Louisiana

States - Big Screen

The Bayou State welcomes you to come as you are, thus inciting a motto of inclusion that should also engage and encompass Louisianans with disabilities in the general workforce and economic mainstream. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Louisiana’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
-0.24%
Change from
2018 to 2019
4,648,794
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.4%
Change from
2018 to 2019
375,922
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.43%
Change from
2018 to 2019
131,742
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.08%
Change from
2018 to 2019
35.05%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.86%
Change from
2018 to 2019
74.33%

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 4,684,333 4,659,978 4,648,794
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 361,642 374,421 375,922
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 122,683 121,952 131,742
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,765,230 1,758,914 1,752,117
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.92% 32.57% 35.05%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 72.47% 73.69% 74.33%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.10% 4.90% 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.40% 25.10% 26.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 19.00% 17.50% 17.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 327,357 344,265 342,094
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 352,166 356,997 377,726
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 430,116 437,242 452,167
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 221,548 233,652 236,460
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,135 28,192 23,902
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,614 4,732 4,945
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,652 6,309 6,530
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 12,434 12,828 13,451
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 4,007 6,364 6,038

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 5,865 5,727 5,696
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.50% 3.50% 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 156,107 154,395 152,643

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,660 1,871 2,276
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 3,502 3,703 4,177
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 9,069 9,589 10,551
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 18.30% 19.50% 21.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 0.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00% N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 0.80% 3.00% 7.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A 2 6
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3 2 4
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 65 386 896

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 12,198 18,478 18,600
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 1,475 1,863 890
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 646 723 375
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 44.00% 39.00% 42.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 13.97 15.48 8.03

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 22.00% 18.00% 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,522 3,879 4,156
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 269,396 267,599 265,182
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 193 106 119
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 96 68 88

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,055,000 $11,179,547 $11,223,034
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $6,213,000 $4,883,241 $2,877,141
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $15,945,000 $16,486,266 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A $16,486,266 N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 29.00% 31.00% 0.30%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A 2,461 N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,176 969 581
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 2,551 2,573 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 32.10 32.84 30.47

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 59.67% 60.72% 60.87%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.91% 14.71% 14.66%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.33% 1.25% 1.24%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 100.00% 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.68% 39.48% 39.33%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 72.30% 74.98% 76.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 87.26% 87.16% 88.30%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.62% 35.50% 37.60%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 721,050
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 131,005
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 197,993
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 328,998
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 137
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 217
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 354
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,286,952
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,116,168

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 51 31 22
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 9 8 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 60 39 23
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,171 1,233 747
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 274 274 19
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,445 1,507 766

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

In addition, a State Office position coordinates employment activities statewide. The Employment Initiative Program Coordinator serves as LRS’ direct contact to the VR Business Network and distributes job leads and information to the regional offices. In FY 2015, the VR Business Network provided job leads from all over the country. Some of the job leads were from the following companies: Walgreen’s, Lowe’s, TJX Companies, Office Max, Wells Fargo, DOL, Manpower, Inc., USDA, Marriott International, and many others.

LRS continues to participate with Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities (OCDD) in the “Employment First” initiative, which was designed to provide employment asa first option for persons with developmental disabilities, as an alternative to institutionalization, and to provide integration/independence in the community. LRS participates in roundtable discussions hosted by OCDD to inform their staff and providers of new requirements related to integration of individuals with developmental disabilities into their communities as a result of new Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) rules, as well as how to better collaborate with LRS to achieve goals set forth in WIOA. (Page 214- 215) Title IV

Customized Employment

Additionally, 48% of counselors indicated that the quality of services provided to meet the needs of consumers could be improved. Seventy percent of staff responding felt that more CRPs are needed in their area to serve specific services or to serve specific disability populations. Populations that were identified as needing further CRPs to serve include the deaf, deaf-blind and blind/visually impaired, felons/ex-felons with disabilities, individuals with cognitive impairments/intellectual disabilities, autism, mental illness, paraplegic/quadriplegic, and traumatic brain injuries. In addition, it was noted that more CRPs are needed to provide services to transition students, to provide services such as supported employment in rural areas, job readiness/placement, sign language interpretation, assistive technology services and training, training, and customized employment. (Page 195) Title VI

LRS will provide ongoing support services, including customized employment and other appropriate services needed to support and maintain youth with most significant disabilities, to work toward competitive integrated employment; beginning at Job Stabilization / Transition to Extended Services. 

Purchased supported employment services (Milestones) are identified and listed on the IPE and must be obtained through an approved Supported Employment CRP and generally cannot exceed 24 months or four years for youth with disabilities (ages 14-24). If a Consumer requires longer than 24 months in reaching job stabilization or four years for youth with disabilities, the LRS Counselor can extend the service in accordance with Plan guidelines (Page 208) Title VI

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

With support of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant (2012 -2015), LWC worked to ensure the physical, communication and programmatic accessibility of all One-Stop Career Centers by conducting specialized training for all center staff on topics including accessibility for all, disability etiquette and awareness, and identifying and assisting job-seekers with hidden disabilities. LWC will continue to maintain these investments in staff training and technology to make certain One- Stop Career Center staff serve adult job-seekers with disabilities effectively. LWC has incorporated accessibility criteria as part of the One-Stop certification policy criteria in collaboration with the Workforce Investment Council, local boards and CEOs. Additionally, all One-Stop Centers will be monitored onsite annually to ensure compliance with this requirement. (Page 88) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Goal 2: Expand career services and opportunities for populations facing multiple barriers to close the gap in educational attainment and economic advancement through career pathways and improved career services and the expansion of bridge programs. 1. Expand and incentivize the utilization of evidenced-based workforce strategies that support targeted populations (e.g., the long-term unemployed, individuals with disabilities, veterans, outof-school youth) into sector-based career pathway initiatives to achieve similar outcomes relative to other populations. (Page 37-38) Title I 

School to Work Transition

Job-seekers who have large gaps in their work history, limited, obsolete or unknown skills, limited education, inadequate credentials, lack soft skills, have significant barriers to employment or a combination of any of these factors as well as any job-seeker determined most likely to exhaust all their UI benefits shall be considered not workforce ready. Job-seekers who are not workforce ready shall be provided individualized career services, consisting of a minimum of a comprehensive assessment and development of an individualized employment plan (IEP) in the context of case management. (Page 62) Title I

The comprehensive assessment is the foundation for development of an IEP, and no IEP shall be created without completing a comprehensive assessment. In many cases the comprehensive assessment will then be an ongoing process that may result in changes to the goals and objectives of the IEP. The IEP is developed with a job-seeker to identify or create employment goals, appropriate achievement objectives and the right combination of services to assist in achieving goals and objectives. In short — “Where am I now?” “Where do I want to go?” “How will I get there?” The IEP must include goals and objectives that are SMART (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time bound). A case note must accompany the IEP and must justify the plan based on the identified barrier(s) to employment. Case management requires a regular follow-up and review or revision of the IEP until such time as the job-seeker becomes workforce ready or enters a training program. In either case, follow-up is critical, using a 30-day cycle until the job-seeker attains employment or completes training. (Page 62) Title I

Case Management requires a regular follow-up and review or revision of the IEP, until such time as the job seeker becomes workforce ready or enters a training program. In either case follow-up is critical, using the 30, 60, and 90-day cycle until employed or training is complete is appropriate — except for long term training. For long-term training, Career Specialists should follow the most current guidance. (Page 121) Title II

The formal interagency agreement provides for initial contact to be made with the transition student as early as age sixteen. This is accomplished by the development of criteria and timelines for an effective and efficient referral process; provision of orientation and information sessions for students and their families; and LRS counselors determining transition students’ eligibility for VR services within the timelines established by agency policy. For each student determined eligible for services, every effort will be made to ensure those who are in an Order of Selection (OOS) Category currently being served by LRS leave the school system with an approved IPE in place that incorporates appropriate segments of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and projected employment needs, as applicable. (Page 171) Title II

The Program Coordinator works collaboratively with DOE Transition Coordinator in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities including VR services. Both agencies share responsibility to coordinate the provision of services, conduct outreach, and identify financial responsibility as needed. The DOE will assure that all students with disabilities and their families have knowledge of LRS policies and services including brochures and promotional information supplied by LRS. Information dissemination begins with the writing of the transition service page and continues through referral to LRS. Local Education Agencies (LEAs) also invite LRS representatives to IEP meetings at the students’ request, whena transition service page is being written for a student with a disability who may be eligible for and/or interested in VR services; facilitate appropriate orientation meetings among LRS staff, student and family members; provide time for LRS staff to meet with teachers, guidance counselors, and other appropriate personnel for such purposes as information sharing/gathering at both the individual and agency levels; and assist in the development, provision, and evaluation of interagency vocational assessment processes and functional vocational transition programs. (Page 172) Title II

Current LRS policy and guidelines address the allocation of 15% of State’s VR allotment for the provision of services of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) to high school students with disabilities between the ages of 16 - 21 who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services. The required activities of Pre-ETS are workplace readiness training, job exploration counseling; work-based learning experiences; counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary education programs at institutions of higher education; and instruction in self-advocacy. LRS assigned vendors to work with each high school across the state to make Pre-ETS services available to students who receive IDEA funds or students who are an individuals with a disability for the purposes of section 504 of the Act (29 U.S.C.794). (Page 172-173) Title II

LRS will use agency funds for the provision of Pre-ETS and VR services on the approved IPE that relates directly to the achievement of the agreed upon vocational goal, which is not the responsibility of the education system. The DOE will use agency funds for the provision of educational services on the approved IEP that relates directly to the achievement of the agreed upon educational goal.… LRS Transition Counselors in each region meet with a school liaison, usually the guidance counselor, to provide information regarding LRS services. The school liaison relays the information to students with disabilities and coordinates the student’s initial meeting with the LRS Transition Counselor. LRS Transition Counselors conduct outreach by hosting transition meetings at area high schools to provide information about VR services and to accept referrals. Information disseminated at these meetings includes agency brochures, client handbooks describing the VR processes/services, and referrals to other community resources students may need to access. Counselors work with the students, parents and educators to plan services needed for successful transition from school to work from the point that the student with a disability is identified. Counselors attend “Career Days” at the high schools to share information with transition students on available services that may identify career goals and to share information regarding services available to assist them in reaching their goals. (Page 173) Title II

Approximately three hundred and fifty (350) consumers could be referred for supported  employment services during each fiscal year. Once eligibility for supported employment services has been established, LRS continues to collaborate with OBH to ensure that services are provided in a timely manner and to assure the development of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). The IPE shall specify the responsibilities of all parties involved in the supported employment program for the individual and shall include reporting requirements for both agencies. (Page 174- 175) Title II

LRS has five Third Party Cooperative Arrangements (TPCAs) established with separate School Districts in Grant, Bossier, Evangeline, Orleans and Franklin Parishes as well as with Sci Academy and GW Carver. Through these TPCAs, a Transition Specialist provides workplace readiness training including self-advocacy, work-based learning experiences, and identification of employers who will host students for work-based learning. Bossier Parish Community College has a program called Program for Successful Employment (PSE) funded through a TPCA with LRS to provide job readiness to students with disabilities, work with employers to help find job placement and provide follow up. Virtual Academy of Lafourche has hired a transition specialist, through a TPCA, to provide workplace readiness training including self-advocacy, work-based learning experiences, and identification of employers who will host students for work-based learning. (Page 177) Title II

Some examples of collaborative efforts include Transition Core Team meetings held statewide attended by the DOE, the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities, Families Helping Families, and other interested individuals. These meetings are held to assist agencies who serve transition students as they exit from school to work. LRS has a Program Coordinator specializing in Assistive Technology who conducts in-service training annually to keep field staff members abreast of the most recent technology available to assist individuals with disabilities. Specialized training is provided to our staff members working with low-incident disabilities to include such training as orientation to deafness, mobility training, sign language coursework, deaf-blindness training, and graduate level training specific to working with low-incident populations (i.e. visual impairment/hearing impairment/significant cognitive impairment). (Page 188) Title II

Respondents from other components of the statewide workforce investment system were given survey links to complete the survey online. Needs identified by respondents included transportation; benefit planning; job coaching; postemployment services; transition from school to work; assistive technology devices/services; and job placement. The primary barriers identified by respondents included the lack of medical insurance/care; adjustment to disability; fear of losing government benefits; lack of public resources; lack of employer acceptance of an individual’s disability; and the lack of transportation.
Fifty percent of LRS employees responding noted that they are satisfied or very satisfied when working with the Business and Career Solution Centers (BCSC). Thirty-eight percent noted that they have not worked with a BCSC. Thirty nine percent used a BCSC in the last month to access/provide services to individuals with disabilities. Eighteen percent utilized the BCSC in the last three months. Seventy-four percent of staff are familiar with services available through their local BCSC. (Page 194) Title II

LRS shall provide for continuity of services once an otherwise eligible individual is selected for services and has begun to receive services under an IPE, irrespective of the severity of the individual’s disability. LRS will continue to provide needed VR services to all individuals with an existing Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). All services, including post-employment services, shall be available to individuals receiving services under an Order of Selection insofar as such services are necessary and appropriate to the individual's Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in order to ultimately place them in successful employment. All Agency policies and procedures governing the expenditure of funds, consumer financial participation, and use of comparable services and benefits are applicable to individuals receiving services under an Order of Selection. (Page 204) Title II

Louisiana Rehabilitation Services estimates that it will serve 13,843 individuals during fiscal year 2019 in the vocational rehabilitation program. This number includes approximately 9,260 cases that are expected to receive services under an IPE. The estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services is 1,283. The estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services is 1,609. In addition, approximately 5,300 students with disabilities will be served through the Pre-Employment Transition Services program. (Page 205) Title II

LRS continues to renew and revise existing local cooperative agreements, as applicable, with the 70 school districts and 146 Charter Schools in Louisiana. The LRS Transition Program Coordinator continues to collaborate and partner with DOE, OCDD, Work Incentive Planning Program, Office of Community Services, LWC, and the Office of Youth Development in an effort to network, share information and utilize comparable benefits to enhance VR services to transition students. The primary focus of LRS’ collaboration is to identify and address barriers (e.g. policies, eligibility process, resource allocation); assure effective service provision through the support of local interagency core teams, provide cross-agency training, outreach, engage in capacity building of young adults and family outreach efforts; provide continued support of innovative models and practices related to transition; and provide information and technical assistance. The Program Coordinator provides guidance and information to the Rehabilitation Counselors regarding specific transition issues. The Program Coordinator worked collaboratively with WINTAC’s Coordinator using conference calls, to discuss transition topics and provide information to LRS’ field offices. The Training Unit developed a School-to-Work Job Readiness curriculum and has trained staff to implement the curriculum with eligible students. Training will continue to be provided statewide. VR Counselors are encouraged to provide services at least once a month, when feasible, to students determined appropriate for job readiness training. (Page 214) Title II

Two Master Rehabilitation Counselor reviews were conducted by the Quality Assurance Unit during the 2017 review year. Each of the caseloads reviewed for promotion to Master Rehabilitation Counselor status exceeded the 90% compliance level required. Strategy 2. Explore opportunities for consumers to participate in Telework in order to increase employment outcomes. Progress: Telework employment options are considered for consumers when appropriate. Strategy 3. Identify and collaborate with employers to provide job development, Work-Based Learning Experiences and job placement. Progress: Through collaboration with the LRS Rehabilitation Employment Development Specialists (REDS) and local businesses throughout the state, 115 jobs were developed leading to successful job placements. Additionally, LRS vendors work with businesses throughout the year in developing jobs and placing consumers. Strategy 4. Increase Counselor presence in secondary education settings in order to improve provision of vocational rehabilitation services to transition students. (Page 216) Title II Progress: Pre-ETS counselors and REDS have identified employers and placed students with disabilities into Work-Based Learning Experiences. Strategy 6. Increase resources for assistive technology assessments and devices to improve employment outcomes. Progress: Two additional, out-of-state vendor/providers have been vetted, and added to provide rehabilitation driving assessments and training on a fee-for-service basis, to include vehicle modification specifications for LRS consumers. A contractual agreement to hire a Physical Therapist and Rehabilitation Engineer through LSU Health Sciences Department was negotiated and approved. These professionals will conduct seating and positioning assessments, wheelchair and personal mobility evaluations, home modifications for accessibility evaluations, job accommodations assessments, and other rehabilitation engineering field services as required. The state-approved list of assistive technology and rehabilitation technology providers/vendorshas been updated, and referral forms made available to the regional offices. (Page 217) Title II

Strategy 1. Perform comprehensive statewide needs assessment to determine needs of students with disabilities. Progress: The needs assessment is scheduled to be conducted in calendar year 2017 for submission in the State Plan submitted in 2018. Strategy 2. Expand outreach to students with disabilities to make them aware of VR services including Pre-ETS.
Progress: Pre-ETS counselors throughout the state attend IEP meeting, career fairs, and other school functions to make them aware of LRS services. Strategy 3 Monitor the provision of Pre-ETS services to determine effectiveness and possible improvement to service delivery process. Progress: Pre-ETS counselors monitor vendor activities in the schools to ensure delivery of appropriate services and determine any improvements needed. Objective C. Increase the number of Randolph-Sheppard Managers earning at least $25,000 annually by expanding opportunities and enhancing consumer service delivery in the RandolphSheppard Program. . (Page 219) Title II

Career Pathways

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Apprenticeship

The Local Boards are responsible for developing local plans for the governor’s approval, designating local One-Stop operators, designating eligible partners of training services, negotiating local performance measures with the state workforce board and the governor, monitoring local system performance against established performance measures, and helping to develop the labor market information system for local areas. Local Boards will facilitate relationships between Partner Programs, local entities, and supportive service agencies for a strengthened service delivery in regard to provision of services to youth. These relationships will include, as a minimum, procedures for youth participant co-enrollment and common intake as necessary to integrate: intake, case management, and reporting. This shall be the case for all Partner Programs under which youth may be served. Youth services shall begin with a systematic approach to gathering information about strengths and assets, need and challenges, and interests and goals. These assessments shall be used to determining program eligibility, and subsequently guide the development of individualized plans and all other Case Management activities. Youth shall be co-enrolled as necessary in any programs under WIOA funding sources and any Partner Program that is not WIOA funded, e.g., Adult Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Children and Family Services that is necessary based on their needs assessment. Youth will be simultaneously co-enrolled in any and all programs under which they are eligible for, and receiving, services. This will prevent youth having to wait until they exit one program in order to access services offered by other programs, and allow them to receive the best combination of services from different funding streams. For any program year, LWDBs must spend not less than 75 percent of local workforce development area funds to provide direct services to out-of-school youth. For any program year, LWDBs must spend not less than 20 percent of the funds allocated to the local area to provide in school youth and out of school youth with work experiences such as summer employment, pre-apprenticeship, internship, job shadowing, and on-the-job training. Local boards shall ensure that parents, participants, and other members of the community with experience relating to the programs for youth are involved in its design and implementation. One-Stop operators shall carry out programs that: • Provide an assessment of academic levels, skill levels and occupational skills, any prior work experience, employability, interests and aptitudes. (Pages 111-112) Title II

Work-eligible recipients shall participate in appropriate work activities as agreed upon in the Family Success Agreement. Work-eligible is defined as families containing an adult under sixty years of age, or teen head of household, that is not disabled, incapacitated, or caring for a family member who is disabled or incapacitated as documented by a medical expert to which the status of disability is clearly established and explained. Work-eligible excludes cases in which only the child portion of need that is unrelated to a sanction or penalty, known as a child-only case, is considered in determining eligibility. The work activities may include but are not limited to: Unsubsidized employment, Subsidized employment, Unpaid work experience, On-the-job training, Job search/job readiness, Vocational education, Satisfactory attendance at secondary school or in course of study leading to a certificate of general equivalence, in the case of recipients who have not completed secondary schools or received a certificate, Education directly related to employment, in the case of a recipient who has not received a high school diploma or certificate of equivalency, Job skills training directly related to employment, community service, and The provision of child care to an individual who is participating in community service. Participants, who are found not to possess basic workplace or basic literacy skills, as determined by an assessment, shall combine employment and job readiness and job search activities with activities designed to increase their basic and workplace literacy skills. (Page 242) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

The state integrated One-Stop Center operations under the Workforce Investment Act several years ago. Within the past two years, stand-alone Wagner-Peyser offices have been eliminated. Each of Louisiana’s fifteen Workforce Development areas has established at least one Comprehensive Center that has been certified by its respective board as meeting the criteria to be branded as an American Job Center. Smaller offices operated by local boards and/or One-Stop operators (contractors) where all Program Partners are not present, shall be designated and operated as “Affiliate” One-Stop centers and may have any subset of partners, but shall not be operated as Wagner Peyser stand-alone Employment Services offices. Under the plan, local boards will have the flexibility to include additional partners in One-Stop Centers, in particular and specifically identified by the law: • Employment and training programs administered by the Social Security Administration, including the Ticket to Work and the Self-Sufficiency Program. • Employment and training programs carried out by the Small Business Administration. • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) employment and training programs. • Other programs authorized under the National and Community Service Act of 1990. (Page 48) Title I Ticket-to-Work: LRS continues to network and collaborate with MAXIMUS, as well as many other agencies in the state, to ensure Ticket-to-Work is successful in Louisiana. LRS continues to maintain a statewide 1-800 Ticket Hotline number for individuals interested in learning more about their Ticket and how LRS would be able to assist them. In FY 2017, LRS received $1,163,021.25; this amount was a slight decrease from FY 2016’s $1,488,446.32 which was received from the Social Security Administration’s (SSAs) reimbursement program. The Program Coordinator continues to work closely with SSA to insure all documentation is submitted properly so that claims can be processed. (Page 226) Title II

 

Employer / Business Engagement

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability or implementation.  (Page 196, 267)

Data Collection

Programmatic/Fiscal Onsite Monitoring: Programs are identified for onsite monitoring through a comprehensive risk analysis based on the following factors: (1) desk monitoring; (2) need to verify data quality and program expenditures; (3) consistent low performance on NRS indicators in several categories; (4) prospective noncompliance with grant requirements identified through review of programmatic and fiscal reports, or ongoing communications with the program; (4) unresolved audit findings; (5) ongoing lack of progress in resolving required actions from prior monitoring visit; (6) significant staff turnover in the program; and (7) recent or newly established programs. The goals for State onsite monitoring visits are to: • ensure that programs meet AEFLA requirements; • improve the quality of federally-funded activities; • provide assistance identifying and resolving accountability problems; and, • ensure the accuracy, validity, and reliability of data collection and data reporting as well as policies and procedures for program accountability. (Page 76) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation: Louisiana Rehabilitation Services (LRS) will monitor the services provided within the guidelines of the existing corporative agreements and evaluate if modifications will be needed when they are renegotiated. LRS will monitor vendors to ensure the quality of supported employment services provided to eligible consumers. The monitoring will utilize site reviews and include quality indicators to evaluate the assessment of employment outcomes and an evaluation of the provision of services. The monitoring will be carried out by the state and field office staff. (Page 76) Title I 

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Recognizing the high unemployment rate among individuals with disabilities and the qualifiedemployee shortage businesses are facing, the Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) is committed to providing reasonable accommodations and access to all programs, services and facilities. Each One-Stop Career Center should utilize the one-stop disability access checklist provided by the United States Department of Labor to self-evaluate its current level of accessibility. With support of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant (2012 -2015), LWC worked to ensure the physical, communication and programmatic accessibility of all One-Stop Career Centers by conducting specialized training for all center staff on topics including accessibility for all, disability etiquette and awareness, and identifying and assisting job-seekers with hidden disabilities. LWC will continue to maintain these investments in staff training and technology to make certain One- Stop Career Center staff serve adult job-seekers with disabilities effectively. (Page 88) Title I Disseminate information on effective outreach to, partnerships with, and services for, businesses • Disseminate information on effective service delivery strategies to serve workers and job seekers • Disseminate performance information and information on the cost of attendance including tuition and fees, for participants in applicable training programs on the Eligible Training Provider’s List (ETPL) with recognized post- secondary credentials, as well as OJT and IWTP • Disseminate information on physical and programmatic accessibility, in accordance with sec. 188 of WIOA relative to nondiscrimination, if applicable, and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 for individuals with disabilities.

• Conduct evaluations of State Programs, in coordination with evaluations of programs and activities carried out by the U.S. Secretary of Labor • Disseminate a list of providers of youth workforce investment activities eligible to receive competitive, or sole source, grants and contracts for training with credentials for youth • Provide re-designation assistance to local areas • Provide assistance in the development of Regional Plans * Operate a fiscal and management accountability information system (MIS) to manage, track, and report primary indicators of performance for Youth, Adult, and Dislocated Worker Programs • Conduct continuous, and at least annually, monitoring and oversight of activities carried out by sub-recipients of WIOA funding to conform to the Uniform Administrative Requirements (UAR) • Provide additional assistance to local areas that have high concentrations of eligible youth (Page 100) Title I 

 

Veterans

Jobs For Veterans State Grant (JVSG) STRENGTHS Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist are providing individualized career services to 99% of the Veterans they provide services to. Despite serving only veterans with Significant Barriers, DVOPs have achieved an Entered Employment Rate (EER) of 66%. Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are integrated in to the Business Services Teams within their assigned workforce regions. LVERs conduct employer outreach with and as a part of regional business services teams. OPPORTUNITIES Incorporate the service delivery strategy utilized by DVOPs in to the OneStop Centers statewide. Currently the EER for all Veterans receiving services statewide is 51%. Large opportunity for improvement. LVERs could be more involved in employer engagement centered on assisting employers to develop and start registered apprenticeship programs and Onthe-job training programs. These efforts could provide more opportunities for Veterans to learn while they work. (Page 33) Title 1

The LVER responsibilities are specifically targeted to promote the advantages of hiring veterans to employers, employer associations and business groups. LVER roles and responsibilities are consistent with 38 U.S.C. § 4104, VPL 07—10 and VPL 03—14. As such, the LVER serves an important role in the state’s Business Services Delivery Model. In coordination with the other members of the business services team, the LVER advocates for employment and training opportunities through outreach to employers, training facilities, unions, apprenticeship programs and private and government businesses. The LVER also participates in job fairs, promotes programs that offer licensing and credentialing opportunities and develops and makes presentations to employers. Each LVER must provide a monthly report to the state veterans coordinator detailing their outreach activities. LVER Staff members conduct outreach to perform the following activities: • Conducting employer outreach; • In conjunction with employers, conducting job searches and workshops and establishing job search groups; • Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; • Informing federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans; • Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and • Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. (267-268) Title II To maximize the impact of the streamlined LVER staff, the state takes a top—down, cooperative approach to employer outreach. LVER staff shall coordinate with their business service team partners, and other state agencies or programs such as Louisiana Rehabilitative Services (LRS), to conduct outreach to employer associations at the state and regional level. In this way the maximum number of employers can be efficiently and effectively incorporated into the promotion of hiring of veterans. This outreach will educate employers on the advantages of hiring veterans, and inform employers on how to find qualified veteran applicants by leveraging the State workforce system and OSCCs. The state intends to increase veteran employment by making a sound business case to employers regarding the advantage of hiring veterans and providing employer’s tools and contacts to do so effectively. (Page 268) Title IV

 

Behavioral / Mental Health

10. The eligible provider’s collaboration with other available education, training and social service resources in the community. Particularly, the eligible provider should have, or have the means to establish, meaningful partnerships with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, One-Stop Centers, job training programs and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries for the development of career pathways. 11. The flexibility of program scheduling offered by the eligible provider, including coordination (when available) with federal, state and local support services such as child care, transportation, mental health services and career planning. 12. The eligible provider’s management information system; the expectation will be that the eligible provider will use the state-administered designated MIS for all grant related data collection and reporting. (Page 149) Title II

LRS staff members take advantage of training opportunities provided through webinars and teleconferences as well as on-site training. Numerous types of training and support continue to be provided and/or coordinated by State Office Program staff members to support the field staff. Such Training for PY 2017 included PEPNET, Travel Training, TBI Conference, Deaf Counselor Training, Ethics Symposium at Southern University, AWARE, Case Management, CATS, Share Point, Pre-ETS, Regional Manager and District Supervisor training. Additionally, the agency has specific monthly in-service training requirements (4 hours per month), which are conducted by the regional field offices to ensure continuous education for all professional and paraprofessional staff members. This training is provided by experienced staff members or by knowledgeable community providers who specialize in the area of training required. Rehabilitation Counselor Associates (RCAs) are required to attend all in-service training with the Rehabilitation Counselors and also attend separate training as needed. Examples of training topics include assessment, guidance and vocational counseling, eligibility, planning, disability related issues, assistive technology, disability services at colleges and universities, ethics, community-based employment outcomes, mental health, and employment related issues. (Page 185) Title II

Upon reviewing survey information of individuals receiving SSI/SSDI, the top needs identified by respondents included job placement (46%); job coaching (30%); benefits planning (30%); transportation (29%); job readiness skills (28%); and vocational guidance and career counseling (27%). They identified barriers to employment as being the fear of losing their government benefits (52%), lack of employer acceptance of their disability (44%), adjustment to disability (32%); lack of transportation (38%); lack of public services (36%); the slow job market (36%); and lack of medical insurance (27%). Respondents receiving supported employment services identified the following as needs not being met, job placement (23%); training/tuition assistance (21%); transportation (21%); room & board (15%); mental health counseling (14%); post-employment services (14%); benefits planning (13%); and equipment for work (13%). The barriers to employment identified by respondents receiving supported employment services included the fear of losing government benefits (40%); lack of transportation (39%); employer acceptance of their disability (36%); their personal adjustment to the disability (29%); lack of public resources (29%); the slow job market (21%); and the lack of medical insurance/care (20%). (Page 193) Title II

To assist Louisiana families in becoming economically self-reliant so that their dependence on government benefits for basic needs is minimized, the department implemented the STEP program so that cash assistance recipients, with certain exceptions, are actively engaged in meaningful activities designed to enable their transition from cash assistance to self-reliance. It is further intended that cash assistance recipients demonstrate active and diligent personal responsibility in achieving self-reliance through employment and increased workplace literacy. All appropriate state agencies responsible for employment, training, and educating Louisiana’s citizens are expected to cooperate in the pursuit of this goal. Once an applicant is certified for eligibility, a comprehensive assessment will be conducted and include workplace literacy, basic skills and educational attainment, interests and aptitude related to employment, barriers to employment, need for education, supportive services such as child care and transportation, and other supportive services. Specialized assessments can occur for issues that arise after an initial assessment has been completed and could include substance abuse, domestic violence, mental health screening, or others as determined by the department. (Page 240) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Through policy, LWC has refined the state’s response to the U.S. Labor Department mandate that the workforce development system become a seamless, integrated system. Prior to implementation, One-Stop Center operations used a rigid customer flow and team model. This new policy establishes a revision and refocusing effort to drive clients to the “right door” because of the state’s need to respond to a decrease in funding and environmental as well as socio-economic changes. Goals are as follows: • Change the lock-step process and team approach in providing job-seeker and employer services to a more flexible process (or roadmap) that allows quick response to changes in the labor market and workforce needs. • Add flexibility to the delivery of training services by simplifying the process for identifying qualified candidates. • Create a process that recognizes the ever-changing funding environment associated with federal mandates and grants, so that it provides necessary flexibility to respond to specific grant and funding mandates of U.S. Department of Labor programs regarding unemployment insurance benefits (UI), workforce participation, veteran’s services and National Emergency Grants. • Support the state’s redesign of its business engagement Process in a way that optimizes agency response to in-demand industry needs in hiring, retaining, training and advancement of workers. • Anticipate the ongoing need for creating contingency plans to support economic growth in targeted industry sectors, and developing improved relationships with local and state economic development entities with the goal of pre-empting shortfalls in a skilled workforce. • Address the need to reintegrate specific UI recipient related functions into the job-seeker process in order to shorten the return-to-work time for individuals receiving unemployment insurance benefits. (Page 57) Title I 

 

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

SNAP - Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs) - 04/01/2020

“A new federal rule that takes effect April 1, 2020, will require some Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to meet federal work requirements to continue receiving federal food assistance, commonly known as "food stamps."

