical Education collaborates with the Office of Teaching and Learning to ensure we have strategies that help us uphold our Mission for all students.Exceptional Children include Special Needs, English Learners, Gifted and Talented, Blind - VI and Deaf - HH students.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Veterans Employment, Training and Support Program - 12/05/2018

~~“KyVets is the Kentucky Veterans Employment Training and Support Program. KyVets provides resources and support to assist veterans across the commonwealth in obtaining gainful employment and training services. For more information, email KyVets@ky.gov

This page has links to resources to help veterans who are job seekers.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY GUIDLINES FOR KENTUCKY SCHOOLS - 12/01/2018

~~“The purpose of this document is to assist teachers and administrators in identifying and meeting student needs for assistive technology as provided by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and to offer specific directions on classroom implementation. It includes a thorough description of issues to consider from the start of screening through the provision of assistive technology and on-going evaluation of its use for educational purposes. Connections are given to related resources and programs which can enhance access and utilization of assistive technology. Until recently, there have been few materials available to help educators make critical decisions in the provision and application of assistive technology. This document represents a compilation of ideas and information devised by those in Kentucky and elsewhere who strive to use assistive technology to improve accessibility and acceptance for children and youth with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Kentucky Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP) - 06/18/2019

~~“The Community Work Transition Program is designed to provide a positive beginning in the world of work for students in special education during their last two years of high school. It is a cooperative effort between participating local school districts, the Kentucky Department of Education, the Kentucky Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Kentucky Department for the Blind, and HDI.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities - 10/18/2018

~~“We are an independent self-governing organization dedicated to advancing the inclusion  of Kentuckians in all facets of community life. The Council is part 56 national State and Territory Councils on Developmental Disabilities, all federally funded and mandated to advocate and create systems change for people with developmental disabilities.

We have a Council of 26 governor appointed citizens and seven Council staff. The Council develops a Five Year State Plan to meet goals in advocacy, capacity building and creating change. Working from the Five Year State Plan, the Council provides grants and contracts for innovative and sustainable projects that empower Kentuckians with Developmental Disabilities and their families. We assist in training initiatives and public policy strategies to educate lawmakers and policy makers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Assistive Technology Service Network “A Guide to Assistive Technology Funding in Kentucky 15th Edition” - 08/01/2016

“…the services of the ATRCs include, but are not limited to: Assistive Technology Services for Early Intervention, K-12 and Post-secondary school, Employment, Transition, Independent Living, leisure or recreation; Loan Library of Assistive Devices, adaptive equipment and toys; Demonstrations of assistive technology devices; Funding information, Assistance and Referral; Assessments and Evaluations for AT; Vocational assessments; Consultations on appropriate technologies; Workplace AT; Environmental Controls; Recycled Computers and Assistive Technology Devices; Training and Technical Assistance on and about AT.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Perkins Center (Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation)

“The Perkins Center is a division of the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the vast majority of our consumers are referred by OVR Counselors located in several cities and towns across the Commonwealth….One of the main reasons for the creation of the Perkins Center was to enable Kentuckians with disabilities to obtain all the services they would need to become employed... The Center currently operates several programs and services that enable consumers to achieve their vocational goals”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Assistive Technology Services Network

".

~The KATS Network is one of 56 statewide assistive technology programs federally funded under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998, as ammended in 2004.

The KATS Network’s mission is to make assistive technology (AT) information, devices and services easily obtainable for people of any age and/or disability. AT is any item or piece of equipment (both low-tech and high-tech) used to improve and/or maintain independence in the home, at work, school or play.

KATS Network Overview and ATRC Contact Information

Services we provide

The KATS Network provides access to AT through a network of five (5) Regional AT Resource Centers (ATRCs) across the state. The Regional ATRCs operate AT demonstration programs, lending libraries and AT reutilization programs. The KATS Network Coordinating Center and each of the ATRCs work cooperatively to provide outreach, information & referral services, and training on various AT topics. Technical Assistance and collaboration is also provided to state agencies and organizations to enhance the understanding of and access to AT and accessible information technology (IT).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Assistive Technology Loan Corporation

“Working with its lending partner, Fifth Third Bank, KATLC can provide loans for modified vehicles, hearing aids, adapted computers, mobility devices, augmentative communication devices or any other type of equipment or home modification that will improve the quality of life or increase the independence of Kentuckians with disabilities.

“Established by state statute in 1996, KATLC is governed by a seven-member Board of Directors…. The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation currently provides staff support to the Board of Directors and the KATLC program.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P)

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P) provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. [Their] work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Project CASE “Creating Access to Successful Employment” - 04/01/2019

“Project CASE in Kentucky intends to increase participation in Career Pathways for individuals with disabilities. Under Project CASE, we will build and expand on the current Career Pathways program components that align to the Kentucky Workforce Investment Board’s targeted sectors of Information Technology, Manufacturing and Industrial Technology, and Healthcare/Nursing & Allied Health, and examine what specific strategies or mix of strategies are most effective in serving individuals with disabilities.

The grant will provide direct services to individuals in the 7 counties of Metro Louisville (KentuckianaWorks) and more rural 23 counties of Eastern Kentucky (Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program- EKCEP).  This project will address new levels of outreach, and flexible and innovative training and postsecondary approaches for both students and youth.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Seed to Provide Support to the Kentucky Work Matters Task Force - 06/26/2017

“The State Exchange on Employment and Disability (SEED) at the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) is providing policy expertise to the new Kentucky Work Matters Task Force. SEED’s partners include the Council of State Governments and the National Conference of State Legislatures. ODEP Deputy Assistant Secretary Jennifer Sheehy joined Governor Matt Bevin for an announcement about this collaboration earlier this month at a press conference in Frankfort with federal and state officials and key stakeholders. The 23-member task force brings together key departments of Kentucky’s state government and private-sector representatives to address barriers to employment. It also promotes workforce inclusion among targeted constituencies, including people with disabilities, foster children, disabled veterans, and others.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AIDD Expands Partnerships in Integrated Employment - 10/06/2016

“ACL's Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Supported Employment Training Project “Newly Designed Supported Employment Leadership Series” - 01/01/2019

~~Supported Employment Training Project isa project of the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky. It announces its 2019 Supported Employment Leadership Series with more information about content and dates available by accessing the web link. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

"Customized Employment in Kentucky” Video Premiering at 25th Anniversary of the ADA Celebration - 07/29/2015

“Just in time for the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the University of Kentucky Human Development Institute announced the debut of their new video, ‘Customized Employment in Kentucky’…    The seven-minute video profiles three employees with developmental disabilities who are working in their community, in jobs which are a good fit for them, and in which their contributions are valued by their employer. The common thread in these stories is that the jobs were “customized,” a process in which employer needs are matched with the talents, interests and contributions of individual job seekers.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

“Toolbox for Employment: Customized Self-Employment and Benefits Planning” - 11/12/2013

~~“TThis is a presentation on methods that a person might use as a guide to becoming self-employed.“Business AND Benefits PlanningGo hand in handStarts with Discovery–DPG™Have to understand the interaction of income from wage and/or self-employment on public benefit systemsWhat public benefit systems are being received now?SSA, Medicaid, DD Waivers – CILA? Home Based Support?, DRS Home Services” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

“2018 Supported Employment Leadership Series” –Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky

“12 days of high quality supported employment professional development provide the foundation for the SE Leadership Series… Participants will study ways of connecting discovery with targeted job development, informational interviews, job analysis/needs analysis, customized employment, and specific representational considerations and strategies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky APSE “Training/Continuing Education”

This page is a resource for various traning and continuing education programs that are available in Kentucky. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services “Peer Support Specialist Curriculum Approval Process”

The Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) will approve the following curricula for Peer Support Specialists (PSS): Adult Peer Support Specialist, Family Peer Support Specialist, Youth Peer Support Specialist, and Kentucky Family Leadership Academy, as established in the Kentucky Administrative Regulations.

The regulations provide the curriculum applicant with an understanding of the requirements for peer support specialists—both eligibility and training—and specifically speak to the elements of a "training curriculum" and the training requirements (testing of the trainee and evaluation of the trainers). View these regulations in Related Links.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Supported Employment Training Project

About Us Having a job represents much more than earning a salary. Employment, including the kind of work one performs, influences one's personal identity, sense of belonging, and place in the world. Furthermore, employment represents one primary way of expressing the inherent human need to contribute – doing something that matters. Yet all too often the significance of employment for people with disabilities has been unrecognized, ignored, or minimized.Supported employment is designed to promote personalized employment opportunities for people with disabilities when they need support to:

Discover personal interests and contributions,Find or negotiate a job that fits things people like to do and do well,Become established as valued employees; andPursue job advancements.

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. Our work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. Please contact mtyree@uky.edu to make suggestions or request additional information. Many documents on this site are only available in PDF format

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities State Plan for Federal Fiscal Years 2017-2021

Goal #2- The capacity of systems that serve all people will be improved so that people with developmental disabilities will have increased access to opportunities for greater independence and integration

Objective 2-B (Employment): By 2021, the Council will support the efforts of at least 10 organizations to expand competitive, integrated employment for individuals with developmental disabilities by employing or assisting  more individuals with developmental disabilities in obtaining  jobs in the communities

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: Self-Employment Guide

This webpage offers information on and resources for self-employment. It orients job seekers on where to start the self-employment process and contains links to relevant resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky Educational Collaborative for State Agency Children Resource Guide

“This resource book came about because several young people who had lived in parental and foster homes their entire lives realized they were facing life after high school in a nursing facility because of lack of available adult supports in the community and confusion about how to get them.    “As a result, P&A brought together staff of several agencies to figure out how to help people find the transition services they needed. The group pooled their knowledge about available programs to put together a resource book that could be used by young people with disabilities in foster care to transition successfully to adulthood.    “Although the original purpose of this book was to help kids in foster care, it can be used by young people with disabilities anywhere who are looking at life after high school.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Justice Department Settles Pregnancy and Disability Discrimination Lawsuit Against City of Florence, Kentucky - 10/26/2016

“The Justice Department filed a proposed consent decree with the city of Florence, Kentucky, to resolve a pregnancy and disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the department under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

 

According to the department's complaint, Florence discriminated against two pregnant police officers by denying both officers' requests for light duty.  The department alleges that Florence previously assigned light duty positions to employees who were temporarily unable to perform their regular job duties, regardless of why the employee needed light duty.  In April 2013, within months of a police officer's pregnancy-related light duty request, Florence limited light duty to employees with on-the-job injuries.  Florence also required that employees with non-work-related illnesses, injuries or conditions demonstrate that they had "no restrictions" before they could return to work.

 

Under the consent decree, which still must be approved by the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky, Florence will adopt new policies that allow accommodations, including light duty, for pregnant employees and employees with disabilities; establish an effective process for receiving and responding to employees' accommodation requests and discrimination complaints; and ensure the proper maintenance of employee medical records.  In addition, Florence will train all supervisors, administrators, officers and employees who participate in making personnel decisions related to light duty and other accommodation requests made pursuant to Title VII and the ADA.  Florence has also agreed to pay $135,000 in compensatory damages and attorney's fees as well as restore the paid leave that Officers Trischler and Riley were forced to use.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

Medicaid 1915(c) HCBS Waiver Redesign Project: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) - 12/14/2018

~~“The Department for Medicaid Services (the Department) on behalf of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (the Cabinet) is publishing this Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)document to provide timely updates and respond to stakeholder questions about redesign of the Cabinet’s 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waivers. The questions included in this FAQs document are a combination of submitted questions from stakeholders and anticipated questions identified by the Department.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State Plan Under Title XIX of the Social Security Act - 04/06/2017

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Kentucky's Medicaid program.

 

The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act, such as:

-Methods of Administration

-Eligibility

-Services Covered

-Quality Control

-Fiscal Reimbursements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supports for Community Living Waiver - 03/29/2017

~~“The Supports for Community Living (SCL) waiver provides Medicaid-paid services to adults and children with intellectual or developmental disabilities. These supports allow individuals to live at home rather than in an institutional setting.  “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State Medicaid Plan Amendments - 01/19/2017

~~“The Medicaid State Plan is an agreement between the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the federal government describing how we administer our Medicaid program. It gives assurance that Kentucky will abide by federal rules and may claim federal matching funds for its program.  The state plan sets out groups to be covered, services, methodologies for reimbursing providers and state program administrative activities.When Kentucky plans to make changes to its program policies or operations, the state Department for Medicaid Services must submit a state plan amendment (SPA) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. We also submit SPAs to request approval for program changes, make corrections or update our Medicaid plan with new information."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Request for a Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver - 08/24/2016

“Kentucky HEALTH is an innovative, transformative healthcare program designed to not only stabilize the program financially, but to also improve the health outcomes and overall quality of life for all members. This demonstration waiver seeks to evaluate new policies and program elements designed to engage members in their healthcare and provide the necessary education and tools required to achieve long term health and an improved quality of life. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Michelle P (0475.R02.00) - 07/15/2016

Provides adult day health, case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, assessment/reassessment, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, specialized medical equipment and supplies, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/MR/DD ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky DOE ESEA Flexibility Request - 03/31/2015

“The Kentucky State Department of Education’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 9, 2012.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky HCBS Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

On March 17, 2014, updated Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) final rules became effective in the Federal Register for 1915(c) waivers, 1915(i) state plan services, and 1915(k) community first choice state plan option . As they pertain to 1915(c) waivers, these rules include requirements for several areas of HCBS: all residential and non-residential settings, provider- owned residential settings, person-centered planning process, service plan requirements, and conflict-free case management.    The goal of the HCBS final rules is to improve the services rendered to HCBS participants and to maximize the opportunities to receive services in integrated settings and realize the benefits of community living. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is allowing five years (until March 17, 2019) for states and providers to transition into compliance with the all settings and provider-owned settings requirements.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Supports for Community Living (0314.R04.00) - 09/01/2010

Provides case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, residential support level I, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, FMS, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, residential support level II, specialized medical equipment and supplies, technology assisted level I residential support, vehicle adaptation for individuals w ID/DD individuals ages 3 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

KY HCBS Waiver (0144.R05.00) - 07/01/2010

Provides adult day health, case management, homemaker, personal care, respite, OT, PT, speech therapy, financial management services, goods and services, home and community supports, support broker, assessment/reassessment, attendant care, environmental and minor home adaptation for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The unbridled spirit of Kentucky has shown that people with disabilities are able to succeed in their careers here in the Bluegrass State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kentucky’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.39%
Change from
2016 to 2017
4,454,189
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.2%
Change from
2016 to 2017
430,265
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.06%
Change from
2016 to 2017
129,954
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-0.86%
Change from
2016 to 2017
30.20%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.15%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.32%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 4,425,092 4,436,974 4,454,189
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 421,948 439,748 430,265
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 115,577 133,926 129,954
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,691,633 1,689,336 1,711,997
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 27.39% 30.46% 30.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.82% 75.44% 76.32%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.30% 5.00% 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 26.60% 27.40% 26.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.90% 16.50% 15.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 363,593 378,456 379,509
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 374,702 400,707 385,766
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 663,187 697,898 688,909
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 54,903 55,587 52,490
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 10,314 14,699 12,879
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,106 2,616 2,948
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,772 4,209 3,865
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 13,210 14,927 13,803
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,784 3,578 3,029

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,644 5,010 5,114
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.60% 2.90% 3.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 206,175 203,471 199,178

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 17,429 19,709 19,654
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 44,630 46,712 45,046
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 96,818 96,862 85,368
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 18.00% 20.30% 23.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.40% 1.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.70% 0.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50% 0.80% 0.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 608 577 658
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 282 299 309
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 224 338 366
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,223 6,023 6,431
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 43 37 472
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 27 25 209
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00% 68.00% 44.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.61 0.56 4.72

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,438
10,181
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 18 15 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,754 2,607 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,389 1,945 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,720 2,276 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,447 3,174 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 110 164 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.30% 33.90% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,455 5,268 4,625
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 323,767 321,459 315,423
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A 483 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 391 337 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $4,377,000 $3,128,000 $7,396,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $11,298,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $4,556,000 $8,244,000 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $70,671,000 $65,073,000 $60,568,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 10.00% 10.00% 30.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 5,726 6,035 5,228
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 1,002
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 579 786 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 15.40 14.40 60.60

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.15% 73.73% 73.81%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.22% 8.28% 8.31%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.86% 1.68% 1.72%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.19% 98.41% 97.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 18.43% 18.02% 18.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.17% 60.94% 59.39%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.82% 69.06% 68.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 39.74% 42.92% 41.31%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 788,499
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,104
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 421,644
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 85,649
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 507,293
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 538
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 97
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 635
AbilityOne wages (products). $3,841,069
AbilityOne wages (services). $901,392

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 20 22 25
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 2 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 22 24 26
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,152 1,340 1,564
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 161 161 73
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,313 1,501 1,637

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~The CRP Branch works closely with Kentucky APSE (Association of People Supporting Employment First) and its committees, and the 874K Coalition (a statewide Disability Advocacy Group) in a unified effort to secure additional state dollars for supported employment extended services. (Page 155) Title I

The CRP Branch works cooperatively with the Arc of Kentucky, among other groups, such as the Kentucky Association of Supporting Employment First (KYAPSE), the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (BHDDID), the Kentucky Rehabilitation Association (KRA), UK Human Development Institute, EKU Center of Excellence, most of the Comprehensive Care Centers in the state, and many Supported Employment providers, to educate families about supported employment and enlist their assistance in impacting additional funds for supported employment. (Page 156) Title I

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services. (Page 209) Title I
 

Customized Employment

~~Information regarding these potential funding sources is updated and shared by the Supported Employment Branch on a statewide basis to encourage increased funding for all phases of supported employment. 12. The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set. (Page 156) Title I

Training opportunities for staff on new policies related to customized employment and person-centered planning have occurred in statewide, regional, district, and local office training events. A statewide survey addressing the need of customized SE services has been given, as a means to continue to identify need for training as well as to identify the need for this valuable service. (Page 221)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Kentucky issued a statewide co—enrollment policy in 2015. Co—enrollment allows partners to leverage resources while providing a more comprehensive service delivery strategy that meets the needs of customers with several barriers to employment. All adults and dislocated workers who receive KCC services other than self—service and informational activities must be registered and considered a participant for WIOA Title I services. (Page 17) Title I

The WorkSmart Kentucky plan demonstrates a commitment to leveraging state and federal resources focused on workforce investment across state government. The process to develop the strategic plan involved all board members representing a variety of agencies, businesses and community partners. Focus groups consisting of business people, customers and staff were conducted. Each of the 25 action steps included in the WorkSmart plan is grounded in partnerships across state government. (Page 30) Title I

Information regarding these potential funding sources is updated and shared by the Supported Employment Branch on a statewide basis to encourage increased funding for all phases of supported employment. 12. The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set. (Page 156) Title I

The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation is pursuing a collaborative effort between the KY Department of Behavioral Health, the University of Kentucky and Eastern Kentucky University, to leverage funding for the continuation of state IPS Trainer and Fidelity Monitoring services. These services are a vital component to this evidenced-based practice of IPS supported employment services. These elements are vital to the continued support, growth and fidelity of the various programs throughout the state. (Page 161) Title I

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services. OVR will continue to maximize existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self—determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, provide training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. Currently, meetings are ongoing with the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and intellectual Disabilities to strengthen the partnership by leveraging funding to expand IPS SE services in unserved areas, as well as exploring possibilities of implementing IPS services for individuals with intellectual disabilities, which would be one of the first endeavors for this evidenced based practice. (Page 209) Title IV

Objective 5.2: Increase available resources & seek to leverage funding, staff resources, in—kind and programmatic support & other forms of assistance from partners.
OFB will collaborate with other statewide partners increasing their capacity to serve individuals with disabilities, and will refer eligible individuals who can benefit from the resources and services available at no cost.
OFB staff will provide training for Career Center Partner Staff to increase knowledge and confidence in working with individuals who are blind and visually impaired.
Report of Progress:
A plan for marketing to eye physicians was developed and implemented. The main focus is the Spring Optometric Association Annual meeting event held annually. OFB identifies staff with lower referrals from eye physicians through WEBI reports and they are targeted to attend the event for networking purposes. Though the conference we receive a list of eye physicians throughout the state that is then distributed to staff for marketing and outreach purposes.
Through the Career Pathways Grant OFB has made a lot of progress in collaboration with statewide partners to increase capacity in serving individuals. Project CASE Career Pathways Coordinators provided all the liaison and coordination services for the following STEM Camps, which were held in Eastern Kentucky on the campuses of Big Sandy Community and Technical College, Southeast Community and Technical College, and Hazard Community and Technical College. The grant has allowed for enhanced connections with the system initiatives in the local workforce areas. (Page 230) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

We currently have in place five other innovative programs that provide high school students with a variety of work–based learning, financial literacy, self–advocacy training, job exploration, career counseling, and workplace readiness training opportunities that exist in the community with employers, in our rehabilitation center, and in post–secondary institutions.