SNAP recipients who are classified as an Able-Bodied Adult Without Dependents (ABAWD) - that is, recipients who are age 18 to 49, do not have a child living with them and are considered able to work - can receive benefits for only three months in a 36-month period unless they meet the federal ABAWD work requirement or qualify for an exemption (or exception). This rule, known as the SNAP Time Limit, is established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). For Louisiana SNAP recipients, the rule would cover the period of April 2020 through March 2023.

FNS has granted a waiver of the SNAP Time Limit rule for 14 parishes with higher unemployment rates. Those parishes are Assumption, Catahoula, Concordia, East Carroll, Franklin, Madison, Morehouse, Richland, St. Landry, St. Mary, Tensas, Vernon, West Carroll and Winn.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Community Choices Waiver - 02/20/2020

“The Louisiana Community Choices Waiver (CCW) is a program for elderly and / or disabled Louisiana residents. This program, which replaced the Elderly and Disabled Adult Waiver, provides a wide range of services and support to assist elderly state residents in maintaining their independence. In other words, it helps to prevent institutionalization in nursing homes by providing support at home, in assisted living facilities, and in adult foster care homes.

In addition to in-home support services, this waiver offers a unique benefit called Monitored In-Home Caregiving (MIHC), which can loosely be compared to adult foster care. Under MIHC, a family member or friend can move in to the care recipient's home and get paid to provide care. The alternative option exists as well, where the elderly individual moves into a friend or younger family member's home (such as his/her adult child) and that individual receives compensation for providing care. Even spouses can be compensated for providing care under MIHC. However, it’s important to note that the caregiver must adhere to the rules set forth by the Department of Health and Hospitals (DHH) and be approved as a MIHC service provider.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Louisiana Statewide Transition Plan for Compliance with the CMS Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule - 02/01/2020

“The following represents the Louisiana Work Plan. The purpose of this plan is to guide the development and implementation of a Transition Plan to: 1) provide for a robust input and engagement process for consumers and stakeholders; 2) identify areas of non-compliance; 3) seek intervention strategies to comply with the new setting requirements ; 4) implement strategies to maintain continuous compliance; and 5) ensure quality components are designed into each phase of the Transition Plan to ensure continued compliance.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Southwest Louisiana Area Health Education Center (SWLAHEC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, young adults (26–35 year olds), agriculture community workers, manufacturing community workers, trade community workers, finance community workers, education and healthcare community workers, job service community workers, entertainment industry employees, African-American communities, and Asian communities.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Central LA Area Health Education Center (CLAHEC).  They will partner with the Louisiana Dept. of Insurance,  Louisiana Enrollment Partnership Coalition, Faith-based groups, Hospitals, clinics, and social service agencies, State and local elected officials, Louisiana Primary Care Association (LPCA), and the Louisiana Workforce Commission. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Brian BurtonPhone: (337) 989-0001Email: interventions@swlahec.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Strategic Plan Fiscal Year July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2025 - 07/01/2019

~~“The Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) is an aggressive advocate for a trained, viable workforce and is committed to employment strategies for Louisiana residents that respond to business and industry’s workforce demands. LWC is dedicated to working closely with employers, employees, and job seekers to meet their employment and training needs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Louisiana Developmental Disability Council Report - 06/30/2019

~~“On  January  25,  2019,  the  Medicaid  Extenders  Act  of  2019,  a  bill  that  includes short-term  funding  for  the  Money  Follows  the  Person  program,  became  law. Participants can now transition through MFP through CY  2019, which was extended from December 31, 2018.  On February 28, 2019, Congress introduced two reauthorization bills, H.R.1342 and S.548, through the Empower Care Act to extend  the  MFP  program  for  five  additional  years. They  are  still  pending Congressional action.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LA HB199 - 06/20/2019

~~“AN ACT To enact Part III of Chapter 8 of Title 46 of the Louisiana Revised Statutes of 1950, to be comprised of R.S. 46:977.21 through 977.25, relative to services for children provided through the medical assistance program of this state known commonly as Medicaid; to provide for duties and responsibilities of the Louisiana Department of Health in administering the Medicaid program; to provide legislative findings relative to Medicaid waiver programs; to establish and provide for a demonstration waiver program to serve certain children with disabilities; to require development and submission of an application for program approval to the federal Medicaid agency; to provide for definitions; to provide for promulgation of rules; and to provide for related matter.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Individualized Education Program (IEP) - 06/11/2019

~~“Some students with disabilities ages 3-21 may require special education and related services to meet their unique needs and to support them in attaining both their short and long term educational goals.  These services are governed by federal legislation via the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004)."

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Update: Louisiana Department of Health eliminates waiting list for those with developmental disabilities - 04/30/2019

~~“Nearly a year after eliminating its 25-year-old waiting list for specialized services, the Louisiana Department of Health’s Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities is receiving positive feedback from those served by the Tiered Waiver plan.Tiered Waiver prioritizes individuals with a greater urgency of need for receiving the most appropriate home and community-based services, rather than the Office’s prior approach of offering services on a first-come, first-served basis.Julie Foster Hagan, assistant secretary of the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities, said more than 12,000 people have received a Screening for Urgency of Need (SUN), using a nationally accepted best practice model, to determine the urgency of their need for waiver services. There are five levels of need, or tiers:• 4-Emergent: Supports will be needed in the next 90 days.• 3-Urgent: Supports will be needed in the next 3-12 months.• 2-Critical: Supports will be needed in the next 1-2 years.• 1-Planning: Supports will be needed in the next 3-5 years.• 0-Currently no unmet needs."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

LA HB199 - 06/20/2019

~~“AN ACT To enact Part III of Chapter 8 of Title 46 of the Louisiana Revised Statutes of 1950, to be comprised of R.S. 46:977.21 through 977.25, relative to services for children provided through the medical assistance program of this state known commonly as Medicaid; to provide for duties and responsibilities of the Louisiana Department of Health in administering the Medicaid program; to provide legislative findings relative to Medicaid waiver programs; to establish and provide for a demonstration waiver program to serve certain children with disabilities; to require development and submission of an application for program approval to the federal Medicaid agency; to provide for definitions; to provide for promulgation of rules; and to provide for related matter.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Louisiana House Bill No. 598 - 06/11/2015

“…The ABLE Account Program is hereby created and shall be administered by the ABLE Account Authority, refereed to hereafter as “the authority” to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting persons with disabilities in endeavors to maintain health, independence, and quality of life…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana House Bill 508

To enact RS. 47:297.13, relative to income taxation; to provide relative to individual and corporation income tax deductions; to authorize an income tax deduction for taxpayers w employ certain qualified disabled individuals; to provide for certain definitions; to provide for certain requirements and limitations; to provide for an effective date; and to provide for related matters.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

2018 Louisiana Employment First Report - 01/04/2019

~~“With the urging of advocacy groups, and under the leadership of the Governor’s Advisory Council on Disability Affairs, an Employment First Workgroup was formed in January2017, with the responsibility of developing a report to the Governor with recommendations for moving forward on a cross-disability Employment First effort. This report is an important step in moving this policy forward and expanding the scope of Louisiana’s employment first policy beyond individuals with developmental disabilities. 

This report summarizes a set of comprehensive recommendations that will advance Louisiana’s Employment First goals. This report also highlights specific initiatives undertaken since June 2017 and proposed work for the coming year”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 19-08 State as Model Employer Task Force - 03/19/2018

“WHEREAS,  the State of Louisiana is committed to developing and maintaining a high performing public workforce that provides access, meaningful services, and improved outcomes for all citizens and reflects the rich diversity of the citizens of this great state. In order to achieve this goal, state leaders must be able to apply diverse perspectives and experiences to the development of responsive solutions to the issues facing the state. Such diversity enhances the fullness of our understanding of these issues and opens opportunities for the consideration of new and better solutions;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, JOHN BEL EDWARDS, Governor of the state of Louisiana, by virtue of he power vested in me by the Constitution and statutes of the state of Louisiana do, effective immediately, hereby order and direct as follows:

SECTION 1:  The State as a Model Employer Task Force (hereafter “Task Force”) is hereby established within the executive department, Office of the Governor, Office of Disability Affairs…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

Gov. Edwards Proclaims October ‘Disability Employment Awareness Month’ - 10/09/2017

“Gov. John Bel Edwards proclaimed October as ‘Disability Employment Awareness Month in Louisiana. In collaboration with Louisiana Workforce Commission and Families Helping Families, the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs will be traveling the state on an Employment First Tour, beginning October 10 in Lafayette. This is an opportunity for the office to host roundtable discussions regarding the integrated, competitive employment for people with disabilities.

 

Disability Employment Awareness Month is a great way to emphasize the importance of the contributions of persons with disabilities in moving Louisiana forward,” said Gov. Edwards. “Our businesses and communities can greatly benefit from the integrated, competitive employment of persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order No. JBE 16-45: Louisiana Rehabilitation Council - 08/04/2016

“Whereas, the State Rehabilitation Council was originally established by executive order to provide Louisiana’s citizens with disabilities assistance in their pursuit of meaningful careers and gainful employment through specific programs.

Preparing and submitting an annual report to the governor and the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Service Administration, Washington, D.C., on the status of vocational rehabilitation programs operating within the state, and making the report available to the public.

Providing for coordination and the establishment of working relationships between Louisiana Rehabilitation Services, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Centers for Independent Living within the state”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Data Sharing

Executive Order No. JBE 2016-11: Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination - 04/13/2016

“No state agencies, departments, offices, commissions, boards, entities or officers of the State of Louisiana shall harass or discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, political affiliation, disability, or age against any individual in the provision of any service and/or benefit by such agencies, departments, offices, commissions, boards or entities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

SNAP - Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs) - 04/01/2020

“A new federal rule that takes effect April 1, 2020, will require some Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to meet federal work requirements to continue receiving federal food assistance, commonly known as "food stamps."

SNAP recipients who are classified as an Able-Bodied Adult Without Dependents (ABAWD) - that is, recipients who are age 18 to 49, do not have a child living with them and are considered able to work - can receive benefits for only three months in a 36-month period unless they meet the federal ABAWD work requirement or qualify for an exemption (or exception). This rule, known as the SNAP Time Limit, is established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). For Louisiana SNAP recipients, the rule would cover the period of April 2020 through March 2023.

FNS has granted a waiver of the SNAP Time Limit rule for 14 parishes with higher unemployment rates. Those parishes are Assumption, Catahoula, Concordia, East Carroll, Franklin, Madison, Morehouse, Richland, St. Landry, St. Mary, Tensas, Vernon, West Carroll and Winn.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Strategic Plan Fiscal Year July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2025 - 07/01/2019

~~“The Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) is an aggressive advocate for a trained, viable workforce and is committed to employment strategies for Louisiana residents that respond to business and industry’s workforce demands. LWC is dedicated to working closely with employers, employees, and job seekers to meet their employment and training needs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Individualized Education Program (IEP) - 06/11/2019

~~“Some students with disabilities ages 3-21 may require special education and related services to meet their unique needs and to support them in attaining both their short and long term educational goals.  These services are governed by federal legislation via the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004)."

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment & Vocational Training - 04/01/2019

~~“Our Veterans Assistance Counselors help veterans and their families receive benefits for which they qualify. General eligibility requirements include military service and Louisiana state residency. Specific programs may have additional requirements. Spouses and dependents of deceased veterans who meet eligibility requirements may also be eligible for certain programs and services.”

Systems
  • Other

Employment Advocacy Initiatives - 05/09/2018

“The Council supports a policy of “Employment First” in which employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. The Council advocates for:

Policies that incentivize services for individualized integrated, competitive employment and dis-incentivize segregated, sheltered day habilitation services, Sheltered workshops to transition people into individualized, competitive, paid employment and discontinue admissions into segregated day programs, Improvements in the employment provider system with evidence-based practice, collaborative cross-agency infrastructure and training and technical assistance, and The Louisiana Rehabilitation Services’ (Vocational Rehabilitation [VR] program) federal draw down will increase and eventually include the entire federal VR grant award.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

“LOUISIANA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION POSTS DRAFT ESSA PLAN FOR PUBLIC COMMENT” - 02/20/2017

~~“ESSA's provisions become effective July 1, 2017. Per the law, the United States Secretary of Education must approve or deny a plan within 120 days of a state submitting its plan to the U.S. Department of Education. Because completion of the plan prior to the start of the school year in which it becomes effective is critically important for Louisiana administrators, educators and parents, Louisiana commenced public development of its plan more than a year in advance of the law taking effect.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Louisiana Awarded $2 Million to Improve Career Education” - 01/11/2017

~~“The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and JPMorgan Chase & Co. on Wednesday announced Louisiana is one of 10 states to receive a three-year, $2 million grant through phase two of the New Skills for Youth (NSFY) grant opportunity to strengthen and expand career-education pathways for students.

 "This New Skills for Youth grant will provide tremendous support for our state's high school teachers and students in accessing high-quality workforce training, particularly in rural school districts and in support of our students with disabilities," said Gov. John Bel Edwards. "I'm confident that Louisiana's team of state and local education, economic development and workforce partners will make excellent use of these funds to dramatically improve the number of our young citizens prepared for college, career and life success."

 The phase two grant funds will be used to expand Jump Start, the state's innovative career and technical education program, said State Superintendent of Education John White. "These funds will allow our state to build upon Jump Start's strong foundation, expanding opportunities and resources that enable our students to earn the industry credentials they need to attain employment in Louisiana's most important industries."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“THE HEART OF ESSA: REFLECT ON RESULTS, PLAN AND PRIORITIZE, AND FUND PRIORITIES” - 01/09/2017

~~“Career education access: Louisiana developed a career education initiative, Jump Start, as well as a diverse course delivery program known as Course Choice. Using funds won through the New Skills for Youth grant, Louisiana conducted an inventory of every pathway offered in every high school in the state. Further grant funding will in part go toward bolstering connections among employers, higher education, and high schools. Students with disabilities eligible to pursue a high school diploma via an alternate pathway may also select a Jump Start pathway to earn a career diploma and a recognized workforce credential. All Jump Start pathways are accessible to these students, with the student’s IEP team setting alternate exit and performance criteria.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Governor’s Advisory Council on Disability Affairs (GACDA) Annual Report 2017 - 01/01/2017

“The Governor’s Advisory Council on Disabilities Affairs (GACDA) was established by Governor John Bel Edwards through Executive Order NO. JBE 2016-10 on April 7, 2016 to monitor state compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and to advise the governor on the needs of individuals with disabilities in Louisiana. GACDA is also charged with assisting the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs with the resolution of state disability issues and provide education, communication, and networking services concerning disability issues and needs for all Louisiana citizens. GACDA is composed of 31 members appointed by governor Edwards. Support staff, facilities and resources for GACDA are provided by the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs within the Governor’s Office of Programs and Planning.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana’s “Every Student Succeeds Act” (ESSA) Framework - 09/28/2016

“Long-term indicators: To foster a better understanding of how skills taught in schools translate to life after high school, Louisiana will provide to schools and school systems an annual series of reports on the postsecondary success and economic productivity of their graduates as a group. These reports will provide local communities and educators with aggregated data regarding the measurable life outcomes experienced by recent graduates, including income, employment, and education attainment information

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

First-of-its kind workforce collaboration in Louisiana - 10/19/2017

“South Louisiana Community College, the board of directors for Local Workforce Development Board #40, and area parish presidents in Acadiana are partnering to improve workforce development in the region. The collaboration – a first for a community college in Louisiana – falls under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) enacted in 2014.

“The Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act puts great emphasis on the out-of-school youth, collaborations with re-entry and adult education partners, individuals with disabilities, in addition to the unemployed and underemployed populations. The board of LWDB #40 is confident that SLCC will be successful in coordinating the alignment of services among the One-Stop partners that will promote and increase successful outcomes to both the individual and the employer. Special gratitude to the parish presidents, Louisiana Workforce Commission Office of Workforce Development, LWDB #40 board of directors, One-Stop Committee members, attorney, CPA, partners and most importantly, the dedicated team of SLPG/LWDB #40 for continuous improvement of our Workforce Development programs,” said Brenda Hubbard-Thomas, LWDB #40 WIOA Executive Director.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Workgroup - 02/17/2017

~~“The first meeting of the Employment First Workgroup was held Thursday, February 16. The Workgroup is comprised of federal, state, regional and local agency stakeholders as well as community advocates, other professionals, business leaders, families, and individuals with disabilities to address barriers to employment and improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. During the meeting, members of the workgroup shared information and perspectives related to education, individuals and families, developmental disabilities, and services for people with disabilities. Attendees also shared their experiences regarding seeking employment and applying to receive services.The workgroup will meet monthly and will report its work by June 30, 2017. The next meeting will take place on March 23, 2017 at 10 a.m. at the Louisiana State Capitol on the 4th floor. The meeting will be open and all interested parties are encouraged to participate.” 

Systems
  • Other

Louisiana's Demand-Driven Workforce Investment Plan - 07/01/2012

Vocational Rehabilitation

“As a mandated partner in the Workforce Investment Act, the Vocational Rehabilitation Program is instrumental in meeting the workforce needs of individuals with disabilities in the state of Louisiana. The purpose of the VR Program is, in part, ‘to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society.’ The VR Program operates a statewide comprehensive program to assess, plan, develop and provide vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities, ‘consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice, so that such individuals may prepare for and engage in gainful employment.’”

 

W-P Section 8(b) 20 CFR 652.211

“The state has designated at least one person in each state or Federal employment office to promote and develop employment opportunities, job counseling, and placement for individuals with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Workforce Commission.

“LRS continues to collaborate with LWC in identifying effective ways to integrate services in BCSCs [Business and Career Solution Centers]. LRS is represented on each of the LWIBs and attends meetings as scheduled. The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) established with each of the WIBs is updated annually. Within the 18 WIAs, 63 BCSCs have been established, 18 cost allocation plans have been completed by the WIBs and approved by all parties. LRS continues to pay expenses to the local centers for participation, as per the local cost allocation plans.”

“LWC is working with the Shared Youth Vision workgroup on youth, local workforce boards, youth councils, and community-based organizations to continue development of the systems needed to provide these comprehensive services to eligible youth, including coordination with Job Corps and other youth programs within each local workforce investment area. Vocational rehabilitation is involved in the development of these service strategies to ensure that youth with disabilities or other barriers to employment are included in the comprehensive service strategy.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Louisiana FY 2011 Block Grant State Plan

The Office of Behavioral Health (OBH) is a member of the WORK PAY$ committee. “This committee is comprised of community partners and is intended to further the employment of individuals with disabilities in the state of Louisiana. OBH is also working as a collaborative partner on both a state and regional level in the development and implementation of job fairs for individuals with disabilities throughout the state.”

“The Louisiana Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (LAWIPA) program helps Social Security beneficiaries work through issues relating to social security benefits and employment. The program is a coalition between the Advocacy Center of Louisiana and the LSU Health Sciences Center’s Human Development Center. Many individuals with disabilities who receive SSDI and/ or SSI benefits want to work or increase their work activity. One barrier for these individuals is the fear of losing health care and other benefits if they work. Valuable work incentive programs can extend benefits, but are often poorly understood and underutilized. The LAWIPA coalition educates clients and assists them in overcoming work barriers, perceived or real; and also focuses on improved community partnerships. Benefit specialists, called Community Work Incentive Coordinators, provide services to all Louisiana SSDI and SSI beneficiaries age 14 and older who have disabilities. CMHC staff and clients are able to work with Coordinators to help navigate the various work related resources (as offered in conjunction with the Ticket to Work program), and identify on an individualized basis the way their benefits will be impacted by going to work. The ultimate goal of the new WIPA coalition is to support the successful employment of beneficiaries with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Office of Behavioral Health receives grant to help people with serious mental illness find jobs - 01/04/2019

~~“The United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy selected Louisiana as a grant recipient through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. The Provider Visionary Opportunities to Increase Competitive Employment (VOICE) grant provides the Office of Behavioral Health with 100 hours of training and technical assistance needed to help people in the target population find meaningful jobs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Louisiana Selected as Vision Quest State - 11/02/2017

“Louisiana is one of eight states selected to receive Training and Technical Assistance

as a Vision Quest State for the 2018 fiscal year under the United States Department

of Labor's, Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) Employment First State

Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). This award is the result of a year-long

effort by the Governor's Office of Disability Affairs working in collaboration with

stakeholders. Vision Quest States are eligible to receive up to 100 hours of technical

assistance to support the state in achieving its goals as an EFSLMP state.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Medicaid Balancing Incentive Program - 02/08/2013

“Since 2001, the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals has been engaged in focused, comprehensive system transformation of the long-term care system. These reform efforts have included stakeholder input at all levels and have resulted in changes in laws and regulations, service delivery, and funding priorities. In transforming the long-term care system, the state has committed to rebalancing the service system in order to provide choice between institutional and home and community-based services. The State has been working toward rebalancing its long-term care system by eliminating barriers that prevent or restrict the flexible use of Medicaid funds, increasing the ability of the Medicaid program to assure continued provision of services to people who transition from institutions by consistently increasing funding and slot allocation, improving service menus and rate structures to meet needs, and by ensuring procedures are in place for quality assurance and continuous improvement in services by consolidating licensing authority and improving IT systems tracking critical incidents.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Louisiana Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2012

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2014 Louisiana was awarded a Round 3 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The grant ended in 2015.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Data Sharing

Louisiana Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The… program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Southwest Louisiana Area Health Education Center (SWLAHEC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, young adults (26–35 year olds), agriculture community workers, manufacturing community workers, trade community workers, finance community workers, education and healthcare community workers, job service community workers, entertainment industry employees, African-American communities, and Asian communities.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Central LA Area Health Education Center (CLAHEC).  They will partner with the Louisiana Dept. of Insurance,  Louisiana Enrollment Partnership Coalition, Faith-based groups, Hospitals, clinics, and social service agencies, State and local elected officials, Louisiana Primary Care Association (LPCA), and the Louisiana Workforce Commission. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Brian BurtonPhone: (337) 989-0001Email: interventions@swlahec.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Yellow Shirt Days - 04/01/2019

~~“On these days, key policies or issues affecting individuals with developmental disabilities are being discussed.  Members gather to create a presence, reminding policymakers of the issues that concern people with disabilities.  These days also afford opportunities for LaCAN members to speak briefly with legislators in the committee hallways.”

Systems
  • Other

OCDD Resource Center - 01/25/2019

~~“The vision of the OCDD Resource Center is to partner with community providers and professionals to offer quality supports and to build a natural community support network for individuals with complex needs, life threatening conditions, and those who pose greater risk to public safety.Programs developed by the OCDD Resource Center are guided by OCDD Values and Guiding Principles.The goal of the OCDD Resource Center is to have a broad impact in the DD Service System and Louisiana local communities with the following outcomes:• Improved health and behavioral health outcomes for DD service recipients• Broader availability and accessing of natural support networks in local communities• Greater ability of community providers and professionals to support individuals with complex needs• Use of technology and innovative treatments that lead to improved support options and greater independence for recipients• Local access to innovation and technical assistance” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Louisiana Workforce Investment Act Training Manual - 01/01/2019

~~“The Eligible Training Provider Manual provides educational institutions with updated information about the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), Louisiana’s Workforce Development System, and provides the necessary guidance, procedures, and requirements in becoming an  Eligible Training Provider (ETP) in  Louisiana. The Eligible Training Provider List is a list of providers and their training programs and/or services that qualify for WIOA funding eligibility. Only providers’ programs, courses or classes that meet specific criteria and requirements are listed on Louisiana’s ETPL."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Louisiana WIA Training Manual - Louisiana Workforce Commission - 01/01/2019

~~“The Eligible Training Provider Manual provides educational institutions with updated information about the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), Louisiana’s Workforce Development System, and provides the necessary guidance, procedures, and requirements in becoming an  Eligible Training Provider (ETP) in  Louisiana. The Eligible Training Provider List is a list of providers and their training programs and/or services that qualify for WIOA funding eligibility. Only providers’ programs, courses or classes that meet specific criteria and requirements are listed on Louisiana’s ETPL.”

Systems
  • Other

Louisiana APSE - 11/13/2017

~~“This page has information about the Louisiana chapter of APSE such as the officers and board members and any training events.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
Citations

Louisiana State University School of Allied Health Professions Human Development Center

HDC's 40 Hour Supported Employment CORE Training

LSUHSC-Human Development Center (HDC) in collaboration with Louisiana APSE is providing statewide Employment Specialist Core Training. This 40 hour training meets LRS vendor training requirements and Medicaid Employment provider rules. It incorporates APSE's CORE Supported Employment competencies, and includes three and a half days of classroom instruction, fieldwork assignments and online instruction. Class hours are 9:00AM - 4:00PM except for 1/2 days indicated which end at 12:00noon. The fee for this class is $350.

(If you would to schedule a Core training in your region, please send an email to Sue Killam, M.Ed.)

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Louisiana Developmental Disabilities Council “Employment Mentoring”

The Employment Mentoring project will develop, implement, and evaluate a training and mentoring approach that will result in Employment Support Professionals (ESPs) demonstrating competencies in skills which lead to employment outcomes for job seekers with developmental disabilities including those with the most intense support needs in acquiring and maintaining community-based competitive employment.  The project will work with participating Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) to enhance their operations and participating Employment Support Professionals (ESPs) to improve their competencies in the area of supported employment and successful completion of the national Certified Employment Support Professional (CESP) exam.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities “Resources”

The DHH Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities offers a variety and ever-changing collection of resources, trainings and literature to assist consumers, their families, providers, advocates, and others access relevant materials.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Louisiana Community Choices Waiver - 02/20/2020

“The Louisiana Community Choices Waiver (CCW) is a program for elderly and / or disabled Louisiana residents. This program, which replaced the Elderly and Disabled Adult Waiver, provides a wide range of services and support to assist elderly state residents in maintaining their independence. In other words, it helps to prevent institutionalization in nursing homes by providing support at home, in assisted living facilities, and in adult foster care homes.

In addition to in-home support services, this waiver offers a unique benefit called Monitored In-Home Caregiving (MIHC), which can loosely be compared to adult foster care. Under MIHC, a family member or friend can move in to the care recipient's home and get paid to provide care. The alternative option exists as well, where the elderly individual moves into a friend or younger family member's home (such as his/her adult child) and that individual receives compensation for providing care. Even spouses can be compensated for providing care under MIHC. However, it’s important to note that the caregiver must adhere to the rules set forth by the Department of Health and Hospitals (DHH) and be approved as a MIHC service provider.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Louisiana Statewide Transition Plan for Compliance with the CMS Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule - 02/01/2020

“The following represents the Louisiana Work Plan. The purpose of this plan is to guide the development and implementation of a Transition Plan to: 1) provide for a robust input and engagement process for consumers and stakeholders; 2) identify areas of non-compliance; 3) seek intervention strategies to comply with the new setting requirements ; 4) implement strategies to maintain continuous compliance; and 5) ensure quality components are designed into each phase of the Transition Plan to ensure continued compliance.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Louisiana Developmental Disability Council Report - 06/30/2019

~~“On  January  25,  2019,  the  Medicaid  Extenders  Act  of  2019,  a  bill  that  includes short-term  funding  for  the  Money  Follows  the  Person  program,  became  law. Participants can now transition through MFP through CY  2019, which was extended from December 31, 2018.  On February 28, 2019, Congress introduced two reauthorization bills, H.R.1342 and S.548, through the Empower Care Act to extend  the  MFP  program  for  five  additional  years. They  are  still  pending Congressional action.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Update: Louisiana Department of Health eliminates waiting list for those with developmental disabilities - 04/30/2019

~~“Nearly a year after eliminating its 25-year-old waiting list for specialized services, the Louisiana Department of Health’s Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities is receiving positive feedback from those served by the Tiered Waiver plan.Tiered Waiver prioritizes individuals with a greater urgency of need for receiving the most appropriate home and community-based services, rather than the Office’s prior approach of offering services on a first-come, first-served basis.Julie Foster Hagan, assistant secretary of the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities, said more than 12,000 people have received a Screening for Urgency of Need (SUN), using a nationally accepted best practice model, to determine the urgency of their need for waiver services. There are five levels of need, or tiers:• 4-Emergent: Supports will be needed in the next 90 days.• 3-Urgent: Supports will be needed in the next 3-12 months.• 2-Critical: Supports will be needed in the next 1-2 years.• 1-Planning: Supports will be needed in the next 3-5 years.• 0-Currently no unmet needs."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Money Follows the Person - 04/01/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration is a Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) grant designed  to help states try new ways of delivering Medicaid services. In Louisiana the MFP Demonstration is called My Place Louisiana which helps people move from qualified institutions into home and community-based living settings and then follows those individuals for the first year of waiver services to help ensure a successful transition. My Place Louisiana Transition Coordinators work with support coordinator and provider agencies to provide assistance to ensure the health, safety and successful transition of people participating in waivers.The Louisiana Medicaid Office is working with the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities (OCDD) and the Office for Aging and Adult Services (OAAS) to implement My Place Louisiana, which is a 13-year (2008-2020) program focusing on Medicaid funding and following participants in transitioning from qualified institutions to home and community-based living settings.” 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Long-Term Care Services - 01/01/2018

“Louisiana's Medicaid Program provides payment for special long-term care support services, as well as full Medicaid health coverage, to eligible people who, because of their medical conditions, require assistance with activities of daily living (for example, eating, bathing, dressing, grooming, and transferring). Long-term care supports may be provided either in a facility or in an individual's own home or in the community.

 

Louisiana's Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS), or Medicaid waiver programs, include programs administered by both the Office of Aging and Adult Services and the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Waiver Services - 01/01/2018

“The State of Louisiana offers two Medicaid Waiver Programs to individuals with developmental disabilities. These programs are called Children's Choice and the New Opportunities Waiver (NOW). Some of the services included in these programs are: case management, personal care respite support, environmental modifications, equipment, and Medicaid. Services are based upon the child's disability, not parental income.

 

Flexible Family Funding is a small monthly supplement for school aged children with severe or profound disabilities who qualify for Special Education through the school system and have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities (OCDD) QUARTERLY DD COUNCIL REPORT September 28, 2016” Detailing DD Waiver Activities. - 09/20/2016

A report detailing Medicaid service levels, as well as a variety of Waivers and initiatives, including, but not limited to, the “residential Option Waiver, the New Opportunities Waiver, and the Self-Directed Waiver, as well as a description of ”Money Follows the Person”.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LA Supports Waiver (0453.R02.00) - 07/01/2014

This waiver, "provides day hab, habilitation, prevocational services, respite, support coordination, supported employment, housing stabilization service, housing stabilization transition, PERS for individuals w/autism, ID, DD"

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Louisiana Balancing Incentive Program - 02/08/2013

Since 2001, the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals has been engaged in focused, comprehensive system transformation of the long-term care system. These reform efforts have included stakeholder input at all levels and have resulted in changes in laws and regulations, service delivery, and funding priorities. In transforming the long-term care system, the state has committed to rebalancing the service system in order to provide choice between institutional and home and community-based services. The State has been working toward rebalancing its long-term care system by eliminating barriers that prevent or restrict the flexible use of Medicaid funds, increasing the ability of the Medicaid program to assure continued provision of services to people who transition from institutions by consistently increasing funding and slot allocation, improving service menus and rate structures to meet needs, and by ensuring procedures are in place for quality assurance and continuous improvement in services by consolidating licensing authority and improving IT systems tracking critical incidents.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The Bayou State welcomes you to come as you are, thus inciting a motto of inclusion that should also engage and encompass Louisianans with disabilities in the general workforce and economic mainstream. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Louisiana’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
-0.24%
Change from
2018 to 2019
4,648,794
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.4%
Change from
2018 to 2019
375,922
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.43%
Change from
2018 to 2019
131,742
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.08%
Change from
2018 to 2019
35.05%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.86%
Change from
2018 to 2019
74.33%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 4,684,333 4,659,978 4,648,794
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 361,642 374,421 375,922
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 122,683 121,952 131,742
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,765,230 1,758,914 1,752,117
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.92% 32.57% 35.05%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 72.47% 73.69% 74.33%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.10% 4.90% 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.40% 25.10% 26.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 19.00% 17.50% 17.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 327,357 344,265 342,094
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 352,166 356,997 377,726
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 430,116 437,242 452,167
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 221,548 233,652 236,460
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,135 28,192 23,902
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,614 4,732 4,945
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,652 6,309 6,530
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 12,434 12,828 13,451
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 4,007 6,364 6,038

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 5,865 5,727 5,696
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.50% 3.50% 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 156,107 154,395 152,643

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,660 1,871 2,276
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 3,502 3,703 4,177
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 9,069 9,589 10,551
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 18.30% 19.50% 21.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 0.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00% N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 0.80% 3.00% 7.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A 2 6
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3 2 4
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 65 386 896

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 12,198 18,478 18,600
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 1,475 1,863 890
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 646 723 375
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 44.00% 39.00% 42.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 13.97 15.48 8.03

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 22.00% 18.00% 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,522 3,879 4,156
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 269,396 267,599 265,182
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 193 106 119
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 96 68 88

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,055,000 $11,179,547 $11,223,034
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $6,213,000 $4,883,241 $2,877,141
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $15,945,000 $16,486,266 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A $16,486,266 N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 29.00% 31.00% 0.30%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A 2,461 N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,176 969 581
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 2,551 2,573 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 32.10 32.84 30.47

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 59.67% 60.72% 60.87%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.91% 14.71% 14.66%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.33% 1.25% 1.24%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 100.00% 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.68% 39.48% 39.33%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 72.30% 74.98% 76.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 87.26% 87.16% 88.30%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.62% 35.50% 37.60%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 721,050
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 131,005
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 197,993
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 328,998
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 137
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 217
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 354
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,286,952
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,116,168

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 51 31 22
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 9 8 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 60 39 23
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,171 1,233 747
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 274 274 19
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,445 1,507 766

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

In addition, a State Office position coordinates employment activities statewide. The Employment Initiative Program Coordinator serves as LRS’ direct contact to the VR Business Network and distributes job leads and information to the regional offices. In FY 2015, the VR Business Network provided job leads from all over the country. Some of the job leads were from the following companies: Walgreen’s, Lowe’s, TJX Companies, Office Max, Wells Fargo, DOL, Manpower, Inc., USDA, Marriott International, and many others.

LRS continues to participate with Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities (OCDD) in the “Employment First” initiative, which was designed to provide employment asa first option for persons with developmental disabilities, as an alternative to institutionalization, and to provide integration/independence in the community. LRS participates in roundtable discussions hosted by OCDD to inform their staff and providers of new requirements related to integration of individuals with developmental disabilities into their communities as a result of new Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) rules, as well as how to better collaborate with LRS to achieve goals set forth in WIOA. (Page 214- 215) Title IV

Customized Employment

Additionally, 48% of counselors indicated that the quality of services provided to meet the needs of consumers could be improved. Seventy percent of staff responding felt that more CRPs are needed in their area to serve specific services or to serve specific disability populations. Populations that were identified as needing further CRPs to serve include the deaf, deaf-blind and blind/visually impaired, felons/ex-felons with disabilities, individuals with cognitive impairments/intellectual disabilities, autism, mental illness, paraplegic/quadriplegic, and traumatic brain injuries. In addition, it was noted that more CRPs are needed to provide services to transition students, to provide services such as supported employment in rural areas, job readiness/placement, sign language interpretation, assistive technology services and training, training, and customized employment. (Page 195) Title VI

LRS will provide ongoing support services, including customized employment and other appropriate services needed to support and maintain youth with most significant disabilities, to work toward competitive integrated employment; beginning at Job Stabilization / Transition to Extended Services. 

Purchased supported employment services (Milestones) are identified and listed on the IPE and must be obtained through an approved Supported Employment CRP and generally cannot exceed 24 months or four years for youth with disabilities (ages 14-24). If a Consumer requires longer than 24 months in reaching job stabilization or four years for youth with disabilities, the LRS Counselor can extend the service in accordance with Plan guidelines (Page 208) Title VI

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

With support of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant (2012 -2015), LWC worked to ensure the physical, communication and programmatic accessibility of all One-Stop Career Centers by conducting specialized training for all center staff on topics including accessibility for all, disability etiquette and awareness, and identifying and assisting job-seekers with hidden disabilities. LWC will continue to maintain these investments in staff training and technology to make certain One- Stop Career Center staff serve adult job-seekers with disabilities effectively. LWC has incorporated accessibility criteria as part of the One-Stop certification policy criteria in collaboration with the Workforce Investment Council, local boards and CEOs. Additionally, all One-Stop Centers will be monitored onsite annually to ensure compliance with this requirement. (Page 88) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Goal 2: Expand career services and opportunities for populations facing multiple barriers to close the gap in educational attainment and economic advancement through career pathways and improved career services and the expansion of bridge programs. 1. Expand and incentivize the utilization of evidenced-based workforce strategies that support targeted populations (e.g., the long-term unemployed, individuals with disabilities, veterans, outof-school youth) into sector-based career pathway initiatives to achieve similar outcomes relative to other populations. (Page 37-38) Title I 

School to Work Transition

Job-seekers who have large gaps in their work history, limited, obsolete or unknown skills, limited education, inadequate credentials, lack soft skills, have significant barriers to employment or a combination of any of these factors as well as any job-seeker determined most likely to exhaust all their UI benefits shall be considered not workforce ready. Job-seekers who are not workforce ready shall be provided individualized career services, consisting of a minimum of a comprehensive assessment and development of an individualized employment plan (IEP) in the context of case management. (Page 62) Title I

The comprehensive assessment is the foundation for development of an IEP, and no IEP shall be created without completing a comprehensive assessment. In many cases the comprehensive assessment will then be an ongoing process that may result in changes to the goals and objectives of the IEP. The IEP is developed with a job-seeker to identify or create employment goals, appropriate achievement objectives and the right combination of services to assist in achieving goals and objectives. In short — “Where am I now?” “Where do I want to go?” “How will I get there?” The IEP must include goals and objectives that are SMART (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time bound). A case note must accompany the IEP and must justify the plan based on the identified barrier(s) to employment. Case management requires a regular follow-up and review or revision of the IEP until such time as the job-seeker becomes workforce ready or enters a training program. In either case, follow-up is critical, using a 30-day cycle until the job-seeker attains employment or completes training. (Page 62) Title I

Case Management requires a regular follow-up and review or revision of the IEP, until such time as the job seeker becomes workforce ready or enters a training program. In either case follow-up is critical, using the 30, 60, and 90-day cycle until employed or training is complete is appropriate — except for long term training. For long-term training, Career Specialists should follow the most current guidance. (Page 121) Title II

The formal interagency agreement provides for initial contact to be made with the transition student as early as age sixteen. This is accomplished by the development of criteria and timelines for an effective and efficient referral process; provision of orientation and information sessions for students and their families; and LRS counselors determining transition students’ eligibility for VR services within the timelines established by agency policy. For each student determined eligible for services, every effort will be made to ensure those who are in an Order of Selection (OOS) Category currently being served by LRS leave the school system with an approved IPE in place that incorporates appropriate segments of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and projected employment needs, as applicable. (Page 171) Title II

The Program Coordinator works collaboratively with DOE Transition Coordinator in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities including VR services. Both agencies share responsibility to coordinate the provision of services, conduct outreach, and identify financial responsibility as needed. The DOE will assure that all students with disabilities and their families have knowledge of LRS policies and services including brochures and promotional information supplied by LRS. Information dissemination begins with the writing of the transition service page and continues through referral to LRS. Local Education Agencies (LEAs) also invite LRS representatives to IEP meetings at the students’ request, whena transition service page is being written for a student with a disability who may be eligible for and/or interested in VR services; facilitate appropriate orientation meetings among LRS staff, student and family members; provide time for LRS staff to meet with teachers, guidance counselors, and other appropriate personnel for such purposes as information sharing/gathering at both the individual and agency levels; and assist in the development, provision, and evaluation of interagency vocational assessment processes and functional vocational transition programs. (Page 172) Title II

Current LRS policy and guidelines address the allocation of 15% of State’s VR allotment for the provision of services of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) to high school students with disabilities between the ages of 16 - 21 who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services. The required activities of Pre-ETS are workplace readiness training, job exploration counseling; work-based learning experiences; counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary education programs at institutions of higher education; and instruction in self-advocacy. LRS assigned vendors to work with each high school across the state to make Pre-ETS services available to students who receive IDEA funds or students who are an individuals with a disability for the purposes of section 504 of the Act (29 U.S.C.794). (Page 172-173) Title II

LRS will use agency funds for the provision of Pre-ETS and VR services on the approved IPE that relates directly to the achievement of the agreed upon vocational goal, which is not the responsibility of the education system. The DOE will use agency funds for the provision of educational services on the approved IEP that relates directly to the achievement of the agreed upon educational goal.… LRS Transition Counselors in each region meet with a school liaison, usually the guidance counselor, to provide information regarding LRS services. The school liaison relays the information to students with disabilities and coordinates the student’s initial meeting with the LRS Transition Counselor. LRS Transition Counselors conduct outreach by hosting transition meetings at area high schools to provide information about VR services and to accept referrals. Information disseminated at these meetings includes agency brochures, client handbooks describing the VR processes/services, and referrals to other community resources students may need to access. Counselors work with the students, parents and educators to plan services needed for successful transition from school to work from the point that the student with a disability is identified. Counselors attend “Career Days” at the high schools to share information with transition students on available services that may identify career goals and to share information regarding services available to assist them in reaching their goals. (Page 173) Title II

Approximately three hundred and fifty (350) consumers could be referred for supported  employment services during each fiscal year. Once eligibility for supported employment services has been established, LRS continues to collaborate with OBH to ensure that services are provided in a timely manner and to assure the development of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). The IPE shall specify the responsibilities of all parties involved in the supported employment program for the individual and shall include reporting requirements for both agencies. (Page 174- 175) Title II

LRS has five Third Party Cooperative Arrangements (TPCAs) established with separate School Districts in Grant, Bossier, Evangeline, Orleans and Franklin Parishes as well as with Sci Academy and GW Carver. Through these TPCAs, a Transition Specialist provides workplace readiness training including self-advocacy, work-based learning experiences, and identification of employers who will host students for work-based learning. Bossier Parish Community College has a program called Program for Successful Employment (PSE) funded through a TPCA with LRS to provide job readiness to students with disabilities, work with employers to help find job placement and provide follow up. Virtual Academy of Lafourche has hired a transition specialist, through a TPCA, to provide workplace readiness training including self-advocacy, work-based learning experiences, and identification of employers who will host students for work-based learning. (Page 177) Title II

Some examples of collaborative efforts include Transition Core Team meetings held statewide attended by the DOE, the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities, Families Helping Families, and other interested individuals. These meetings are held to assist agencies who serve transition students as they exit from school to work. LRS has a Program Coordinator specializing in Assistive Technology who conducts in-service training annually to keep field staff members abreast of the most recent technology available to assist individuals with disabilities. Specialized training is provided to our staff members working with low-incident disabilities to include such training as orientation to deafness, mobility training, sign language coursework, deaf-blindness training, and graduate level training specific to working with low-incident populations (i.e. visual impairment/hearing impairment/significant cognitive impairment). (Page 188) Title II

Respondents from other components of the statewide workforce investment system were given survey links to complete the survey online. Needs identified by respondents included transportation; benefit planning; job coaching; postemployment services; transition from school to work; assistive technology devices/services; and job placement. The primary barriers identified by respondents included the lack of medical insurance/care; adjustment to disability; fear of losing government benefits; lack of public resources; lack of employer acceptance of an individual’s disability; and the lack of transportation.
Fifty percent of LRS employees responding noted that they are satisfied or very satisfied when working with the Business and Career Solution Centers (BCSC). Thirty-eight percent noted that they have not worked with a BCSC. Thirty nine percent used a BCSC in the last month to access/provide services to individuals with disabilities. Eighteen percent utilized the BCSC in the last three months. Seventy-four percent of staff are familiar with services available through their local BCSC. (Page 194) Title II

LRS shall provide for continuity of services once an otherwise eligible individual is selected for services and has begun to receive services under an IPE, irrespective of the severity of the individual’s disability. LRS will continue to provide needed VR services to all individuals with an existing Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). All services, including post-employment services, shall be available to individuals receiving services under an Order of Selection insofar as such services are necessary and appropriate to the individual's Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in order to ultimately place them in successful employment. All Agency policies and procedures governing the expenditure of funds, consumer financial participation, and use of comparable services and benefits are applicable to individuals receiving services under an Order of Selection. (Page 204) Title II

Louisiana Rehabilitation Services estimates that it will serve 13,843 individuals during fiscal year 2019 in the vocational rehabilitation program. This number includes approximately 9,260 cases that are expected to receive services under an IPE. The estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services is 1,283. The estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services is 1,609. In addition, approximately 5,300 students with disabilities will be served through the Pre-Employment Transition Services program. (Page 205) Title II

LRS continues to renew and revise existing local cooperative agreements, as applicable, with the 70 school districts and 146 Charter Schools in Louisiana. The LRS Transition Program Coordinator continues to collaborate and partner with DOE, OCDD, Work Incentive Planning Program, Office of Community Services, LWC, and the Office of Youth Development in an effort to network, share information and utilize comparable benefits to enhance VR services to transition students. The primary focus of LRS’ collaboration is to identify and address barriers (e.g. policies, eligibility process, resource allocation); assure effective service provision through the support of local interagency core teams, provide cross-agency training, outreach, engage in capacity building of young adults and family outreach efforts; provide continued support of innovative models and practices related to transition; and provide information and technical assistance. The Program Coordinator provides guidance and information to the Rehabilitation Counselors regarding specific transition issues. The Program Coordinator worked collaboratively with WINTAC’s Coordinator using conference calls, to discuss transition topics and provide information to LRS’ field offices. The Training Unit developed a School-to-Work Job Readiness curriculum and has trained staff to implement the curriculum with eligible students. Training will continue to be provided statewide. VR Counselors are encouraged to provide services at least once a month, when feasible, to students determined appropriate for job readiness training. (Page 214) Title II

Two Master Rehabilitation Counselor reviews were conducted by the Quality Assurance Unit during the 2017 review year. Each of the caseloads reviewed for promotion to Master Rehabilitation Counselor status exceeded the 90% compliance level required. Strategy 2. Explore opportunities for consumers to participate in Telework in order to increase employment outcomes. Progress: Telework employment options are considered for consumers when appropriate. Strategy 3. Identify and collaborate with employers to provide job development, Work-Based Learning Experiences and job placement. Progress: Through collaboration with the LRS Rehabilitation Employment Development Specialists (REDS) and local businesses throughout the state, 115 jobs were developed leading to successful job placements. Additionally, LRS vendors work with businesses throughout the year in developing jobs and placing consumers. Strategy 4. Increase Counselor presence in secondary education settings in order to improve provision of vocational rehabilitation services to transition students. (Page 216) Title II Progress: Pre-ETS counselors and REDS have identified employers and placed students with disabilities into Work-Based Learning Experiences. Strategy 6. Increase resources for assistive technology assessments and devices to improve employment outcomes. Progress: Two additional, out-of-state vendor/providers have been vetted, and added to provide rehabilitation driving assessments and training on a fee-for-service basis, to include vehicle modification specifications for LRS consumers. A contractual agreement to hire a Physical Therapist and Rehabilitation Engineer through LSU Health Sciences Department was negotiated and approved. These professionals will conduct seating and positioning assessments, wheelchair and personal mobility evaluations, home modifications for accessibility evaluations, job accommodations assessments, and other rehabilitation engineering field services as required. The state-approved list of assistive technology and rehabilitation technology providers/vendorshas been updated, and referral forms made available to the regional offices. (Page 217) Title II

Strategy 1. Perform comprehensive statewide needs assessment to determine needs of students with disabilities. Progress: The needs assessment is scheduled to be conducted in calendar year 2017 for submission in the State Plan submitted in 2018. Strategy 2. Expand outreach to students with disabilities to make them aware of VR services including Pre-ETS.
Progress: Pre-ETS counselors throughout the state attend IEP meeting, career fairs, and other school functions to make them aware of LRS services. Strategy 3 Monitor the provision of Pre-ETS services to determine effectiveness and possible improvement to service delivery process. Progress: Pre-ETS counselors monitor vendor activities in the schools to ensure delivery of appropriate services and determine any improvements needed. Objective C. Increase the number of Randolph-Sheppard Managers earning at least $25,000 annually by expanding opportunities and enhancing consumer service delivery in the RandolphSheppard Program. . (Page 219) Title II

Career Pathways

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Apprenticeship

The Local Boards are responsible for developing local plans for the governor’s approval, designating local One-Stop operators, designating eligible partners of training services, negotiating local performance measures with the state workforce board and the governor, monitoring local system performance against established performance measures, and helping to develop the labor market information system for local areas. Local Boards will facilitate relationships between Partner Programs, local entities, and supportive service agencies for a strengthened service delivery in regard to provision of services to youth. These relationships will include, as a minimum, procedures for youth participant co-enrollment and common intake as necessary to integrate: intake, case management, and reporting. This shall be the case for all Partner Programs under which youth may be served. Youth services shall begin with a systematic approach to gathering information about strengths and assets, need and challenges, and interests and goals. These assessments shall be used to determining program eligibility, and subsequently guide the development of individualized plans and all other Case Management activities. Youth shall be co-enrolled as necessary in any programs under WIOA funding sources and any Partner Program that is not WIOA funded, e.g., Adult Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Children and Family Services that is necessary based on their needs assessment. Youth will be simultaneously co-enrolled in any and all programs under which they are eligible for, and receiving, services. This will prevent youth having to wait until they exit one program in order to access services offered by other programs, and allow them to receive the best combination of services from different funding streams. For any program year, LWDBs must spend not less than 75 percent of local workforce development area funds to provide direct services to out-of-school youth. For any program year, LWDBs must spend not less than 20 percent of the funds allocated to the local area to provide in school youth and out of school youth with work experiences such as summer employment, pre-apprenticeship, internship, job shadowing, and on-the-job training. Local boards shall ensure that parents, participants, and other members of the community with experience relating to the programs for youth are involved in its design and implementation. One-Stop operators shall carry out programs that: • Provide an assessment of academic levels, skill levels and occupational skills, any prior work experience, employability, interests and aptitudes. (Pages 111-112) Title II

Work-eligible recipients shall participate in appropriate work activities as agreed upon in the Family Success Agreement. Work-eligible is defined as families containing an adult under sixty years of age, or teen head of household, that is not disabled, incapacitated, or caring for a family member who is disabled or incapacitated as documented by a medical expert to which the status of disability is clearly established and explained. Work-eligible excludes cases in which only the child portion of need that is unrelated to a sanction or penalty, known as a child-only case, is considered in determining eligibility. The work activities may include but are not limited to: Unsubsidized employment, Subsidized employment, Unpaid work experience, On-the-job training, Job search/job readiness, Vocational education, Satisfactory attendance at secondary school or in course of study leading to a certificate of general equivalence, in the case of recipients who have not completed secondary schools or received a certificate, Education directly related to employment, in the case of a recipient who has not received a high school diploma or certificate of equivalency, Job skills training directly related to employment, community service, and The provision of child care to an individual who is participating in community service. Participants, who are found not to possess basic workplace or basic literacy skills, as determined by an assessment, shall combine employment and job readiness and job search activities with activities designed to increase their basic and workplace literacy skills. (Page 242) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

The state integrated One-Stop Center operations under the Workforce Investment Act several years ago. Within the past two years, stand-alone Wagner-Peyser offices have been eliminated. Each of Louisiana’s fifteen Workforce Development areas has established at least one Comprehensive Center that has been certified by its respective board as meeting the criteria to be branded as an American Job Center. Smaller offices operated by local boards and/or One-Stop operators (contractors) where all Program Partners are not present, shall be designated and operated as “Affiliate” One-Stop centers and may have any subset of partners, but shall not be operated as Wagner Peyser stand-alone Employment Services offices. Under the plan, local boards will have the flexibility to include additional partners in One-Stop Centers, in particular and specifically identified by the law: • Employment and training programs administered by the Social Security Administration, including the Ticket to Work and the Self-Sufficiency Program. • Employment and training programs carried out by the Small Business Administration. • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) employment and training programs. • Other programs authorized under the National and Community Service Act of 1990. (Page 48) Title I Ticket-to-Work: LRS continues to network and collaborate with MAXIMUS, as well as many other agencies in the state, to ensure Ticket-to-Work is successful in Louisiana. LRS continues to maintain a statewide 1-800 Ticket Hotline number for individuals interested in learning more about their Ticket and how LRS would be able to assist them. In FY 2017, LRS received $1,163,021.25; this amount was a slight decrease from FY 2016’s $1,488,446.32 which was received from the Social Security Administration’s (SSAs) reimbursement program. The Program Coordinator continues to work closely with SSA to insure all documentation is submitted properly so that claims can be processed. (Page 226) Title II

 

Employer / Business Engagement

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability or implementation.  (Page 196, 267)

Data Collection

Programmatic/Fiscal Onsite Monitoring: Programs are identified for onsite monitoring through a comprehensive risk analysis based on the following factors: (1) desk monitoring; (2) need to verify data quality and program expenditures; (3) consistent low performance on NRS indicators in several categories; (4) prospective noncompliance with grant requirements identified through review of programmatic and fiscal reports, or ongoing communications with the program; (4) unresolved audit findings; (5) ongoing lack of progress in resolving required actions from prior monitoring visit; (6) significant staff turnover in the program; and (7) recent or newly established programs. The goals for State onsite monitoring visits are to: • ensure that programs meet AEFLA requirements; • improve the quality of federally-funded activities; • provide assistance identifying and resolving accountability problems; and, • ensure the accuracy, validity, and reliability of data collection and data reporting as well as policies and procedures for program accountability. (Page 76) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation: Louisiana Rehabilitation Services (LRS) will monitor the services provided within the guidelines of the existing corporative agreements and evaluate if modifications will be needed when they are renegotiated. LRS will monitor vendors to ensure the quality of supported employment services provided to eligible consumers. The monitoring will utilize site reviews and include quality indicators to evaluate the assessment of employment outcomes and an evaluation of the provision of services. The monitoring will be carried out by the state and field office staff. (Page 76) Title I 

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Recognizing the high unemployment rate among individuals with disabilities and the qualifiedemployee shortage businesses are facing, the Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) is committed to providing reasonable accommodations and access to all programs, services and facilities. Each One-Stop Career Center should utilize the one-stop disability access checklist provided by the United States Department of Labor to self-evaluate its current level of accessibility. With support of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant (2012 -2015), LWC worked to ensure the physical, communication and programmatic accessibility of all One-Stop Career Centers by conducting specialized training for all center staff on topics including accessibility for all, disability etiquette and awareness, and identifying and assisting job-seekers with hidden disabilities. LWC will continue to maintain these investments in staff training and technology to make certain One- Stop Career Center staff serve adult job-seekers with disabilities effectively. (Page 88) Title I Disseminate information on effective outreach to, partnerships with, and services for, businesses • Disseminate information on effective service delivery strategies to serve workers and job seekers • Disseminate performance information and information on the cost of attendance including tuition and fees, for participants in applicable training programs on the Eligible Training Provider’s List (ETPL) with recognized post- secondary credentials, as well as OJT and IWTP • Disseminate information on physical and programmatic accessibility, in accordance with sec. 188 of WIOA relative to nondiscrimination, if applicable, and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 for individuals with disabilities.