The Summer Youth Boot Camp Program focuses on job exploration, workplace readiness training, and self–advocacy and is held at the Charles W. McDowell Center in Louisville. It is an intensive four week program based on the work of Dr. Karen Wolffe that introduces employability skills to transition aged individuals. The curriculum is specific to individuals that are blind or visually impaired.

The Summer Work Experience Program is in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Providers. CRPs are paid to find work experiences in competitive integrated settings for transition aged individuals. The work experiences last six to eight weeks and the students are paid by the Office for the Blind for the time worked. The goals of the work experience are to provide community based career exploration and the opportunity to practice work readiness skills. It is also hoped that by participating in the work experience program, employers will be open to providing more opportunities for individuals who are blind or visually impaired in their communities. (Page 310) 

School to Work Transition

~~Service coordination activities may also include resource information about vocational rehabilitation, presentations, handouts, and staff development. The counselor works in a collaborative team process along with the local education agency to develop the transition services section of the Individualized Education Program (IEP) and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for transitioning students. Both the IEP and IPE will include, if appropriate, a statement of interagency responsibilities or any needed linkages by which the responsibilities of other entities are satisfied. (Pages 151-152) Title I

VR counselors attend transition related meetings as early at age 14 and act as a consultant in the student’s IEP. Early contact and intervention not only saves the VR counselor considerable time and effort, it allows the student and parents the opportunity to plan a realistic vocational path that will lead them to the vocational goal of their choice. VR counselors shall attend student IEP meetings starting at age 14.
The school system will continue to have the primary responsibility for accommodations and student’s educational needs. Once the student graduates OVR will become the primary agent. It is mandatory that the IPE be developed with the student 90 days after eligibility or prior to graduation, whichever comes first.
An IPE is developed for each student determined eligible and that meets the current order of selection for vocational rehabilitation services. The IPE should address the student’s pre-employment transition services needs in the areas of job exploration counseling, work based learning experiences, counseling regarding post-secondary training opportunities, workplace readiness training to assist in the development of social and independent living skills, and instruction in self-advocacy. (Pages 152-153) Title I

Provisions under the cooperative agreement include: 1. Process for making student referrals to the OVR; 2. Determination of eligibility for OVR services; 3. Joint sharing and use of evaluations and assessments; 4. Planning and development of individualized programs (IEP and IPE) as a collaborative team process; 5. Role of educational personnel in transition planning; 6. Role of the OVR counselor in outreach to, identification of, and transition planning for eligible students with disabilities; 7. Use of memoranda of agreement (MOA) at the local level to facilitate and coordinate transition services for secondary students with disabilities; 8. State coordination with agencies in the provision of transition services inclusive of pre — employment transition services; 9. A comprehensive system of personnel development for qualified personnel responsible for transition services; 10. Determination of lead agencies; 11. Financial responsibilities; 12. Status of services for an individual student/consumer during a dispute; 13. Agency dispute resolution; 14. Due process for the individual student/consumer. 15. Memoranda of Agreements at the Local Level. (Page 153) Title I

The CWTP is designed to provide pre-employment transition services to all students with disabilities and provide transition services to assist VR eligible students with the most significant disabilities in transitioning from high school to competitive integrated employment. Student employment coordinators, funded by the local education agency, refer students to OVR in order to provide pre—employment transition services during their final three years of school. 
During this time, should the student need individualized transition services, counselors work with the employment coordinators to ensure that community vocational services provided lead to the completion of an individualized vocational evaluation and the development of individualized programs (IEP and IPE) to ensure successful transitioning from high school to post school activities, including employment. Upon completion of the IPE, further community—based vocational services are provided to the student in the form of training for the planned vocational goal. The desired outcome for participants in the CWTP Transition Services is a post—school outcome or paid employment. 
Outreach to students also occurs through OVR’s contractual agreements with the Kentucky Career and Technical Educational College System and the nine Special Education Cooperatives for pre-employment transition services. (Page 154) Title I

An IPE is developed for each student determined eligible and that meets the current order of selection for vocational rehabilitation services. The IPE should address the student’s pre-employment transition services needs in the areas of job exploration counseling, work based learning experiences, counseling regarding post-secondary training opportunities, workplace readiness training to assist in the development of social and independent living skills, and instruction in self-advocacy. (Page 153) Title I

A variety of partnerships are needed in order to market the benefits of a variety of earn and learn opportunities, including registered apprenticeships to Kentucky business for individuals with disabilities including youth and students with disabilities. OFB will work with its existing partnerships among workforce, economic development, education and business entities in fostering work based learning opportunities. (Page 158) Title I

The CWTP is designed to provide pre-employment transition services to all students with disabilities and provide transition services to assist VR eligible students with the most significant disabilities in transitioning from high school to competitive integrated employment. There will be a Supported Employment Consulting fee available with the Community Work Transition program for seamless transition into competitive integrated employment. There are specific programs i n place with specialized services for the blind and visually impaired. The PATH Program focuses on job exploration, workplace readiness training, and self-advocacy and is an intensive three week program based on the work of Dr. Karen Wolffe that introduces employability skills to students with disabilities. The curriculum is specific to individuals that are blind or visually impaired. The Summer Work Experience Program is in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Providers. CRPs are paid to find work experiences in competitive integrated settings for transition aged individuals. The goals of the work experience are to provide community based career exploration and the opportunity to practice work readiness skills. It is also hoped that by participating in the work experience program, employers will be open to providing more opportunities for individuals who are blind or visually impaired in their communities. The Summer Work Program is in collaboration with the Kentucky School for the Blind, Kentucky Kingdom, the American Printing House for the Blind, and the Louisville Zoo. The World of Work Program is another program in which the OFB and KSB provide work based learning experiences to students. The program provides competitive integrated work experiences to students that attend the Kentucky School for the Blind. The INSIGHT Post-Secondary Preparation Program is held each summer at Morehead State University. Students are able to participate in college classes, live in the dorm, and participate in social activities both on and off campus during this eight day program. They receive counseling on post-secondary opportunities and are taught the self-advocacy skills necessary to succeed in a post-secondary environment along with workplace readiness skills. (Page 159) Title I

Rehabilitation counselors work collaboratively with the special education cooperatives, high school education teachers, local directors of special education, and job coaches for students transitioning from high school into employment. OVR Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors attend IEP and ARC meetings working with the team in establishing a vocational goal. This assures the development of the students IPE in conjunction with the vocational rehabilitation IEP. OVR provides support to teaching instructors, school staff and job coaches regarding rehabilitation issues and other areas of expertise such as Assistive Technology to ensure successful placements. Often rural schools do not have the needed resources; therefore OVR staff offer their expertise based on the individual needs of the student working closely with all staff involved with IDEA.  (Page 181) Title I

gain this year, VI teachers indicated that their expectations in working with a counselor are mainly to provide resources for the student/family, and to include the counselor as part of the student’s IEP team. However, overall the survey indicated that the VI teachers expect greater involvement in the provision of guidance and counseling, training, the employment proves and career counseling. These beliefs may indicate a need to not only affirm our own commitment to early involvement in planning, but to find new ways to stay involved and easily accessible. VI teachers gave positive ratings to OFB”s counseling staff in areas such as knowledge, rapport building ability, and ability to connect to needed vocational services such as training, job search and placement, including post-secondary education as well the development of strong appropriate vocational goals. (Page 192) Title IV

WIOA allows KY OVR to address these particular issues by allocating funds for pre-employment transition services. WIOA mandates 15% of all federal funds be set aside to provide pre-employment
Page 196transition services. Indications of post-school success are broken into categories in ‘Predictors of Post-School Success in Taxonomy 2.0. (Test, et al., 2009) clearly noting areas where Vocational Rehabilitation may play vital roles. The predictors are (possible VR role in parentheses): Student Development (assessment, employment skills attainment, supports), Student-focused planning (IEP development ant IPE participation), and Family engagement (family involvement, family empowerment, and family preparation), Program Structures (strategic planning, high expectation, and high involvement), Interagency Collaboration (collaborative framework, and collaborative service delivery). (Pages 195-196) Title IV

All training programs at the Carl D. Perkins Vocational Training Center (CDPVTC) have associated work based learning experiences in the local community. The agency is always pursuing other collaborative activities to provide Pre-ETS, and we have made at least 9 proposals to Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). These proposals are in the process of being implemented. The contract was completed and renewed for a partnership with the Kentucky Partnership for Families and Children to sponsor students to attend the KPFC Youth Parent Conference. The PepNet2 project grant has ended related to partnerships with the school system and KDE to improve transition outcomes for students who are deaf and hard of hearing. This population, however, will be the focus of a Co-Op contact as a targeted population. (Pages 219-220) Title IV

Goal 6: To engage youth, parents, high schools, and other transition specialists in exploring and planning career choices that connect to a full range of post—secondary options for training, career development, and competitive integrated employment.
Objective 6.1: To improve the number, quality, and rate of employment outcomes for youth and students participating in Transition services.
Strategies
VR Counseling Staff, school counseling and teaching staff, and VI teachers statewide will collaborate to achieve earlier involvement of OFB counselors in IEP development of vocational goals. OFB transition policies and practices used to guide the implementation and continuous improvement of services leading to employment will be based on the gathering and tracking data through the case management system. (Page 230) Title IV

Objective 6.3: Enhance student awareness of enrollment in transition programs
Promote summer transition programs through innovative marketing strategies in order to increase referrals. Implementation of marketing strategies to VI teachers, students and their families.
Report of Progress:
Path a summer transition program for students ages 14-21 who are blind and visually impaired was held at the Charles W. McDowell Center in Louisville during July. There were 16 students in attendance. Students participated in classes teaching blindness skills such as orientation and mobility, assistive technology and braille. Additionally, the curriculum had a focus on pre-employability skills such as local labor market information, career pathways, financial literacy and interest inventories. Students went off site for employment site tours and participated in recreational activities that provided for many their first exposure to those kinds of events. (Pages 230-231) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~In October 2015, Kentucky was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR—eligible individuals, including youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized post—secondary credentials necessary to secure competitive, integrated employment in high—demand, high—quality occupations.
This five—year grant award of nearly $4.4 million is named Project CASE (Creating Access to Successful Employment). Project CASE has strong support from the leadership of OVR, OET, KYAE and the Department of Education. Title IV

Project CASE activities are consistent with the section 101(d) of WIOA, with focus on improved alignment of federal programs to strengthen the capacity of state workforce systems to meet emerging employers’ needs with appropriately skilled and credentialed individuals. Project CASE provides a solid strategy for providing individuals with disabilities who face barriers to employment with workforce investment activities, education and supportive services to enter and retain employment.
Career Pathways initiatives in Kentucky over the past decade have created partnerships between industry and education at the secondary and post—secondary levels, and forged important links to strengthen local economies. Project CASE will help ensure that individuals with disabilities, even at the secondary school level, are not left out of participating in these existing initiatives and can prepare for and obtain jobs in high—wage, high—demand occupations. (Page 32) Title I

Project CASE is a collaborative effort between state vocational rehabilitation agencies, adult education, secondary and post—secondary education, career centers, employers and other partners to demonstrate how career pathways can help individuals with disabilities acquire the marketable skills and attain recognized credentials that lead to employment in high—demand occupations. In Kentucky, two pilot projects are planned in the Metro Louisville and Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) regions; these will engage seven and 23 counties respectively. (Page 44) Title I

Through Project CASE, a program developed from the use of Federal grant funding through the Rehabilitation Services Administration, OVR has stronger coordination and collaboration with the Youth Career Centers and other Kentucky Career Centers. Partnering with Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) and KentuckianaWorks in the hiring of Career Pathway Coordinators, and in cross-agency training of staff on career pathways for students with disabilities, Project CASE will ensure sustained partnerships. (Pages 150-151) Title I
One project that aligns with this area in serving students is Project CASE (Creating Access to Successful Employment). In October 2015, the Kentucky Office for the Blind/Kentucky Career Center was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR-eligible individuals, including students and youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized postsecondary credentials necessary to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations. Creating Access to Successful Employment (CASE) will help ensure that individuals with disabilities, even at the secondary school level, are not left out of participating in these existing initiatives, and can prepare for and obtain jobs in high-wage and high-demand occupations.  (Page 212) Title IV

A federal Career Pathways grant recently received by the Kentucky Office for the Blind (OFB) from the Rehabilitation Services Administration. OVR will collaborate with OFB on assisting consumers in three career pathways (healthcare, manufacturing, and information technology) in two of Kentucky Career Centers, Kentuckian Works in the Louisville metropolitan area and the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) in rural Appalachia.  (Page 217) Title IV

Apprenticeship
OVR can work with consumers on internships, apprenticeships, and on—the—job training arrangements as additional options on the career pathway to employment. These options allow individuals to train while being actual employees. (Page 20) Title I A variety of partnerships are needed in order to market the benefits of a variety of earn and learn opportunities, including registered apprenticeships to Kentucky business for individuals with disabilities including youth and students with disabilities. OFB will work with its existing partnerships among workforce, economic development, education and business entities in fostering work based learning opportunities. (Page 158) Title I As a means of providing Pre—Employment Transition Services, OVR will work with partner agencies in Workforce Development to identify existing apprenticeship programs with employers with which OVR may partner to focus on incorporating students and youth with disabilities into the programs. The Kentucky Apprenticeship program recently moved from the Department of Labor to Workforce. OVR partners with the Office of Autism in order to understand how to assist youth on the spectrum with attaining and maintaining employment. A model program focused on creating apprenticeship opportunities for students and youth with disabilities will be developed in such a manner as to be replicated in urban and rural areas alike. This will expand employment opportunities for all the youth with disabilities in Kentucky. (Page 159) Title I
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Existing legacy case management systems across WIOA Title I, Wagner Peyser, Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education are disparate and insular: Currently, the Office of Employment and Training (OET) and the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) are supported by insular case management systems that respond to requests for the following programs: • Wagner Peyser Labor Exchange (Employ Kentucky Operating System - EKOS) • Unemployment Insurance — both benefits and tax/collections (Mainframe and Kentucky’s Electronic Workplace for Employment Services — KEWES) • Veterans Program • Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Program • National Emergency Grants • High Growth Job Training • Foreign Labor Certification • Health Care Tax Credit System • Trade Adjustment Act • Work Opportunities Tax Credit • Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) • Student data • Customer records, services provided and costs of services for individuals with disabilities and blindness — Case Management System — CMS • Social Security Reimbursement tracking and processing • Social Security Ticket to Work assignment tracking and processing  (Pages 45-46) Title I

There is a Social Security Reimbursement module within CMS that enables each respective agency to seek reimbursement for the cost of the services provided to agency consumers receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. There is a Maximus module that generates files that are submitted to Social Security for the Ticket to Work program and tracks responses and ticket assignments. In July 2016, Kentucky ceased WIA data collection and reporting and began working to implement WIOA data collection and reporting requirements in addition to other USDOE and state reporting. CMS is a staff only application with a web front end. An interface exists between CMS and eMARS, the state’s payment system, to enable processing of payments to, and refunds from, vendors. The system is Section 508 and Bobby compliant and staff use screen readers such as JAWS, ZoomText and WindowEyes, as well as speech recognition software such as Dragon Naturally Speaking.  (Page 46-47) Title I

OFB continues to provide training on the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 as well as training on the ADA, Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act (TWWIIA). Central office and other support staff as well as members of the State Rehabilitation Council will be included in all appropriate HRD activities. OFB is vested in using technology and is actively identifying potential web-based training programs that will allow staff the opportunity to utilize these alternative training methods for increased professional development. (Pages 178-179) Title I

GOAL III: Provide information concerning benefits planning and financial planning in order to promote inclusion, integration, and empowerment of individuals with the most significant and significant disabilities. We have written and passed a new policy on Benefits Planning and Analysis. A fact sheet has been developed for resources in benefits planning that will be given to OVR consumers at time of eligibility or later in the case if they begin receiving Social Security benefits. We are also 8 months in on the SGA project, which gives benefits planning to individuals with SSI and seeks to help them gain competitive integrated employment. OVR services are completed in an expedited fashion in order to insure quicker service provision. The agency has developed a Spanish version of the Benefits Planning fact sheet to make it more accessible. The staff has been trained on Disability Benefits 101(DB101) an electronic system to help with benefits planning. It was launched in December of 2017. As of 2017, the agency is keeping the fee for a Benefits Analysis at $450, but we are hoping the use of DB101 will cut down on the authorization for a benefits analysis. The agency is also hoping that benefits counseling is provided earlier in the process and planning of a case. The agency is also encouraging Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and non-profit providers to consider providing benefits planning services. The agency is encouraging the CRPs and non-profit providers to participate in “Introduction to Social Security Disability Benefits, Work Incentives, and Employment Support Programs” offered by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in hopes that some staff might become interested in pursuing certification to provide those services. (Page 220) Title IV

The WIPA Program for one half of the state is just now up and running. GOAL IV: To provide job placement and supported employment services in order for consumers with significant and most significant disabilities respectively to attain competitive integrated employment. IMPEDIMENTS: No impediments at this time (Page 232) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Goal 2: Work-Based Learning Infrastructure — Create a state-level framework to facilitate employer engagement in work-based learning and ensure consistency in definitions used across the education and training continuum partners regarding definition. • define it • governance structure that is partnership-based • standardized continuum • asset map • identify best practices at every level • create Kentucky model • implement and model • communication strategy (Page 28) Title I

In addition to leveraging and expanding the KSN effort, Kentucky expects a great deal of new activity assessing and addressing employer needs via existing partnerships with business organizations like the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, and most importantly, through new strategies and initiatives crafted by the new administration. (Page 40) Title I

OVR employs fourteen job placement specialists across the state. These specialists are responsible for developing relationships with local employers to facilitate the placement of OVR consumers into competitive integrated employment. Employer engagement activities may include: 1) technical assistance to employers on hiring individuals with disabilities; 2) disability awareness training 3) ongoing and regular contact with employers 4) attending meetings of local Chambers of Commerce, Society of Human Resource Managers (SHRM), and other business related groups; and 5) no cost accessibility surveys to employers. OVR employs a statewide Job Placement Coordinator who coordinates all job placement activities. This staff member trains new job placement specialists, provides technical assistance to the job placement specialists and to districts where there are no job placement specialists, pursues agency—wide relationships with large employers, and acts as the agency contact for the National NET and TAP programs managed by CSAVR. (Page 157) Title I

The Kentucky Skills Network (KSN) is a partnership of local and state workforce development organizations dedicated to providing proactive business services and industry skills development. Through local “Business Service Teams” the KSN has laid a foundation for coordinated employer services that will be leveraged in the coming four years. (Page 157) Title IV

In October 2015, the Kentucky Office for the Blind/Kentucky Career Center was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR-eligible individuals, including youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized postsecondary credentials necessary to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations. Under this project employer engagement is a goal area. For all five years of the grant staff will conduct employer engagement activities such as regional employer conferences in the two project target areas on a variety of topics. 