• Conduct evaluations of State Programs, in coordination with evaluations of programs and activities carried out by the U.S. Secretary of Labor • Disseminate a list of providers of youth workforce investment activities eligible to receive competitive, or sole source, grants and contracts for training with credentials for youth • Provide re-designation assistance to local areas • Provide assistance in the development of Regional Plans * Operate a fiscal and management accountability information system (MIS) to manage, track, and report primary indicators of performance for Youth, Adult, and Dislocated Worker Programs • Conduct continuous, and at least annually, monitoring and oversight of activities carried out by sub-recipients of WIOA funding to conform to the Uniform Administrative Requirements (UAR) • Provide additional assistance to local areas that have high concentrations of eligible youth (Page 100) Title I 

 

Veterans

Jobs For Veterans State Grant (JVSG) STRENGTHS Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist are providing individualized career services to 99% of the Veterans they provide services to. Despite serving only veterans with Significant Barriers, DVOPs have achieved an Entered Employment Rate (EER) of 66%. Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are integrated in to the Business Services Teams within their assigned workforce regions. LVERs conduct employer outreach with and as a part of regional business services teams. OPPORTUNITIES Incorporate the service delivery strategy utilized by DVOPs in to the OneStop Centers statewide. Currently the EER for all Veterans receiving services statewide is 51%. Large opportunity for improvement. LVERs could be more involved in employer engagement centered on assisting employers to develop and start registered apprenticeship programs and Onthe-job training programs. These efforts could provide more opportunities for Veterans to learn while they work. (Page 33) Title 1

The LVER responsibilities are specifically targeted to promote the advantages of hiring veterans to employers, employer associations and business groups. LVER roles and responsibilities are consistent with 38 U.S.C. § 4104, VPL 07—10 and VPL 03—14. As such, the LVER serves an important role in the state’s Business Services Delivery Model. In coordination with the other members of the business services team, the LVER advocates for employment and training opportunities through outreach to employers, training facilities, unions, apprenticeship programs and private and government businesses. The LVER also participates in job fairs, promotes programs that offer licensing and credentialing opportunities and develops and makes presentations to employers. Each LVER must provide a monthly report to the state veterans coordinator detailing their outreach activities. LVER Staff members conduct outreach to perform the following activities: • Conducting employer outreach; • In conjunction with employers, conducting job searches and workshops and establishing job search groups; • Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; • Informing federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans; • Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and • Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. (267-268) Title II To maximize the impact of the streamlined LVER staff, the state takes a top—down, cooperative approach to employer outreach. LVER staff shall coordinate with their business service team partners, and other state agencies or programs such as Louisiana Rehabilitative Services (LRS), to conduct outreach to employer associations at the state and regional level. In this way the maximum number of employers can be efficiently and effectively incorporated into the promotion of hiring of veterans. This outreach will educate employers on the advantages of hiring veterans, and inform employers on how to find qualified veteran applicants by leveraging the State workforce system and OSCCs. The state intends to increase veteran employment by making a sound business case to employers regarding the advantage of hiring veterans and providing employer’s tools and contacts to do so effectively. (Page 268) Title IV

 

Behavioral / Mental Health

10. The eligible provider’s collaboration with other available education, training and social service resources in the community. Particularly, the eligible provider should have, or have the means to establish, meaningful partnerships with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, One-Stop Centers, job training programs and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries for the development of career pathways. 11. The flexibility of program scheduling offered by the eligible provider, including coordination (when available) with federal, state and local support services such as child care, transportation, mental health services and career planning. 12. The eligible provider’s management information system; the expectation will be that the eligible provider will use the state-administered designated MIS for all grant related data collection and reporting. (Page 149) Title II

LRS staff members take advantage of training opportunities provided through webinars and teleconferences as well as on-site training. Numerous types of training and support continue to be provided and/or coordinated by State Office Program staff members to support the field staff. Such Training for PY 2017 included PEPNET, Travel Training, TBI Conference, Deaf Counselor Training, Ethics Symposium at Southern University, AWARE, Case Management, CATS, Share Point, Pre-ETS, Regional Manager and District Supervisor training. Additionally, the agency has specific monthly in-service training requirements (4 hours per month), which are conducted by the regional field offices to ensure continuous education for all professional and paraprofessional staff members. This training is provided by experienced staff members or by knowledgeable community providers who specialize in the area of training required. Rehabilitation Counselor Associates (RCAs) are required to attend all in-service training with the Rehabilitation Counselors and also attend separate training as needed. Examples of training topics include assessment, guidance and vocational counseling, eligibility, planning, disability related issues, assistive technology, disability services at colleges and universities, ethics, community-based employment outcomes, mental health, and employment related issues. (Page 185) Title II

Upon reviewing survey information of individuals receiving SSI/SSDI, the top needs identified by respondents included job placement (46%); job coaching (30%); benefits planning (30%); transportation (29%); job readiness skills (28%); and vocational guidance and career counseling (27%). They identified barriers to employment as being the fear of losing their government benefits (52%), lack of employer acceptance of their disability (44%), adjustment to disability (32%); lack of transportation (38%); lack of public services (36%); the slow job market (36%); and lack of medical insurance (27%). Respondents receiving supported employment services identified the following as needs not being met, job placement (23%); training/tuition assistance (21%); transportation (21%); room & board (15%); mental health counseling (14%); post-employment services (14%); benefits planning (13%); and equipment for work (13%). The barriers to employment identified by respondents receiving supported employment services included the fear of losing government benefits (40%); lack of transportation (39%); employer acceptance of their disability (36%); their personal adjustment to the disability (29%); lack of public resources (29%); the slow job market (21%); and the lack of medical insurance/care (20%). (Page 193) Title II

To assist Louisiana families in becoming economically self-reliant so that their dependence on government benefits for basic needs is minimized, the department implemented the STEP program so that cash assistance recipients, with certain exceptions, are actively engaged in meaningful activities designed to enable their transition from cash assistance to self-reliance. It is further intended that cash assistance recipients demonstrate active and diligent personal responsibility in achieving self-reliance through employment and increased workplace literacy. All appropriate state agencies responsible for employment, training, and educating Louisiana’s citizens are expected to cooperate in the pursuit of this goal. Once an applicant is certified for eligibility, a comprehensive assessment will be conducted and include workplace literacy, basic skills and educational attainment, interests and aptitude related to employment, barriers to employment, need for education, supportive services such as child care and transportation, and other supportive services. Specialized assessments can occur for issues that arise after an initial assessment has been completed and could include substance abuse, domestic violence, mental health screening, or others as determined by the department. (Page 240) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Through policy, LWC has refined the state’s response to the U.S. Labor Department mandate that the workforce development system become a seamless, integrated system. Prior to implementation, One-Stop Center operations used a rigid customer flow and team model. This new policy establishes a revision and refocusing effort to drive clients to the “right door” because of the state’s need to respond to a decrease in funding and environmental as well as socio-economic changes. Goals are as follows: • Change the lock-step process and team approach in providing job-seeker and employer services to a more flexible process (or roadmap) that allows quick response to changes in the labor market and workforce needs. • Add flexibility to the delivery of training services by simplifying the process for identifying qualified candidates. • Create a process that recognizes the ever-changing funding environment associated with federal mandates and grants, so that it provides necessary flexibility to respond to specific grant and funding mandates of U.S. Department of Labor programs regarding unemployment insurance benefits (UI), workforce participation, veteran’s services and National Emergency Grants. • Support the state’s redesign of its business engagement Process in a way that optimizes agency response to in-demand industry needs in hiring, retaining, training and advancement of workers. • Anticipate the ongoing need for creating contingency plans to support economic growth in targeted industry sectors, and developing improved relationships with local and state economic development entities with the goal of pre-empting shortfalls in a skilled workforce. • Address the need to reintegrate specific UI recipient related functions into the job-seeker process in order to shorten the return-to-work time for individuals receiving unemployment insurance benefits. (Page 57) Title I 

 

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

SNAP - Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs) - 04/01/2020

“A new federal rule that takes effect April 1, 2020, will require some Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to meet federal work requirements to continue receiving federal food assistance, commonly known as "food stamps."

SNAP recipients who are classified as an Able-Bodied Adult Without Dependents (ABAWD) - that is, recipients who are age 18 to 49, do not have a child living with them and are considered able to work - can receive benefits for only three months in a 36-month period unless they meet the federal ABAWD work requirement or qualify for an exemption (or exception). This rule, known as the SNAP Time Limit, is established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). For Louisiana SNAP recipients, the rule would cover the period of April 2020 through March 2023.

FNS has granted a waiver of the SNAP Time Limit rule for 14 parishes with higher unemployment rates. Those parishes are Assumption, Catahoula, Concordia, East Carroll, Franklin, Madison, Morehouse, Richland, St. Landry, St. Mary, Tensas, Vernon, West Carroll and Winn.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Community Choices Waiver - 02/20/2020

“The Louisiana Community Choices Waiver (CCW) is a program for elderly and / or disabled Louisiana residents. This program, which replaced the Elderly and Disabled Adult Waiver, provides a wide range of services and support to assist elderly state residents in maintaining their independence. In other words, it helps to prevent institutionalization in nursing homes by providing support at home, in assisted living facilities, and in adult foster care homes.

In addition to in-home support services, this waiver offers a unique benefit called Monitored In-Home Caregiving (MIHC), which can loosely be compared to adult foster care. Under MIHC, a family member or friend can move in to the care recipient's home and get paid to provide care. The alternative option exists as well, where the elderly individual moves into a friend or younger family member's home (such as his/her adult child) and that individual receives compensation for providing care. Even spouses can be compensated for providing care under MIHC. However, it’s important to note that the caregiver must adhere to the rules set forth by the Department of Health and Hospitals (DHH) and be approved as a MIHC service provider.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Louisiana Statewide Transition Plan for Compliance with the CMS Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule - 02/01/2020

“The following represents the Louisiana Work Plan. The purpose of this plan is to guide the development and implementation of a Transition Plan to: 1) provide for a robust input and engagement process for consumers and stakeholders; 2) identify areas of non-compliance; 3) seek intervention strategies to comply with the new setting requirements ; 4) implement strategies to maintain continuous compliance; and 5) ensure quality components are designed into each phase of the Transition Plan to ensure continued compliance.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Southwest Louisiana Area Health Education Center (SWLAHEC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, young adults (26–35 year olds), agriculture community workers, manufacturing community workers, trade community workers, finance community workers, education and healthcare community workers, job service community workers, entertainment industry employees, African-American communities, and Asian communities.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Central LA Area Health Education Center (CLAHEC).  They will partner with the Louisiana Dept. of Insurance,  Louisiana Enrollment Partnership Coalition, Faith-based groups, Hospitals, clinics, and social service agencies, State and local elected officials, Louisiana Primary Care Association (LPCA), and the Louisiana Workforce Commission. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Brian BurtonPhone: (337) 989-0001Email: interventions@swlahec.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Strategic Plan Fiscal Year July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2025 - 07/01/2019

~~“The Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) is an aggressive advocate for a trained, viable workforce and is committed to employment strategies for Louisiana residents that respond to business and industry’s workforce demands. LWC is dedicated to working closely with employers, employees, and job seekers to meet their employment and training needs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Louisiana Developmental Disability Council Report - 06/30/2019

~~“On  January  25,  2019,  the  Medicaid  Extenders  Act  of  2019,  a  bill  that  includes short-term  funding  for  the  Money  Follows  the  Person  program,  became  law. Participants can now transition through MFP through CY  2019, which was extended from December 31, 2018.  On February 28, 2019, Congress introduced two reauthorization bills, H.R.1342 and S.548, through the Empower Care Act to extend  the  MFP  program  for  five  additional  years. They  are  still  pending Congressional action.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LA HB199 - 06/20/2019

~~“AN ACT To enact Part III of Chapter 8 of Title 46 of the Louisiana Revised Statutes of 1950, to be comprised of R.S. 46:977.21 through 977.25, relative to services for children provided through the medical assistance program of this state known commonly as Medicaid; to provide for duties and responsibilities of the Louisiana Department of Health in administering the Medicaid program; to provide legislative findings relative to Medicaid waiver programs; to establish and provide for a demonstration waiver program to serve certain children with disabilities; to require development and submission of an application for program approval to the federal Medicaid agency; to provide for definitions; to provide for promulgation of rules; and to provide for related matter.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Individualized Education Program (IEP) - 06/11/2019

~~“Some students with disabilities ages 3-21 may require special education and related services to meet their unique needs and to support them in attaining both their short and long term educational goals.  These services are governed by federal legislation via the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004)."

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Update: Louisiana Department of Health eliminates waiting list for those with developmental disabilities - 04/30/2019

~~“Nearly a year after eliminating its 25-year-old waiting list for specialized services, the Louisiana Department of Health’s Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities is receiving positive feedback from those served by the Tiered Waiver plan.Tiered Waiver prioritizes individuals with a greater urgency of need for receiving the most appropriate home and community-based services, rather than the Office’s prior approach of offering services on a first-come, first-served basis.Julie Foster Hagan, assistant secretary of the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities, said more than 12,000 people have received a Screening for Urgency of Need (SUN), using a nationally accepted best practice model, to determine the urgency of their need for waiver services. There are five levels of need, or tiers:• 4-Emergent: Supports will be needed in the next 90 days.• 3-Urgent: Supports will be needed in the next 3-12 months.• 2-Critical: Supports will be needed in the next 1-2 years.• 1-Planning: Supports will be needed in the next 3-5 years.• 0-Currently no unmet needs."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

LA HB199 - 06/20/2019

~~“AN ACT To enact Part III of Chapter 8 of Title 46 of the Louisiana Revised Statutes of 1950, to be comprised of R.S. 46:977.21 through 977.25, relative to services for children provided through the medical assistance program of this state known commonly as Medicaid; to provide for duties and responsibilities of the Louisiana Department of Health in administering the Medicaid program; to provide legislative findings relative to Medicaid waiver programs; to establish and provide for a demonstration waiver program to serve certain children with disabilities; to require development and submission of an application for program approval to the federal Medicaid agency; to provide for definitions; to provide for promulgation of rules; and to provide for related matter.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Louisiana House Bill No. 598 - 06/11/2015

“…The ABLE Account Program is hereby created and shall be administered by the ABLE Account Authority, refereed to hereafter as “the authority” to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting persons with disabilities in endeavors to maintain health, independence, and quality of life…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana House Bill 508

To enact RS. 47:297.13, relative to income taxation; to provide relative to individual and corporation income tax deductions; to authorize an income tax deduction for taxpayers w employ certain qualified disabled individuals; to provide for certain definitions; to provide for certain requirements and limitations; to provide for an effective date; and to provide for related matters.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

2018 Louisiana Employment First Report - 01/04/2019

~~“With the urging of advocacy groups, and under the leadership of the Governor’s Advisory Council on Disability Affairs, an Employment First Workgroup was formed in January2017, with the responsibility of developing a report to the Governor with recommendations for moving forward on a cross-disability Employment First effort. This report is an important step in moving this policy forward and expanding the scope of Louisiana’s employment first policy beyond individuals with developmental disabilities. 

This report summarizes a set of comprehensive recommendations that will advance Louisiana’s Employment First goals. This report also highlights specific initiatives undertaken since June 2017 and proposed work for the coming year”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 19-08 State as Model Employer Task Force - 03/19/2018

“WHEREAS,  the State of Louisiana is committed to developing and maintaining a high performing public workforce that provides access, meaningful services, and improved outcomes for all citizens and reflects the rich diversity of the citizens of this great state. In order to achieve this goal, state leaders must be able to apply diverse perspectives and experiences to the development of responsive solutions to the issues facing the state. Such diversity enhances the fullness of our understanding of these issues and opens opportunities for the consideration of new and better solutions;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, JOHN BEL EDWARDS, Governor of the state of Louisiana, by virtue of he power vested in me by the Constitution and statutes of the state of Louisiana do, effective immediately, hereby order and direct as follows:

SECTION 1:  The State as a Model Employer Task Force (hereafter “Task Force”) is hereby established within the executive department, Office of the Governor, Office of Disability Affairs…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

Gov. Edwards Proclaims October ‘Disability Employment Awareness Month’ - 10/09/2017

“Gov. John Bel Edwards proclaimed October as ‘Disability Employment Awareness Month in Louisiana. In collaboration with Louisiana Workforce Commission and Families Helping Families, the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs will be traveling the state on an Employment First Tour, beginning October 10 in Lafayette. This is an opportunity for the office to host roundtable discussions regarding the integrated, competitive employment for people with disabilities.

 

Disability Employment Awareness Month is a great way to emphasize the importance of the contributions of persons with disabilities in moving Louisiana forward,” said Gov. Edwards. “Our businesses and communities can greatly benefit from the integrated, competitive employment of persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order No. JBE 16-45: Louisiana Rehabilitation Council - 08/04/2016

“Whereas, the State Rehabilitation Council was originally established by executive order to provide Louisiana’s citizens with disabilities assistance in their pursuit of meaningful careers and gainful employment through specific programs.

Preparing and submitting an annual report to the governor and the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Service Administration, Washington, D.C., on the status of vocational rehabilitation programs operating within the state, and making the report available to the public.

Providing for coordination and the establishment of working relationships between Louisiana Rehabilitation Services, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Centers for Independent Living within the state”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Data Sharing

Executive Order No. JBE 2016-11: Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination - 04/13/2016

“No state agencies, departments, offices, commissions, boards, entities or officers of the State of Louisiana shall harass or discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, political affiliation, disability, or age against any individual in the provision of any service and/or benefit by such agencies, departments, offices, commissions, boards or entities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

SNAP - Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs) - 04/01/2020

“A new federal rule that takes effect April 1, 2020, will require some Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to meet federal work requirements to continue receiving federal food assistance, commonly known as "food stamps."

SNAP recipients who are classified as an Able-Bodied Adult Without Dependents (ABAWD) - that is, recipients who are age 18 to 49, do not have a child living with them and are considered able to work - can receive benefits for only three months in a 36-month period unless they meet the federal ABAWD work requirement or qualify for an exemption (or exception). This rule, known as the SNAP Time Limit, is established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). For Louisiana SNAP recipients, the rule would cover the period of April 2020 through March 2023.

FNS has granted a waiver of the SNAP Time Limit rule for 14 parishes with higher unemployment rates. Those parishes are Assumption, Catahoula, Concordia, East Carroll, Franklin, Madison, Morehouse, Richland, St. Landry, St. Mary, Tensas, Vernon, West Carroll and Winn.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Strategic Plan Fiscal Year July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2025 - 07/01/2019

~~“The Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) is an aggressive advocate for a trained, viable workforce and is committed to employment strategies for Louisiana residents that respond to business and industry’s workforce demands. LWC is dedicated to working closely with employers, employees, and job seekers to meet their employment and training needs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Individualized Education Program (IEP) - 06/11/2019

~~“Some students with disabilities ages 3-21 may require special education and related services to meet their unique needs and to support them in attaining both their short and long term educational goals.  These services are governed by federal legislation via the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004)."

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment & Vocational Training - 04/01/2019

~~“Our Veterans Assistance Counselors help veterans and their families receive benefits for which they qualify. General eligibility requirements include military service and Louisiana state residency. Specific programs may have additional requirements. Spouses and dependents of deceased veterans who meet eligibility requirements may also be eligible for certain programs and services.”

Systems
  • Other

Employment Advocacy Initiatives - 05/09/2018

“The Council supports a policy of “Employment First” in which employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. The Council advocates for:

Policies that incentivize services for individualized integrated, competitive employment and dis-incentivize segregated, sheltered day habilitation services, Sheltered workshops to transition people into individualized, competitive, paid employment and discontinue admissions into segregated day programs, Improvements in the employment provider system with evidence-based practice, collaborative cross-agency infrastructure and training and technical assistance, and The Louisiana Rehabilitation Services’ (Vocational Rehabilitation [VR] program) federal draw down will increase and eventually include the entire federal VR grant award.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

“LOUISIANA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION POSTS DRAFT ESSA PLAN FOR PUBLIC COMMENT” - 02/20/2017

~~“ESSA's provisions become effective July 1, 2017. Per the law, the United States Secretary of Education must approve or deny a plan within 120 days of a state submitting its plan to the U.S. Department of Education. Because completion of the plan prior to the start of the school year in which it becomes effective is critically important for Louisiana administrators, educators and parents, Louisiana commenced public development of its plan more than a year in advance of the law taking effect.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Louisiana Awarded $2 Million to Improve Career Education” - 01/11/2017

~~“The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and JPMorgan Chase & Co. on Wednesday announced Louisiana is one of 10 states to receive a three-year, $2 million grant through phase two of the New Skills for Youth (NSFY) grant opportunity to strengthen and expand career-education pathways for students.

 "This New Skills for Youth grant will provide tremendous support for our state's high school teachers and students in accessing high-quality workforce training, particularly in rural school districts and in support of our students with disabilities," said Gov. John Bel Edwards. "I'm confident that Louisiana's team of state and local education, economic development and workforce partners will make excellent use of these funds to dramatically improve the number of our young citizens prepared for college, career and life success."

 The phase two grant funds will be used to expand Jump Start, the state's innovative career and technical education program, said State Superintendent of Education John White. "These funds will allow our state to build upon Jump Start's strong foundation, expanding opportunities and resources that enable our students to earn the industry credentials they need to attain employment in Louisiana's most important industries."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“THE HEART OF ESSA: REFLECT ON RESULTS, PLAN AND PRIORITIZE, AND FUND PRIORITIES” - 01/09/2017

~~“Career education access: Louisiana developed a career education initiative, Jump Start, as well as a diverse course delivery program known as Course Choice. Using funds won through the New Skills for Youth grant, Louisiana conducted an inventory of every pathway offered in every high school in the state. Further grant funding will in part go toward bolstering connections among employers, higher education, and high schools. Students with disabilities eligible to pursue a high school diploma via an alternate pathway may also select a Jump Start pathway to earn a career diploma and a recognized workforce credential. All Jump Start pathways are accessible to these students, with the student’s IEP team setting alternate exit and performance criteria.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Governor’s Advisory Council on Disability Affairs (GACDA) Annual Report 2017 - 01/01/2017

“The Governor’s Advisory Council on Disabilities Affairs (GACDA) was established by Governor John Bel Edwards through Executive Order NO. JBE 2016-10 on April 7, 2016 to monitor state compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and to advise the governor on the needs of individuals with disabilities in Louisiana. GACDA is also charged with assisting the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs with the resolution of state disability issues and provide education, communication, and networking services concerning disability issues and needs for all Louisiana citizens. GACDA is composed of 31 members appointed by governor Edwards. Support staff, facilities and resources for GACDA are provided by the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs within the Governor’s Office of Programs and Planning.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana’s “Every Student Succeeds Act” (ESSA) Framework - 09/28/2016

“Long-term indicators: To foster a better understanding of how skills taught in schools translate to life after high school, Louisiana will provide to schools and school systems an annual series of reports on the postsecondary success and economic productivity of their graduates as a group. These reports will provide local communities and educators with aggregated data regarding the measurable life outcomes experienced by recent graduates, including income, employment, and education attainment information

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

First-of-its kind workforce collaboration in Louisiana - 10/19/2017

“South Louisiana Community College, the board of directors for Local Workforce Development Board #40, and area parish presidents in Acadiana are partnering to improve workforce development in the region. The collaboration – a first for a community college in Louisiana – falls under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) enacted in 2014.

“The Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act puts great emphasis on the out-of-school youth, collaborations with re-entry and adult education partners, individuals with disabilities, in addition to the unemployed and underemployed populations. The board of LWDB #40 is confident that SLCC will be successful in coordinating the alignment of services among the One-Stop partners that will promote and increase successful outcomes to both the individual and the employer. Special gratitude to the parish presidents, Louisiana Workforce Commission Office of Workforce Development, LWDB #40 board of directors, One-Stop Committee members, attorney, CPA, partners and most importantly, the dedicated team of SLPG/LWDB #40 for continuous improvement of our Workforce Development programs,” said Brenda Hubbard-Thomas, LWDB #40 WIOA Executive Director.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Workgroup - 02/17/2017

~~“The first meeting of the Employment First Workgroup was held Thursday, February 16. The Workgroup is comprised of federal, state, regional and local agency stakeholders as well as community advocates, other professionals, business leaders, families, and individuals with disabilities to address barriers to employment and improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. During the meeting, members of the workgroup shared information and perspectives related to education, individuals and families, developmental disabilities, and services for people with disabilities. Attendees also shared their experiences regarding seeking employment and applying to receive services.The workgroup will meet monthly and will report its work by June 30, 2017. The next meeting will take place on March 23, 2017 at 10 a.m. at the Louisiana State Capitol on the 4th floor. The meeting will be open and all interested parties are encouraged to participate.” 

Systems
  • Other

Louisiana's Demand-Driven Workforce Investment Plan - 07/01/2012

Vocational Rehabilitation

“As a mandated partner in the Workforce Investment Act, the Vocational Rehabilitation Program is instrumental in meeting the workforce needs of individuals with disabilities in the state of Louisiana. The purpose of the VR Program is, in part, ‘to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society.’ The VR Program operates a statewide comprehensive program to assess, plan, develop and provide vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities, ‘consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice, so that such individuals may prepare for and engage in gainful employment.’”

 

W-P Section 8(b) 20 CFR 652.211

“The state has designated at least one person in each state or Federal employment office to promote and develop employment opportunities, job counseling, and placement for individuals with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Workforce Commission.

“LRS continues to collaborate with LWC in identifying effective ways to integrate services in BCSCs [Business and Career Solution Centers]. LRS is represented on each of the LWIBs and attends meetings as scheduled. The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) established with each of the WIBs is updated annually. Within the 18 WIAs, 63 BCSCs have been established, 18 cost allocation plans have been completed by the WIBs and approved by all parties. LRS continues to pay expenses to the local centers for participation, as per the local cost allocation plans.”

“LWC is working with the Shared Youth Vision workgroup on youth, local workforce boards, youth councils, and community-based organizations to continue development of the systems needed to provide these comprehensive services to eligible youth, including coordination with Job Corps and other youth programs within each local workforce investment area. Vocational rehabilitation is involved in the development of these service strategies to ensure that youth with disabilities or other barriers to employment are included in the comprehensive service strategy.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Louisiana FY 2011 Block Grant State Plan

The Office of Behavioral Health (OBH) is a member of the WORK PAY$ committee. “This committee is comprised of community partners and is intended to further the employment of individuals with disabilities in the state of Louisiana. OBH is also working as a collaborative partner on both a state and regional level in the development and implementation of job fairs for individuals with disabilities throughout the state.”

“The Louisiana Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (LAWIPA) program helps Social Security beneficiaries work through issues relating to social security benefits and employment. The program is a coalition between the Advocacy Center of Louisiana and the LSU Health Sciences Center’s Human Development Center. Many individuals with disabilities who receive SSDI and/ or SSI benefits want to work or increase their work activity. One barrier for these individuals is the fear of losing health care and other benefits if they work. Valuable work incentive programs can extend benefits, but are often poorly understood and underutilized. The LAWIPA coalition educates clients and assists them in overcoming work barriers, perceived or real; and also focuses on improved community partnerships. Benefit specialists, called Community Work Incentive Coordinators, provide services to all Louisiana SSDI and SSI beneficiaries age 14 and older who have disabilities. CMHC staff and clients are able to work with Coordinators to help navigate the various work related resources (as offered in conjunction with the Ticket to Work program), and identify on an individualized basis the way their benefits will be impacted by going to work. The ultimate goal of the new WIPA coalition is to support the successful employment of beneficiaries with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Office of Behavioral Health receives grant to help people with serious mental illness find jobs - 01/04/2019

~~“The United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy selected Louisiana as a grant recipient through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. The Provider Visionary Opportunities to Increase Competitive Employment (VOICE) grant provides the Office of Behavioral Health with 100 hours of training and technical assistance needed to help people in the target population find meaningful jobs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Louisiana Selected as Vision Quest State - 11/02/2017

“Louisiana is one of eight states selected to receive Training and Technical Assistance

as a Vision Quest State for the 2018 fiscal year under the United States Department

of Labor's, Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) Employment First State

Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). This award is the result of a year-long

effort by the Governor's Office of Disability Affairs working in collaboration with

stakeholders. Vision Quest States are eligible to receive up to 100 hours of technical

assistance to support the state in achieving its goals as an EFSLMP state.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Medicaid Balancing Incentive Program - 02/08/2013

“Since 2001, the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals has been engaged in focused, comprehensive system transformation of the long-term care system. These reform efforts have included stakeholder input at all levels and have resulted in changes in laws and regulations, service delivery, and funding priorities. In transforming the long-term care system, the state has committed to rebalancing the service system in order to provide choice between institutional and home and community-based services. The State has been working toward rebalancing its long-term care system by eliminating barriers that prevent or restrict the flexible use of Medicaid funds, increasing the ability of the Medicaid program to assure continued provision of services to people who transition from institutions by consistently increasing funding and slot allocation, improving service menus and rate structures to meet needs, and by ensuring procedures are in place for quality assurance and continuous improvement in services by consolidating licensing authority and improving IT systems tracking critical incidents.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Louisiana Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2012

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2014 Louisiana was awarded a Round 3 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The grant ended in 2015.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Data Sharing

Louisiana Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The… program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Southwest Louisiana Area Health Education Center (SWLAHEC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, young adults (26–35 year olds), agriculture community workers, manufacturing community workers, trade community workers, finance community workers, education and healthcare community workers, job service community workers, entertainment industry employees, African-American communities, and Asian communities.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Central LA Area Health Education Center (CLAHEC).  They will partner with the Louisiana Dept. of Insurance,  Louisiana Enrollment Partnership Coalition, Faith-based groups, Hospitals, clinics, and social service agencies, State and local elected officials, Louisiana Primary Care Association (LPCA), and the Louisiana Workforce Commission. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Brian BurtonPhone: (337) 989-0001Email: interventions@swlahec.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Yellow Shirt Days - 04/01/2019

~~“On these days, key policies or issues affecting individuals with developmental disabilities are being discussed.  Members gather to create a presence, reminding policymakers of the issues that concern people with disabilities.  These days also afford opportunities for LaCAN members to speak briefly with legislators in the committee hallways.”