The Statewide Council for Vocational Rehabilitation (SCVR), Kentucky’s State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), includes several employers and a representative of the Workforce Investment Board who provide important input on agency policy and activities related to employment. OVR, in conjunction with SCVR, conducts a Job Placement Month annually in October which includes many events around the state that promote collaboration with employers. Regional Employer Recognition Awards are given out during the month to employers who have hired OVR consumers. OVR will also continue to partner with local initiatives like Project SEARCH in Northern Kentucky and the Coalition for Workforce Diversity in Louisville, Lexington, Ashland, and Mayfield to identify and educate employers willing to develop new programs specifically designed to focus on hiring and training individuals with disabilities. (Page 158) Title I

Goal 4: Recruit, employ, retain and train the most qualified and highly skilled rehabilitation staff which reflects employment focused, job driven outcomes.
Objective 4.1: Increase the skills and competency levels of all rehabilitation staff statewide. Strategies Maximize training funds to support staff in professional training and development activities. Provide quality training statewide that is job specific and targeted to address any deficiencies identified in quality assurance reviews or training needs assessments. Provide job—driven training that promotes skill enhance and employer engagement. (Page 224) Title IV

LVER staff indirectly serve veterans through direct business outreach to promote the hiring of qualified veterans and obtain job orders for review of potential cross—match with veterans seeking employment. (Page 252) Title IV

Data Collection
Kentucky will build a workforce investment system assessment that combines the results of the independent review and the collection of common performance measures and aligns those results with program improvements and innovations. Basic service delivery performance standards will be set to continuously improve. New comprehensive WIOA service delivery ideas and standards will be added over time to help ensure that common measure and customer satisfaction results go up over time. Kentucky will add to this basic approach and develop broader continuous improvement activities for across the workforce system. (Page 29) Title I Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We anticipate that the current system will be able to collect the necessary data beginning 7/1/2016 and produce accurate reports prior to the due dates for Rehabilitation Services Administration and common measures reporting. (Page 213) Title IV Objective 4.2: Improve services to underserved populations within the blind and visually impaired community, including substance abuse, mental health, and criminal background. Strategies Participate in cross training's with agencies who provide services to treat mental illness, substance abuse to provide all professionals a better understanding of the unique services necessary to improve outcomes for consumers. Collaborate with criminal justice agencies to promote better understanding of issues that impact employment for consumers with backgrounds. Reports of Progress: Given budget constraints progress on this goal area was limited. Staff were provided training for those areas through quality assurance reviews deficiencies were identified and areas of concern voiced by staff through the training assessment were prevalent. Trainings occurred for changes in the case management system for 911 fields as well as on Pre-employment Transition Services. The Cabinet sponsored cross training for the area or team building. There was no progress for the area of substance abuse, mental health or criminal backgrounds. (Page 224) Title IV The Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, Department of Workforce Investment is currently working to develop a single system for all of the data collection needs of the Department including the Office of Employment and Training, Office for the Blind and Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. This system is being developed in phases. The current system has been edited to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We will continue to make changes identified as necessary to correct or improve that process. We anticipate that the new system will be available for OVR/OFB by 12/31/2019.KEE Suite is the integrated case management system being developed for state agencies (OVR, OFB, OET, CHFS, Adult Ed, WIOA, etc.) to streamline services for program participants in the Commonwealth. It is currently planned to replace OVR/OFB’s current case management system in the fall of 2019. We are in the beginning planning stages for the VR specific portion of the system. All information entered into the system will be shared on Permission based guidelines, set by the Agency(s) based on State and Federal Law. Shared Personally Identifiable Information (PII) that will be available to the participating partners in this system will be Common basic information requested and collected from the participant by each partner to streamline and simplify the process for the participant instead of the participant being required to answer and supply the same information multiple times, and to facilitate the federal reporting of the WIOA required Common Measures. VR specific data and records will be secured by access restrictions in place based on need to know. Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. Once a baseline is determined and the relationship between services, partnerships, etc. and successful outcomes and measurable progress is analyzed, strategies will be developed to improve the performance outcomes. (Page 236) Title IV
511

~~In relation to Section 511 of WIOA, it was asked whether the agency was a 14C certificate holder, and their current knowledge about this legislation. In summary, they were asked to list their agency if they had a need for further training. The CRP survey was sent to the 54 CRPs authorized as vendors for KYOVR or KYOFB with 34 actually initiating and completing the survey, for a 63% completion rate. Of the respondents, 53% (18) had provided services to KYOVR or KYOFB consumers for five years or less and 21% (7) had provided services for more than 20 years. When inquired, 38% (13) of the respondents stated their agency received less than 10 referrals per year. In regards to size of the agency, 53% (18) had less than 10 staff and 21% (7) reported more than 50 employees. Based on the fact that there was at least 1 response in all choices of the demographic questions it was felt that a variety of CRPs are represented in the survey responses. (Page 194) Title IV

GOAL V: To implement Section 511 of WIOA. We have team together to look at the best way of implementing this process. We will target students who are not usually referred to OVR while in school, but would have been sent straight to the Sheltered Workshop once out of School, for an early referral to OVR to go through the VR process. Youths out of school but younger than 24 will be referred to an OVR counselor to go through the VR Process. Letters will go out to all 14C Programs in Kentucky in the spring of 2016 explaining section 511 and VR’s involvement in the process. Each 14C will be visited by one of the 3 SE Consultants. Educational groups will be set up for all the current employees of the 14C facilities about career exploration and community integrated employment. These will be done every 6 months for the 1st two years and annually thereafter. A Section 511 team was created and fulfilled identified goals. Communication with 14c holders occurred to provide education on Section 511. A Section 511 video was developed for consumers to view to meet the career counseling mandate. Career counseling participation and completion documents are collected and reviewed to ensure requirements are met. Ongoing monitoring continues by CRP consultants. Input continues to be gathered and communication continues to occur and information is collected during trainings, meetings and focus groups. Process implementation was provided to educate CRP’s on Section 511, and to ensure career counseling is provided to consumers. Effective communication and monitoring continues to occur to ensure consumer needs and requirements are met. Documentation is obtained from the CRP Branch as it relates to refusal of services. (Page 221) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
OVR will have stronger coordination and collaboration with the Youth Career Center offices and other Kentucky Career Center offices in the EKCEP and KentuckianaWorks regions. Adult Education is an active partner in CASE providing supports through the AOKY program. Accelerating Opportunity is aimed at creating effective pathways to credentials for low-skilled adults (testing at a sixth-12th academic grade level) so they can earn the credentials they need to get a family sustaining job. The initiative seeks to reform how education is delivered to low-skilled adults by integrating basic skills education with technical training while providing wrap around services that include instructional and career supports for adult learners. The initiative is informed by I-BEST, an accelerated, integrated instructional model in which adult education and technical instructors work together in the classroom. Career and Technical Education is closely aligned with the project as well. Kentucky will use funds to ensure that all youth program elements are made available to youth. The state supports the local workforce areas in designing youth programs tailored to the needs of in-school and out-of-school youth in local communities. Local areas encourage youth to use one-stop services as needed. Areas have designed special referral processes for youth who come into one-stops and one area has developed a one-stop career center specifically for youth. Vocational Rehabilitation staff will provide high quality services and communication to transition students and youth, provide accurate and timely information related to work incentives and long-term supports for Social Security recipients, increase and improve job placement options and opportunities for persons served, strengthen and expand competitive integrated employment opportunities by implementing Section 511 of WIOA, improve programmatic and physical accessibility to workforce investment system partners and career center offices, communicate and cooperate with workforce partners on accountability measures discussed in Section 116 of WIOA and seek to meet the standards of WIOA, expand opportunities for increased services, such as supported employment, provide options for transportation and information related to medical services available to consumers, and provide a more timely and efficient process for accessing services. (Pages 37-38) Title I Kentucky assesses the overall effectiveness of the workforce investment system in relation to the strategic vision and goals of the WorkSmart Kentucky and Economic Competitiveness plans, seeking integration of activities and information from all the core programs. The ultimate goal is to increase the long—term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment, to improve services to employers and demonstrate continuous improvement. Kentucky will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with Section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), and continuous improvement of the career center. (Page 51) Title I Accessibility is addressed on several levels and venues in the KCC. Given that OVR staffs are housed in many of the career center offices and are a central part of the workforce programs, there is a heightened sense of assuring this topic is addressed. Accessibility is a part of the required certification process under II. Career Center (office) Management: Physical Infrastructure and Accessibility. The standards that apply to this are as follows: Standard 1: Career Center offices are accessible so that all customers can fully use services and resources. (ADA compliant checklist) KCC offices: • are fully ADA compliant; • are feasible (As new center locations are selected, KCC offices are located in areas that are convenient for their customers, close to major highways, on public transportation routes, centrally—located, close to heavily—trafficked areas such as malls and shopping centers, etc.); • provide assistive technology to assist customers with disabilities (visual, hearing or physical) so they can access computers and other KCC resources/services; • evaluate assistive technology annually to ensure that it is up—to—date and fully functioning. • provide free parking and inclusive parking spaces that are adequate for the average level of customer traffic, especially for individuals with disabilities; and • make services accessible to customers who have language and literacy barriers (non—English speakers or individuals with hearing impairments, disabilities or literacy/reading barriers). For assistive technology, the objective is to design a computer workstation/kiosk that can be used by individuals with the widest possible range of abilities and/or circumstances. Kentucky follows the guidelines set forth by the Job Accommodation Network, One—Stop Disability Resource Manual. All Kentucky Career Center offices are expected to ensure universal access to programs and activities for all eligible individuals. Kentucky has taken steps to ensure equitable access to and participation in federally funded programs for all consumers and for agency staff regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or age. OET will comply with the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Public Law 101—336, and applicable federal regulations relating there to prohibiting discrimination against otherwise qualified disabled individuals under any program or activity and adhere to the U.S. Department of Labor Final Rule on Federal Executive Order 11246. (Page 61) Title I GEPA section 427—Special Needs/Barriers to participation Kentucky recently completed the RFA process for services under WIOA. As part of that RFA process, each applicant was directed to address the thirteen AFLEA considerations. Consideration number two addresses special needs populations and barriers. KYAE Skills U weighted heavily the responses provided in the considerations in the selection of applicants for service. Applicants addressed how they will serve special needs populations Page 135and students with barriers through ADA compliance, Office of Rehabilitation (OVR) assessment on physical disabilities, assistive technologies and other reasonable accommodations as well as partnerships with state agencies that provide support services to students with barriers or special needs. All programs have been supplied with the Burlington English product as one tool to use with non-English speaking students. In addition, all local programs sign contracts and affidavits that cover Title IX and affirm they will not discriminate on the basis of age, color, race or any protected class under Title VI and VII of the Civil Right Act of 1964, Age discrimination Act of 1975, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and all applicable laws which prohibit discrimination. Programs are continually monitored by state staff of Administration and Accountability and on a rotating basis participate in an agreed upon procedures audit by the State Auditor of Public Accounts as to the terms of the contract. State employees are encouraged to express their concerns regarding existing or potential barriers or prohibitions to equal employment opportunity due to race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, ancestry, veteran status, and disability in accordance with state and federal laws. EEO assistance is available by contacting the Human Resources EEO Counselor/Coordinator or the State EEO Coordinator. (Page 134) Title I OVR employs fourteen job placement specialists across the state. These specialists are responsible for developing relationships with local employers to facilitate the placement of OVR consumers into competitive integrated employment. Employer engagement activities may include: 1) technical assistance to employers on hiring individuals with disabilities; 2) disability awareness training 3) ongoing and regular contact with employers 4) attending meetings of local Chambers of Commerce, Society of Human Resource Managers (SHRM), and other business related groups; and 5) no cost accessibility surveys to employers. (Page 157) Title I The agency has also worked diligently with other state agencies to bring web-designs created by state entities into compliance with accessibility laws. This is an ongoing process and the agency will continue to push for changes necessary to make all state government technology and software systems fully accessible. (Page 176) Title I Goal 2: continue to monitor and explore additional strategies to improve CRP service quality and compliance Strategies: Involve job coaches with transition students by the last semester of school; Strategies: Train staff on new policies related to customized employment and person—centered planning; Strategies: Require notes to be submitted by Supported Employment Providers by the 5th day of each month. Strategies: Continued monitoring by the Section 511 Implementation Team to insure agency compliance to WIOA requirements related to OVR relationships with sheltered workshops; (Page 199) Title IV
Vets
Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) is a $2.4 million grant administered by OET with staff located in the Kentucky Career Center offices statewide. Those who are both veterans and ex-offenders fall within a category specified to be served under this grant. Currently, the state coordinator receives a monthly list of every incarcerated veteran in Kentucky from the Department of Corrections; those in local jails and state facilities, with their release dates. The nearest disabled veterans outreach program specialist (DVOP) reaches out to these individuals to offer re-entry employment preparation and support services prior to release, when possible. After release, JVSG staff work with the each individual from their KCC office. KCC partners with the Department of Corrections (DOC) and Adult Education to provide training and assessments toward achieving a National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC) for anyone during incarceration. On Jan. 1, 2016, DOC began offering 30 days of “good time” off on sentences of individuals who earn an NCRC. After release, KCC offers a complete portfolio of services to ex-offenders. As a population with barriers to employment, they are entitled to additional WIOA services facilitated OET’s NCRC coordinator. Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) - A special tax credit is available to employers who hire qualified ex-felons. The qualified ex-felon is an individual who has been convicted of a felony or released from incarceration for a felony conviction within 12 months prior to the individual’s start date. (Page 25) Title IV Veterans Each career center office, along with each of the 10 local areas, provides “Priority of Service” to veterans for all Department of Labor funded programs. Each customer entering the local office receives a questionnaire that is used to determine whether the customer is priority-of-service eligible. If the customer is an eligible “covered person,” he/she receives a fact sheet listing all of the services and programs along with the program’s qualifications, which must abide by the Priority of Service mandate. The covered person is then seen by the first available staff person or referred to the disabled veterans program specialists if they are determined to have one of the significant barriers to employment as specified by the appropriate veterans program letters. Additionally, Kentucky’s Focus Career system automatically contacts veterans matched to new job orders 24 hours before non-veterans. (Page 26-27) Title I Eligible veterans and eligible persons who are determined to have a significant barrier to employment, as defined in VPL 03-14 changes 1 and 2 or most current guidance, are referred to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program specialist (DVOP). Additionally, any eligible veterans or eligible persons who are part of a designated additional population by the Assistant Secretary, as defined in VPL 04-14 or current guidance, will be referred to the DVOP. These referrals will be made following an initial identification of an SBE through the registration process. Customers registering electronically using Kentucky’s Focus Career module will be asked a series of questions to determine if they are priority of service eligible. If they are identified as a covered person, they are presented with a screen defining priority of service and directed to their local career center for further information on services and programs. (Page 60) Initial contact at a KCC visited by a veteran and other eligible person will be by an intake/assessment customer service staff member. This person will provide the veteran with a self—assessment form that determines if the individual is qualified as having Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE), and is to be referred to a DVOP specialist. OET will continue to emphasize and train KCC staff to identify those who are already in the system seeking services, those entering the KCC and those found by the DVOP conducting outreach that are consistent with these target populations. These targeted populations include: • special disabled or disabled veterans, as defined in 38 USC §4211(1) and (3); • homeless veterans and those veterans who are at—risk of becoming homeless (any individual or family who is fleeing, or is attempting to flee, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, or other dangerous or life-threatening conditions in the individual’s or family’s current housing situation, including where the health and safety of children are jeopardized, and who have no other residence and lack the resources or support networks to obtain other permanent housing); • recently—separated service member, as defined in 38 USC §4211(6); • ex—offenders, as defined by WIOA Section 101(38); • veterans lacking a high school diploma or equivalent; • low—income veterans, as defined by WIOA Section 101(36); • 18 to 24 year—old veterans, as directed by the assistant director for Veterans Employment and Training (ASVET) in Veterans Program Letter (VPL) 04—14; • transitioning service members assessed as not meeting the Career Readiness Standards, as documented on DD2958 and active duty services members being involuntarily separated through a service reduction in force as described in (VPL) 07—14; and • wounded, ill or injured service members receiving treatment at a military treatment facility or a warrior transition unit and the spouses and family caregivers of such wounded, ill or injured service members as described in (VPL) 08—14. (Page 250) Title IV DVOP specialists provide intensive services to veterans with SBEs, other eligible veterans, and other eligible persons as specified by 38 USC §4103A, and at the direction of the ASVET through guidance contained in VPL 03—14, VPL 03—14 Change 1, VPL 03—14 Change 2, VPL 04—14, VPL 07—14 and VPL 08—14. DVOP specialists will provide a full array of employment, training and placement services to those veterans with one or more SBEs. DVOP specialists will also facilitate services through an effective case management strategy. DVOP specialists conduct an assessment, and provide services to veterans and eligible persons to include: • evaluation of skill levels and needs; • development of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) to identify employment goals, appropriate objectives, and appropriate combination of services for the participant to achieve the employment goals; • coordination of supportive services with applicable providers; • assistance to KCC partners in providing services to veterans on a priority basis; and • conducting outreach to identify those veterans and other eligible persons, ensuring they receive appropriate intensive services, case management and other workforce services necessary to re— turn to meaningful, sustainable employment. LVER staff perform only those duties specified in 38 USC §4104(b), in accordance with guidance promulgated at VPL 03—14. These are related to direct outreach with businesses, and facilitation within the state’s employment service delivery system. LVER staff is assigned duties that promote veterans to businesses, business associations, and business groups. When business outreach is primarily conducted by a Business Services Team, the LVER will be included as an active member. Additional LVER activities and services include, but are not limited to the following: • planning and participating in job and career fairs; • coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs, businesses and business organizations to promote employment and training programs for veterans; • informing federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans; • promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and • conducting veterans’ programs training for all KCC staff. (Page 250) Title I Service delivery is conducted through an integrated delivery system within the KCC structure. Crosstrained, responsive customer service teams throughout the Commonwealth provide effective services. Upon arrival to a KCC, veterans with SBEs will be identified using a self—assessment form and if eligible they will be referred to the DVOP specialist for further assessment, services and intensive case management as required. LVER staff work with the Business Services Team to promote the hiring of veterans to employers. LVERs are key members of the Business Services Teams, providing information on current employer job openings, assisting employers seeking to hire qualified veterans, and actively promoting job—ready veterans to employers. (Page 251) Title IV Kentucky possesses the capacity and capability to serve all veterans. DVOP Specialists, however, only serve those veterans with SBEs, and other targeted populations as directed by the Secretary. These include: • special disabled or disabled veterans, as defined in 38 USC §4211(1) and (3); • homeless veterans and those veterans who are at—risk of becoming homeless; • recently—separated service member, as defined in 38 USC §4211(6); • ex—offenders, as defined by WIOA Section 101(38); • veterans lacking a high school diploma or equivalent; • low Income veterans, as defined by WIOA Section 101(36); • 18— to 24—year—old veterans, as directed by the assistant director for Veterans Employment and Training (ASVET) in Veterans Program Letter (VPL) 04—14. • Transitioning service member assessed as not meeting the Career Readiness Standards, as documented on DD2958 and active duty services members being involuntarily separated through a service reduction in force as described in (VPL) 07—14; • Wounded, ill or injured service members receiving treatment at a military treatment facility or a warrior transition unit and the spouses and family caregivers of such wounded, ill or injured service members as described in (VPL) 08—14 ;• Chapter 31 VR&E veterans . LVER staff indirectly serve veterans through direct business outreach to promote the hiring of qualified veterans and obtain job orders for review of potential cross—match with veterans seeking employment. (Pages 251-252) Title IV All Workforce Investment Boards (WIB) and KCCs will ensure their plans provide strategies and policies for providing veterans and other eligible persons with priority of service. Policies implemented will ensure that veterans and other eligible persons are aware of their entitlement to priority of service, the array of programs and services available to them, and any eligibility requirements for those programs and/or services. (Page 252) Title IV All veterans and eligible persons will be provided local labor market information along with current training programs tailored to the economic sectors for that region by either the DVOP, KCC staff or partner agency staff. Upon completion of the training program, veterans will be registered into the Focus Career system for job matching and placement. Additionally, DVOP and KCC staff will provide referrals as required for all veterans completing training. Success will be measured by the number of veterans and eligible persons training enrollments, completion of training and employment outcomes. (Page 253) Title IV
Mental Health