Systems
  • Other

OCDD Resource Center - 01/25/2019

~~“The vision of the OCDD Resource Center is to partner with community providers and professionals to offer quality supports and to build a natural community support network for individuals with complex needs, life threatening conditions, and those who pose greater risk to public safety.Programs developed by the OCDD Resource Center are guided by OCDD Values and Guiding Principles.The goal of the OCDD Resource Center is to have a broad impact in the DD Service System and Louisiana local communities with the following outcomes:• Improved health and behavioral health outcomes for DD service recipients• Broader availability and accessing of natural support networks in local communities• Greater ability of community providers and professionals to support individuals with complex needs• Use of technology and innovative treatments that lead to improved support options and greater independence for recipients• Local access to innovation and technical assistance” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Louisiana Workforce Investment Act Training Manual - 01/01/2019

~~“The Eligible Training Provider Manual provides educational institutions with updated information about the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), Louisiana’s Workforce Development System, and provides the necessary guidance, procedures, and requirements in becoming an  Eligible Training Provider (ETP) in  Louisiana. The Eligible Training Provider List is a list of providers and their training programs and/or services that qualify for WIOA funding eligibility. Only providers’ programs, courses or classes that meet specific criteria and requirements are listed on Louisiana’s ETPL."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Louisiana WIA Training Manual - Louisiana Workforce Commission - 01/01/2019

~~“The Eligible Training Provider Manual provides educational institutions with updated information about the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), Louisiana’s Workforce Development System, and provides the necessary guidance, procedures, and requirements in becoming an  Eligible Training Provider (ETP) in  Louisiana. The Eligible Training Provider List is a list of providers and their training programs and/or services that qualify for WIOA funding eligibility. Only providers’ programs, courses or classes that meet specific criteria and requirements are listed on Louisiana’s ETPL.”

Systems
  • Other

Louisiana APSE - 11/13/2017

~~“This page has information about the Louisiana chapter of APSE such as the officers and board members and any training events.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
Citations

Louisiana State University School of Allied Health Professions Human Development Center

HDC's 40 Hour Supported Employment CORE Training

LSUHSC-Human Development Center (HDC) in collaboration with Louisiana APSE is providing statewide Employment Specialist Core Training. This 40 hour training meets LRS vendor training requirements and Medicaid Employment provider rules. It incorporates APSE's CORE Supported Employment competencies, and includes three and a half days of classroom instruction, fieldwork assignments and online instruction. Class hours are 9:00AM - 4:00PM except for 1/2 days indicated which end at 12:00noon. The fee for this class is $350.

(If you would to schedule a Core training in your region, please send an email to Sue Killam, M.Ed.)

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Louisiana Developmental Disabilities Council “Employment Mentoring”

The Employment Mentoring project will develop, implement, and evaluate a training and mentoring approach that will result in Employment Support Professionals (ESPs) demonstrating competencies in skills which lead to employment outcomes for job seekers with developmental disabilities including those with the most intense support needs in acquiring and maintaining community-based competitive employment.  The project will work with participating Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) to enhance their operations and participating Employment Support Professionals (ESPs) to improve their competencies in the area of supported employment and successful completion of the national Certified Employment Support Professional (CESP) exam.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities “Resources”

The DHH Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities offers a variety and ever-changing collection of resources, trainings and literature to assist consumers, their families, providers, advocates, and others access relevant materials.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Louisiana Community Choices Waiver - 02/20/2020

“The Louisiana Community Choices Waiver (CCW) is a program for elderly and / or disabled Louisiana residents. This program, which replaced the Elderly and Disabled Adult Waiver, provides a wide range of services and support to assist elderly state residents in maintaining their independence. In other words, it helps to prevent institutionalization in nursing homes by providing support at home, in assisted living facilities, and in adult foster care homes.

In addition to in-home support services, this waiver offers a unique benefit called Monitored In-Home Caregiving (MIHC), which can loosely be compared to adult foster care. Under MIHC, a family member or friend can move in to the care recipient's home and get paid to provide care. The alternative option exists as well, where the elderly individual moves into a friend or younger family member's home (such as his/her adult child) and that individual receives compensation for providing care. Even spouses can be compensated for providing care under MIHC. However, it’s important to note that the caregiver must adhere to the rules set forth by the Department of Health and Hospitals (DHH) and be approved as a MIHC service provider.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Louisiana Statewide Transition Plan for Compliance with the CMS Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule - 02/01/2020

“The following represents the Louisiana Work Plan. The purpose of this plan is to guide the development and implementation of a Transition Plan to: 1) provide for a robust input and engagement process for consumers and stakeholders; 2) identify areas of non-compliance; 3) seek intervention strategies to comply with the new setting requirements ; 4) implement strategies to maintain continuous compliance; and 5) ensure quality components are designed into each phase of the Transition Plan to ensure continued compliance.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Louisiana Developmental Disability Council Report - 06/30/2019

~~“On  January  25,  2019,  the  Medicaid  Extenders  Act  of  2019,  a  bill  that  includes short-term  funding  for  the  Money  Follows  the  Person  program,  became  law. Participants can now transition through MFP through CY  2019, which was extended from December 31, 2018.  On February 28, 2019, Congress introduced two reauthorization bills, H.R.1342 and S.548, through the Empower Care Act to extend  the  MFP  program  for  five  additional  years. They  are  still  pending Congressional action.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Update: Louisiana Department of Health eliminates waiting list for those with developmental disabilities - 04/30/2019

~~“Nearly a year after eliminating its 25-year-old waiting list for specialized services, the Louisiana Department of Health’s Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities is receiving positive feedback from those served by the Tiered Waiver plan.Tiered Waiver prioritizes individuals with a greater urgency of need for receiving the most appropriate home and community-based services, rather than the Office’s prior approach of offering services on a first-come, first-served basis.Julie Foster Hagan, assistant secretary of the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities, said more than 12,000 people have received a Screening for Urgency of Need (SUN), using a nationally accepted best practice model, to determine the urgency of their need for waiver services. There are five levels of need, or tiers:• 4-Emergent: Supports will be needed in the next 90 days.• 3-Urgent: Supports will be needed in the next 3-12 months.• 2-Critical: Supports will be needed in the next 1-2 years.• 1-Planning: Supports will be needed in the next 3-5 years.• 0-Currently no unmet needs."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Money Follows the Person - 04/01/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration is a Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) grant designed  to help states try new ways of delivering Medicaid services. In Louisiana the MFP Demonstration is called My Place Louisiana which helps people move from qualified institutions into home and community-based living settings and then follows those individuals for the first year of waiver services to help ensure a successful transition. My Place Louisiana Transition Coordinators work with support coordinator and provider agencies to provide assistance to ensure the health, safety and successful transition of people participating in waivers.The Louisiana Medicaid Office is working with the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities (OCDD) and the Office for Aging and Adult Services (OAAS) to implement My Place Louisiana, which is a 13-year (2008-2020) program focusing on Medicaid funding and following participants in transitioning from qualified institutions to home and community-based living settings.” 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Long-Term Care Services - 01/01/2018

“Louisiana's Medicaid Program provides payment for special long-term care support services, as well as full Medicaid health coverage, to eligible people who, because of their medical conditions, require assistance with activities of daily living (for example, eating, bathing, dressing, grooming, and transferring). Long-term care supports may be provided either in a facility or in an individual's own home or in the community.

 

Louisiana's Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS), or Medicaid waiver programs, include programs administered by both the Office of Aging and Adult Services and the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Waiver Services - 01/01/2018

“The State of Louisiana offers two Medicaid Waiver Programs to individuals with developmental disabilities. These programs are called Children's Choice and the New Opportunities Waiver (NOW). Some of the services included in these programs are: case management, personal care respite support, environmental modifications, equipment, and Medicaid. Services are based upon the child's disability, not parental income.

 

Flexible Family Funding is a small monthly supplement for school aged children with severe or profound disabilities who qualify for Special Education through the school system and have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities (OCDD) QUARTERLY DD COUNCIL REPORT September 28, 2016” Detailing DD Waiver Activities. - 09/20/2016

A report detailing Medicaid service levels, as well as a variety of Waivers and initiatives, including, but not limited to, the “residential Option Waiver, the New Opportunities Waiver, and the Self-Directed Waiver, as well as a description of ”Money Follows the Person”.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LA Supports Waiver (0453.R02.00) - 07/01/2014

This waiver, "provides day hab, habilitation, prevocational services, respite, support coordination, supported employment, housing stabilization service, housing stabilization transition, PERS for individuals w/autism, ID, DD"

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Louisiana Balancing Incentive Program - 02/08/2013

Since 2001, the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals has been engaged in focused, comprehensive system transformation of the long-term care system. These reform efforts have included stakeholder input at all levels and have resulted in changes in laws and regulations, service delivery, and funding priorities. In transforming the long-term care system, the state has committed to rebalancing the service system in order to provide choice between institutional and home and community-based services. The State has been working toward rebalancing its long-term care system by eliminating barriers that prevent or restrict the flexible use of Medicaid funds, increasing the ability of the Medicaid program to assure continued provision of services to people who transition from institutions by consistently increasing funding and slot allocation, improving service menus and rate structures to meet needs, and by ensuring procedures are in place for quality assurance and continuous improvement in services by consolidating licensing authority and improving IT systems tracking critical incidents.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The Bayou State welcomes you to come as you are, thus inciting a motto of inclusion that should also engage and encompass Louisianans with disabilities in the general workforce and economic mainstream. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Louisiana’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
-0.24%
Change from
2018 to 2019
4,648,794
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.4%
Change from
2018 to 2019
375,922
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.43%
Change from
2018 to 2019
131,742
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.08%
Change from
2018 to 2019
35.05%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.86%
Change from
2018 to 2019
74.33%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 4,684,333 4,659,978 4,648,794
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 361,642 374,421 375,922
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 122,683 121,952 131,742
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,765,230 1,758,914 1,752,117
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.92% 32.57% 35.05%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 72.47% 73.69% 74.33%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.10% 4.90% 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.40% 25.10% 26.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 19.00% 17.50% 17.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 327,357 344,265 342,094
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 352,166 356,997 377,726
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 430,116 437,242 452,167
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 221,548 233,652 236,460
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,135 28,192 23,902
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,614 4,732 4,945
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,652 6,309 6,530
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 12,434 12,828 13,451
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 4,007 6,364 6,038

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 5,865 5,727 5,696
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.50% 3.50% 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 156,107 154,395 152,643

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,660 1,871 2,276
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 3,502 3,703 4,177
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 9,069 9,589 10,551
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 18.30% 19.50% 21.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 0.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00% N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 0.80% 3.00% 7.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A 2 6
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3 2 4
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 65 386 896

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 12,198 18,478 18,600
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 1,475 1,863 890
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 646 723 375
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 44.00% 39.00% 42.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 13.97 15.48 8.03

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 22.00% 18.00% 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,522 3,879 4,156
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 269,396 267,599 265,182
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 193 106 119
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 96 68 88

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,055,000 $11,179,547 $11,223,034
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $6,213,000 $4,883,241 $2,877,141
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $15,945,000 $16,486,266 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A $16,486,266 N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 29.00% 31.00% 0.30%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A 2,461 N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,176 969 581
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 2,551 2,573 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 32.10 32.84 30.47

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 59.67% 60.72% 60.87%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.91% 14.71% 14.66%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.33% 1.25% 1.24%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 100.00% 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.68% 39.48% 39.33%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 72.30% 74.98% 76.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 87.26% 87.16% 88.30%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.62% 35.50% 37.60%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 721,050
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 131,005
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 197,993
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 328,998
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 137
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 217
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 354
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,286,952
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,116,168

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 51 31 22
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 9 8 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 60 39 23
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,171 1,233 747
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 274 274 19
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,445 1,507 766

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

In addition, a State Office position coordinates employment activities statewide. The Employment Initiative Program Coordinator serves as LRS’ direct contact to the VR Business Network and distributes job leads and information to the regional offices. In FY 2015, the VR Business Network provided job leads from all over the country. Some of the job leads were from the following companies: Walgreen’s, Lowe’s, TJX Companies, Office Max, Wells Fargo, DOL, Manpower, Inc., USDA, Marriott International, and many others.

LRS continues to participate with Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities (OCDD) in the “Employment First” initiative, which was designed to provide employment asa first option for persons with developmental disabilities, as an alternative to institutionalization, and to provide integration/independence in the community. LRS participates in roundtable discussions hosted by OCDD to inform their staff and providers of new requirements related to integration of individuals with developmental disabilities into their communities as a result of new Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) rules, as well as how to better collaborate with LRS to achieve goals set forth in WIOA. (Page 214- 215) Title IV

Customized Employment

Additionally, 48% of counselors indicated that the quality of services provided to meet the needs of consumers could be improved. Seventy percent of staff responding felt that more CRPs are needed in their area to serve specific services or to serve specific disability populations. Populations that were identified as needing further CRPs to serve include the deaf, deaf-blind and blind/visually impaired, felons/ex-felons with disabilities, individuals with cognitive impairments/intellectual disabilities, autism, mental illness, paraplegic/quadriplegic, and traumatic brain injuries. In addition, it was noted that more CRPs are needed to provide services to transition students, to provide services such as supported employment in rural areas, job readiness/placement, sign language interpretation, assistive technology services and training, training, and customized employment. (Page 195) Title VI

LRS will provide ongoing support services, including customized employment and other appropriate services needed to support and maintain youth with most significant disabilities, to work toward competitive integrated employment; beginning at Job Stabilization / Transition to Extended Services. 

Purchased supported employment services (Milestones) are identified and listed on the IPE and must be obtained through an approved Supported Employment CRP and generally cannot exceed 24 months or four years for youth with disabilities (ages 14-24). If a Consumer requires longer than 24 months in reaching job stabilization or four years for youth with disabilities, the LRS Counselor can extend the service in accordance with Plan guidelines (Page 208) Title VI

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

With support of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant (2012 -2015), LWC worked to ensure the physical, communication and programmatic accessibility of all One-Stop Career Centers by conducting specialized training for all center staff on topics including accessibility for all, disability etiquette and awareness, and identifying and assisting job-seekers with hidden disabilities. LWC will continue to maintain these investments in staff training and technology to make certain One- Stop Career Center staff serve adult job-seekers with disabilities effectively. LWC has incorporated accessibility criteria as part of the One-Stop certification policy criteria in collaboration with the Workforce Investment Council, local boards and CEOs. Additionally, all One-Stop Centers will be monitored onsite annually to ensure compliance with this requirement. (Page 88) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Goal 2: Expand career services and opportunities for populations facing multiple barriers to close the gap in educational attainment and economic advancement through career pathways and improved career services and the expansion of bridge programs. 1. Expand and incentivize the utilization of evidenced-based workforce strategies that support targeted populations (e.g., the long-term unemployed, individuals with disabilities, veterans, outof-school youth) into sector-based career pathway initiatives to achieve similar outcomes relative to other populations. (Page 37-38) Title I 

School to Work Transition

Job-seekers who have large gaps in their work history, limited, obsolete or unknown skills, limited education, inadequate credentials, lack soft skills, have significant barriers to employment or a combination of any of these factors as well as any job-seeker determined most likely to exhaust all their UI benefits shall be considered not workforce ready. Job-seekers who are not workforce ready shall be provided individualized career services, consisting of a minimum of a comprehensive assessment and development of an individualized employment plan (IEP) in the context of case management. (Page 62) Title I

The comprehensive assessment is the foundation for development of an IEP, and no IEP shall be created without completing a comprehensive assessment. In many cases the comprehensive assessment will then be an ongoing process that may result in changes to the goals and objectives of the IEP. The IEP is developed with a job-seeker to identify or create employment goals, appropriate achievement objectives and the right combination of services to assist in achieving goals and objectives. In short — “Where am I now?” “Where do I want to go?” “How will I get there?” The IEP must include goals and objectives that are SMART (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time bound). A case note must accompany the IEP and must justify the plan based on the identified barrier(s) to employment. Case management requires a regular follow-up and review or revision of the IEP until such time as the job-seeker becomes workforce ready or enters a training program. In either case, follow-up is critical, using a 30-day cycle until the job-seeker attains employment or completes training. (Page 62) Title I

Case Management requires a regular follow-up and review or revision of the IEP, until such time as the job seeker becomes workforce ready or enters a training program. In either case follow-up is critical, using the 30, 60, and 90-day cycle until employed or training is complete is appropriate — except for long term training. For long-term training, Career Specialists should follow the most current guidance. (Page 121) Title II

The formal interagency agreement provides for initial contact to be made with the transition student as early as age sixteen. This is accomplished by the development of criteria and timelines for an effective and efficient referral process; provision of orientation and information sessions for students and their families; and LRS counselors determining transition students’ eligibility for VR services within the timelines established by agency policy. For each student determined eligible for services, every effort will be made to ensure those who are in an Order of Selection (OOS) Category currently being served by LRS leave the school system with an approved IPE in place that incorporates appropriate segments of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and projected employment needs, as applicable. (Page 171) Title II

The Program Coordinator works collaboratively with DOE Transition Coordinator in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities including VR services. Both agencies share responsibility to coordinate the provision of services, conduct outreach, and identify financial responsibility as needed. The DOE will assure that all students with disabilities and their families have knowledge of LRS policies and services including brochures and promotional information supplied by LRS. Information dissemination begins with the writing of the transition service page and continues through referral to LRS. Local Education Agencies (LEAs) also invite LRS representatives to IEP meetings at the students’ request, whena transition service page is being written for a student with a disability who may be eligible for and/or interested in VR services; facilitate appropriate orientation meetings among LRS staff, student and family members; provide time for LRS staff to meet with teachers, guidance counselors, and other appropriate personnel for such purposes as information sharing/gathering at both the individual and agency levels; and assist in the development, provision, and evaluation of interagency vocational assessment processes and functional vocational transition programs. (Page 172) Title II

Current LRS policy and guidelines address the allocation of 15% of State’s VR allotment for the provision of services of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) to high school students with disabilities between the ages of 16 - 21 who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services. The required activities of Pre-ETS are workplace readiness training, job exploration counseling; work-based learning experiences; counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary education programs at institutions of higher education; and instruction in self-advocacy. LRS assigned vendors to work with each high school across the state to make Pre-ETS services available to students who receive IDEA funds or students who are an individuals with a disability for the purposes of section 504 of the Act (29 U.S.C.794). (Page 172-173) Title II

LRS will use agency funds for the provision of Pre-ETS and VR services on the approved IPE that relates directly to the achievement of the agreed upon vocational goal, which is not the responsibility of the education system. The DOE will use agency funds for the provision of educational services on the approved IEP that relates directly to the achievement of the agreed upon educational goal.… LRS Transition Counselors in each region meet with a school liaison, usually the guidance counselor, to provide information regarding LRS services. The school liaison relays the information to students with disabilities and coordinates the student’s initial meeting with the LRS Transition Counselor. LRS Transition Counselors conduct outreach by hosting transition meetings at area high schools to provide information about VR services and to accept referrals. Information disseminated at these meetings includes agency brochures, client handbooks describing the VR processes/services, and referrals to other community resources students may need to access. Counselors work with the students, parents and educators to plan services needed for successful transition from school to work from the point that the student with a disability is identified. Counselors attend “Career Days” at the high schools to share information with transition students on available services that may identify career goals and to share information regarding services available to assist them in reaching their goals. (Page 173) Title II

Approximately three hundred and fifty (350) consumers could be referred for supported  employment services during each fiscal year. Once eligibility for supported employment services has been established, LRS continues to collaborate with OBH to ensure that services are provided in a timely manner and to assure the development of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). The IPE shall specify the responsibilities of all parties involved in the supported employment program for the individual and shall include reporting requirements for both agencies. (Page 174- 175) Title II

LRS has five Third Party Cooperative Arrangements (TPCAs) established with separate School Districts in Grant, Bossier, Evangeline, Orleans and Franklin Parishes as well as with Sci Academy and GW Carver. Through these TPCAs, a Transition Specialist provides workplace readiness training including self-advocacy, work-based learning experiences, and identification of employers who will host students for work-based learning. Bossier Parish Community College has a program called Program for Successful Employment (PSE) funded through a TPCA with LRS to provide job readiness to students with disabilities, work with employers to help find job placement and provide follow up. Virtual Academy of Lafourche has hired a transition specialist, through a TPCA, to provide workplace readiness training including self-advocacy, work-based learning experiences, and identification of employers who will host students for work-based learning. (Page 177) Title II

Some examples of collaborative efforts include Transition Core Team meetings held statewide attended by the DOE, the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities, Families Helping Families, and other interested individuals. These meetings are held to assist agencies who serve transition students as they exit from school to work. LRS has a Program Coordinator specializing in Assistive Technology who conducts in-service training annually to keep field staff members abreast of the most recent technology available to assist individuals with disabilities. Specialized training is provided to our staff members working with low-incident disabilities to include such training as orientation to deafness, mobility training, sign language coursework, deaf-blindness training, and graduate level training specific to working with low-incident populations (i.e. visual impairment/hearing impairment/significant cognitive impairment). (Page 188) Title II

Respondents from other components of the statewide workforce investment system were given survey links to complete the survey online. Needs identified by respondents included transportation; benefit planning; job coaching; postemployment services; transition from school to work; assistive technology devices/services; and job placement. The primary barriers identified by respondents included the lack of medical insurance/care; adjustment to disability; fear of losing government benefits; lack of public resources; lack of employer acceptance of an individual’s disability; and the lack of transportation.
Fifty percent of LRS employees responding noted that they are satisfied or very satisfied when working with the Business and Career Solution Centers (BCSC). Thirty-eight percent noted that they have not worked with a BCSC. Thirty nine percent used a BCSC in the last month to access/provide services to individuals with disabilities. Eighteen percent utilized the BCSC in the last three months. Seventy-four percent of staff are familiar with services available through their local BCSC. (Page 194) Title II

LRS shall provide for continuity of services once an otherwise eligible individual is selected for services and has begun to receive services under an IPE, irrespective of the severity of the individual’s disability. LRS will continue to provide needed VR services to all individuals with an existing Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). All services, including post-employment services, shall be available to individuals receiving services under an Order of Selection insofar as such services are necessary and appropriate to the individual's Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in order to ultimately place them in successful employment. All Agency policies and procedures governing the expenditure of funds, consumer financial participation, and use of comparable services and benefits are applicable to individuals receiving services under an Order of Selection. (Page 204) Title II

Louisiana Rehabilitation Services estimates that it will serve 13,843 individuals during fiscal year 2019 in the vocational rehabilitation program. This number includes approximately 9,260 cases that are expected to receive services under an IPE. The estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services is 1,283. The estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services is 1,609. In addition, approximately 5,300 students with disabilities will be served through the Pre-Employment Transition Services program. (Page 205) Title II

LRS continues to renew and revise existing local cooperative agreements, as applicable, with the 70 school districts and 146 Charter Schools in Louisiana. The LRS Transition Program Coordinator continues to collaborate and partner with DOE, OCDD, Work Incentive Planning Program, Office of Community Services, LWC, and the Office of Youth Development in an effort to network, share information and utilize comparable benefits to enhance VR services to transition students. The primary focus of LRS’ collaboration is to identify and address barriers (e.g. policies, eligibility process, resource allocation); assure effective service provision through the support of local interagency core teams, provide cross-agency training, outreach, engage in capacity building of young adults and family outreach efforts; provide continued support of innovative models and practices related to transition; and provide information and technical assistance. The Program Coordinator provides guidance and information to the Rehabilitation Counselors regarding specific transition issues. The Program Coordinator worked collaboratively with WINTAC’s Coordinator using conference calls, to discuss transition topics and provide information to LRS’ field offices. The Training Unit developed a School-to-Work Job Readiness curriculum and has trained staff to implement the curriculum with eligible students. Training will continue to be provided statewide. VR Counselors are encouraged to provide services at least once a month, when feasible, to students determined appropriate for job readiness training. (Page 214) Title II

Two Master Rehabilitation Counselor reviews were conducted by the Quality Assurance Unit during the 2017 review year. Each of the caseloads reviewed for promotion to Master Rehabilitation Counselor status exceeded the 90% compliance level required. Strategy 2. Explore opportunities for consumers to participate in Telework in order to increase employment outcomes. Progress: Telework employment options are considered for consumers when appropriate. Strategy 3. Identify and collaborate with employers to provide job development, Work-Based Learning Experiences and job placement. Progress: Through collaboration with the LRS Rehabilitation Employment Development Specialists (REDS) and local businesses throughout the state, 115 jobs were developed leading to successful job placements. Additionally, LRS vendors work with businesses throughout the year in developing jobs and placing consumers. Strategy 4. Increase Counselor presence in secondary education settings in order to improve provision of vocational rehabilitation services to transition students. (Page 216) Title II Progress: Pre-ETS counselors and REDS have identified employers and placed students with disabilities into Work-Based Learning Experiences. Strategy 6. Increase resources for assistive technology assessments and devices to improve employment outcomes. Progress: Two additional, out-of-state vendor/providers have been vetted, and added to provide rehabilitation driving assessments and training on a fee-for-service basis, to include vehicle modification specifications for LRS consumers. A contractual agreement to hire a Physical Therapist and Rehabilitation Engineer through LSU Health Sciences Department was negotiated and approved. These professionals will conduct seating and positioning assessments, wheelchair and personal mobility evaluations, home modifications for accessibility evaluations, job accommodations assessments, and other rehabilitation engineering field services as required. The state-approved list of assistive technology and rehabilitation technology providers/vendorshas been updated, and referral forms made available to the regional offices. (Page 217) Title II

Strategy 1. Perform comprehensive statewide needs assessment to determine needs of students with disabilities. Progress: The needs assessment is scheduled to be conducted in calendar year 2017 for submission in the State Plan submitted in 2018. Strategy 2. Expand outreach to students with disabilities to make them aware of VR services including Pre-ETS.
Progress: Pre-ETS counselors throughout the state attend IEP meeting, career fairs, and other school functions to make them aware of LRS services. Strategy 3 Monitor the provision of Pre-ETS services to determine effectiveness and possible improvement to service delivery process. Progress: Pre-ETS counselors monitor vendor activities in the schools to ensure delivery of appropriate services and determine any improvements needed. Objective C. Increase the number of Randolph-Sheppard Managers earning at least $25,000 annually by expanding opportunities and enhancing consumer service delivery in the RandolphSheppard Program. . (Page 219) Title II

Career Pathways

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Apprenticeship

The Local Boards are responsible for developing local plans for the governor’s approval, designating local One-Stop operators, designating eligible partners of training services, negotiating local performance measures with the state workforce board and the governor, monitoring local system performance against established performance measures, and helping to develop the labor market information system for local areas. Local Boards will facilitate relationships between Partner Programs, local entities, and supportive service agencies for a strengthened service delivery in regard to provision of services to youth. These relationships will include, as a minimum, procedures for youth participant co-enrollment and common intake as necessary to integrate: intake, case management, and reporting. This shall be the case for all Partner Programs under which youth may be served. Youth services shall begin with a systematic approach to gathering information about strengths and assets, need and challenges, and interests and goals. These assessments shall be used to determining program eligibility, and subsequently guide the development of individualized plans and all other Case Management activities. Youth shall be co-enrolled as necessary in any programs under WIOA funding sources and any Partner Program that is not WIOA funded, e.g., Adult Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Children and Family Services that is necessary based on their needs assessment. Youth will be simultaneously co-enrolled in any and all programs under which they are eligible for, and receiving, services. This will prevent youth having to wait until they exit one program in order to access services offered by other programs, and allow them to receive the best combination of services from different funding streams. For any program year, LWDBs must spend not less than 75 percent of local workforce development area funds to provide direct services to out-of-school youth. For any program year, LWDBs must spend not less than 20 percent of the funds allocated to the local area to provide in school youth and out of school youth with work experiences such as summer employment, pre-apprenticeship, internship, job shadowing, and on-the-job training. Local boards shall ensure that parents, participants, and other members of the community with experience relating to the programs for youth are involved in its design and implementation. One-Stop operators shall carry out programs that: • Provide an assessment of academic levels, skill levels and occupational skills, any prior work experience, employability, interests and aptitudes. (Pages 111-112) Title II

Work-eligible recipients shall participate in appropriate work activities as agreed upon in the Family Success Agreement. Work-eligible is defined as families containing an adult under sixty years of age, or teen head of household, that is not disabled, incapacitated, or caring for a family member who is disabled or incapacitated as documented by a medical expert to which the status of disability is clearly established and explained. Work-eligible excludes cases in which only the child portion of need that is unrelated to a sanction or penalty, known as a child-only case, is considered in determining eligibility. The work activities may include but are not limited to: Unsubsidized employment, Subsidized employment, Unpaid work experience, On-the-job training, Job search/job readiness, Vocational education, Satisfactory attendance at secondary school or in course of study leading to a certificate of general equivalence, in the case of recipients who have not completed secondary schools or received a certificate, Education directly related to employment, in the case of a recipient who has not received a high school diploma or certificate of equivalency, Job skills training directly related to employment, community service, and The provision of child care to an individual who is participating in community service. Participants, who are found not to possess basic workplace or basic literacy skills, as determined by an assessment, shall combine employment and job readiness and job search activities with activities designed to increase their basic and workplace literacy skills. (Page 242) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

The state integrated One-Stop Center operations under the Workforce Investment Act several years ago. Within the past two years, stand-alone Wagner-Peyser offices have been eliminated. Each of Louisiana’s fifteen Workforce Development areas has established at least one Comprehensive Center that has been certified by its respective board as meeting the criteria to be branded as an American Job Center. Smaller offices operated by local boards and/or One-Stop operators (contractors) where all Program Partners are not present, shall be designated and operated as “Affiliate” One-Stop centers and may have any subset of partners, but shall not be operated as Wagner Peyser stand-alone Employment Services offices. Under the plan, local boards will have the flexibility to include additional partners in One-Stop Centers, in particular and specifically identified by the law: • Employment and training programs administered by the Social Security Administration, including the Ticket to Work and the Self-Sufficiency Program. • Employment and training programs carried out by the Small Business Administration. • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) employment and training programs. • Other programs authorized under the National and Community Service Act of 1990. (Page 48) Title I Ticket-to-Work: LRS continues to network and collaborate with MAXIMUS, as well as many other agencies in the state, to ensure Ticket-to-Work is successful in Louisiana. LRS continues to maintain a statewide 1-800 Ticket Hotline number for individuals interested in learning more about their Ticket and how LRS would be able to assist them. In FY 2017, LRS received $1,163,021.25; this amount was a slight decrease from FY 2016’s $1,488,446.32 which was received from the Social Security Administration’s (SSAs) reimbursement program. The Program Coordinator continues to work closely with SSA to insure all documentation is submitted properly so that claims can be processed. (Page 226) Title II

 

Employer / Business Engagement

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability or implementation.  (Page 196, 267)

Data Collection

Programmatic/Fiscal Onsite Monitoring: Programs are identified for onsite monitoring through a comprehensive risk analysis based on the following factors: (1) desk monitoring; (2) need to verify data quality and program expenditures; (3) consistent low performance on NRS indicators in several categories; (4) prospective noncompliance with grant requirements identified through review of programmatic and fiscal reports, or ongoing communications with the program; (4) unresolved audit findings; (5) ongoing lack of progress in resolving required actions from prior monitoring visit; (6) significant staff turnover in the program; and (7) recent or newly established programs. The goals for State onsite monitoring visits are to: • ensure that programs meet AEFLA requirements; • improve the quality of federally-funded activities; • provide assistance identifying and resolving accountability problems; and, • ensure the accuracy, validity, and reliability of data collection and data reporting as well as policies and procedures for program accountability. (Page 76) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation: Louisiana Rehabilitation Services (LRS) will monitor the services provided within the guidelines of the existing corporative agreements and evaluate if modifications will be needed when they are renegotiated. LRS will monitor vendors to ensure the quality of supported employment services provided to eligible consumers. The monitoring will utilize site reviews and include quality indicators to evaluate the assessment of employment outcomes and an evaluation of the provision of services. The monitoring will be carried out by the state and field office staff. (Page 76) Title I 

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Recognizing the high unemployment rate among individuals with disabilities and the qualifiedemployee shortage businesses are facing, the Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) is committed to providing reasonable accommodations and access to all programs, services and facilities. Each One-Stop Career Center should utilize the one-stop disability access checklist provided by the United States Department of Labor to self-evaluate its current level of accessibility. With support of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant (2012 -2015), LWC worked to ensure the physical, communication and programmatic accessibility of all One-Stop Career Centers by conducting specialized training for all center staff on topics including accessibility for all, disability etiquette and awareness, and identifying and assisting job-seekers with hidden disabilities. LWC will continue to maintain these investments in staff training and technology to make certain One- Stop Career Center staff serve adult job-seekers with disabilities effectively. (Page 88) Title I Disseminate information on effective outreach to, partnerships with, and services for, businesses • Disseminate information on effective service delivery strategies to serve workers and job seekers • Disseminate performance information and information on the cost of attendance including tuition and fees, for participants in applicable training programs on the Eligible Training Provider’s List (ETPL) with recognized post- secondary credentials, as well as OJT and IWTP • Disseminate information on physical and programmatic accessibility, in accordance with sec. 188 of WIOA relative to nondiscrimination, if applicable, and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 for individuals with disabilities.

• Conduct evaluations of State Programs, in coordination with evaluations of programs and activities carried out by the U.S. Secretary of Labor • Disseminate a list of providers of youth workforce investment activities eligible to receive competitive, or sole source, grants and contracts for training with credentials for youth • Provide re-designation assistance to local areas • Provide assistance in the development of Regional Plans * Operate a fiscal and management accountability information system (MIS) to manage, track, and report primary indicators of performance for Youth, Adult, and Dislocated Worker Programs • Conduct continuous, and at least annually, monitoring and oversight of activities carried out by sub-recipients of WIOA funding to conform to the Uniform Administrative Requirements (UAR) • Provide additional assistance to local areas that have high concentrations of eligible youth (Page 100) Title I 

 

Veterans

Jobs For Veterans State Grant (JVSG) STRENGTHS Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist are providing individualized career services to 99% of the Veterans they provide services to. Despite serving only veterans with Significant Barriers, DVOPs have achieved an Entered Employment Rate (EER) of 66%. Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are integrated in to the Business Services Teams within their assigned workforce regions. LVERs conduct employer outreach with and as a part of regional business services teams. OPPORTUNITIES Incorporate the service delivery strategy utilized by DVOPs in to the OneStop Centers statewide. Currently the EER for all Veterans receiving services statewide is 51%. Large opportunity for improvement. LVERs could be more involved in employer engagement centered on assisting employers to develop and start registered apprenticeship programs and Onthe-job training programs. These efforts could provide more opportunities for Veterans to learn while they work. (Page 33) Title 1

The LVER responsibilities are specifically targeted to promote the advantages of hiring veterans to employers, employer associations and business groups. LVER roles and responsibilities are consistent with 38 U.S.C. § 4104, VPL 07—10 and VPL 03—14. As such, the LVER serves an important role in the state’s Business Services Delivery Model. In coordination with the other members of the business services team, the LVER advocates for employment and training opportunities through outreach to employers, training facilities, unions, apprenticeship programs and private and government businesses. The LVER also participates in job fairs, promotes programs that offer licensing and credentialing opportunities and develops and makes presentations to employers. Each LVER must provide a monthly report to the state veterans coordinator detailing their outreach activities. LVER Staff members conduct outreach to perform the following activities: • Conducting employer outreach; • In conjunction with employers, conducting job searches and workshops and establishing job search groups; • Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; • Informing federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans; • Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and • Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. (267-268) Title II To maximize the impact of the streamlined LVER staff, the state takes a top—down, cooperative approach to employer outreach. LVER staff shall coordinate with their business service team partners, and other state agencies or programs such as Louisiana Rehabilitative Services (LRS), to conduct outreach to employer associations at the state and regional level. In this way the maximum number of employers can be efficiently and effectively incorporated into the promotion of hiring of veterans. This outreach will educate employers on the advantages of hiring veterans, and inform employers on how to find qualified veteran applicants by leveraging the State workforce system and OSCCs. The state intends to increase veteran employment by making a sound business case to employers regarding the advantage of hiring veterans and providing employer’s tools and contacts to do so effectively. (Page 268) Title IV

 

Behavioral / Mental Health

10. The eligible provider’s collaboration with other available education, training and social service resources in the community. Particularly, the eligible provider should have, or have the means to establish, meaningful partnerships with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, One-Stop Centers, job training programs and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries for the development of career pathways. 11. The flexibility of program scheduling offered by the eligible provider, including coordination (when available) with federal, state and local support services such as child care, transportation, mental health services and career planning. 12. The eligible provider’s management information system; the expectation will be that the eligible provider will use the state-administered designated MIS for all grant related data collection and reporting. (Page 149) Title II

LRS staff members take advantage of training opportunities provided through webinars and teleconferences as well as on-site training. Numerous types of training and support continue to be provided and/or coordinated by State Office Program staff members to support the field staff. Such Training for PY 2017 included PEPNET, Travel Training, TBI Conference, Deaf Counselor Training, Ethics Symposium at Southern University, AWARE, Case Management, CATS, Share Point, Pre-ETS, Regional Manager and District Supervisor training. Additionally, the agency has specific monthly in-service training requirements (4 hours per month), which are conducted by the regional field offices to ensure continuous education for all professional and paraprofessional staff members. This training is provided by experienced staff members or by knowledgeable community providers who specialize in the area of training required. Rehabilitation Counselor Associates (RCAs) are required to attend all in-service training with the Rehabilitation Counselors and also attend separate training as needed. Examples of training topics include assessment, guidance and vocational counseling, eligibility, planning, disability related issues, assistive technology, disability services at colleges and universities, ethics, community-based employment outcomes, mental health, and employment related issues. (Page 185) Title II

Upon reviewing survey information of individuals receiving SSI/SSDI, the top needs identified by respondents included job placement (46%); job coaching (30%); benefits planning (30%); transportation (29%); job readiness skills (28%); and vocational guidance and career counseling (27%). They identified barriers to employment as being the fear of losing their government benefits (52%), lack of employer acceptance of their disability (44%), adjustment to disability (32%); lack of transportation (38%); lack of public services (36%); the slow job market (36%); and lack of medical insurance (27%). Respondents receiving supported employment services identified the following as needs not being met, job placement (23%); training/tuition assistance (21%); transportation (21%); room & board (15%); mental health counseling (14%); post-employment services (14%); benefits planning (13%); and equipment for work (13%). The barriers to employment identified by respondents receiving supported employment services included the fear of losing government benefits (40%); lack of transportation (39%); employer acceptance of their disability (36%); their personal adjustment to the disability (29%); lack of public resources (29%); the slow job market (21%); and the lack of medical insurance/care (20%). (Page 193) Title II

To assist Louisiana families in becoming economically self-reliant so that their dependence on government benefits for basic needs is minimized, the department implemented the STEP program so that cash assistance recipients, with certain exceptions, are actively engaged in meaningful activities designed to enable their transition from cash assistance to self-reliance. It is further intended that cash assistance recipients demonstrate active and diligent personal responsibility in achieving self-reliance through employment and increased workplace literacy. All appropriate state agencies responsible for employment, training, and educating Louisiana’s citizens are expected to cooperate in the pursuit of this goal. Once an applicant is certified for eligibility, a comprehensive assessment will be conducted and include workplace literacy, basic skills and educational attainment, interests and aptitude related to employment, barriers to employment, need for education, supportive services such as child care and transportation, and other supportive services. Specialized assessments can occur for issues that arise after an initial assessment has been completed and could include substance abuse, domestic violence, mental health screening, or others as determined by the department. (Page 240) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Through policy, LWC has refined the state’s response to the U.S. Labor Department mandate that the workforce development system become a seamless, integrated system. Prior to implementation, One-Stop Center operations used a rigid customer flow and team model. This new policy establishes a revision and refocusing effort to drive clients to the “right door” because of the state’s need to respond to a decrease in funding and environmental as well as socio-economic changes. Goals are as follows: • Change the lock-step process and team approach in providing job-seeker and employer services to a more flexible process (or roadmap) that allows quick response to changes in the labor market and workforce needs. • Add flexibility to the delivery of training services by simplifying the process for identifying qualified candidates. • Create a process that recognizes the ever-changing funding environment associated with federal mandates and grants, so that it provides necessary flexibility to respond to specific grant and funding mandates of U.S. Department of Labor programs regarding unemployment insurance benefits (UI), workforce participation, veteran’s services and National Emergency Grants. • Support the state’s redesign of its business engagement Process in a way that optimizes agency response to in-demand industry needs in hiring, retaining, training and advancement of workers. • Anticipate the ongoing need for creating contingency plans to support economic growth in targeted industry sectors, and developing improved relationships with local and state economic development entities with the goal of pre-empting shortfalls in a skilled workforce. • Address the need to reintegrate specific UI recipient related functions into the job-seeker process in order to shorten the return-to-work time for individuals receiving unemployment insurance benefits. (Page 57) Title I 

 

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

SNAP - Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs) - 04/01/2020

“A new federal rule that takes effect April 1, 2020, will require some Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to meet federal work requirements to continue receiving federal food assistance, commonly known as "food stamps."

SNAP recipients who are classified as an Able-Bodied Adult Without Dependents (ABAWD) - that is, recipients who are age 18 to 49, do not have a child living with them and are considered able to work - can receive benefits for only three months in a 36-month period unless they meet the federal ABAWD work requirement or qualify for an exemption (or exception). This rule, known as the SNAP Time Limit, is established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). For Louisiana SNAP recipients, the rule would cover the period of April 2020 through March 2023.

FNS has granted a waiver of the SNAP Time Limit rule for 14 parishes with higher unemployment rates. Those parishes are Assumption, Catahoula, Concordia, East Carroll, Franklin, Madison, Morehouse, Richland, St. Landry, St. Mary, Tensas, Vernon, West Carroll and Winn.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Community Choices Waiver - 02/20/2020

“The Louisiana Community Choices Waiver (CCW) is a program for elderly and / or disabled Louisiana residents. This program, which replaced the Elderly and Disabled Adult Waiver, provides a wide range of services and support to assist elderly state residents in maintaining their independence. In other words, it helps to prevent institutionalization in nursing homes by providing support at home, in assisted living facilities, and in adult foster care homes.

In addition to in-home support services, this waiver offers a unique benefit called Monitored In-Home Caregiving (MIHC), which can loosely be compared to adult foster care. Under MIHC, a family member or friend can move in to the care recipient's home and get paid to provide care. The alternative option exists as well, where the elderly individual moves into a friend or younger family member's home (such as his/her adult child) and that individual receives compensation for providing care. Even spouses can be compensated for providing care under MIHC. However, it’s important to note that the caregiver must adhere to the rules set forth by the Department of Health and Hospitals (DHH) and be approved as a MIHC service provider.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Louisiana Statewide Transition Plan for Compliance with the CMS Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule - 02/01/2020

“The following represents the Louisiana Work Plan. The purpose of this plan is to guide the development and implementation of a Transition Plan to: 1) provide for a robust input and engagement process for consumers and stakeholders; 2) identify areas of non-compliance; 3) seek intervention strategies to comply with the new setting requirements ; 4) implement strategies to maintain continuous compliance; and 5) ensure quality components are designed into each phase of the Transition Plan to ensure continued compliance.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Southwest Louisiana Area Health Education Center (SWLAHEC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, young adults (26–35 year olds), agriculture community workers, manufacturing community workers, trade community workers, finance community workers, education and healthcare community workers, job service community workers, entertainment industry employees, African-American communities, and Asian communities.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Central LA Area Health Education Center (CLAHEC).  They will partner with the Louisiana Dept. of Insurance,  Louisiana Enrollment Partnership Coalition, Faith-based groups, Hospitals, clinics, and social service agencies, State and local elected officials, Louisiana Primary Care Association (LPCA), and the Louisiana Workforce Commission. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Brian BurtonPhone: (337) 989-0001Email: interventions@swlahec.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Strategic Plan Fiscal Year July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2025 - 07/01/2019

~~“The Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) is an aggressive advocate for a trained, viable workforce and is committed to employment strategies for Louisiana residents that respond to business and industry’s workforce demands. LWC is dedicated to working closely with employers, employees, and job seekers to meet their employment and training needs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Louisiana Developmental Disability Council Report - 06/30/2019

~~“On  January  25,  2019,  the  Medicaid  Extenders  Act  of  2019,  a  bill  that  includes short-term  funding  for  the  Money  Follows  the  Person  program,  became  law. Participants can now transition through MFP through CY  2019, which was extended from December 31, 2018.  On February 28, 2019, Congress introduced two reauthorization bills, H.R.1342 and S.548, through the Empower Care Act to extend  the  MFP  program  for  five  additional  years. They  are  still  pending Congressional action.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LA HB199 - 06/20/2019

~~“AN ACT To enact Part III of Chapter 8 of Title 46 of the Louisiana Revised Statutes of 1950, to be comprised of R.S. 46:977.21 through 977.25, relative to services for children provided through the medical assistance program of this state known commonly as Medicaid; to provide for duties and responsibilities of the Louisiana Department of Health in administering the Medicaid program; to provide legislative findings relative to Medicaid waiver programs; to establish and provide for a demonstration waiver program to serve certain children with disabilities; to require development and submission of an application for program approval to the federal Medicaid agency; to provide for definitions; to provide for promulgation of rules; and to provide for related matter.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Individualized Education Program (IEP) - 06/11/2019

~~“Some students with disabilities ages 3-21 may require special education and related services to meet their unique needs and to support them in attaining both their short and long term educational goals.  These services are governed by federal legislation via the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004)."

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Update: Louisiana Department of Health eliminates waiting list for those with developmental disabilities - 04/30/2019

~~“Nearly a year after eliminating its 25-year-old waiting list for specialized services, the Louisiana Department of Health’s Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities is receiving positive feedback from those served by the Tiered Waiver plan.Tiered Waiver prioritizes individuals with a greater urgency of need for receiving the most appropriate home and community-based services, rather than the Office’s prior approach of offering services on a first-come, first-served basis.Julie Foster Hagan, assistant secretary of the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities, said more than 12,000 people have received a Screening for Urgency of Need (SUN), using a nationally accepted best practice model, to determine the urgency of their need for waiver services. There are five levels of need, or tiers:• 4-Emergent: Supports will be needed in the next 90 days.• 3-Urgent: Supports will be needed in the next 3-12 months.• 2-Critical: Supports will be needed in the next 1-2 years.• 1-Planning: Supports will be needed in the next 3-5 years.• 0-Currently no unmet needs."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

LA HB199 - 06/20/2019

~~“AN ACT To enact Part III of Chapter 8 of Title 46 of the Louisiana Revised Statutes of 1950, to be comprised of R.S. 46:977.21 through 977.25, relative to services for children provided through the medical assistance program of this state known commonly as Medicaid; to provide for duties and responsibilities of the Louisiana Department of Health in administering the Medicaid program; to provide legislative findings relative to Medicaid waiver programs; to establish and provide for a demonstration waiver program to serve certain children with disabilities; to require development and submission of an application for program approval to the federal Medicaid agency; to provide for definitions; to provide for promulgation of rules; and to provide for related matter.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Louisiana House Bill No. 598 - 06/11/2015

“…The ABLE Account Program is hereby created and shall be administered by the ABLE Account Authority, refereed to hereafter as “the authority” to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting persons with disabilities in endeavors to maintain health, independence, and quality of life…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana House Bill 508

To enact RS. 47:297.13, relative to income taxation; to provide relative to individual and corporation income tax deductions; to authorize an income tax deduction for taxpayers w employ certain qualified disabled individuals; to provide for certain definitions; to provide for certain requirements and limitations; to provide for an effective date; and to provide for related matters.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

2018 Louisiana Employment First Report - 01/04/2019

~~“With the urging of advocacy groups, and under the leadership of the Governor’s Advisory Council on Disability Affairs, an Employment First Workgroup was formed in January2017, with the responsibility of developing a report to the Governor with recommendations for moving forward on a cross-disability Employment First effort. This report is an important step in moving this policy forward and expanding the scope of Louisiana’s employment first policy beyond individuals with developmental disabilities. 

This report summarizes a set of comprehensive recommendations that will advance Louisiana’s Employment First goals. This report also highlights specific initiatives undertaken since June 2017 and proposed work for the coming year”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 19-08 State as Model Employer Task Force - 03/19/2018

“WHEREAS,  the State of Louisiana is committed to developing and maintaining a high performing public workforce that provides access, meaningful services, and improved outcomes for all citizens and reflects the rich diversity of the citizens of this great state. In order to achieve this goal, state leaders must be able to apply diverse perspectives and experiences to the development of responsive solutions to the issues facing the state. Such diversity enhances the fullness of our understanding of these issues and opens opportunities for the consideration of new and better solutions;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, JOHN BEL EDWARDS, Governor of the state of Louisiana, by virtue of he power vested in me by the Constitution and statutes of the state of Louisiana do, effective immediately, hereby order and direct as follows:

SECTION 1:  The State as a Model Employer Task Force (hereafter “Task Force”) is hereby established within the executive department, Office of the Governor, Office of Disability Affairs…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

Gov. Edwards Proclaims October ‘Disability Employment Awareness Month’ - 10/09/2017

“Gov. John Bel Edwards proclaimed October as ‘Disability Employment Awareness Month in Louisiana. In collaboration with Louisiana Workforce Commission and Families Helping Families, the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs will be traveling the state on an Employment First Tour, beginning October 10 in Lafayette. This is an opportunity for the office to host roundtable discussions regarding the integrated, competitive employment for people with disabilities.

 

Disability Employment Awareness Month is a great way to emphasize the importance of the contributions of persons with disabilities in moving Louisiana forward,” said Gov. Edwards. “Our businesses and communities can greatly benefit from the integrated, competitive employment of persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order No. JBE 16-45: Louisiana Rehabilitation Council - 08/04/2016

“Whereas, the State Rehabilitation Council was originally established by executive order to provide Louisiana’s citizens with disabilities assistance in their pursuit of meaningful careers and gainful employment through specific programs.

Preparing and submitting an annual report to the governor and the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Service Administration, Washington, D.C., on the status of vocational rehabilitation programs operating within the state, and making the report available to the public.

Providing for coordination and the establishment of working relationships between Louisiana Rehabilitation Services, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Centers for Independent Living within the state”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Data Sharing

Executive Order No. JBE 2016-11: Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination - 04/13/2016

“No state agencies, departments, offices, commissions, boards, entities or officers of the State of Louisiana shall harass or discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, political affiliation, disability, or age against any individual in the provision of any service and/or benefit by such agencies, departments, offices, commissions, boards or entities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

SNAP - Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs) - 04/01/2020

“A new federal rule that takes effect April 1, 2020, will require some Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to meet federal work requirements to continue receiving federal food assistance, commonly known as "food stamps."

SNAP recipients who are classified as an Able-Bodied Adult Without Dependents (ABAWD) - that is, recipients who are age 18 to 49, do not have a child living with them and are considered able to work - can receive benefits for only three months in a 36-month period unless they meet the federal ABAWD work requirement or qualify for an exemption (or exception). This rule, known as the SNAP Time Limit, is established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). For Louisiana SNAP recipients, the rule would cover the period of April 2020 through March 2023.

FNS has granted a waiver of the SNAP Time Limit rule for 14 parishes with higher unemployment rates. Those parishes are Assumption, Catahoula, Concordia, East Carroll, Franklin, Madison, Morehouse, Richland, St. Landry, St. Mary, Tensas, Vernon, West Carroll and Winn.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Strategic Plan Fiscal Year July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2025 - 07/01/2019

~~“The Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) is an aggressive advocate for a trained, viable workforce and is committed to employment strategies for Louisiana residents that respond to business and industry’s workforce demands. LWC is dedicated to working closely with employers, employees, and job seekers to meet their employment and training needs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Individualized Education Program (IEP) - 06/11/2019

~~“Some students with disabilities ages 3-21 may require special education and related services to meet their unique needs and to support them in attaining both their short and long term educational goals.  These services are governed by federal legislation via the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004)."

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment & Vocational Training - 04/01/2019

~~“Our Veterans Assistance Counselors help veterans and their families receive benefits for which they qualify. General eligibility requirements include military service and Louisiana state residency. Specific programs may have additional requirements. Spouses and dependents of deceased veterans who meet eligibility requirements may also be eligible for certain programs and services.”

Systems
  • Other

Employment Advocacy Initiatives - 05/09/2018

“The Council supports a policy of “Employment First” in which employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. The Council advocates for:

Policies that incentivize services for individualized integrated, competitive employment and dis-incentivize segregated, sheltered day habilitation services, Sheltered workshops to transition people into individualized, competitive, paid employment and discontinue admissions into segregated day programs, Improvements in the employment provider system with evidence-based practice, collaborative cross-agency infrastructure and training and technical assistance, and The Louisiana Rehabilitation Services’ (Vocational Rehabilitation [VR] program) federal draw down will increase and eventually include the entire federal VR grant award.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

“LOUISIANA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION POSTS DRAFT ESSA PLAN FOR PUBLIC COMMENT” - 02/20/2017

~~“ESSA's provisions become effective July 1, 2017. Per the law, the United States Secretary of Education must approve or deny a plan within 120 days of a state submitting its plan to the U.S. Department of Education. Because completion of the plan prior to the start of the school year in which it becomes effective is critically important for Louisiana administrators, educators and parents, Louisiana commenced public development of its plan more than a year in advance of the law taking effect.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Louisiana Awarded $2 Million to Improve Career Education” - 01/11/2017

~~“The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and JPMorgan Chase & Co. on Wednesday announced Louisiana is one of 10 states to receive a three-year, $2 million grant through phase two of the New Skills for Youth (NSFY) grant opportunity to strengthen and expand career-education pathways for students.

 "This New Skills for Youth grant will provide tremendous support for our state's high school teachers and students in accessing high-quality workforce training, particularly in rural school districts and in support of our students with disabilities," said Gov. John Bel Edwards. "I'm confident that Louisiana's team of state and local education, economic development and workforce partners will make excellent use of these funds to dramatically improve the number of our young citizens prepared for college, career and life success."

 The phase two grant funds will be used to expand Jump Start, the state's innovative career and technical education program, said State Superintendent of Education John White. "These funds will allow our state to build upon Jump Start's strong foundation, expanding opportunities and resources that enable our students to earn the industry credentials they need to attain employment in Louisiana's most important industries."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“THE HEART OF ESSA: REFLECT ON RESULTS, PLAN AND PRIORITIZE, AND FUND PRIORITIES” - 01/09/2017

~~“Career education access: Louisiana developed a career education initiative, Jump Start, as well as a diverse course delivery program known as Course Choice. Using funds won through the New Skills for Youth grant, Louisiana conducted an inventory of every pathway offered in every high school in the state. Further grant funding will in part go toward bolstering connections among employers, higher education, and high schools. Students with disabilities eligible to pursue a high school diploma via an alternate pathway may also select a Jump Start pathway to earn a career diploma and a recognized workforce credential. All Jump Start pathways are accessible to these students, with the student’s IEP team setting alternate exit and performance criteria.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Governor’s Advisory Council on Disability Affairs (GACDA) Annual Report 2017 - 01/01/2017

“The Governor’s Advisory Council on Disabilities Affairs (GACDA) was established by Governor John Bel Edwards through Executive Order NO. JBE 2016-10 on April 7, 2016 to monitor state compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and to advise the governor on the needs of individuals with disabilities in Louisiana. GACDA is also charged with assisting the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs with the resolution of state disability issues and provide education, communication, and networking services concerning disability issues and needs for all Louisiana citizens. GACDA is composed of 31 members appointed by governor Edwards. Support staff, facilities and resources for GACDA are provided by the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs within the Governor’s Office of Programs and Planning.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana’s “Every Student Succeeds Act” (ESSA) Framework - 09/28/2016

“Long-term indicators: To foster a better understanding of how skills taught in schools translate to life after high school, Louisiana will provide to schools and school systems an annual series of reports on the postsecondary success and economic productivity of their graduates as a group. These reports will provide local communities and educators with aggregated data regarding the measurable life outcomes experienced by recent graduates, including income, employment, and education attainment information

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

First-of-its kind workforce collaboration in Louisiana - 10/19/2017

“South Louisiana Community College, the board of directors for Local Workforce Development Board #40, and area parish presidents in Acadiana are partnering to improve workforce development in the region. The collaboration – a first for a community college in Louisiana – falls under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) enacted in 2014.