~~Kentucky’s fourteen Regional Boards for Mental Health or Individuals with an Intellectual Disability are a primary source for extended services in KY. Cooperative budget planning is done between OVR and the Kentucky Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) so that state funds for all phases of supported employment can be sought by each agency. A cooperative agreement is also in place.

The Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) and OVR partnered together, and in 2010, Kentucky became the 12th state to participate in the Dartmouth College, Johnson and Johnson, Supported Employment Initiative to demonstrate the effectiveness of the IPS model for supported employment (Individualized Placement and Support, an Evidence—Based Practice). The first local pilot projects were launched prior to the close of 2010. Through the Dartmouth Project, a new SE funding partner was added when the Greater Cincinnati Health Foundation provided funding for 2 of the local pilots in Northern KY. IPS Supported Employment now includes all 13 Kentucky Community Mental Health Centers. In FY 2016 the partnership with Behavioral Health continues with the addition of 5 IPS sites outside of the Community Mental Health Centers and 2 sites serving those with substance abuse. (Page 155) Title I

The Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) is responsible for the administration of state and federally funded mental health and substance abuse treatment services throughout the commonwealth. Publicly-funded community services are provided for Kentuckians who have problems with mental health, developmental and intellectual disabilities, or substance abuse, through Kentucky’s 14 regional Boards for Mental Health or Individuals with an Intellectual Disability (Regional MHID Boards). Regional MHID Boards are private, nonprofit organizations established by KRS Chapter 210 which serve residents of a designated multi-county region. Regional MHID Boards are private, nonprofit organizations established by KRS Chapter 210 (see Related Links) which serve residents of a designated multi-county region. (Page 160) Title I

Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP’s) and other OVR staff both saw mental health counseling and treatment as one of the greatest unmet needs of consumers. Furthermore CRP’s increased the greatest in demand in the last 3 years to come from those with a diagnosis of Mental Illness (58.0% of respondents). Other OVR staff respondents indicated that psychological restoration was one of the services in greatest demand (35%). The identified need for mental health counseling and treatment has not been listed as the greatest need in the last few Comprehensive Needs Assessments. However, disability coordinators did indicate that mental health issues were a significant barrier for transition age youth as they exit the post-secondary educational setting. (Page 187) Title I

CRPs were asked to identify areas of ‘unmet need’ for their consumers. They indicated support services, mental health treatment and post-employment services were all ‘unmet needs’. When asked what CRP services they foresee an increase in the next 3 years they indicated Employment and retention, skills training and customized supported employment. (Page 195) Title IV

Objective 4.2: Improve services to underserved populations within the blind and visually impaired community, including substance abuse, mental health, and criminal background. Strategies Participate in cross training's with agencies who provide services to treat mental illness, substance abuse to provide all professionals a better understanding of the unique services necessary to improve outcomes for consumers. Collaborate with criminal justice agencies to promote better understanding of issues that impact employment for consumers with backgrounds. Reports of Progress: Given budget constraints progress on this goal area was limited. Staff were provided training for those areas through quality assurance reviews deficiencies were identified and areas of concern voiced by staff through the training assessment were prevalent. Trainings occurred for changes in the case management system for 911 fields as well as on Pre-employment Transition Services. The Cabinet sponsored cross training for the area or team building. There was no progress for the area of substance abuse, mental health or criminal backgrounds. (Page 224) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
Other federal, state, and local agencies related to the rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities such as the Department of Protection and Advocacy, Department of Probation and Parole, Department of Workers Compensation, Department of Disability Determination. (Page 147) Title I Kentucky has shifted focus in the Career Centers from Unemployment Insurance assistance to Employment Services. This shift has allowed Wagner Peyser staff to focus more on providing employment services to customers in a more individualized manner rather than the focus on claimant assistance. More emphasis has been placed career coaching with special emphasis on first time payment customers and RESEA customers. Kentucky currently has an outdated RESEA profile model which has hindered our ability to identify and engage all potential customers. (Page 276) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 66

Accessibility - 06/28/2019

~~“The Kentucky Department of Education is committed to making its electronic and information technologies accessible to individuals with disabilities by meeting or exceeding the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. 794d), as amended in 1998. Section 508 requires agencies to provide individuals with disabilities equal access to electronic information and data comparable to those who do not have disabilities unless an undue burden would be imposed on the agency. The Section 508 Standards are the technical requirements and criteria that are used to measure conformance within this law. More information on Section 508 and the technical standards can be found online.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Special Education Forms - Due Process - 06/24/2019

~~“This page contains downloads to special education forms commonly used by local school districts to document due process and implementation of appropriate programs…Included are state approved forms for the Referral, Consents, Individual Education Program (IEP), Conference Summary and other state approved special education forms.”  

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP) - 06/18/2019

~~“The Community Work Transition Program is designed to provide a positive beginning in the world of work for students in special education during their last two years of high school. It is a cooperative effort between participating local school districts, the Kentucky Department of Education, the Kentucky Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Kentucky Department for the Blind, and HDI.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Express - 04/18/2019

~~“Veterans services

Our offices have local veterans employment representatives and disabled veteran outreach program specialists trained specifically to assist veterans with their employment and training needs.They work with other Kentucky Career Center staff members, the Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Department of Veterans Affairs and various other organizations in providing veterans with priority services designed to improve employability and career options. Services available to veterans can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Project CASE “Creating Access to Successful Employment” - 04/01/2019

“Project CASE in Kentucky intends to increase participation in Career Pathways for individuals with disabilities. Under Project CASE, we will build and expand on the current Career Pathways program components that align to the Kentucky Workforce Investment Board’s targeted sectors of Information Technology, Manufacturing and Industrial Technology, and Healthcare/Nursing & Allied Health, and examine what specific strategies or mix of strategies are most effective in serving individuals with disabilities.

The grant will provide direct services to individuals in the 7 counties of Metro Louisville (KentuckianaWorks) and more rural 23 counties of Eastern Kentucky (Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program- EKCEP).  This project will address new levels of outreach, and flexible and innovative training and postsecondary approaches for both students and youth.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Career Center Office for the Blind - 04/01/2019

~~“The mission of the Kentucky Office for the Blind is to provide opportunities for employment  and independence to people with visual disabilities in their homes, schools, workplaces and communities. Services are tailored to each individual’s strengths, abilities and interests.

Individualized services for eligible applicants can be found by accessing the web link. ":

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Special Education Services - 02/12/2019

~~“Welcome to the Division of IDEA implementation and Preschool.  This  site includes information on all aspects of special education programs in public schools.  We welcome your comments and suggestions.  If you need further assistance with finding information on special education programs in Kentucky's public schools, please contact us.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshots - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information on the RETAIN program in Kentucky including the amount of funding requested, the target population and the contact person

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Supported Employment Training Project “Newly Designed Supported Employment Leadership Series” - 01/01/2019

~~Supported Employment Training Project isa project of the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky. It announces its 2019 Supported Employment Leadership Series with more information about content and dates available by accessing the web link. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

WIOA STATE PLAN FOR THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY FY-2018 - 12/31/2018

~~“The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

HB 2 – Worker’s Compensation - 03/30/2018

“AN ACT relating to workers' compensation.

    Amend KRS 342.020 to limit the time period of payment of medical expenses for certain permanent partial disabilities to 780 weeks but provide a mechanism to apply for extended benefits; limit the number of drug screens for which the employer will be liable;

[…]

to indicate that an application for adjustment of claim for compensation for a cumulative trauma injury must be made within five years of the last injurious exposure to the cumulative trauma;

[…]

amend KRS 342.730 to increase average weekly wage caps; set time limits for total disability benefits paid to certain professional athletes; allow payment of temporary total disability benefits to be offset by gross income minus applicable taxes paid to an employee during a period of light-duty work or work in an alternative job position; provide an offset against temporary total disability benefits for salary continuation or wholly employer-funded disability retirement plans; indicate that benefits shall terminate when a plaintiff reaches age 67 or two years after the date of injury, whichever shall last occur;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Statute 42.0146 - Certification Program for Disabled Veteran-Owned Businesses - 07/15/2016

~~“The Office of Equal Employment Opportunity and Contract Compliance shall oversee a program that provides certification of a disabled veteran-owned business in order to encourage growth among businesses owned by disabled veterans within the state and assist those businesses in competing for work in other states that require certification by a statewide body. This certification does not provide a preference in state procurement, nor does it create a point system or set aside for disabled veteran-owned businesses.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky ABLE Act S.B. 179 - 04/05/2016

Signed by the Governor on April  5, 2016

AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities.

Amend KRS 205.200 to disregard any amount in an ABLE account, any contributions to an ABLE account, and any distribution from an ABLE account for qualified expenses for the purposes of determining an individual's eligibility for a means-tested public assistance program and the amount of assistance or benefits the individual is eligible to receive under the program; direct the State Treasurer, the Secretary of the Finance and Administration Cabinet, the Executive Director of the Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Executive Director of the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority to work cooperatively to seek all available sources of funding, determine the best plan of action related to ABLE accounts, and report to the Legislative Research Commission on or before December 31, 2016.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Gov. Bevin Unveils Final Report of Kentucky Work Matters Task Force and Signs Employment First Executive Order - 05/15/2018

~~“During today’s ceremony Gov. Bevin signed the Employment First executive order, recognizing that competitive integrated employment into the general workforce is the preferred outcome for citizens of all ages and levels of disability. He also announced formation of the Employment First Council to continue momentum on targeted areas of the task force’s report.

Highlights of the policy recommendations made by the Kentucky Work Matters Task Force include:•Streamlining occupational licensing for veterans to ensure they are given credit for similar training/experience they received in the military or in another state. (The recently enacted House Bill 319 will expedite occupational licensing for Kentucky veterans.)•Capitalizing on opportunities for the state to serve as model employer. (The Commonwealth is currently transitioning management of two large state cafeterias to the Kentucky Office for the Blind (OFB), providing job opportunities for the visually impaired.)•Increasing resources for the Fostering Success program, which provides job opportunities for youth aging out of the foster care system. (This year’s state budget included an increase of $375,000 per year to expand this program.)•Increasing general fund allocations to the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and Office for the Blind (OFB) to draw down full available federal match. (This year’s state budget increased total funding by more than $9 million for OVR and OFB, which will serve approximately 6,500 more clients.)•Partnering with school systems to ensure that students with disabilities are included in career readiness and development programs.”

“Promoting inclusive workforce policies requires coordination at all levels of government, with states having critical knowledge of economic and employment realities on the ground,” said Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Jennifer Sheehy. “We appreciate Gov. Bevin’s leadership on this issue and continue to encourage states to share their experience and insight.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Relating to Medicaid Expansion - 01/12/2018

“Now, therefore, I, Matthew G. Bevin, Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, by virtue of the authority vested in me by Section 69 of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, do hereby Order and Direct the following:

 

In the event one or more of the components of Kentucky’s Section 1115 Waiver and the accompanying Special Terms and Conditions are prohibited from being implemented pursuant to a final judgment issued by a court of competent jurisdiction, with all appeals of the judgment issued by a court of competent jurisdiction, with all appeals of the judgment having been exhausted or waived, the Secretary of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services and the Commissioner of the Department for Medicaid Services within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services are hereby directed to take the necessary actions to terminate Kentucky’s Medicaid expansion program no later than six months from the date on which all appeals of the judgment have been exhausted or waived, or otherwise as soon as legally practicable under the remaining terms or the Special Terms and Conditions, applicable statutes or regulations.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 25

Accessibility - 06/28/2019

~~“The Kentucky Department of Education is committed to making its electronic and information technologies accessible to individuals with disabilities by meeting or exceeding the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. 794d), as amended in 1998. Section 508 requires agencies to provide individuals with disabilities equal access to electronic information and data comparable to those who do not have disabilities unless an undue burden would be imposed on the agency. The Section 508 Standards are the technical requirements and criteria that are used to measure conformance within this law. More information on Section 508 and the technical standards can be found online.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Special Education Forms - Due Process - 06/24/2019

~~“This page contains downloads to special education forms commonly used by local school districts to document due process and implementation of appropriate programs…Included are state approved forms for the Referral, Consents, Individual Education Program (IEP), Conference Summary and other state approved special education forms.”  

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Veterans Express - 04/18/2019

~~“Veterans services

Our offices have local veterans employment representatives and disabled veteran outreach program specialists trained specifically to assist veterans with their employment and training needs.They work with other Kentucky Career Center staff members, the Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Department of Veterans Affairs and various other organizations in providing veterans with priority services designed to improve employability and career options. Services available to veterans can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Kentucky Career Center Office for the Blind - 04/01/2019

~~“The mission of the Kentucky Office for the Blind is to provide opportunities for employment  and independence to people with visual disabilities in their homes, schools, workplaces and communities. Services are tailored to each individual’s strengths, abilities and interests.

Individualized services for eligible applicants can be found by accessing the web link. ":

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Special Education Services - 02/12/2019

~~“Welcome to the Division of IDEA implementation and Preschool.  This  site includes information on all aspects of special education programs in public schools.  We welcome your comments and suggestions.  If you need further assistance with finding information on special education programs in Kentucky's public schools, please contact us.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshots - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information on the RETAIN program in Kentucky including the amount of funding requested, the target population and the contact person

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

WIOA STATE PLAN FOR THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY FY-2018 - 12/31/2018

~~“The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Working with Exceptional Children in CTE - 12/05/2018

~~‘The Office of Career and Technical Education collaborates with the Office of Teaching and Learning to ensure we have strategies that help us uphold our Mission for all students.Exceptional Children include Special Needs, English Learners, Gifted and Talented, Blind - VI and Deaf - HH students.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Veterans Employment, Training and Support Program - 12/05/2018

~~“KyVets is the Kentucky Veterans Employment Training and Support Program. KyVets provides resources and support to assist veterans across the commonwealth in obtaining gainful employment and training services. For more information, email KyVets@ky.gov

This page has links to resources to help veterans who are job seekers.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY GUIDLINES FOR KENTUCKY SCHOOLS - 12/01/2018

~~“The purpose of this document is to assist teachers and administrators in identifying and meeting student needs for assistive technology as provided by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and to offer specific directions on classroom implementation. It includes a thorough description of issues to consider from the start of screening through the provision of assistive technology and on-going evaluation of its use for educational purposes. Connections are given to related resources and programs which can enhance access and utilization of assistive technology. Until recently, there have been few materials available to help educators make critical decisions in the provision and application of assistive technology. This document represents a compilation of ideas and information devised by those in Kentucky and elsewhere who strive to use assistive technology to improve accessibility and acceptance for children and youth with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Kentucky Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP) - 06/18/2019

~~“The Community Work Transition Program is designed to provide a positive beginning in the world of work for students in special education during their last two years of high school. It is a cooperative effort between participating local school districts, the Kentucky Department of Education, the Kentucky Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Kentucky Department for the Blind, and HDI.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities - 10/18/2018

~~“We are an independent self-governing organization dedicated to advancing the inclusion  of Kentuckians in all facets of community life. The Council is part 56 national State and Territory Councils on Developmental Disabilities, all federally funded and mandated to advocate and create systems change for people with developmental disabilities.

We have a Council of 26 governor appointed citizens and seven Council staff. The Council develops a Five Year State Plan to meet goals in advocacy, capacity building and creating change. Working from the Five Year State Plan, the Council provides grants and contracts for innovative and sustainable projects that empower Kentuckians with Developmental Disabilities and their families. We assist in training initiatives and public policy strategies to educate lawmakers and policy makers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Assistive Technology Service Network “A Guide to Assistive Technology Funding in Kentucky 15th Edition” - 08/01/2016

“…the services of the ATRCs include, but are not limited to: Assistive Technology Services for Early Intervention, K-12 and Post-secondary school, Employment, Transition, Independent Living, leisure or recreation; Loan Library of Assistive Devices, adaptive equipment and toys; Demonstrations of assistive technology devices; Funding information, Assistance and Referral; Assessments and Evaluations for AT; Vocational assessments; Consultations on appropriate technologies; Workplace AT; Environmental Controls; Recycled Computers and Assistive Technology Devices; Training and Technical Assistance on and about AT.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Perkins Center (Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation)

“The Perkins Center is a division of the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the vast majority of our consumers are referred by OVR Counselors located in several cities and towns across the Commonwealth….One of the main reasons for the creation of the Perkins Center was to enable Kentuckians with disabilities to obtain all the services they would need to become employed... The Center currently operates several programs and services that enable consumers to achieve their vocational goals”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Assistive Technology Services Network

".

~The KATS Network is one of 56 statewide assistive technology programs federally funded under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998, as ammended in 2004.

The KATS Network’s mission is to make assistive technology (AT) information, devices and services easily obtainable for people of any age and/or disability. AT is any item or piece of equipment (both low-tech and high-tech) used to improve and/or maintain independence in the home, at work, school or play.

KATS Network Overview and ATRC Contact Information

Services we provide

The KATS Network provides access to AT through a network of five (5) Regional AT Resource Centers (ATRCs) across the state. The Regional ATRCs operate AT demonstration programs, lending libraries and AT reutilization programs. The KATS Network Coordinating Center and each of the ATRCs work cooperatively to provide outreach, information & referral services, and training on various AT topics. Technical Assistance and collaboration is also provided to state agencies and organizations to enhance the understanding of and access to AT and accessible information technology (IT).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Assistive Technology Loan Corporation

“Working with its lending partner, Fifth Third Bank, KATLC can provide loans for modified vehicles, hearing aids, adapted computers, mobility devices, augmentative communication devices or any other type of equipment or home modification that will improve the quality of life or increase the independence of Kentuckians with disabilities.

“Established by state statute in 1996, KATLC is governed by a seven-member Board of Directors…. The Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation currently provides staff support to the Board of Directors and the KATLC program.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Kentucky Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P)

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project (SET-P) provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. [Their] work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Project CASE “Creating Access to Successful Employment” - 04/01/2019

“Project CASE in Kentucky intends to increase participation in Career Pathways for individuals with disabilities. Under Project CASE, we will build and expand on the current Career Pathways program components that align to the Kentucky Workforce Investment Board’s targeted sectors of Information Technology, Manufacturing and Industrial Technology, and Healthcare/Nursing & Allied Health, and examine what specific strategies or mix of strategies are most effective in serving individuals with disabilities.

The grant will provide direct services to individuals in the 7 counties of Metro Louisville (KentuckianaWorks) and more rural 23 counties of Eastern Kentucky (Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program- EKCEP).  This project will address new levels of outreach, and flexible and innovative training and postsecondary approaches for both students and youth.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Seed to Provide Support to the Kentucky Work Matters Task Force - 06/26/2017

“The State Exchange on Employment and Disability (SEED) at the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) is providing policy expertise to the new Kentucky Work Matters Task Force. SEED’s partners include the Council of State Governments and the National Conference of State Legislatures. ODEP Deputy Assistant Secretary Jennifer Sheehy joined Governor Matt Bevin for an announcement about this collaboration earlier this month at a press conference in Frankfort with federal and state officials and key stakeholders. The 23-member task force brings together key departments of Kentucky’s state government and private-sector representatives to address barriers to employment. It also promotes workforce inclusion among targeted constituencies, including people with disabilities, foster children, disabled veterans, and others.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AIDD Expands Partnerships in Integrated Employment - 10/06/2016

“ACL's Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Supported Employment Training Project “Newly Designed Supported Employment Leadership Series” - 01/01/2019

~~Supported Employment Training Project isa project of the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky. It announces its 2019 Supported Employment Leadership Series with more information about content and dates available by accessing the web link. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

"Customized Employment in Kentucky” Video Premiering at 25th Anniversary of the ADA Celebration - 07/29/2015

“Just in time for the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the University of Kentucky Human Development Institute announced the debut of their new video, ‘Customized Employment in Kentucky’…    The seven-minute video profiles three employees with developmental disabilities who are working in their community, in jobs which are a good fit for them, and in which their contributions are valued by their employer. The common thread in these stories is that the jobs were “customized,” a process in which employer needs are matched with the talents, interests and contributions of individual job seekers.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

“Toolbox for Employment: Customized Self-Employment and Benefits Planning” - 11/12/2013

~~“TThis is a presentation on methods that a person might use as a guide to becoming self-employed.“Business AND Benefits PlanningGo hand in handStarts with Discovery–DPG™Have to understand the interaction of income from wage and/or self-employment on public benefit systemsWhat public benefit systems are being received now?SSA, Medicaid, DD Waivers – CILA? Home Based Support?, DRS Home Services” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

“2018 Supported Employment Leadership Series” –Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky

“12 days of high quality supported employment professional development provide the foundation for the SE Leadership Series… Participants will study ways of connecting discovery with targeted job development, informational interviews, job analysis/needs analysis, customized employment, and specific representational considerations and strategies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky APSE “Training/Continuing Education”

This page is a resource for various traning and continuing education programs that are available in Kentucky. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services “Peer Support Specialist Curriculum Approval Process”

The Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) will approve the following curricula for Peer Support Specialists (PSS): Adult Peer Support Specialist, Family Peer Support Specialist, Youth Peer Support Specialist, and Kentucky Family Leadership Academy, as established in the Kentucky Administrative Regulations.

The regulations provide the curriculum applicant with an understanding of the requirements for peer support specialists—both eligibility and training—and specifically speak to the elements of a "training curriculum" and the training requirements (testing of the trainee and evaluation of the trainers). View these regulations in Related Links.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Supported Employment Training Project

About Us Having a job represents much more than earning a salary. Employment, including the kind of work one performs, influences one's personal identity, sense of belonging, and place in the world. Furthermore, employment represents one primary way of expressing the inherent human need to contribute – doing something that matters. Yet all too often the significance of employment for people with disabilities has been unrecognized, ignored, or minimized.Supported employment is designed to promote personalized employment opportunities for people with disabilities when they need support to:

Discover personal interests and contributions,Find or negotiate a job that fits things people like to do and do well,Become established as valued employees; andPursue job advancements.

Kentucky’s Supported Employment Training Project provides support for professionals who in turn support people with disabilities with finding good jobs. Our work through the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, is sponsored by the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Kentucky Division of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. Please contact mtyree@uky.edu to make suggestions or request additional information. Many documents on this site are only available in PDF format

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities State Plan for Federal Fiscal Years 2017-2021

Goal #2- The capacity of systems that serve all people will be improved so that people with developmental disabilities will have increased access to opportunities for greater independence and integration

Objective 2-B (Employment): By 2021, the Council will support the efforts of at least 10 organizations to expand competitive, integrated employment for individuals with developmental disabilities by employing or assisting  more individuals with developmental disabilities in obtaining  jobs in the communities

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: Self-Employment Guide

This webpage offers information on and resources for self-employment. It orients job seekers on where to start the self-employment process and contains links to relevant resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky Educational Collaborative for State Agency Children Resource Guide

“This resource book came about because several young people who had lived in parental and foster homes their entire lives realized they were facing life after high school in a nursing facility because of lack of available adult supports in the community and confusion about how to get them.    “As a result, P&A brought together staff of several agencies to figure out how to help people find the transition services they needed. The group pooled their knowledge about available programs to put together a resource book that could be used by young people with disabilities in foster care to transition successfully to adulthood.    “Although the original purpose of this book was to help kids in foster care, it can be used by young people with disabilities anywhere who are looking at life after high school.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Justice Department Settles Pregnancy and Disability Discrimination Lawsuit Against City of Florence, Kentucky - 10/26/2016

“The Justice Department filed a proposed consent decree with the city of Florence, Kentucky, to resolve a pregnancy and disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the department under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

 

According to the department's complaint, Florence discriminated against two pregnant police officers by denying both officers' requests for light duty.  The department alleges that Florence previously assigned light duty positions to employees who were temporarily unable to perform their regular job duties, regardless of why the employee needed light duty.  In April 2013, within months of a police officer's pregnancy-related light duty request, Florence limited light duty to employees with on-the-job injuries.  Florence also required that employees with non-work-related illnesses, injuries or conditions demonstrate that they had "no restrictions" before they could return to work.

 

Under the consent decree, which still must be approved by the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky, Florence will adopt new policies that allow accommodations, including light duty, for pregnant employees and employees with disabilities; establish an effective process for receiving and responding to employees' accommodation requests and discrimination complaints; and ensure the proper maintenance of employee medical records.  In addition, Florence will train all supervisors, administrators, officers and employees who participate in making personnel decisions related to light duty and other accommodation requests made pursuant to Title VII and the ADA.  Florence has also agreed to pay $135,000 in compensatory damages and attorney's fees as well as restore the paid leave that Officers Trischler and Riley were forced to use.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

Medicaid 1915(c) HCBS Waiver Redesign Project: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) - 12/14/2018

~~“The Department for Medicaid Services (the Department) on behalf of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (the Cabinet) is publishing this Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)document to provide timely updates and respond to stakeholder questions about redesign of the Cabinet’s 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waivers. The questions included in this FAQs document are a combination of submitted questions from stakeholders and anticipated questions identified by the Department.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State Plan Under Title XIX of the Social Security Act - 04/06/2017

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Kentucky's Medicaid program.

 

The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act, such as:

-Methods of Administration

-Eligibility

-Services Covered

-Quality Control

-Fiscal Reimbursements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supports for Community Living Waiver - 03/29/2017

~~“The Supports for Community Living (SCL) waiver provides Medicaid-paid services to adults and children with intellectual or developmental disabilities. These supports allow individuals to live at home rather than in an institutional setting.  “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State Medicaid Plan Amendments - 01/19/2017

~~“The Medicaid State Plan is an agreement between the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the federal government describing how we administer our Medicaid program. It gives assurance that Kentucky will abide by federal rules and may claim federal matching funds for its program.  The state plan sets out groups to be covered, services, methodologies for reimbursing providers and state program administrative activities.When Kentucky plans to make changes to its program policies or operations, the state Department for Medicaid Services must submit a state plan amendment (SPA) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. We also submit SPAs to request approval for program changes, make corrections or update our Medicaid plan with new information."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky Request for a Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver - 08/24/2016

“Kentucky HEALTH is an innovative, transformative healthcare program designed to not only stabilize the program financially, but to also improve the health outcomes and overall quality of life for all members. This demonstration waiver seeks to evaluate new policies and program elements designed to engage members in their healthcare and provide the necessary education and tools required to achieve long term health and an improved quality of life. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Michelle P (0475.R02.00) - 07/15/2016

Provides adult day health, case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, assessment/reassessment, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, specialized medical equipment and supplies, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/MR/DD ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kentucky DOE ESEA Flexibility Request - 03/31/2015

“The Kentucky State Department of Education’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 9, 2012.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky HCBS Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

On March 17, 2014, updated Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) final rules became effective in the Federal Register for 1915(c) waivers, 1915(i) state plan services, and 1915(k) community first choice state plan option . As they pertain to 1915(c) waivers, these rules include requirements for several areas of HCBS: all residential and non-residential settings, provider- owned residential settings, person-centered planning process, service plan requirements, and conflict-free case management.    The goal of the HCBS final rules is to improve the services rendered to HCBS participants and to maximize the opportunities to receive services in integrated settings and realize the benefits of community living. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is allowing five years (until March 17, 2019) for states and providers to transition into compliance with the all settings and provider-owned settings requirements.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

KY Supports for Community Living (0314.R04.00) - 09/01/2010

Provides case management, community access, day training, personal assistance, residential support level I, respite, shared living, supported employment, OT, PT, speech therapy, community guide, FMS, goods and services, natural supports training, transportation, community transition, consultative clinical and therapeutic service, environmental accessibility adaptation, person centered coaching, positive behavior supports, residential support level II, specialized medical equipment and supplies, technology assisted level I residential support, vehicle adaptation for individuals w ID/DD individuals ages 3 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

KY HCBS Waiver (0144.R05.00) - 07/01/2010

Provides adult day health, case management, homemaker, personal care, respite, OT, PT, speech therapy, financial management services, goods and services, home and community supports, support broker, assessment/reassessment, attendant care, environmental and minor home adaptation for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The unbridled spirit of Kentucky has shown that people with disabilities are able to succeed in their careers here in the Bluegrass State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kentucky’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.39%
Change from
2016 to 2017
4,454,189
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.2%
Change from
2016 to 2017
430,265
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.06%
Change from
2016 to 2017
129,954
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-0.86%
Change from
2016 to 2017
30.20%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.15%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.32%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 4,454,189
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 430,265
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 129,954
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,711,997
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.32%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 26.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 379,509
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 385,766
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 688,909
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 52,490
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 12,879
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,948
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 3,865
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 13,803
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 3,029

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 5,114
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 199,178

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 19,654
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 45,046
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 85,368
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 23.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 658
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 309
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 366
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,431
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 472
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 209
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 44.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 4.72

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,625
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 315,423
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $7,396,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $11,298,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $60,568,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 30.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 5,228
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,002
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 60.60

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.81%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.31%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.72%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 18.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.39%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 68.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 41.31%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 788,499
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,104
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 421,644
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 85,649
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 507,293
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 538
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 97
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 635
AbilityOne wages (products). $3,841,069
AbilityOne wages (services). $901,392

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 25
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 26
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,564
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 73
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,637

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~The CRP Branch works closely with Kentucky APSE (Association of People Supporting Employment First) and its committees, and the 874K Coalition (a statewide Disability Advocacy Group) in a unified effort to secure additional state dollars for supported employment extended services. (Page 155) Title I

The CRP Branch works cooperatively with the Arc of Kentucky, among other groups, such as the Kentucky Association of Supporting Employment First (KYAPSE), the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (BHDDID), the Kentucky Rehabilitation Association (KRA), UK Human Development Institute, EKU Center of Excellence, most of the Comprehensive Care Centers in the state, and many Supported Employment providers, to educate families about supported employment and enlist their assistance in impacting additional funds for supported employment. (Page 156) Title I

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services. (Page 209) Title I
 

Customized Employment

~~Information regarding these potential funding sources is updated and shared by the Supported Employment Branch on a statewide basis to encourage increased funding for all phases of supported employment. 12. The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set. (Page 156) Title I

Training opportunities for staff on new policies related to customized employment and person-centered planning have occurred in statewide, regional, district, and local office training events. A statewide survey addressing the need of customized SE services has been given, as a means to continue to identify need for training as well as to identify the need for this valuable service. (Page 221)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Kentucky issued a statewide co—enrollment policy in 2015. Co—enrollment allows partners to leverage resources while providing a more comprehensive service delivery strategy that meets the needs of customers with several barriers to employment. All adults and dislocated workers who receive KCC services other than self—service and informational activities must be registered and considered a participant for WIOA Title I services. (Page 17) Title I

The WorkSmart Kentucky plan demonstrates a commitment to leveraging state and federal resources focused on workforce investment across state government. The process to develop the strategic plan involved all board members representing a variety of agencies, businesses and community partners. Focus groups consisting of business people, customers and staff were conducted. Each of the 25 action steps included in the WorkSmart plan is grounded in partnerships across state government. (Page 30) Title I

Information regarding these potential funding sources is updated and shared by the Supported Employment Branch on a statewide basis to encourage increased funding for all phases of supported employment. 12. The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set. (Page 156) Title I

The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation is pursuing a collaborative effort between the KY Department of Behavioral Health, the University of Kentucky and Eastern Kentucky University, to leverage funding for the continuation of state IPS Trainer and Fidelity Monitoring services. These services are a vital component to this evidenced-based practice of IPS supported employment services. These elements are vital to the continued support, growth and fidelity of the various programs throughout the state. (Page 161) Title I

The Office will seek to expand services to not served and underserved counties as well as not served and underserved disability groups, including youth with the most significant disabilities and will encourage continuous improvement in supported employment by monitoring the state fiscal climate for opportunities to partner with KY APSE (Association for Persons in Supporting Employment First) to advocate for increased state funding for extended support services. OVR will continue to maximize existing dollars for extended support services through collaborative agreements and contracts, increasing knowledge of Kentucky’s plan for self—determination strategies, especially within the Medicaid Waiver (Supports for Community Living, Michelle P) programs, continuing partnerships with local Community Mental Health Centers, recruiting new Providers, provide training and technical assistance to new supported employment agencies, and providing consultation and technical assistance to OVR staff and providers as needed, researching better ways to fund and/or deliver services. Currently, meetings are ongoing with the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental and intellectual Disabilities to strengthen the partnership by leveraging funding to expand IPS SE services in unserved areas, as well as exploring possibilities of implementing IPS services for individuals with intellectual disabilities, which would be one of the first endeavors for this evidenced based practice. (Page 209) Title IV

Objective 5.2: Increase available resources & seek to leverage funding, staff resources, in—kind and programmatic support & other forms of assistance from partners.
OFB will collaborate with other statewide partners increasing their capacity to serve individuals with disabilities, and will refer eligible individuals who can benefit from the resources and services available at no cost.
OFB staff will provide training for Career Center Partner Staff to increase knowledge and confidence in working with individuals who are blind and visually impaired.
Report of Progress:
A plan for marketing to eye physicians was developed and implemented. The main focus is the Spring Optometric Association Annual meeting event held annually. OFB identifies staff with lower referrals from eye physicians through WEBI reports and they are targeted to attend the event for networking purposes. Though the conference we receive a list of eye physicians throughout the state that is then distributed to staff for marketing and outreach purposes.
Through the Career Pathways Grant OFB has made a lot of progress in collaboration with statewide partners to increase capacity in serving individuals. Project CASE Career Pathways Coordinators provided all the liaison and coordination services for the following STEM Camps, which were held in Eastern Kentucky on the campuses of Big Sandy Community and Technical College, Southeast Community and Technical College, and Hazard Community and Technical College. The grant has allowed for enhanced connections with the system initiatives in the local workforce areas. (Page 230) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

We currently have in place five other innovative programs that provide high school students with a variety of work–based learning, financial literacy, self–advocacy training, job exploration, career counseling, and workplace readiness training opportunities that exist in the community with employers, in our rehabilitation center, and in post–secondary institutions.