“The Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act puts great emphasis on the out-of-school youth, collaborations with re-entry and adult education partners, individuals with disabilities, in addition to the unemployed and underemployed populations. The board of LWDB #40 is confident that SLCC will be successful in coordinating the alignment of services among the One-Stop partners that will promote and increase successful outcomes to both the individual and the employer. Special gratitude to the parish presidents, Louisiana Workforce Commission Office of Workforce Development, LWDB #40 board of directors, One-Stop Committee members, attorney, CPA, partners and most importantly, the dedicated team of SLPG/LWDB #40 for continuous improvement of our Workforce Development programs,” said Brenda Hubbard-Thomas, LWDB #40 WIOA Executive Director.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Workgroup - 02/17/2017

~~“The first meeting of the Employment First Workgroup was held Thursday, February 16. The Workgroup is comprised of federal, state, regional and local agency stakeholders as well as community advocates, other professionals, business leaders, families, and individuals with disabilities to address barriers to employment and improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. During the meeting, members of the workgroup shared information and perspectives related to education, individuals and families, developmental disabilities, and services for people with disabilities. Attendees also shared their experiences regarding seeking employment and applying to receive services.The workgroup will meet monthly and will report its work by June 30, 2017. The next meeting will take place on March 23, 2017 at 10 a.m. at the Louisiana State Capitol on the 4th floor. The meeting will be open and all interested parties are encouraged to participate.” 

Systems
  • Other

Louisiana's Demand-Driven Workforce Investment Plan - 07/01/2012

Vocational Rehabilitation

“As a mandated partner in the Workforce Investment Act, the Vocational Rehabilitation Program is instrumental in meeting the workforce needs of individuals with disabilities in the state of Louisiana. The purpose of the VR Program is, in part, ‘to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society.’ The VR Program operates a statewide comprehensive program to assess, plan, develop and provide vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities, ‘consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice, so that such individuals may prepare for and engage in gainful employment.’”

 

W-P Section 8(b) 20 CFR 652.211

“The state has designated at least one person in each state or Federal employment office to promote and develop employment opportunities, job counseling, and placement for individuals with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Workforce Commission.

“LRS continues to collaborate with LWC in identifying effective ways to integrate services in BCSCs [Business and Career Solution Centers]. LRS is represented on each of the LWIBs and attends meetings as scheduled. The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) established with each of the WIBs is updated annually. Within the 18 WIAs, 63 BCSCs have been established, 18 cost allocation plans have been completed by the WIBs and approved by all parties. LRS continues to pay expenses to the local centers for participation, as per the local cost allocation plans.”

“LWC is working with the Shared Youth Vision workgroup on youth, local workforce boards, youth councils, and community-based organizations to continue development of the systems needed to provide these comprehensive services to eligible youth, including coordination with Job Corps and other youth programs within each local workforce investment area. Vocational rehabilitation is involved in the development of these service strategies to ensure that youth with disabilities or other barriers to employment are included in the comprehensive service strategy.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Louisiana FY 2011 Block Grant State Plan

The Office of Behavioral Health (OBH) is a member of the WORK PAY$ committee. “This committee is comprised of community partners and is intended to further the employment of individuals with disabilities in the state of Louisiana. OBH is also working as a collaborative partner on both a state and regional level in the development and implementation of job fairs for individuals with disabilities throughout the state.”

“The Louisiana Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (LAWIPA) program helps Social Security beneficiaries work through issues relating to social security benefits and employment. The program is a coalition between the Advocacy Center of Louisiana and the LSU Health Sciences Center’s Human Development Center. Many individuals with disabilities who receive SSDI and/ or SSI benefits want to work or increase their work activity. One barrier for these individuals is the fear of losing health care and other benefits if they work. Valuable work incentive programs can extend benefits, but are often poorly understood and underutilized. The LAWIPA coalition educates clients and assists them in overcoming work barriers, perceived or real; and also focuses on improved community partnerships. Benefit specialists, called Community Work Incentive Coordinators, provide services to all Louisiana SSDI and SSI beneficiaries age 14 and older who have disabilities. CMHC staff and clients are able to work with Coordinators to help navigate the various work related resources (as offered in conjunction with the Ticket to Work program), and identify on an individualized basis the way their benefits will be impacted by going to work. The ultimate goal of the new WIPA coalition is to support the successful employment of beneficiaries with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Office of Behavioral Health receives grant to help people with serious mental illness find jobs - 01/04/2019

~~“The United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy selected Louisiana as a grant recipient through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. The Provider Visionary Opportunities to Increase Competitive Employment (VOICE) grant provides the Office of Behavioral Health with 100 hours of training and technical assistance needed to help people in the target population find meaningful jobs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Louisiana Selected as Vision Quest State - 11/02/2017

“Louisiana is one of eight states selected to receive Training and Technical Assistance

as a Vision Quest State for the 2018 fiscal year under the United States Department

of Labor's, Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) Employment First State

Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). This award is the result of a year-long

effort by the Governor's Office of Disability Affairs working in collaboration with

stakeholders. Vision Quest States are eligible to receive up to 100 hours of technical

assistance to support the state in achieving its goals as an EFSLMP state.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Medicaid Balancing Incentive Program - 02/08/2013

“Since 2001, the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals has been engaged in focused, comprehensive system transformation of the long-term care system. These reform efforts have included stakeholder input at all levels and have resulted in changes in laws and regulations, service delivery, and funding priorities. In transforming the long-term care system, the state has committed to rebalancing the service system in order to provide choice between institutional and home and community-based services. The State has been working toward rebalancing its long-term care system by eliminating barriers that prevent or restrict the flexible use of Medicaid funds, increasing the ability of the Medicaid program to assure continued provision of services to people who transition from institutions by consistently increasing funding and slot allocation, improving service menus and rate structures to meet needs, and by ensuring procedures are in place for quality assurance and continuous improvement in services by consolidating licensing authority and improving IT systems tracking critical incidents.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Louisiana Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2012

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2014 Louisiana was awarded a Round 3 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The grant ended in 2015.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Data Sharing

Louisiana Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The… program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Southwest Louisiana Area Health Education Center (SWLAHEC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, young adults (26–35 year olds), agriculture community workers, manufacturing community workers, trade community workers, finance community workers, education and healthcare community workers, job service community workers, entertainment industry employees, African-American communities, and Asian communities.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Central LA Area Health Education Center (CLAHEC).  They will partner with the Louisiana Dept. of Insurance,  Louisiana Enrollment Partnership Coalition, Faith-based groups, Hospitals, clinics, and social service agencies, State and local elected officials, Louisiana Primary Care Association (LPCA), and the Louisiana Workforce Commission. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Brian BurtonPhone: (337) 989-0001Email: interventions@swlahec.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Yellow Shirt Days - 04/01/2019

~~“On these days, key policies or issues affecting individuals with developmental disabilities are being discussed.  Members gather to create a presence, reminding policymakers of the issues that concern people with disabilities.  These days also afford opportunities for LaCAN members to speak briefly with legislators in the committee hallways.”

Systems
  • Other

OCDD Resource Center - 01/25/2019

~~“The vision of the OCDD Resource Center is to partner with community providers and professionals to offer quality supports and to build a natural community support network for individuals with complex needs, life threatening conditions, and those who pose greater risk to public safety.Programs developed by the OCDD Resource Center are guided by OCDD Values and Guiding Principles.The goal of the OCDD Resource Center is to have a broad impact in the DD Service System and Louisiana local communities with the following outcomes:• Improved health and behavioral health outcomes for DD service recipients• Broader availability and accessing of natural support networks in local communities• Greater ability of community providers and professionals to support individuals with complex needs• Use of technology and innovative treatments that lead to improved support options and greater independence for recipients• Local access to innovation and technical assistance” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Louisiana Workforce Investment Act Training Manual - 01/01/2019

~~“The Eligible Training Provider Manual provides educational institutions with updated information about the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), Louisiana’s Workforce Development System, and provides the necessary guidance, procedures, and requirements in becoming an  Eligible Training Provider (ETP) in  Louisiana. The Eligible Training Provider List is a list of providers and their training programs and/or services that qualify for WIOA funding eligibility. Only providers’ programs, courses or classes that meet specific criteria and requirements are listed on Louisiana’s ETPL."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Louisiana WIA Training Manual - Louisiana Workforce Commission - 01/01/2019

~~“The Eligible Training Provider Manual provides educational institutions with updated information about the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), Louisiana’s Workforce Development System, and provides the necessary guidance, procedures, and requirements in becoming an  Eligible Training Provider (ETP) in  Louisiana. The Eligible Training Provider List is a list of providers and their training programs and/or services that qualify for WIOA funding eligibility. Only providers’ programs, courses or classes that meet specific criteria and requirements are listed on Louisiana’s ETPL.”

Systems
  • Other

Louisiana APSE - 11/13/2017

~~“This page has information about the Louisiana chapter of APSE such as the officers and board members and any training events.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
Citations

Louisiana State University School of Allied Health Professions Human Development Center

HDC's 40 Hour Supported Employment CORE Training

LSUHSC-Human Development Center (HDC) in collaboration with Louisiana APSE is providing statewide Employment Specialist Core Training. This 40 hour training meets LRS vendor training requirements and Medicaid Employment provider rules. It incorporates APSE's CORE Supported Employment competencies, and includes three and a half days of classroom instruction, fieldwork assignments and online instruction. Class hours are 9:00AM - 4:00PM except for 1/2 days indicated which end at 12:00noon. The fee for this class is $350.

(If you would to schedule a Core training in your region, please send an email to Sue Killam, M.Ed.)

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Louisiana Developmental Disabilities Council “Employment Mentoring”

The Employment Mentoring project will develop, implement, and evaluate a training and mentoring approach that will result in Employment Support Professionals (ESPs) demonstrating competencies in skills which lead to employment outcomes for job seekers with developmental disabilities including those with the most intense support needs in acquiring and maintaining community-based competitive employment.  The project will work with participating Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) to enhance their operations and participating Employment Support Professionals (ESPs) to improve their competencies in the area of supported employment and successful completion of the national Certified Employment Support Professional (CESP) exam.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities “Resources”

The DHH Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities offers a variety and ever-changing collection of resources, trainings and literature to assist consumers, their families, providers, advocates, and others access relevant materials.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Louisiana Community Choices Waiver - 02/20/2020

“The Louisiana Community Choices Waiver (CCW) is a program for elderly and / or disabled Louisiana residents. This program, which replaced the Elderly and Disabled Adult Waiver, provides a wide range of services and support to assist elderly state residents in maintaining their independence. In other words, it helps to prevent institutionalization in nursing homes by providing support at home, in assisted living facilities, and in adult foster care homes.

In addition to in-home support services, this waiver offers a unique benefit called Monitored In-Home Caregiving (MIHC), which can loosely be compared to adult foster care. Under MIHC, a family member or friend can move in to the care recipient's home and get paid to provide care. The alternative option exists as well, where the elderly individual moves into a friend or younger family member's home (such as his/her adult child) and that individual receives compensation for providing care. Even spouses can be compensated for providing care under MIHC. However, it’s important to note that the caregiver must adhere to the rules set forth by the Department of Health and Hospitals (DHH) and be approved as a MIHC service provider.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Louisiana Statewide Transition Plan for Compliance with the CMS Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule - 02/01/2020

“The following represents the Louisiana Work Plan. The purpose of this plan is to guide the development and implementation of a Transition Plan to: 1) provide for a robust input and engagement process for consumers and stakeholders; 2) identify areas of non-compliance; 3) seek intervention strategies to comply with the new setting requirements ; 4) implement strategies to maintain continuous compliance; and 5) ensure quality components are designed into each phase of the Transition Plan to ensure continued compliance.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Louisiana Developmental Disability Council Report - 06/30/2019

~~“On  January  25,  2019,  the  Medicaid  Extenders  Act  of  2019,  a  bill  that  includes short-term  funding  for  the  Money  Follows  the  Person  program,  became  law. Participants can now transition through MFP through CY  2019, which was extended from December 31, 2018.  On February 28, 2019, Congress introduced two reauthorization bills, H.R.1342 and S.548, through the Empower Care Act to extend  the  MFP  program  for  five  additional  years. They  are  still  pending Congressional action.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Update: Louisiana Department of Health eliminates waiting list for those with developmental disabilities - 04/30/2019

~~“Nearly a year after eliminating its 25-year-old waiting list for specialized services, the Louisiana Department of Health’s Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities is receiving positive feedback from those served by the Tiered Waiver plan.Tiered Waiver prioritizes individuals with a greater urgency of need for receiving the most appropriate home and community-based services, rather than the Office’s prior approach of offering services on a first-come, first-served basis.Julie Foster Hagan, assistant secretary of the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities, said more than 12,000 people have received a Screening for Urgency of Need (SUN), using a nationally accepted best practice model, to determine the urgency of their need for waiver services. There are five levels of need, or tiers:• 4-Emergent: Supports will be needed in the next 90 days.• 3-Urgent: Supports will be needed in the next 3-12 months.• 2-Critical: Supports will be needed in the next 1-2 years.• 1-Planning: Supports will be needed in the next 3-5 years.• 0-Currently no unmet needs."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Money Follows the Person - 04/01/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration is a Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) grant designed  to help states try new ways of delivering Medicaid services. In Louisiana the MFP Demonstration is called My Place Louisiana which helps people move from qualified institutions into home and community-based living settings and then follows those individuals for the first year of waiver services to help ensure a successful transition. My Place Louisiana Transition Coordinators work with support coordinator and provider agencies to provide assistance to ensure the health, safety and successful transition of people participating in waivers.The Louisiana Medicaid Office is working with the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities (OCDD) and the Office for Aging and Adult Services (OAAS) to implement My Place Louisiana, which is a 13-year (2008-2020) program focusing on Medicaid funding and following participants in transitioning from qualified institutions to home and community-based living settings.” 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Long-Term Care Services - 01/01/2018

“Louisiana's Medicaid Program provides payment for special long-term care support services, as well as full Medicaid health coverage, to eligible people who, because of their medical conditions, require assistance with activities of daily living (for example, eating, bathing, dressing, grooming, and transferring). Long-term care supports may be provided either in a facility or in an individual's own home or in the community.

 

Louisiana's Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS), or Medicaid waiver programs, include programs administered by both the Office of Aging and Adult Services and the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Waiver Services - 01/01/2018

“The State of Louisiana offers two Medicaid Waiver Programs to individuals with developmental disabilities. These programs are called Children's Choice and the New Opportunities Waiver (NOW). Some of the services included in these programs are: case management, personal care respite support, environmental modifications, equipment, and Medicaid. Services are based upon the child's disability, not parental income.

 

Flexible Family Funding is a small monthly supplement for school aged children with severe or profound disabilities who qualify for Special Education through the school system and have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities (OCDD) QUARTERLY DD COUNCIL REPORT September 28, 2016” Detailing DD Waiver Activities. - 09/20/2016

A report detailing Medicaid service levels, as well as a variety of Waivers and initiatives, including, but not limited to, the “residential Option Waiver, the New Opportunities Waiver, and the Self-Directed Waiver, as well as a description of ”Money Follows the Person”.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LA Supports Waiver (0453.R02.00) - 07/01/2014

This waiver, "provides day hab, habilitation, prevocational services, respite, support coordination, supported employment, housing stabilization service, housing stabilization transition, PERS for individuals w/autism, ID, DD"

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Louisiana Balancing Incentive Program - 02/08/2013

Since 2001, the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals has been engaged in focused, comprehensive system transformation of the long-term care system. These reform efforts have included stakeholder input at all levels and have resulted in changes in laws and regulations, service delivery, and funding priorities. In transforming the long-term care system, the state has committed to rebalancing the service system in order to provide choice between institutional and home and community-based services. The State has been working toward rebalancing its long-term care system by eliminating barriers that prevent or restrict the flexible use of Medicaid funds, increasing the ability of the Medicaid program to assure continued provision of services to people who transition from institutions by consistently increasing funding and slot allocation, improving service menus and rate structures to meet needs, and by ensuring procedures are in place for quality assurance and continuous improvement in services by consolidating licensing authority and improving IT systems tracking critical incidents.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The Bayou State welcomes you to come as you are, thus inciting a motto of inclusion that should also engage and encompass Louisianans with disabilities in the general workforce and economic mainstream. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Louisiana’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
-0.24%
Change from
2018 to 2019
4,648,794
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.4%
Change from
2018 to 2019
375,922
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.43%
Change from
2018 to 2019
131,742
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.08%
Change from
2018 to 2019
35.05%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.86%
Change from
2018 to 2019
74.33%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 4,648,794
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 375,922
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 131,742
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,752,117
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.05%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.33%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 26.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 342,094
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 377,726
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 452,167
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 236,460
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 23,902
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,945
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,530
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 13,451
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 6,038

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 5,696
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 152,643

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,276
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 4,177
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 10,551
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 7.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 6
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 4
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 896

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 18,600
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 890
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 375
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 42.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 8.03

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,156
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 265,182
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 119
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 88

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,223,034
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $2,877,141
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 0.30%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 581
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 30.47

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.87%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.66%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.24%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 39.33%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 76.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 88.30%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 37.60%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 721,050
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 131,005
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 197,993
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 328,998
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 137
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 217
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 354
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,286,952
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,116,168

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 22
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 23
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 747
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 19
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 766

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

In addition, a State Office position coordinates employment activities statewide. The Employment Initiative Program Coordinator serves as LRS’ direct contact to the VR Business Network and distributes job leads and information to the regional offices. In FY 2015, the VR Business Network provided job leads from all over the country. Some of the job leads were from the following companies: Walgreen’s, Lowe’s, TJX Companies, Office Max, Wells Fargo, DOL, Manpower, Inc., USDA, Marriott International, and many others.

LRS continues to participate with Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities (OCDD) in the “Employment First” initiative, which was designed to provide employment asa first option for persons with developmental disabilities, as an alternative to institutionalization, and to provide integration/independence in the community. LRS participates in roundtable discussions hosted by OCDD to inform their staff and providers of new requirements related to integration of individuals with developmental disabilities into their communities as a result of new Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) rules, as well as how to better collaborate with LRS to achieve goals set forth in WIOA. (Page 214- 215) Title IV

Customized Employment

Additionally, 48% of counselors indicated that the quality of services provided to meet the needs of consumers could be improved. Seventy percent of staff responding felt that more CRPs are needed in their area to serve specific services or to serve specific disability populations. Populations that were identified as needing further CRPs to serve include the deaf, deaf-blind and blind/visually impaired, felons/ex-felons with disabilities, individuals with cognitive impairments/intellectual disabilities, autism, mental illness, paraplegic/quadriplegic, and traumatic brain injuries. In addition, it was noted that more CRPs are needed to provide services to transition students, to provide services such as supported employment in rural areas, job readiness/placement, sign language interpretation, assistive technology services and training, training, and customized employment. (Page 195) Title VI

LRS will provide ongoing support services, including customized employment and other appropriate services needed to support and maintain youth with most significant disabilities, to work toward competitive integrated employment; beginning at Job Stabilization / Transition to Extended Services. 

Purchased supported employment services (Milestones) are identified and listed on the IPE and must be obtained through an approved Supported Employment CRP and generally cannot exceed 24 months or four years for youth with disabilities (ages 14-24). If a Consumer requires longer than 24 months in reaching job stabilization or four years for youth with disabilities, the LRS Counselor can extend the service in accordance with Plan guidelines (Page 208) Title VI

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

With support of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant (2012 -2015), LWC worked to ensure the physical, communication and programmatic accessibility of all One-Stop Career Centers by conducting specialized training for all center staff on topics including accessibility for all, disability etiquette and awareness, and identifying and assisting job-seekers with hidden disabilities. LWC will continue to maintain these investments in staff training and technology to make certain One- Stop Career Center staff serve adult job-seekers with disabilities effectively. LWC has incorporated accessibility criteria as part of the One-Stop certification policy criteria in collaboration with the Workforce Investment Council, local boards and CEOs. Additionally, all One-Stop Centers will be monitored onsite annually to ensure compliance with this requirement. (Page 88) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Goal 2: Expand career services and opportunities for populations facing multiple barriers to close the gap in educational attainment and economic advancement through career pathways and improved career services and the expansion of bridge programs. 1. Expand and incentivize the utilization of evidenced-based workforce strategies that support targeted populations (e.g., the long-term unemployed, individuals with disabilities, veterans, outof-school youth) into sector-based career pathway initiatives to achieve similar outcomes relative to other populations. (Page 37-38) Title I 

School to Work Transition

Job-seekers who have large gaps in their work history, limited, obsolete or unknown skills, limited education, inadequate credentials, lack soft skills, have significant barriers to employment or a combination of any of these factors as well as any job-seeker determined most likely to exhaust all their UI benefits shall be considered not workforce ready. Job-seekers who are not workforce ready shall be provided individualized career services, consisting of a minimum of a comprehensive assessment and development of an individualized employment plan (IEP) in the context of case management. (Page 62) Title I

The comprehensive assessment is the foundation for development of an IEP, and no IEP shall be created without completing a comprehensive assessment. In many cases the comprehensive assessment will then be an ongoing process that may result in changes to the goals and objectives of the IEP. The IEP is developed with a job-seeker to identify or create employment goals, appropriate achievement objectives and the right combination of services to assist in achieving goals and objectives. In short — “Where am I now?” “Where do I want to go?” “How will I get there?” The IEP must include goals and objectives that are SMART (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time bound). A case note must accompany the IEP and must justify the plan based on the identified barrier(s) to employment. Case management requires a regular follow-up and review or revision of the IEP until such time as the job-seeker becomes workforce ready or enters a training program. In either case, follow-up is critical, using a 30-day cycle until the job-seeker attains employment or completes training. (Page 62) Title I

Case Management requires a regular follow-up and review or revision of the IEP, until such time as the job seeker becomes workforce ready or enters a training program. In either case follow-up is critical, using the 30, 60, and 90-day cycle until employed or training is complete is appropriate — except for long term training. For long-term training, Career Specialists should follow the most current guidance. (Page 121) Title II

The formal interagency agreement provides for initial contact to be made with the transition student as early as age sixteen. This is accomplished by the development of criteria and timelines for an effective and efficient referral process; provision of orientation and information sessions for students and their families; and LRS counselors determining transition students’ eligibility for VR services within the timelines established by agency policy. For each student determined eligible for services, every effort will be made to ensure those who are in an Order of Selection (OOS) Category currently being served by LRS leave the school system with an approved IPE in place that incorporates appropriate segments of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and projected employment needs, as applicable. (Page 171) Title II

The Program Coordinator works collaboratively with DOE Transition Coordinator in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities including VR services. Both agencies share responsibility to coordinate the provision of services, conduct outreach, and identify financial responsibility as needed. The DOE will assure that all students with disabilities and their families have knowledge of LRS policies and services including brochures and promotional information supplied by LRS. Information dissemination begins with the writing of the transition service page and continues through referral to LRS. Local Education Agencies (LEAs) also invite LRS representatives to IEP meetings at the students’ request, whena transition service page is being written for a student with a disability who may be eligible for and/or interested in VR services; facilitate appropriate orientation meetings among LRS staff, student and family members; provide time for LRS staff to meet with teachers, guidance counselors, and other appropriate personnel for such purposes as information sharing/gathering at both the individual and agency levels; and assist in the development, provision, and evaluation of interagency vocational assessment processes and functional vocational transition programs. (Page 172) Title II

Current LRS policy and guidelines address the allocation of 15% of State’s VR allotment for the provision of services of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) to high school students with disabilities between the ages of 16 - 21 who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services. The required activities of Pre-ETS are workplace readiness training, job exploration counseling; work-based learning experiences; counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary education programs at institutions of higher education; and instruction in self-advocacy. LRS assigned vendors to work with each high school across the state to make Pre-ETS services available to students who receive IDEA funds or students who are an individuals with a disability for the purposes of section 504 of the Act (29 U.S.C.794). (Page 172-173) Title II

LRS will use agency funds for the provision of Pre-ETS and VR services on the approved IPE that relates directly to the achievement of the agreed upon vocational goal, which is not the responsibility of the education system. The DOE will use agency funds for the provision of educational services on the approved IEP that relates directly to the achievement of the agreed upon educational goal.… LRS Transition Counselors in each region meet with a school liaison, usually the guidance counselor, to provide information regarding LRS services. The school liaison relays the information to students with disabilities and coordinates the student’s initial meeting with the LRS Transition Counselor. LRS Transition Counselors conduct outreach by hosting transition meetings at area high schools to provide information about VR services and to accept referrals. Information disseminated at these meetings includes agency brochures, client handbooks describing the VR processes/services, and referrals to other community resources students may need to access. Counselors work with the students, parents and educators to plan services needed for successful transition from school to work from the point that the student with a disability is identified. Counselors attend “Career Days” at the high schools to share information with transition students on available services that may identify career goals and to share information regarding services available to assist them in reaching their goals. (Page 173) Title II

Approximately three hundred and fifty (350) consumers could be referred for supported  employment services during each fiscal year. Once eligibility for supported employment services has been established, LRS continues to collaborate with OBH to ensure that services are provided in a timely manner and to assure the development of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). The IPE shall specify the responsibilities of all parties involved in the supported employment program for the individual and shall include reporting requirements for both agencies. (Page 174- 175) Title II

LRS has five Third Party Cooperative Arrangements (TPCAs) established with separate School Districts in Grant, Bossier, Evangeline, Orleans and Franklin Parishes as well as with Sci Academy and GW Carver. Through these TPCAs, a Transition Specialist provides workplace readiness training including self-advocacy, work-based learning experiences, and identification of employers who will host students for work-based learning. Bossier Parish Community College has a program called Program for Successful Employment (PSE) funded through a TPCA with LRS to provide job readiness to students with disabilities, work with employers to help find job placement and provide follow up. Virtual Academy of Lafourche has hired a transition specialist, through a TPCA, to provide workplace readiness training including self-advocacy, work-based learning experiences, and identification of employers who will host students for work-based learning. (Page 177) Title II

Some examples of collaborative efforts include Transition Core Team meetings held statewide attended by the DOE, the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities, Families Helping Families, and other interested individuals. These meetings are held to assist agencies who serve transition students as they exit from school to work. LRS has a Program Coordinator specializing in Assistive Technology who conducts in-service training annually to keep field staff members abreast of the most recent technology available to assist individuals with disabilities. Specialized training is provided to our staff members working with low-incident disabilities to include such training as orientation to deafness, mobility training, sign language coursework, deaf-blindness training, and graduate level training specific to working with low-incident populations (i.e. visual impairment/hearing impairment/significant cognitive impairment). (Page 188) Title II

Respondents from other components of the statewide workforce investment system were given survey links to complete the survey online. Needs identified by respondents included transportation; benefit planning; job coaching; postemployment services; transition from school to work; assistive technology devices/services; and job placement. The primary barriers identified by respondents included the lack of medical insurance/care; adjustment to disability; fear of losing government benefits; lack of public resources; lack of employer acceptance of an individual’s disability; and the lack of transportation.
Fifty percent of LRS employees responding noted that they are satisfied or very satisfied when working with the Business and Career Solution Centers (BCSC). Thirty-eight percent noted that they have not worked with a BCSC. Thirty nine percent used a BCSC in the last month to access/provide services to individuals with disabilities. Eighteen percent utilized the BCSC in the last three months. Seventy-four percent of staff are familiar with services available through their local BCSC. (Page 194) Title II

LRS shall provide for continuity of services once an otherwise eligible individual is selected for services and has begun to receive services under an IPE, irrespective of the severity of the individual’s disability. LRS will continue to provide needed VR services to all individuals with an existing Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). All services, including post-employment services, shall be available to individuals receiving services under an Order of Selection insofar as such services are necessary and appropriate to the individual's Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in order to ultimately place them in successful employment. All Agency policies and procedures governing the expenditure of funds, consumer financial participation, and use of comparable services and benefits are applicable to individuals receiving services under an Order of Selection. (Page 204) Title II

Louisiana Rehabilitation Services estimates that it will serve 13,843 individuals during fiscal year 2019 in the vocational rehabilitation program. This number includes approximately 9,260 cases that are expected to receive services under an IPE. The estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services is 1,283. The estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services is 1,609. In addition, approximately 5,300 students with disabilities will be served through the Pre-Employment Transition Services program. (Page 205) Title II

LRS continues to renew and revise existing local cooperative agreements, as applicable, with the 70 school districts and 146 Charter Schools in Louisiana. The LRS Transition Program Coordinator continues to collaborate and partner with DOE, OCDD, Work Incentive Planning Program, Office of Community Services, LWC, and the Office of Youth Development in an effort to network, share information and utilize comparable benefits to enhance VR services to transition students. The primary focus of LRS’ collaboration is to identify and address barriers (e.g. policies, eligibility process, resource allocation); assure effective service provision through the support of local interagency core teams, provide cross-agency training, outreach, engage in capacity building of young adults and family outreach efforts; provide continued support of innovative models and practices related to transition; and provide information and technical assistance. The Program Coordinator provides guidance and information to the Rehabilitation Counselors regarding specific transition issues. The Program Coordinator worked collaboratively with WINTAC’s Coordinator using conference calls, to discuss transition topics and provide information to LRS’ field offices. The Training Unit developed a School-to-Work Job Readiness curriculum and has trained staff to implement the curriculum with eligible students. Training will continue to be provided statewide. VR Counselors are encouraged to provide services at least once a month, when feasible, to students determined appropriate for job readiness training. (Page 214) Title II