The Summer Youth Boot Camp Program focuses on job exploration, workplace readiness training, and self–advocacy and is held at the Charles W. McDowell Center in Louisville. It is an intensive four week program based on the work of Dr. Karen Wolffe that introduces employability skills to transition aged individuals. The curriculum is specific to individuals that are blind or visually impaired.

The Summer Work Experience Program is in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Providers. CRPs are paid to find work experiences in competitive integrated settings for transition aged individuals. The work experiences last six to eight weeks and the students are paid by the Office for the Blind for the time worked. The goals of the work experience are to provide community based career exploration and the opportunity to practice work readiness skills. It is also hoped that by participating in the work experience program, employers will be open to providing more opportunities for individuals who are blind or visually impaired in their communities. (Page 310) 

School to Work Transition

~~Service coordination activities may also include resource information about vocational rehabilitation, presentations, handouts, and staff development. The counselor works in a collaborative team process along with the local education agency to develop the transition services section of the Individualized Education Program (IEP) and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for transitioning students. Both the IEP and IPE will include, if appropriate, a statement of interagency responsibilities or any needed linkages by which the responsibilities of other entities are satisfied. (Pages 151-152) Title I

VR counselors attend transition related meetings as early at age 14 and act as a consultant in the student’s IEP. Early contact and intervention not only saves the VR counselor considerable time and effort, it allows the student and parents the opportunity to plan a realistic vocational path that will lead them to the vocational goal of their choice. VR counselors shall attend student IEP meetings starting at age 14.
The school system will continue to have the primary responsibility for accommodations and student’s educational needs. Once the student graduates OVR will become the primary agent. It is mandatory that the IPE be developed with the student 90 days after eligibility or prior to graduation, whichever comes first.
An IPE is developed for each student determined eligible and that meets the current order of selection for vocational rehabilitation services. The IPE should address the student’s pre-employment transition services needs in the areas of job exploration counseling, work based learning experiences, counseling regarding post-secondary training opportunities, workplace readiness training to assist in the development of social and independent living skills, and instruction in self-advocacy. (Pages 152-153) Title I

Provisions under the cooperative agreement include: 1. Process for making student referrals to the OVR; 2. Determination of eligibility for OVR services; 3. Joint sharing and use of evaluations and assessments; 4. Planning and development of individualized programs (IEP and IPE) as a collaborative team process; 5. Role of educational personnel in transition planning; 6. Role of the OVR counselor in outreach to, identification of, and transition planning for eligible students with disabilities; 7. Use of memoranda of agreement (MOA) at the local level to facilitate and coordinate transition services for secondary students with disabilities; 8. State coordination with agencies in the provision of transition services inclusive of pre — employment transition services; 9. A comprehensive system of personnel development for qualified personnel responsible for transition services; 10. Determination of lead agencies; 11. Financial responsibilities; 12. Status of services for an individual student/consumer during a dispute; 13. Agency dispute resolution; 14. Due process for the individual student/consumer. 15. Memoranda of Agreements at the Local Level. (Page 153) Title I

The CWTP is designed to provide pre-employment transition services to all students with disabilities and provide transition services to assist VR eligible students with the most significant disabilities in transitioning from high school to competitive integrated employment. Student employment coordinators, funded by the local education agency, refer students to OVR in order to provide pre—employment transition services during their final three years of school. 
During this time, should the student need individualized transition services, counselors work with the employment coordinators to ensure that community vocational services provided lead to the completion of an individualized vocational evaluation and the development of individualized programs (IEP and IPE) to ensure successful transitioning from high school to post school activities, including employment. Upon completion of the IPE, further community—based vocational services are provided to the student in the form of training for the planned vocational goal. The desired outcome for participants in the CWTP Transition Services is a post—school outcome or paid employment. 
Outreach to students also occurs through OVR’s contractual agreements with the Kentucky Career and Technical Educational College System and the nine Special Education Cooperatives for pre-employment transition services. (Page 154) Title I

An IPE is developed for each student determined eligible and that meets the current order of selection for vocational rehabilitation services. The IPE should address the student’s pre-employment transition services needs in the areas of job exploration counseling, work based learning experiences, counseling regarding post-secondary training opportunities, workplace readiness training to assist in the development of social and independent living skills, and instruction in self-advocacy. (Page 153) Title I

A variety of partnerships are needed in order to market the benefits of a variety of earn and learn opportunities, including registered apprenticeships to Kentucky business for individuals with disabilities including youth and students with disabilities. OFB will work with its existing partnerships among workforce, economic development, education and business entities in fostering work based learning opportunities. (Page 158) Title I

The CWTP is designed to provide pre-employment transition services to all students with disabilities and provide transition services to assist VR eligible students with the most significant disabilities in transitioning from high school to competitive integrated employment. There will be a Supported Employment Consulting fee available with the Community Work Transition program for seamless transition into competitive integrated employment. There are specific programs i n place with specialized services for the blind and visually impaired. The PATH Program focuses on job exploration, workplace readiness training, and self-advocacy and is an intensive three week program based on the work of Dr. Karen Wolffe that introduces employability skills to students with disabilities. The curriculum is specific to individuals that are blind or visually impaired. The Summer Work Experience Program is in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Providers. CRPs are paid to find work experiences in competitive integrated settings for transition aged individuals. The goals of the work experience are to provide community based career exploration and the opportunity to practice work readiness skills. It is also hoped that by participating in the work experience program, employers will be open to providing more opportunities for individuals who are blind or visually impaired in their communities. The Summer Work Program is in collaboration with the Kentucky School for the Blind, Kentucky Kingdom, the American Printing House for the Blind, and the Louisville Zoo. The World of Work Program is another program in which the OFB and KSB provide work based learning experiences to students. The program provides competitive integrated work experiences to students that attend the Kentucky School for the Blind. The INSIGHT Post-Secondary Preparation Program is held each summer at Morehead State University. Students are able to participate in college classes, live in the dorm, and participate in social activities both on and off campus during this eight day program. They receive counseling on post-secondary opportunities and are taught the self-advocacy skills necessary to succeed in a post-secondary environment along with workplace readiness skills. (Page 159) Title I

Rehabilitation counselors work collaboratively with the special education cooperatives, high school education teachers, local directors of special education, and job coaches for students transitioning from high school into employment. OVR Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors attend IEP and ARC meetings working with the team in establishing a vocational goal. This assures the development of the students IPE in conjunction with the vocational rehabilitation IEP. OVR provides support to teaching instructors, school staff and job coaches regarding rehabilitation issues and other areas of expertise such as Assistive Technology to ensure successful placements. Often rural schools do not have the needed resources; therefore OVR staff offer their expertise based on the individual needs of the student working closely with all staff involved with IDEA.  (Page 181) Title I

gain this year, VI teachers indicated that their expectations in working with a counselor are mainly to provide resources for the student/family, and to include the counselor as part of the student’s IEP team. However, overall the survey indicated that the VI teachers expect greater involvement in the provision of guidance and counseling, training, the employment proves and career counseling. These beliefs may indicate a need to not only affirm our own commitment to early involvement in planning, but to find new ways to stay involved and easily accessible. VI teachers gave positive ratings to OFB”s counseling staff in areas such as knowledge, rapport building ability, and ability to connect to needed vocational services such as training, job search and placement, including post-secondary education as well the development of strong appropriate vocational goals. (Page 192) Title IV

WIOA allows KY OVR to address these particular issues by allocating funds for pre-employment transition services. WIOA mandates 15% of all federal funds be set aside to provide pre-employment
Page 196transition services. Indications of post-school success are broken into categories in ‘Predictors of Post-School Success in Taxonomy 2.0. (Test, et al., 2009) clearly noting areas where Vocational Rehabilitation may play vital roles. The predictors are (possible VR role in parentheses): Student Development (assessment, employment skills attainment, supports), Student-focused planning (IEP development ant IPE participation), and Family engagement (family involvement, family empowerment, and family preparation), Program Structures (strategic planning, high expectation, and high involvement), Interagency Collaboration (collaborative framework, and collaborative service delivery). (Pages 195-196) Title IV

All training programs at the Carl D. Perkins Vocational Training Center (CDPVTC) have associated work based learning experiences in the local community. The agency is always pursuing other collaborative activities to provide Pre-ETS, and we have made at least 9 proposals to Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). These proposals are in the process of being implemented. The contract was completed and renewed for a partnership with the Kentucky Partnership for Families and Children to sponsor students to attend the KPFC Youth Parent Conference. The PepNet2 project grant has ended related to partnerships with the school system and KDE to improve transition outcomes for students who are deaf and hard of hearing. This population, however, will be the focus of a Co-Op contact as a targeted population. (Pages 219-220) Title IV

Goal 6: To engage youth, parents, high schools, and other transition specialists in exploring and planning career choices that connect to a full range of post—secondary options for training, career development, and competitive integrated employment.
Objective 6.1: To improve the number, quality, and rate of employment outcomes for youth and students participating in Transition services.
Strategies
VR Counseling Staff, school counseling and teaching staff, and VI teachers statewide will collaborate to achieve earlier involvement of OFB counselors in IEP development of vocational goals. OFB transition policies and practices used to guide the implementation and continuous improvement of services leading to employment will be based on the gathering and tracking data through the case management system. (Page 230) Title IV

Objective 6.3: Enhance student awareness of enrollment in transition programs
Promote summer transition programs through innovative marketing strategies in order to increase referrals. Implementation of marketing strategies to VI teachers, students and their families.
Report of Progress:
Path a summer transition program for students ages 14-21 who are blind and visually impaired was held at the Charles W. McDowell Center in Louisville during July. There were 16 students in attendance. Students participated in classes teaching blindness skills such as orientation and mobility, assistive technology and braille. Additionally, the curriculum had a focus on pre-employability skills such as local labor market information, career pathways, financial literacy and interest inventories. Students went off site for employment site tours and participated in recreational activities that provided for many their first exposure to those kinds of events. (Pages 230-231) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~In October 2015, Kentucky was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR—eligible individuals, including youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized post—secondary credentials necessary to secure competitive, integrated employment in high—demand, high—quality occupations.
This five—year grant award of nearly $4.4 million is named Project CASE (Creating Access to Successful Employment). Project CASE has strong support from the leadership of OVR, OET, KYAE and the Department of Education. Title IV

Project CASE activities are consistent with the section 101(d) of WIOA, with focus on improved alignment of federal programs to strengthen the capacity of state workforce systems to meet emerging employers’ needs with appropriately skilled and credentialed individuals. Project CASE provides a solid strategy for providing individuals with disabilities who face barriers to employment with workforce investment activities, education and supportive services to enter and retain employment.
Career Pathways initiatives in Kentucky over the past decade have created partnerships between industry and education at the secondary and post—secondary levels, and forged important links to strengthen local economies. Project CASE will help ensure that individuals with disabilities, even at the secondary school level, are not left out of participating in these existing initiatives and can prepare for and obtain jobs in high—wage, high—demand occupations. (Page 32) Title I

Project CASE is a collaborative effort between state vocational rehabilitation agencies, adult education, secondary and post—secondary education, career centers, employers and other partners to demonstrate how career pathways can help individuals with disabilities acquire the marketable skills and attain recognized credentials that lead to employment in high—demand occupations. In Kentucky, two pilot projects are planned in the Metro Louisville and Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) regions; these will engage seven and 23 counties respectively. (Page 44) Title I

Through Project CASE, a program developed from the use of Federal grant funding through the Rehabilitation Services Administration, OVR has stronger coordination and collaboration with the Youth Career Centers and other Kentucky Career Centers. Partnering with Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) and KentuckianaWorks in the hiring of Career Pathway Coordinators, and in cross-agency training of staff on career pathways for students with disabilities, Project CASE will ensure sustained partnerships. (Pages 150-151) Title I
One project that aligns with this area in serving students is Project CASE (Creating Access to Successful Employment). In October 2015, the Kentucky Office for the Blind/Kentucky Career Center was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR-eligible individuals, including students and youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized postsecondary credentials necessary to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations. Creating Access to Successful Employment (CASE) will help ensure that individuals with disabilities, even at the secondary school level, are not left out of participating in these existing initiatives, and can prepare for and obtain jobs in high-wage and high-demand occupations.  (Page 212) Title IV

A federal Career Pathways grant recently received by the Kentucky Office for the Blind (OFB) from the Rehabilitation Services Administration. OVR will collaborate with OFB on assisting consumers in three career pathways (healthcare, manufacturing, and information technology) in two of Kentucky Career Centers, Kentuckian Works in the Louisville metropolitan area and the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program (EKCEP) in rural Appalachia.  (Page 217) Title IV

Apprenticeship
OVR can work with consumers on internships, apprenticeships, and on—the—job training arrangements as additional options on the career pathway to employment. These options allow individuals to train while being actual employees. (Page 20) Title I A variety of partnerships are needed in order to market the benefits of a variety of earn and learn opportunities, including registered apprenticeships to Kentucky business for individuals with disabilities including youth and students with disabilities. OFB will work with its existing partnerships among workforce, economic development, education and business entities in fostering work based learning opportunities. (Page 158) Title I As a means of providing Pre—Employment Transition Services, OVR will work with partner agencies in Workforce Development to identify existing apprenticeship programs with employers with which OVR may partner to focus on incorporating students and youth with disabilities into the programs. The Kentucky Apprenticeship program recently moved from the Department of Labor to Workforce. OVR partners with the Office of Autism in order to understand how to assist youth on the spectrum with attaining and maintaining employment. A model program focused on creating apprenticeship opportunities for students and youth with disabilities will be developed in such a manner as to be replicated in urban and rural areas alike. This will expand employment opportunities for all the youth with disabilities in Kentucky. (Page 159) Title I
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Existing legacy case management systems across WIOA Title I, Wagner Peyser, Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education are disparate and insular: Currently, the Office of Employment and Training (OET) and the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) are supported by insular case management systems that respond to requests for the following programs: • Wagner Peyser Labor Exchange (Employ Kentucky Operating System - EKOS) • Unemployment Insurance — both benefits and tax/collections (Mainframe and Kentucky’s Electronic Workplace for Employment Services — KEWES) • Veterans Program • Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Program • National Emergency Grants • High Growth Job Training • Foreign Labor Certification • Health Care Tax Credit System • Trade Adjustment Act • Work Opportunities Tax Credit • Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) • Student data • Customer records, services provided and costs of services for individuals with disabilities and blindness — Case Management System — CMS • Social Security Reimbursement tracking and processing • Social Security Ticket to Work assignment tracking and processing  (Pages 45-46) Title I

There is a Social Security Reimbursement module within CMS that enables each respective agency to seek reimbursement for the cost of the services provided to agency consumers receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. There is a Maximus module that generates files that are submitted to Social Security for the Ticket to Work program and tracks responses and ticket assignments. In July 2016, Kentucky ceased WIA data collection and reporting and began working to implement WIOA data collection and reporting requirements in addition to other USDOE and state reporting. CMS is a staff only application with a web front end. An interface exists between CMS and eMARS, the state’s payment system, to enable processing of payments to, and refunds from, vendors. The system is Section 508 and Bobby compliant and staff use screen readers such as JAWS, ZoomText and WindowEyes, as well as speech recognition software such as Dragon Naturally Speaking.  (Page 46-47) Title I

OFB continues to provide training on the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 as well as training on the ADA, Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act (TWWIIA). Central office and other support staff as well as members of the State Rehabilitation Council will be included in all appropriate HRD activities. OFB is vested in using technology and is actively identifying potential web-based training programs that will allow staff the opportunity to utilize these alternative training methods for increased professional development. (Pages 178-179) Title I

GOAL III: Provide information concerning benefits planning and financial planning in order to promote inclusion, integration, and empowerment of individuals with the most significant and significant disabilities. We have written and passed a new policy on Benefits Planning and Analysis. A fact sheet has been developed for resources in benefits planning that will be given to OVR consumers at time of eligibility or later in the case if they begin receiving Social Security benefits. We are also 8 months in on the SGA project, which gives benefits planning to individuals with SSI and seeks to help them gain competitive integrated employment. OVR services are completed in an expedited fashion in order to insure quicker service provision. The agency has developed a Spanish version of the Benefits Planning fact sheet to make it more accessible. The staff has been trained on Disability Benefits 101(DB101) an electronic system to help with benefits planning. It was launched in December of 2017. As of 2017, the agency is keeping the fee for a Benefits Analysis at $450, but we are hoping the use of DB101 will cut down on the authorization for a benefits analysis. The agency is also hoping that benefits counseling is provided earlier in the process and planning of a case. The agency is also encouraging Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and non-profit providers to consider providing benefits planning services. The agency is encouraging the CRPs and non-profit providers to participate in “Introduction to Social Security Disability Benefits, Work Incentives, and Employment Support Programs” offered by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in hopes that some staff might become interested in pursuing certification to provide those services. (Page 220) Title IV

The WIPA Program for one half of the state is just now up and running. GOAL IV: To provide job placement and supported employment services in order for consumers with significant and most significant disabilities respectively to attain competitive integrated employment. IMPEDIMENTS: No impediments at this time (Page 232) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Goal 2: Work-Based Learning Infrastructure — Create a state-level framework to facilitate employer engagement in work-based learning and ensure consistency in definitions used across the education and training continuum partners regarding definition. • define it • governance structure that is partnership-based • standardized continuum • asset map • identify best practices at every level • create Kentucky model • implement and model • communication strategy (Page 28) Title I

In addition to leveraging and expanding the KSN effort, Kentucky expects a great deal of new activity assessing and addressing employer needs via existing partnerships with business organizations like the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, and most importantly, through new strategies and initiatives crafted by the new administration. (Page 40) Title I

OVR employs fourteen job placement specialists across the state. These specialists are responsible for developing relationships with local employers to facilitate the placement of OVR consumers into competitive integrated employment. Employer engagement activities may include: 1) technical assistance to employers on hiring individuals with disabilities; 2) disability awareness training 3) ongoing and regular contact with employers 4) attending meetings of local Chambers of Commerce, Society of Human Resource Managers (SHRM), and other business related groups; and 5) no cost accessibility surveys to employers. OVR employs a statewide Job Placement Coordinator who coordinates all job placement activities. This staff member trains new job placement specialists, provides technical assistance to the job placement specialists and to districts where there are no job placement specialists, pursues agency—wide relationships with large employers, and acts as the agency contact for the National NET and TAP programs managed by CSAVR. (Page 157) Title I

The Kentucky Skills Network (KSN) is a partnership of local and state workforce development organizations dedicated to providing proactive business services and industry skills development. Through local “Business Service Teams” the KSN has laid a foundation for coordinated employer services that will be leveraged in the coming four years. (Page 157) Title IV

In October 2015, the Kentucky Office for the Blind/Kentucky Career Center was awarded the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Program Grant (CFDA 84.235N). This federal grant was provided through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (Department of Education) to create a program that would result in greater participation of VR-eligible individuals, including youth with disabilities, to acquire marketable skills and recognized postsecondary credentials necessary to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations. Under this project employer engagement is a goal area. For all five years of the grant staff will conduct employer engagement activities such as regional employer conferences in the two project target areas on a variety of topics. 

The Statewide Council for Vocational Rehabilitation (SCVR), Kentucky’s State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), includes several employers and a representative of the Workforce Investment Board who provide important input on agency policy and activities related to employment. OVR, in conjunction with SCVR, conducts a Job Placement Month annually in October which includes many events around the state that promote collaboration with employers. Regional Employer Recognition Awards are given out during the month to employers who have hired OVR consumers. OVR will also continue to partner with local initiatives like Project SEARCH in Northern Kentucky and the Coalition for Workforce Diversity in Louisville, Lexington, Ashland, and Mayfield to identify and educate employers willing to develop new programs specifically designed to focus on hiring and training individuals with disabilities. (Page 158) Title I

Goal 4: Recruit, employ, retain and train the most qualified and highly skilled rehabilitation staff which reflects employment focused, job driven outcomes.
Objective 4.1: Increase the skills and competency levels of all rehabilitation staff statewide. Strategies Maximize training funds to support staff in professional training and development activities. Provide quality training statewide that is job specific and targeted to address any deficiencies identified in quality assurance reviews or training needs assessments. Provide job—driven training that promotes skill enhance and employer engagement. (Page 224) Title IV

LVER staff indirectly serve veterans through direct business outreach to promote the hiring of qualified veterans and obtain job orders for review of potential cross—match with veterans seeking employment. (Page 252) Title IV

Data Collection
Kentucky will build a workforce investment system assessment that combines the results of the independent review and the collection of common performance measures and aligns those results with program improvements and innovations. Basic service delivery performance standards will be set to continuously improve. New comprehensive WIOA service delivery ideas and standards will be added over time to help ensure that common measure and customer satisfaction results go up over time. Kentucky will add to this basic approach and develop broader continuous improvement activities for across the workforce system. (Page 29) Title I Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We anticipate that the current system will be able to collect the necessary data beginning 7/1/2016 and produce accurate reports prior to the due dates for Rehabilitation Services Administration and common measures reporting. (Page 213) Title IV Objective 4.2: Improve services to underserved populations within the blind and visually impaired community, including substance abuse, mental health, and criminal background. Strategies Participate in cross training's with agencies who provide services to treat mental illness, substance abuse to provide all professionals a better understanding of the unique services necessary to improve outcomes for consumers. Collaborate with criminal justice agencies to promote better understanding of issues that impact employment for consumers with backgrounds. Reports of Progress: Given budget constraints progress on this goal area was limited. Staff were provided training for those areas through quality assurance reviews deficiencies were identified and areas of concern voiced by staff through the training assessment were prevalent. Trainings occurred for changes in the case management system for 911 fields as well as on Pre-employment Transition Services. The Cabinet sponsored cross training for the area or team building. There was no progress for the area of substance abuse, mental health or criminal backgrounds. (Page 224) Title IV The Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, Department of Workforce Investment is currently working to develop a single system for all of the data collection needs of the Department including the Office of Employment and Training, Office for the Blind and Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. This system is being developed in phases. The current system has been edited to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. We will continue to make changes identified as necessary to correct or improve that process. We anticipate that the new system will be available for OVR/OFB by 12/31/2019.KEE Suite is the integrated case management system being developed for state agencies (OVR, OFB, OET, CHFS, Adult Ed, WIOA, etc.) to streamline services for program participants in the Commonwealth. It is currently planned to replace OVR/OFB’s current case management system in the fall of 2019. We are in the beginning planning stages for the VR specific portion of the system. All information entered into the system will be shared on Permission based guidelines, set by the Agency(s) based on State and Federal Law. Shared Personally Identifiable Information (PII) that will be available to the participating partners in this system will be Common basic information requested and collected from the participant by each partner to streamline and simplify the process for the participant instead of the participant being required to answer and supply the same information multiple times, and to facilitate the federal reporting of the WIOA required Common Measures. VR specific data and records will be secured by access restrictions in place based on need to know. Regardless of the system that the Agencies choose to implement, innovations that are anticipated include: paperless cases, electronic signatures, improved reporting access, increased electronic communication and corroboration among Department partners, and system generated notifications and reminders to increase productivity. In the interim, the current system is being modified to meet the data collection requirements for common measures as well as the additional data elements required for RSA 911 quarterly reporting. Once a baseline is determined and the relationship between services, partnerships, etc. and successful outcomes and measurable progress is analyzed, strategies will be developed to improve the performance outcomes. (Page 236) Title IV
511

~~In relation to Section 511 of WIOA, it was asked whether the agency was a 14C certificate holder, and their current knowledge about this legislation. In summary, they were asked to list their agency if they had a need for further training. The CRP survey was sent to the 54 CRPs authorized as vendors for KYOVR or KYOFB with 34 actually initiating and completing the survey, for a 63% completion rate. Of the respondents, 53% (18) had provided services to KYOVR or KYOFB consumers for five years or less and 21% (7) had provided services for more than 20 years. When inquired, 38% (13) of the respondents stated their agency received less than 10 referrals per year. In regards to size of the agency, 53% (18) had less than 10 staff and 21% (7) reported more than 50 employees. Based on the fact that there was at least 1 response in all choices of the demographic questions it was felt that a variety of CRPs are represented in the survey responses. (Page 194) Title IV

GOAL V: To implement Section 511 of WIOA. We have team together to look at the best way of implementing this process. We will target students who are not usually referred to OVR while in school, but would have been sent straight to the Sheltered Workshop once out of School, for an early referral to OVR to go through the VR process. Youths out of school but younger than 24 will be referred to an OVR counselor to go through the VR Process. Letters will go out to all 14C Programs in Kentucky in the spring of 2016 explaining section 511 and VR’s involvement in the process. Each 14C will be visited by one of the 3 SE Consultants. Educational groups will be set up for all the current employees of the 14C facilities about career exploration and community integrated employment. These will be done every 6 months for the 1st two years and annually thereafter. A Section 511 team was created and fulfilled identified goals. Communication with 14c holders occurred to provide education on Section 511. A Section 511 video was developed for consumers to view to meet the career counseling mandate. Career counseling participation and completion documents are collected and reviewed to ensure requirements are met. Ongoing monitoring continues by CRP consultants. Input continues to be gathered and communication continues to occur and information is collected during trainings, meetings and focus groups. Process implementation was provided to educate CRP’s on Section 511, and to ensure career counseling is provided to consumers. Effective communication and monitoring continues to occur to ensure consumer needs and requirements are met. Documentation is obtained from the CRP Branch as it relates to refusal of services. (Page 221) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
OVR will have stronger coordination and collaboration with the Youth Career Center offices and other Kentucky Career Center offices in the EKCEP and KentuckianaWorks regions. Adult Education is an active partner in CASE providing supports through the AOKY program. Accelerating Opportunity is aimed at creating effective pathways to credentials for low-skilled adults (testing at a sixth-12th academic grade level) so they can earn the credentials they need to get a family sustaining job. The initiative seeks to reform how education is delivered to low-skilled adults by integrating basic skills education with technical training while providing wrap around services that include instructional and career supports for adult learners. The initiative is informed by I-BEST, an accelerated, integrated instructional model in which adult education and technical instructors work together in the classroom. Career and Technical Education is closely aligned with the project as well. Kentucky will use funds to ensure that all youth program elements are made available to youth. The state supports the local workforce areas in designing youth programs tailored to the needs of in-school and out-of-school youth in local communities. Local areas encourage youth to use one-stop services as needed. Areas have designed special referral processes for youth who come into one-stops and one area has developed a one-stop career center specifically for youth. Vocational Rehabilitation staff will provide high quality services and communication to transition students and youth, provide accurate and timely information related to work incentives and long-term supports for Social Security recipients, increase and improve job placement options and opportunities for persons served, strengthen and expand competitive integrated employment opportunities by implementing Section 511 of WIOA, improve programmatic and physical accessibility to workforce investment system partners and career center offices, communicate and cooperate with workforce partners on accountability measures discussed in Section 116 of WIOA and seek to meet the standards of WIOA, expand opportunities for increased services, such as supported employment, provide options for transportation and information related to medical services available to consumers, and provide a more timely and efficient process for accessing services. (Pages 37-38) Title I Kentucky assesses the overall effectiveness of the workforce investment system in relation to the strategic vision and goals of the WorkSmart Kentucky and Economic Competitiveness plans, seeking integration of activities and information from all the core programs. The ultimate goal is to increase the long—term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment, to improve services to employers and demonstrate continuous improvement. Kentucky will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with Section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), and continuous improvement of the career center. (Page 51) Title I Accessibility is addressed on several levels and venues in the KCC. Given that OVR staffs are housed in many of the career center offices and are a central part of the workforce programs, there is a heightened sense of assuring this topic is addressed. Accessibility is a part of the required certification process under II. Career Center (office) Management: Physical Infrastructure and Accessibility. The standards that apply to this are as follows: Standard 1: Career Center offices are accessible so that all customers can fully use services and resources. (ADA compliant checklist) KCC offices: • are fully ADA compliant; • are feasible (As new center locations are selected, KCC offices are located in areas that are convenient for their customers, close to major highways, on public transportation routes, centrally—located, close to heavily—trafficked areas such as malls and shopping centers, etc.); • provide assistive technology to assist customers with disabilities (visual, hearing or physical) so they can access computers and other KCC resources/services; • evaluate assistive technology annually to ensure that it is up—to—date and fully functioning. • provide free parking and inclusive parking spaces that are adequate for the average level of customer traffic, especially for individuals with disabilities; and • make services accessible to customers who have language and literacy barriers (non—English speakers or individuals with hearing impairments, disabilities or literacy/reading barriers). For assistive technology, the objective is to design a computer workstation/kiosk that can be used by individuals with the widest possible range of abilities and/or circumstances. Kentucky follows the guidelines set forth by the Job Accommodation Network, One—Stop Disability Resource Manual. All Kentucky Career Center offices are expected to ensure universal access to programs and activities for all eligible individuals. Kentucky has taken steps to ensure equitable access to and participation in federally funded programs for all consumers and for agency staff regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or age. OET will comply with the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Public Law 101—336, and applicable federal regulations relating there to prohibiting discrimination against otherwise qualified disabled individuals under any program or activity and adhere to the U.S. Department of Labor Final Rule on Federal Executive Order 11246. (Page 61) Title I GEPA section 427—Special Needs/Barriers to participation Kentucky recently completed the RFA process for services under WIOA. As part of that RFA process, each applicant was directed to address the thirteen AFLEA considerations. Consideration number two addresses special needs populations and barriers. KYAE Skills U weighted heavily the responses provided in the considerations in the selection of applicants for service. Applicants addressed how they will serve special needs populations Page 135and students with barriers through ADA compliance, Office of Rehabilitation (OVR) assessment on physical disabilities, assistive technologies and other reasonable accommodations as well as partnerships with state agencies that provide support services to students with barriers or special needs. All programs have been supplied with the Burlington English product as one tool to use with non-English speaking students. In addition, all local programs sign contracts and affidavits that cover Title IX and affirm they will not discriminate on the basis of age, color, race or any protected class under Title VI and VII of the Civil Right Act of 1964, Age discrimination Act of 1975, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and all applicable laws which prohibit discrimination. Programs are continually monitored by state staff of Administration and Accountability and on a rotating basis participate in an agreed upon procedures audit by the State Auditor of Public Accounts as to the terms of the contract. State employees are encouraged to express their concerns regarding existing or potential barriers or prohibitions to equal employment opportunity due to race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, ancestry, veteran status, and disability in accordance with state and federal laws. EEO assistance is available by contacting the Human Resources EEO Counselor/Coordinator or the State EEO Coordinator. (Page 134) Title I OVR employs fourteen job placement specialists across the state. These specialists are responsible for developing relationships with local employers to facilitate the placement of OVR consumers into competitive integrated employment. Employer engagement activities may include: 1) technical assistance to employers on hiring individuals with disabilities; 2) disability awareness training 3) ongoing and regular contact with employers 4) attending meetings of local Chambers of Commerce, Society of Human Resource Managers (SHRM), and other business related groups; and 5) no cost accessibility surveys to employers. (Page 157) Title I The agency has also worked diligently with other state agencies to bring web-designs created by state entities into compliance with accessibility laws. This is an ongoing process and the agency will continue to push for changes necessary to make all state government technology and software systems fully accessible. (Page 176) Title I Goal 2: continue to monitor and explore additional strategies to improve CRP service quality and compliance Strategies: Involve job coaches with transition students by the last semester of school; Strategies: Train staff on new policies related to customized employment and person—centered planning; Strategies: Require notes to be submitted by Supported Employment Providers by the 5th day of each month. Strategies: Continued monitoring by the Section 511 Implementation Team to insure agency compliance to WIOA requirements related to OVR relationships with sheltered workshops; (Page 199) Title IV
Vets
Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) is a $2.4 million grant administered by OET with staff located in the Kentucky Career Center offices statewide. Those who are both veterans and ex-offenders fall within a category specified to be served under this grant. Currently, the state coordinator receives a monthly list of every incarcerated veteran in Kentucky from the Department of Corrections; those in local jails and state facilities, with their release dates. The nearest disabled veterans outreach program specialist (DVOP) reaches out to these individuals to offer re-entry employment preparation and support services prior to release, when possible. After release, JVSG staff work with the each individual from their KCC office. KCC partners with the Department of Corrections (DOC) and Adult Education to provide training and assessments toward achieving a National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC) for anyone during incarceration. On Jan. 1, 2016, DOC began offering 30 days of “good time” off on sentences of individuals who earn an NCRC. After release, KCC offers a complete portfolio of services to ex-offenders. As a population with barriers to employment, they are entitled to additional WIOA services facilitated OET’s NCRC coordinator. Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) - A special tax credit is available to employers who hire qualified ex-felons. The qualified ex-felon is an individual who has been convicted of a felony or released from incarceration for a felony conviction within 12 months prior to the individual’s start date. (Page 25) Title IV Veterans Each career center office, along with each of the 10 local areas, provides “Priority of Service” to veterans for all Department of Labor funded programs. Each customer entering the local office receives a questionnaire that is used to determine whether the customer is priority-of-service eligible. If the customer is an eligible “covered person,” he/she receives a fact sheet listing all of the services and programs along with the program’s qualifications, which must abide by the Priority of Service mandate. The covered person is then seen by the first available staff person or referred to the disabled veterans program specialists if they are determined to have one of the significant barriers to employment as specified by the appropriate veterans program letters. Additionally, Kentucky’s Focus Career system automatically contacts veterans matched to new job orders 24 hours before non-veterans. (Page 26-27) Title I Eligible veterans and eligible persons who are determined to have a significant barrier to employment, as defined in VPL 03-14 changes 1 and 2 or most current guidance, are referred to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program specialist (DVOP). Additionally, any eligible veterans or eligible persons who are part of a designated additional population by the Assistant Secretary, as defined in VPL 04-14 or current guidance, will be referred to the DVOP. These referrals will be made following an initial identification of an SBE through the registration process. Customers registering electronically using Kentucky’s Focus Career module will be asked a series of questions to determine if they are priority of service eligible. If they are identified as a covered person, they are presented with a screen defining priority of service and directed to their local career center for further information on services and programs. (Page 60) Initial contact at a KCC visited by a veteran and other eligible person will be by an intake/assessment customer service staff member. This person will provide the veteran with a self—assessment form that determines if the individual is qualified as having Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE), and is to be referred to a DVOP specialist. OET will continue to emphasize and train KCC staff to identify those who are already in the system seeking services, those entering the KCC and those found by the DVOP conducting outreach that are consistent with these target populations. These targeted populations include: • special disabled or disabled veterans, as defined in 38 USC §4211(1) and (3); • homeless veterans and those veterans who are at—risk of becoming homeless (any individual or family who is fleeing, or is attempting to flee, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, or other dangerous or life-threatening conditions in the individual’s or family’s current housing situation, including where the health and safety of children are jeopardized, and who have no other residence and lack the resources or support networks to obtain other permanent housing); • recently—separated service member, as defined in 38 USC §4211(6); • ex—offenders, as defined by WIOA Section 101(38); • veterans lacking a high school diploma or equivalent; • low—income veterans, as defined by WIOA Section 101(36); • 18 to 24 year—old veterans, as directed by the assistant director for Veterans Employment and Training (ASVET) in Veterans Program Letter (VPL) 04—14; • transitioning service members assessed as not meeting the Career Readiness Standards, as documented on DD2958 and active duty services members being involuntarily separated through a service reduction in force as described in (VPL) 07—14; and • wounded, ill or injured service members receiving treatment at a military treatment facility or a warrior transition unit and the spouses and family caregivers of such wounded, ill or injured service members as described in (VPL) 08—14. (Page 250) Title IV DVOP specialists provide intensive services to veterans with SBEs, other eligible veterans, and other eligible persons as specified by 38 USC §4103A, and at the direction of the ASVET through guidance contained in VPL 03—14, VPL 03—14 Change 1, VPL 03—14 Change 2, VPL 04—14, VPL 07—14 and VPL 08—14. DVOP specialists will provide a full array of employment, training and placement services to those veterans with one or more SBEs. DVOP specialists will also facilitate services through an effective case management strategy. DVOP specialists conduct an assessment, and provide services to veterans and eligible persons to include: • evaluation of skill levels and needs; • development of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) to identify employment goals, appropriate objectives, and appropriate combination of services for the participant to achieve the employment goals; • coordination of supportive services with applicable providers; • assistance to KCC partners in providing services to veterans on a priority basis; and • conducting outreach to identify those veterans and other eligible persons, ensuring they receive appropriate intensive services, case management and other workforce services necessary to re— turn to meaningful, sustainable employment. LVER staff perform only those duties specified in 38 USC §4104(b), in accordance with guidance promulgated at VPL 03—14. These are related to direct outreach with businesses, and facilitation within the state’s employment service delivery system. LVER staff is assigned duties that promote veterans to businesses, business associations, and business groups. When business outreach is primarily conducted by a Business Services Team, the LVER will be included as an active member. Additional LVER activities and services include, but are not limited to the following: • planning and participating in job and career fairs; • coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs, businesses and business organizations to promote employment and training programs for veterans; • informing federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans; • promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and • conducting veterans’ programs training for all KCC staff. (Page 250) Title I Service delivery is conducted through an integrated delivery system within the KCC structure. Crosstrained, responsive customer service teams throughout the Commonwealth provide effective services. Upon arrival to a KCC, veterans with SBEs will be identified using a self—assessment form and if eligible they will be referred to the DVOP specialist for further assessment, services and intensive case management as required. LVER staff work with the Business Services Team to promote the hiring of veterans to employers. LVERs are key members of the Business Services Teams, providing information on current employer job openings, assisting employers seeking to hire qualified veterans, and actively promoting job—ready veterans to employers. (Page 251) Title IV Kentucky possesses the capacity and capability to serve all veterans. DVOP Specialists, however, only serve those veterans with SBEs, and other targeted populations as directed by the Secretary. These include: • special disabled or disabled veterans, as defined in 38 USC §4211(1) and (3); • homeless veterans and those veterans who are at—risk of becoming homeless; • recently—separated service member, as defined in 38 USC §4211(6); • ex—offenders, as defined by WIOA Section 101(38); • veterans lacking a high school diploma or equivalent; • low Income veterans, as defined by WIOA Section 101(36); • 18— to 24—year—old veterans, as directed by the assistant director for Veterans Employment and Training (ASVET) in Veterans Program Letter (VPL) 04—14. • Transitioning service member assessed as not meeting the Career Readiness Standards, as documented on DD2958 and active duty services members being involuntarily separated through a service reduction in force as described in (VPL) 07—14; • Wounded, ill or injured service members receiving treatment at a military treatment facility or a warrior transition unit and the spouses and family caregivers of such wounded, ill or injured service members as described in (VPL) 08—14 ;• Chapter 31 VR&E veterans . LVER staff indirectly serve veterans through direct business outreach to promote the hiring of qualified veterans and obtain job orders for review of potential cross—match with veterans seeking employment. (Pages 251-252) Title IV All Workforce Investment Boards (WIB) and KCCs will ensure their plans provide strategies and policies for providing veterans and other eligible persons with priority of service. Policies implemented will ensure that veterans and other eligible persons are aware of their entitlement to priority of service, the array of programs and services available to them, and any eligibility requirements for those programs and/or services. (Page 252) Title IV All veterans and eligible persons will be provided local labor market information along with current training programs tailored to the economic sectors for that region by either the DVOP, KCC staff or partner agency staff. Upon completion of the training program, veterans will be registered into the Focus Career system for job matching and placement. Additionally, DVOP and KCC staff will provide referrals as required for all veterans completing training. Success will be measured by the number of veterans and eligible persons training enrollments, completion of training and employment outcomes. (Page 253) Title IV
Mental Health

~~Kentucky’s fourteen Regional Boards for Mental Health or Individuals with an Intellectual Disability are a primary source for extended services in KY. Cooperative budget planning is done between OVR and the Kentucky Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) so that state funds for all phases of supported employment can be sought by each agency. A cooperative agreement is also in place.

The Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) and OVR partnered together, and in 2010, Kentucky became the 12th state to participate in the Dartmouth College, Johnson and Johnson, Supported Employment Initiative to demonstrate the effectiveness of the IPS model for supported employment (Individualized Placement and Support, an Evidence—Based Practice). The first local pilot projects were launched prior to the close of 2010. Through the Dartmouth Project, a new SE funding partner was added when the Greater Cincinnati Health Foundation provided funding for 2 of the local pilots in Northern KY. IPS Supported Employment now includes all 13 Kentucky Community Mental Health Centers. In FY 2016 the partnership with Behavioral Health continues with the addition of 5 IPS sites outside of the Community Mental Health Centers and 2 sites serving those with substance abuse. (Page 155) Title I

The Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) is responsible for the administration of state and federally funded mental health and substance abuse treatment services throughout the commonwealth. Publicly-funded community services are provided for Kentuckians who have problems with mental health, developmental and intellectual disabilities, or substance abuse, through Kentucky’s 14 regional Boards for Mental Health or Individuals with an Intellectual Disability (Regional MHID Boards). Regional MHID Boards are private, nonprofit organizations established by KRS Chapter 210 which serve residents of a designated multi-county region. Regional MHID Boards are private, nonprofit organizations established by KRS Chapter 210 (see Related Links) which serve residents of a designated multi-county region. (Page 160) Title I

Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP’s) and other OVR staff both saw mental health counseling and treatment as one of the greatest unmet needs of consumers. Furthermore CRP’s increased the greatest in demand in the last 3 years to come from those with a diagnosis of Mental Illness (58.0% of respondents). Other OVR staff respondents indicated that psychological restoration was one of the services in greatest demand (35%). The identified need for mental health counseling and treatment has not been listed as the greatest need in the last few Comprehensive Needs Assessments. However, disability coordinators did indicate that mental health issues were a significant barrier for transition age youth as they exit the post-secondary educational setting. (Page 187) Title I

CRPs were asked to identify areas of ‘unmet need’ for their consumers. They indicated support services, mental health treatment and post-employment services were all ‘unmet needs’. When asked what CRP services they foresee an increase in the next 3 years they indicated Employment and retention, skills training and customized supported employment. (Page 195) Title IV

Objective 4.2: Improve services to underserved populations within the blind and visually impaired community, including substance abuse, mental health, and criminal background. Strategies Participate in cross training's with agencies who provide services to treat mental illness, substance abuse to provide all professionals a better understanding of the unique services necessary to improve outcomes for consumers. Collaborate with criminal justice agencies to promote better understanding of issues that impact employment for consumers with backgrounds. Reports of Progress: Given budget constraints progress on this goal area was limited. Staff were provided training for those areas through quality assurance reviews deficiencies were identified and areas of concern voiced by staff through the training assessment were prevalent. Trainings occurred for changes in the case management system for 911 fields as well as on Pre-employment Transition Services. The Cabinet sponsored cross training for the area or team building. There was no progress for the area of substance abuse, mental health or criminal backgrounds. (Page 224) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
Other federal, state, and local agencies related to the rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities such as the Department of Protection and Advocacy, Department of Probation and Parole, Department of Workers Compensation, Department of Disability Determination. (Page 147) Title I Kentucky has shifted focus in the Career Centers from Unemployment Insurance assistance to Employment Services. This shift has allowed Wagner Peyser staff to focus more on providing employment services to customers in a more individualized manner rather than the focus on claimant assistance. More emphasis has been placed career coaching with special emphasis on first time payment customers and RESEA customers. Kentucky currently has an outdated RESEA profile model which has hindered our ability to identify and engage all potential customers. (Page 276) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 66

Accessibility - 06/28/2019

~~“The Kentucky Department of Education is committed to making its electronic and information technologies accessible to individuals with disabilities by meeting or exceeding the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. 794d), as amended in 1998. Section 508 requires agencies to provide individuals with disabilities equal access to electronic information and data comparable to those who do not have disabilities unless an undue burden would be imposed on the agency. The Section 508 Standards are the technical requirements and criteria that are used to measure conformance within this law. More information on Section 508 and the technical standards can be found online.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Special Education Forms - Due Process - 06/24/2019

~~“This page contains downloads to special education forms commonly used by local school districts to document due process and implementation of appropriate programs…Included are state approved forms for the Referral, Consents, Individual Education Program (IEP), Conference Summary and other state approved special education forms.”  

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP) - 06/18/2019

~~“The Community Work Transition Program is designed to provide a positive beginning in the world of work for students in special education during their last two years of high school. It is a cooperative effort between participating local school districts, the Kentucky Department of Education, the Kentucky Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Kentucky Department for the Blind, and HDI.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Express - 04/18/2019

~~“Veterans services

Our offices have local veterans employment representatives and disabled veteran outreach program specialists trained specifically to assist veterans with their employment and training needs.They work with other Kentucky Career Center staff members, the Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Department of Veterans Affairs and various other organizations in providing veterans with priority services designed to improve employability and career options. Services available to veterans can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Project CASE “Creating Access to Successful Employment” - 04/01/2019

“Project CASE in Kentucky intends to increase participation in Career Pathways for individuals with disabilities. Under Project CASE, we will build and expand on the current Career Pathways program components that align to the Kentucky Workforce Investment Board’s targeted sectors of Information Technology, Manufacturing and Industrial Technology, and Healthcare/Nursing & Allied Health, and examine what specific strategies or mix of strategies are most effective in serving individuals with disabilities.

The grant will provide direct services to individuals in the 7 counties of Metro Louisville (KentuckianaWorks) and more rural 23 counties of Eastern Kentucky (Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program- EKCEP).  This project will address new levels of outreach, and flexible and innovative training and postsecondary approaches for both students and youth.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Career Center Office for the Blind - 04/01/2019

~~“The mission of the Kentucky Office for the Blind is to provide opportunities for employment  and independence to people with visual disabilities in their homes, schools, workplaces and communities. Services are tailored to each individual’s strengths, abilities and interests.

Individualized services for eligible applicants can be found by accessing the web link. ":

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Special Education Services - 02/12/2019

~~“Welcome to the Division of IDEA implementation and Preschool.  This  site includes information on all aspects of special education programs in public schools.  We welcome your comments and suggestions.  If you need further assistance with finding information on special education programs in Kentucky's public schools, please contact us.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshots - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information on the RETAIN program in Kentucky including the amount of funding requested, the target population and the contact person

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Supported Employment Training Project “Newly Designed Supported Employment Leadership Series” - 01/01/2019

~~Supported Employment Training Project isa project of the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky. It announces its 2019 Supported Employment Leadership Series with more information about content and dates available by accessing the web link. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

WIOA STATE PLAN FOR THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY FY-2018 - 12/31/2018

~~“The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

HB 2 – Worker’s Compensation - 03/30/2018

“AN ACT relating to workers' compensation.

    Amend KRS 342.020 to limit the time period of payment of medical expenses for certain permanent partial disabilities to 780 weeks but provide a mechanism to apply for extended benefits; limit the number of drug screens for which the employer will be liable;

[…]

to indicate that an application for adjustment of claim for compensation for a cumulative trauma injury must be made within five years of the last injurious exposure to the cumulative trauma;

[…]

amend KRS 342.730 to increase average weekly wage caps; set time limits for total disability benefits paid to certain professional athletes; allow payment of temporary total disability benefits to be offset by gross income minus applicable taxes paid to an employee during a period of light-duty work or work in an alternative job position; provide an offset against temporary total disability benefits for salary continuation or wholly employer-funded disability retirement plans; indicate that benefits shall terminate when a plaintiff reaches age 67 or two years after the date of injury, whichever shall last occur;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Statute 42.0146 - Certification Program for Disabled Veteran-Owned Businesses - 07/15/2016

~~“The Office of Equal Employment Opportunity and Contract Compliance shall oversee a program that provides certification of a disabled veteran-owned business in order to encourage growth among businesses owned by disabled veterans within the state and assist those businesses in competing for work in other states that require certification by a statewide body. This certification does not provide a preference in state procurement, nor does it create a point system or set aside for disabled veteran-owned businesses.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Kentucky ABLE Act S.B. 179 - 04/05/2016

Signed by the Governor on April  5, 2016

AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities.

Amend KRS 205.200 to disregard any amount in an ABLE account, any contributions to an ABLE account, and any distribution from an ABLE account for qualified expenses for the purposes of determining an individual's eligibility for a means-tested public assistance program and the amount of assistance or benefits the individual is eligible to receive under the program; direct the State Treasurer, the Secretary of the Finance and Administration Cabinet, the Executive Director of the Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Executive Director of the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority to work cooperatively to seek all available sources of funding, determine the best plan of action related to ABLE accounts, and report to the Legislative Research Commission on or before December 31, 2016.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Gov. Bevin Unveils Final Report of Kentucky Work Matters Task Force and Signs Employment First Executive Order - 05/15/2018

~~“During today’s ceremony Gov. Bevin signed the Employment First executive order, recognizing that competitive integrated employment into the general workforce is the preferred outcome for citizens of all ages and levels of disability. He also announced formation of the Employment First Council to continue momentum on targeted areas of the task force’s report.

Highlights of the policy recommendations made by the Kentucky Work Matters Task Force include:•Streamlining occupational licensing for veterans to ensure they are given credit for similar training/experience they received in the military or in another state. (The recently enacted House Bill 319 will expedite occupational licensing for Kentucky veterans.)•Capitalizing on opportunities for the state to serve as model employer. (The Commonwealth is currently transitioning management of two large state cafeterias to the Kentucky Office for the Blind (OFB), providing job opportunities for the visually impaired.)•Increasing resources for the Fostering Success program, which provides job opportunities for youth aging out of the foster care system. (This year’s state budget included an increase of $375,000 per year to expand this program.)•Increasing general fund allocations to the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and Office for the Blind (OFB) to draw down full available federal match. (This year’s state budget increased total funding by more than $9 million for OVR and OFB, which will serve approximately 6,500 more clients.)•Partnering with school systems to ensure that students with disabilities are included in career readiness and development programs.”

“Promoting inclusive workforce policies requires coordination at all levels of government, with states having critical knowledge of economic and employment realities on the ground,” said Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Jennifer Sheehy. “We appreciate Gov. Bevin’s leadership on this issue and continue to encourage states to share their experience and insight.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Relating to Medicaid Expansion - 01/12/2018

“Now, therefore, I, Matthew G. Bevin, Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, by virtue of the authority vested in me by Section 69 of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, do hereby Order and Direct the following:

 

In the event one or more of the components of Kentucky’s Section 1115 Waiver and the accompanying Special Terms and Conditions are prohibited from being implemented pursuant to a final judgment issued by a court of competent jurisdiction, with all appeals of the judgment issued by a court of competent jurisdiction, with all appeals of the judgment having been exhausted or waived, the Secretary of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services and the Commissioner of the Department for Medicaid Services within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services are hereby directed to take the necessary actions to terminate Kentucky’s Medicaid expansion program no later than six months from the date on which all appeals of the judgment have been exhausted or waived, or otherwise as soon as legally practicable under the remaining terms or the Special Terms and Conditions, applicable statutes or regulations.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 25

Accessibility - 06/28/2019

~~“The Kentucky Department of Education is committed to making its electronic and information technologies accessible to individuals with disabilities by meeting or exceeding the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. 794d), as amended in 1998. Section 508 requires agencies to provide individuals with disabilities equal access to electronic information and data comparable to those who do not have disabilities unless an undue burden would be imposed on the agency. The Section 508 Standards are the technical requirements and criteria that are used to measure conformance within this law. More information on Section 508 and the technical standards can be found online.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Special Education Forms - Due Process - 06/24/2019

~~“This page contains downloads to special education forms commonly used by local school districts to document due process and implementation of appropriate programs…Included are state approved forms for the Referral, Consents, Individual Education Program (IEP), Conference Summary and other state approved special education forms.”  

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Veterans Express - 04/18/2019

~~“Veterans services

Our offices have local veterans employment representatives and disabled veteran outreach program specialists trained specifically to assist veterans with their employment and training needs.They work with other Kentucky Career Center staff members, the Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Department of Veterans Affairs and various other organizations in providing veterans with priority services designed to improve employability and career options. Services available to veterans can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Kentucky Career Center Office for the Blind - 04/01/2019

~~“The mission of the Kentucky Office for the Blind is to provide opportunities for employment  and independence to people with visual disabilities in their homes, schools, workplaces and communities. Services are tailored to each individual’s strengths, abilities and interests.

Individualized services for eligible applicants can be found by accessing the web link. ":

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Special Education Services - 02/12/2019

~~“Welcome to the Division of IDEA implementation and Preschool.  This  site includes information on all aspects of special education programs in public schools.  We welcome your comments and suggestions.  If you need further assistance with finding information on special education programs in Kentucky's public schools, please contact us.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshots - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information on the RETAIN program in Kentucky including the amount of funding requested, the target population and the contact person

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

WIOA STATE PLAN FOR THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY FY-2018 - 12/31/2018

~~“The OVR CRP Branch continues to explore innovative strategies with partnering state agencies to leverage funding to expand evidenced-based supported employment models (IPS) throughout Kentucky. Additionally, exploration continues to be conducted to identify underserved areas for those individuals with the most significant disabling conditions that may not be best suited for a labor market position, but would be better equipped to gain success and independence in a customized employment position, therefore leading to potential opportunities for CRP’s to provide Customized Supported Employment which requires a unique and specialized skill set.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Working with Exceptional Children in CTE - 12/05/2018

~~‘The Office of Career and Technical Education collaborates with the Office of Teaching and Learning to ensure we have strategies that help us uphold our Mission for all students.Exceptional Children include Special Needs, English Learners, Gifted and Talented, Blind - VI and Deaf - HH students.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kentucky Veterans Employment, Training and Support Program - 12/05/2018

~~“KyVets is the Kentucky Veterans Employment Training and Support Program. KyVets provides resources and support to assist veterans across the commonwealth in obtaining gainful employment and training services. For more information, email KyVets@ky.gov

This page has links to resources to help veterans who are job seekers.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY GUIDLINES FOR KENTUCKY SCHOOLS - 12/01/2018

~~“The purpose of this document is to assist teachers and administrators in identifying and meeting student needs for assistive technology as provided by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and to offer specific directions on classroom implementation. It includes a thorough description of issues to consider from the start of screening through the provision of assistive technology and on-going evaluation of its use for educational purposes. Connections are given to related resources and programs which can enhance access and utilization of assistive technology. Until recently, there have been few materials available to help educators make critical decisions in the provision and application of assistive technology. This document represents a compilation of ideas and information devised by those in Kentucky and elsewhere who strive to use assistive technology to improve accessibility and acceptance for children and youth with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
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Kentucky Community Based Work Transition Program (CBWTP) - 06/18/2019

~~“The Community Work Transition Program is designed to provide a positive beginning in the world of work for students in special education during their last two years of high school. It is a cooperative effort between participating local school districts, the Kentucky Department of Education, the Kentucky Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Kentucky Department for the Blind, and HDI.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities - 10/18/2018

~~“We are an independent self-governing organization dedicated to advancing the inclusion  of Kentuckians in all facets of community life. The Council is part 56 national State and Territory Councils on Developmental Disabilities, all federally funded and mandated to advocate and create systems change for people with developmental disabilities.

We have a Council of 26 governor appointed citizens and seven Council staff. The Council develops a Five Year State Plan to meet goals in advocacy, capacity building and creating change. Working from the Five Year State Plan, the Council provides grants and contracts for innovative and sustainable projects that empower Kentuckians with Developmental Disabilities and their families. We assist in training initiatives and public policy strategies to educate lawmakers and policy makers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kentucky Assistive Technology Service Network “A Guide to Assistive Technology Funding in Kentucky 15th Edition” - 08/01/2016

“…the services of the ATRCs include, but are not limited to: Assistive Technology Services for Early Intervention, K-12 and Post-secondary school, Employment, Transition, Independent Living, leisure or recreation; Loan Library of Assistive Devices, adaptive equipment and toys; Demonstrations of assistive technology devices; Funding information, Assistance and Referral; Assessments and Evaluations for AT; Vocational assessments; Consultations on appropriate technologies; Workplace AT; Environmental Controls; Recycled Computers and Assistive Technology Devices; Training and Technical Assistance on and about AT.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
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