Two Master Rehabilitation Counselor reviews were conducted by the Quality Assurance Unit during the 2017 review year. Each of the caseloads reviewed for promotion to Master Rehabilitation Counselor status exceeded the 90% compliance level required. Strategy 2. Explore opportunities for consumers to participate in Telework in order to increase employment outcomes. Progress: Telework employment options are considered for consumers when appropriate. Strategy 3. Identify and collaborate with employers to provide job development, Work-Based Learning Experiences and job placement. Progress: Through collaboration with the LRS Rehabilitation Employment Development Specialists (REDS) and local businesses throughout the state, 115 jobs were developed leading to successful job placements. Additionally, LRS vendors work with businesses throughout the year in developing jobs and placing consumers. Strategy 4. Increase Counselor presence in secondary education settings in order to improve provision of vocational rehabilitation services to transition students. (Page 216) Title II Progress: Pre-ETS counselors and REDS have identified employers and placed students with disabilities into Work-Based Learning Experiences. Strategy 6. Increase resources for assistive technology assessments and devices to improve employment outcomes. Progress: Two additional, out-of-state vendor/providers have been vetted, and added to provide rehabilitation driving assessments and training on a fee-for-service basis, to include vehicle modification specifications for LRS consumers. A contractual agreement to hire a Physical Therapist and Rehabilitation Engineer through LSU Health Sciences Department was negotiated and approved. These professionals will conduct seating and positioning assessments, wheelchair and personal mobility evaluations, home modifications for accessibility evaluations, job accommodations assessments, and other rehabilitation engineering field services as required. The state-approved list of assistive technology and rehabilitation technology providers/vendorshas been updated, and referral forms made available to the regional offices. (Page 217) Title II

Strategy 1. Perform comprehensive statewide needs assessment to determine needs of students with disabilities. Progress: The needs assessment is scheduled to be conducted in calendar year 2017 for submission in the State Plan submitted in 2018. Strategy 2. Expand outreach to students with disabilities to make them aware of VR services including Pre-ETS.
Progress: Pre-ETS counselors throughout the state attend IEP meeting, career fairs, and other school functions to make them aware of LRS services. Strategy 3 Monitor the provision of Pre-ETS services to determine effectiveness and possible improvement to service delivery process. Progress: Pre-ETS counselors monitor vendor activities in the schools to ensure delivery of appropriate services and determine any improvements needed. Objective C. Increase the number of Randolph-Sheppard Managers earning at least $25,000 annually by expanding opportunities and enhancing consumer service delivery in the RandolphSheppard Program. . (Page 219) Title II

Career Pathways

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Apprenticeship

The Local Boards are responsible for developing local plans for the governor’s approval, designating local One-Stop operators, designating eligible partners of training services, negotiating local performance measures with the state workforce board and the governor, monitoring local system performance against established performance measures, and helping to develop the labor market information system for local areas. Local Boards will facilitate relationships between Partner Programs, local entities, and supportive service agencies for a strengthened service delivery in regard to provision of services to youth. These relationships will include, as a minimum, procedures for youth participant co-enrollment and common intake as necessary to integrate: intake, case management, and reporting. This shall be the case for all Partner Programs under which youth may be served. Youth services shall begin with a systematic approach to gathering information about strengths and assets, need and challenges, and interests and goals. These assessments shall be used to determining program eligibility, and subsequently guide the development of individualized plans and all other Case Management activities. Youth shall be co-enrolled as necessary in any programs under WIOA funding sources and any Partner Program that is not WIOA funded, e.g., Adult Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Children and Family Services that is necessary based on their needs assessment. Youth will be simultaneously co-enrolled in any and all programs under which they are eligible for, and receiving, services. This will prevent youth having to wait until they exit one program in order to access services offered by other programs, and allow them to receive the best combination of services from different funding streams. For any program year, LWDBs must spend not less than 75 percent of local workforce development area funds to provide direct services to out-of-school youth. For any program year, LWDBs must spend not less than 20 percent of the funds allocated to the local area to provide in school youth and out of school youth with work experiences such as summer employment, pre-apprenticeship, internship, job shadowing, and on-the-job training. Local boards shall ensure that parents, participants, and other members of the community with experience relating to the programs for youth are involved in its design and implementation. One-Stop operators shall carry out programs that: • Provide an assessment of academic levels, skill levels and occupational skills, any prior work experience, employability, interests and aptitudes. (Pages 111-112) Title II

Work-eligible recipients shall participate in appropriate work activities as agreed upon in the Family Success Agreement. Work-eligible is defined as families containing an adult under sixty years of age, or teen head of household, that is not disabled, incapacitated, or caring for a family member who is disabled or incapacitated as documented by a medical expert to which the status of disability is clearly established and explained. Work-eligible excludes cases in which only the child portion of need that is unrelated to a sanction or penalty, known as a child-only case, is considered in determining eligibility. The work activities may include but are not limited to: Unsubsidized employment, Subsidized employment, Unpaid work experience, On-the-job training, Job search/job readiness, Vocational education, Satisfactory attendance at secondary school or in course of study leading to a certificate of general equivalence, in the case of recipients who have not completed secondary schools or received a certificate, Education directly related to employment, in the case of a recipient who has not received a high school diploma or certificate of equivalency, Job skills training directly related to employment, community service, and The provision of child care to an individual who is participating in community service. Participants, who are found not to possess basic workplace or basic literacy skills, as determined by an assessment, shall combine employment and job readiness and job search activities with activities designed to increase their basic and workplace literacy skills. (Page 242) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

The state integrated One-Stop Center operations under the Workforce Investment Act several years ago. Within the past two years, stand-alone Wagner-Peyser offices have been eliminated. Each of Louisiana’s fifteen Workforce Development areas has established at least one Comprehensive Center that has been certified by its respective board as meeting the criteria to be branded as an American Job Center. Smaller offices operated by local boards and/or One-Stop operators (contractors) where all Program Partners are not present, shall be designated and operated as “Affiliate” One-Stop centers and may have any subset of partners, but shall not be operated as Wagner Peyser stand-alone Employment Services offices. Under the plan, local boards will have the flexibility to include additional partners in One-Stop Centers, in particular and specifically identified by the law: • Employment and training programs administered by the Social Security Administration, including the Ticket to Work and the Self-Sufficiency Program. • Employment and training programs carried out by the Small Business Administration. • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) employment and training programs. • Other programs authorized under the National and Community Service Act of 1990. (Page 48) Title I Ticket-to-Work: LRS continues to network and collaborate with MAXIMUS, as well as many other agencies in the state, to ensure Ticket-to-Work is successful in Louisiana. LRS continues to maintain a statewide 1-800 Ticket Hotline number for individuals interested in learning more about their Ticket and how LRS would be able to assist them. In FY 2017, LRS received $1,163,021.25; this amount was a slight decrease from FY 2016’s $1,488,446.32 which was received from the Social Security Administration’s (SSAs) reimbursement program. The Program Coordinator continues to work closely with SSA to insure all documentation is submitted properly so that claims can be processed. (Page 226) Title II

 

Employer / Business Engagement

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability or implementation.  (Page 196, 267)

Data Collection

Programmatic/Fiscal Onsite Monitoring: Programs are identified for onsite monitoring through a comprehensive risk analysis based on the following factors: (1) desk monitoring; (2) need to verify data quality and program expenditures; (3) consistent low performance on NRS indicators in several categories; (4) prospective noncompliance with grant requirements identified through review of programmatic and fiscal reports, or ongoing communications with the program; (4) unresolved audit findings; (5) ongoing lack of progress in resolving required actions from prior monitoring visit; (6) significant staff turnover in the program; and (7) recent or newly established programs. The goals for State onsite monitoring visits are to: • ensure that programs meet AEFLA requirements; • improve the quality of federally-funded activities; • provide assistance identifying and resolving accountability problems; and, • ensure the accuracy, validity, and reliability of data collection and data reporting as well as policies and procedures for program accountability. (Page 76) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation: Louisiana Rehabilitation Services (LRS) will monitor the services provided within the guidelines of the existing corporative agreements and evaluate if modifications will be needed when they are renegotiated. LRS will monitor vendors to ensure the quality of supported employment services provided to eligible consumers. The monitoring will utilize site reviews and include quality indicators to evaluate the assessment of employment outcomes and an evaluation of the provision of services. The monitoring will be carried out by the state and field office staff. (Page 76) Title I 

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Recognizing the high unemployment rate among individuals with disabilities and the qualifiedemployee shortage businesses are facing, the Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) is committed to providing reasonable accommodations and access to all programs, services and facilities. Each One-Stop Career Center should utilize the one-stop disability access checklist provided by the United States Department of Labor to self-evaluate its current level of accessibility. With support of the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant (2012 -2015), LWC worked to ensure the physical, communication and programmatic accessibility of all One-Stop Career Centers by conducting specialized training for all center staff on topics including accessibility for all, disability etiquette and awareness, and identifying and assisting job-seekers with hidden disabilities. LWC will continue to maintain these investments in staff training and technology to make certain One- Stop Career Center staff serve adult job-seekers with disabilities effectively. (Page 88) Title I Disseminate information on effective outreach to, partnerships with, and services for, businesses • Disseminate information on effective service delivery strategies to serve workers and job seekers • Disseminate performance information and information on the cost of attendance including tuition and fees, for participants in applicable training programs on the Eligible Training Provider’s List (ETPL) with recognized post- secondary credentials, as well as OJT and IWTP • Disseminate information on physical and programmatic accessibility, in accordance with sec. 188 of WIOA relative to nondiscrimination, if applicable, and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 for individuals with disabilities.

• Conduct evaluations of State Programs, in coordination with evaluations of programs and activities carried out by the U.S. Secretary of Labor • Disseminate a list of providers of youth workforce investment activities eligible to receive competitive, or sole source, grants and contracts for training with credentials for youth • Provide re-designation assistance to local areas • Provide assistance in the development of Regional Plans * Operate a fiscal and management accountability information system (MIS) to manage, track, and report primary indicators of performance for Youth, Adult, and Dislocated Worker Programs • Conduct continuous, and at least annually, monitoring and oversight of activities carried out by sub-recipients of WIOA funding to conform to the Uniform Administrative Requirements (UAR) • Provide additional assistance to local areas that have high concentrations of eligible youth (Page 100) Title I 

 

Veterans

Jobs For Veterans State Grant (JVSG) STRENGTHS Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist are providing individualized career services to 99% of the Veterans they provide services to. Despite serving only veterans with Significant Barriers, DVOPs have achieved an Entered Employment Rate (EER) of 66%. Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are integrated in to the Business Services Teams within their assigned workforce regions. LVERs conduct employer outreach with and as a part of regional business services teams. OPPORTUNITIES Incorporate the service delivery strategy utilized by DVOPs in to the OneStop Centers statewide. Currently the EER for all Veterans receiving services statewide is 51%. Large opportunity for improvement. LVERs could be more involved in employer engagement centered on assisting employers to develop and start registered apprenticeship programs and Onthe-job training programs. These efforts could provide more opportunities for Veterans to learn while they work. (Page 33) Title 1

The LVER responsibilities are specifically targeted to promote the advantages of hiring veterans to employers, employer associations and business groups. LVER roles and responsibilities are consistent with 38 U.S.C. § 4104, VPL 07—10 and VPL 03—14. As such, the LVER serves an important role in the state’s Business Services Delivery Model. In coordination with the other members of the business services team, the LVER advocates for employment and training opportunities through outreach to employers, training facilities, unions, apprenticeship programs and private and government businesses. The LVER also participates in job fairs, promotes programs that offer licensing and credentialing opportunities and develops and makes presentations to employers. Each LVER must provide a monthly report to the state veterans coordinator detailing their outreach activities. LVER Staff members conduct outreach to perform the following activities: • Conducting employer outreach; • In conjunction with employers, conducting job searches and workshops and establishing job search groups; • Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; • Informing federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans; • Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and • Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. (267-268) Title II To maximize the impact of the streamlined LVER staff, the state takes a top—down, cooperative approach to employer outreach. LVER staff shall coordinate with their business service team partners, and other state agencies or programs such as Louisiana Rehabilitative Services (LRS), to conduct outreach to employer associations at the state and regional level. In this way the maximum number of employers can be efficiently and effectively incorporated into the promotion of hiring of veterans. This outreach will educate employers on the advantages of hiring veterans, and inform employers on how to find qualified veteran applicants by leveraging the State workforce system and OSCCs. The state intends to increase veteran employment by making a sound business case to employers regarding the advantage of hiring veterans and providing employer’s tools and contacts to do so effectively. (Page 268) Title IV

 

Behavioral / Mental Health

10. The eligible provider’s collaboration with other available education, training and social service resources in the community. Particularly, the eligible provider should have, or have the means to establish, meaningful partnerships with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, One-Stop Centers, job training programs and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries for the development of career pathways. 11. The flexibility of program scheduling offered by the eligible provider, including coordination (when available) with federal, state and local support services such as child care, transportation, mental health services and career planning. 12. The eligible provider’s management information system; the expectation will be that the eligible provider will use the state-administered designated MIS for all grant related data collection and reporting. (Page 149) Title II

LRS staff members take advantage of training opportunities provided through webinars and teleconferences as well as on-site training. Numerous types of training and support continue to be provided and/or coordinated by State Office Program staff members to support the field staff. Such Training for PY 2017 included PEPNET, Travel Training, TBI Conference, Deaf Counselor Training, Ethics Symposium at Southern University, AWARE, Case Management, CATS, Share Point, Pre-ETS, Regional Manager and District Supervisor training. Additionally, the agency has specific monthly in-service training requirements (4 hours per month), which are conducted by the regional field offices to ensure continuous education for all professional and paraprofessional staff members. This training is provided by experienced staff members or by knowledgeable community providers who specialize in the area of training required. Rehabilitation Counselor Associates (RCAs) are required to attend all in-service training with the Rehabilitation Counselors and also attend separate training as needed. Examples of training topics include assessment, guidance and vocational counseling, eligibility, planning, disability related issues, assistive technology, disability services at colleges and universities, ethics, community-based employment outcomes, mental health, and employment related issues. (Page 185) Title II

Upon reviewing survey information of individuals receiving SSI/SSDI, the top needs identified by respondents included job placement (46%); job coaching (30%); benefits planning (30%); transportation (29%); job readiness skills (28%); and vocational guidance and career counseling (27%). They identified barriers to employment as being the fear of losing their government benefits (52%), lack of employer acceptance of their disability (44%), adjustment to disability (32%); lack of transportation (38%); lack of public services (36%); the slow job market (36%); and lack of medical insurance (27%). Respondents receiving supported employment services identified the following as needs not being met, job placement (23%); training/tuition assistance (21%); transportation (21%); room & board (15%); mental health counseling (14%); post-employment services (14%); benefits planning (13%); and equipment for work (13%). The barriers to employment identified by respondents receiving supported employment services included the fear of losing government benefits (40%); lack of transportation (39%); employer acceptance of their disability (36%); their personal adjustment to the disability (29%); lack of public resources (29%); the slow job market (21%); and the lack of medical insurance/care (20%). (Page 193) Title II

To assist Louisiana families in becoming economically self-reliant so that their dependence on government benefits for basic needs is minimized, the department implemented the STEP program so that cash assistance recipients, with certain exceptions, are actively engaged in meaningful activities designed to enable their transition from cash assistance to self-reliance. It is further intended that cash assistance recipients demonstrate active and diligent personal responsibility in achieving self-reliance through employment and increased workplace literacy. All appropriate state agencies responsible for employment, training, and educating Louisiana’s citizens are expected to cooperate in the pursuit of this goal. Once an applicant is certified for eligibility, a comprehensive assessment will be conducted and include workplace literacy, basic skills and educational attainment, interests and aptitude related to employment, barriers to employment, need for education, supportive services such as child care and transportation, and other supportive services. Specialized assessments can occur for issues that arise after an initial assessment has been completed and could include substance abuse, domestic violence, mental health screening, or others as determined by the department. (Page 240) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Through policy, LWC has refined the state’s response to the U.S. Labor Department mandate that the workforce development system become a seamless, integrated system. Prior to implementation, One-Stop Center operations used a rigid customer flow and team model. This new policy establishes a revision and refocusing effort to drive clients to the “right door” because of the state’s need to respond to a decrease in funding and environmental as well as socio-economic changes. Goals are as follows: • Change the lock-step process and team approach in providing job-seeker and employer services to a more flexible process (or roadmap) that allows quick response to changes in the labor market and workforce needs. • Add flexibility to the delivery of training services by simplifying the process for identifying qualified candidates. • Create a process that recognizes the ever-changing funding environment associated with federal mandates and grants, so that it provides necessary flexibility to respond to specific grant and funding mandates of U.S. Department of Labor programs regarding unemployment insurance benefits (UI), workforce participation, veteran’s services and National Emergency Grants. • Support the state’s redesign of its business engagement Process in a way that optimizes agency response to in-demand industry needs in hiring, retaining, training and advancement of workers. • Anticipate the ongoing need for creating contingency plans to support economic growth in targeted industry sectors, and developing improved relationships with local and state economic development entities with the goal of pre-empting shortfalls in a skilled workforce. • Address the need to reintegrate specific UI recipient related functions into the job-seeker process in order to shorten the return-to-work time for individuals receiving unemployment insurance benefits. (Page 57) Title I 

 

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

SNAP - Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs) - 04/01/2020

“A new federal rule that takes effect April 1, 2020, will require some Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to meet federal work requirements to continue receiving federal food assistance, commonly known as "food stamps."

SNAP recipients who are classified as an Able-Bodied Adult Without Dependents (ABAWD) - that is, recipients who are age 18 to 49, do not have a child living with them and are considered able to work - can receive benefits for only three months in a 36-month period unless they meet the federal ABAWD work requirement or qualify for an exemption (or exception). This rule, known as the SNAP Time Limit, is established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). For Louisiana SNAP recipients, the rule would cover the period of April 2020 through March 2023.

FNS has granted a waiver of the SNAP Time Limit rule for 14 parishes with higher unemployment rates. Those parishes are Assumption, Catahoula, Concordia, East Carroll, Franklin, Madison, Morehouse, Richland, St. Landry, St. Mary, Tensas, Vernon, West Carroll and Winn.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Community Choices Waiver - 02/20/2020

“The Louisiana Community Choices Waiver (CCW) is a program for elderly and / or disabled Louisiana residents. This program, which replaced the Elderly and Disabled Adult Waiver, provides a wide range of services and support to assist elderly state residents in maintaining their independence. In other words, it helps to prevent institutionalization in nursing homes by providing support at home, in assisted living facilities, and in adult foster care homes.

In addition to in-home support services, this waiver offers a unique benefit called Monitored In-Home Caregiving (MIHC), which can loosely be compared to adult foster care. Under MIHC, a family member or friend can move in to the care recipient's home and get paid to provide care. The alternative option exists as well, where the elderly individual moves into a friend or younger family member's home (such as his/her adult child) and that individual receives compensation for providing care. Even spouses can be compensated for providing care under MIHC. However, it’s important to note that the caregiver must adhere to the rules set forth by the Department of Health and Hospitals (DHH) and be approved as a MIHC service provider.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Louisiana Statewide Transition Plan for Compliance with the CMS Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule - 02/01/2020

“The following represents the Louisiana Work Plan. The purpose of this plan is to guide the development and implementation of a Transition Plan to: 1) provide for a robust input and engagement process for consumers and stakeholders; 2) identify areas of non-compliance; 3) seek intervention strategies to comply with the new setting requirements ; 4) implement strategies to maintain continuous compliance; and 5) ensure quality components are designed into each phase of the Transition Plan to ensure continued compliance.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Southwest Louisiana Area Health Education Center (SWLAHEC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, young adults (26–35 year olds), agriculture community workers, manufacturing community workers, trade community workers, finance community workers, education and healthcare community workers, job service community workers, entertainment industry employees, African-American communities, and Asian communities.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Central LA Area Health Education Center (CLAHEC).  They will partner with the Louisiana Dept. of Insurance,  Louisiana Enrollment Partnership Coalition, Faith-based groups, Hospitals, clinics, and social service agencies, State and local elected officials, Louisiana Primary Care Association (LPCA), and the Louisiana Workforce Commission. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Brian BurtonPhone: (337) 989-0001Email: interventions@swlahec.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Strategic Plan Fiscal Year July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2025 - 07/01/2019

~~“The Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) is an aggressive advocate for a trained, viable workforce and is committed to employment strategies for Louisiana residents that respond to business and industry’s workforce demands. LWC is dedicated to working closely with employers, employees, and job seekers to meet their employment and training needs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Louisiana Developmental Disability Council Report - 06/30/2019

~~“On  January  25,  2019,  the  Medicaid  Extenders  Act  of  2019,  a  bill  that  includes short-term  funding  for  the  Money  Follows  the  Person  program,  became  law. Participants can now transition through MFP through CY  2019, which was extended from December 31, 2018.  On February 28, 2019, Congress introduced two reauthorization bills, H.R.1342 and S.548, through the Empower Care Act to extend  the  MFP  program  for  five  additional  years. They  are  still  pending Congressional action.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LA HB199 - 06/20/2019

~~“AN ACT To enact Part III of Chapter 8 of Title 46 of the Louisiana Revised Statutes of 1950, to be comprised of R.S. 46:977.21 through 977.25, relative to services for children provided through the medical assistance program of this state known commonly as Medicaid; to provide for duties and responsibilities of the Louisiana Department of Health in administering the Medicaid program; to provide legislative findings relative to Medicaid waiver programs; to establish and provide for a demonstration waiver program to serve certain children with disabilities; to require development and submission of an application for program approval to the federal Medicaid agency; to provide for definitions; to provide for promulgation of rules; and to provide for related matter.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Individualized Education Program (IEP) - 06/11/2019

~~“Some students with disabilities ages 3-21 may require special education and related services to meet their unique needs and to support them in attaining both their short and long term educational goals.  These services are governed by federal legislation via the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004)."

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Update: Louisiana Department of Health eliminates waiting list for those with developmental disabilities - 04/30/2019

~~“Nearly a year after eliminating its 25-year-old waiting list for specialized services, the Louisiana Department of Health’s Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities is receiving positive feedback from those served by the Tiered Waiver plan.Tiered Waiver prioritizes individuals with a greater urgency of need for receiving the most appropriate home and community-based services, rather than the Office’s prior approach of offering services on a first-come, first-served basis.Julie Foster Hagan, assistant secretary of the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities, said more than 12,000 people have received a Screening for Urgency of Need (SUN), using a nationally accepted best practice model, to determine the urgency of their need for waiver services. There are five levels of need, or tiers:• 4-Emergent: Supports will be needed in the next 90 days.• 3-Urgent: Supports will be needed in the next 3-12 months.• 2-Critical: Supports will be needed in the next 1-2 years.• 1-Planning: Supports will be needed in the next 3-5 years.• 0-Currently no unmet needs."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

LA HB199 - 06/20/2019

~~“AN ACT To enact Part III of Chapter 8 of Title 46 of the Louisiana Revised Statutes of 1950, to be comprised of R.S. 46:977.21 through 977.25, relative to services for children provided through the medical assistance program of this state known commonly as Medicaid; to provide for duties and responsibilities of the Louisiana Department of Health in administering the Medicaid program; to provide legislative findings relative to Medicaid waiver programs; to establish and provide for a demonstration waiver program to serve certain children with disabilities; to require development and submission of an application for program approval to the federal Medicaid agency; to provide for definitions; to provide for promulgation of rules; and to provide for related matter.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Louisiana House Bill No. 598 - 06/11/2015

“…The ABLE Account Program is hereby created and shall be administered by the ABLE Account Authority, refereed to hereafter as “the authority” to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting persons with disabilities in endeavors to maintain health, independence, and quality of life…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana House Bill 508

To enact RS. 47:297.13, relative to income taxation; to provide relative to individual and corporation income tax deductions; to authorize an income tax deduction for taxpayers w employ certain qualified disabled individuals; to provide for certain definitions; to provide for certain requirements and limitations; to provide for an effective date; and to provide for related matters.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

2018 Louisiana Employment First Report - 01/04/2019

~~“With the urging of advocacy groups, and under the leadership of the Governor’s Advisory Council on Disability Affairs, an Employment First Workgroup was formed in January2017, with the responsibility of developing a report to the Governor with recommendations for moving forward on a cross-disability Employment First effort. This report is an important step in moving this policy forward and expanding the scope of Louisiana’s employment first policy beyond individuals with developmental disabilities. 

This report summarizes a set of comprehensive recommendations that will advance Louisiana’s Employment First goals. This report also highlights specific initiatives undertaken since June 2017 and proposed work for the coming year”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 19-08 State as Model Employer Task Force - 03/19/2018

“WHEREAS,  the State of Louisiana is committed to developing and maintaining a high performing public workforce that provides access, meaningful services, and improved outcomes for all citizens and reflects the rich diversity of the citizens of this great state. In order to achieve this goal, state leaders must be able to apply diverse perspectives and experiences to the development of responsive solutions to the issues facing the state. Such diversity enhances the fullness of our understanding of these issues and opens opportunities for the consideration of new and better solutions;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, JOHN BEL EDWARDS, Governor of the state of Louisiana, by virtue of he power vested in me by the Constitution and statutes of the state of Louisiana do, effective immediately, hereby order and direct as follows:

SECTION 1:  The State as a Model Employer Task Force (hereafter “Task Force”) is hereby established within the executive department, Office of the Governor, Office of Disability Affairs…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

Gov. Edwards Proclaims October ‘Disability Employment Awareness Month’ - 10/09/2017

“Gov. John Bel Edwards proclaimed October as ‘Disability Employment Awareness Month in Louisiana. In collaboration with Louisiana Workforce Commission and Families Helping Families, the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs will be traveling the state on an Employment First Tour, beginning October 10 in Lafayette. This is an opportunity for the office to host roundtable discussions regarding the integrated, competitive employment for people with disabilities.

 

Disability Employment Awareness Month is a great way to emphasize the importance of the contributions of persons with disabilities in moving Louisiana forward,” said Gov. Edwards. “Our businesses and communities can greatly benefit from the integrated, competitive employment of persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order No. JBE 16-45: Louisiana Rehabilitation Council - 08/04/2016

“Whereas, the State Rehabilitation Council was originally established by executive order to provide Louisiana’s citizens with disabilities assistance in their pursuit of meaningful careers and gainful employment through specific programs.

Preparing and submitting an annual report to the governor and the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Service Administration, Washington, D.C., on the status of vocational rehabilitation programs operating within the state, and making the report available to the public.

Providing for coordination and the establishment of working relationships between Louisiana Rehabilitation Services, the Statewide Independent Living Council, and the Centers for Independent Living within the state”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Data Sharing

Executive Order No. JBE 2016-11: Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination - 04/13/2016

“No state agencies, departments, offices, commissions, boards, entities or officers of the State of Louisiana shall harass or discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, political affiliation, disability, or age against any individual in the provision of any service and/or benefit by such agencies, departments, offices, commissions, boards or entities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

SNAP - Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs) - 04/01/2020

“A new federal rule that takes effect April 1, 2020, will require some Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to meet federal work requirements to continue receiving federal food assistance, commonly known as "food stamps."

SNAP recipients who are classified as an Able-Bodied Adult Without Dependents (ABAWD) - that is, recipients who are age 18 to 49, do not have a child living with them and are considered able to work - can receive benefits for only three months in a 36-month period unless they meet the federal ABAWD work requirement or qualify for an exemption (or exception). This rule, known as the SNAP Time Limit, is established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). For Louisiana SNAP recipients, the rule would cover the period of April 2020 through March 2023.

FNS has granted a waiver of the SNAP Time Limit rule for 14 parishes with higher unemployment rates. Those parishes are Assumption, Catahoula, Concordia, East Carroll, Franklin, Madison, Morehouse, Richland, St. Landry, St. Mary, Tensas, Vernon, West Carroll and Winn.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Strategic Plan Fiscal Year July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2025 - 07/01/2019

~~“The Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) is an aggressive advocate for a trained, viable workforce and is committed to employment strategies for Louisiana residents that respond to business and industry’s workforce demands. LWC is dedicated to working closely with employers, employees, and job seekers to meet their employment and training needs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Individualized Education Program (IEP) - 06/11/2019

~~“Some students with disabilities ages 3-21 may require special education and related services to meet their unique needs and to support them in attaining both their short and long term educational goals.  These services are governed by federal legislation via the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004)."

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment & Vocational Training - 04/01/2019

~~“Our Veterans Assistance Counselors help veterans and their families receive benefits for which they qualify. General eligibility requirements include military service and Louisiana state residency. Specific programs may have additional requirements. Spouses and dependents of deceased veterans who meet eligibility requirements may also be eligible for certain programs and services.”

Systems
  • Other

Employment Advocacy Initiatives - 05/09/2018

“The Council supports a policy of “Employment First” in which employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. The Council advocates for:

Policies that incentivize services for individualized integrated, competitive employment and dis-incentivize segregated, sheltered day habilitation services, Sheltered workshops to transition people into individualized, competitive, paid employment and discontinue admissions into segregated day programs, Improvements in the employment provider system with evidence-based practice, collaborative cross-agency infrastructure and training and technical assistance, and The Louisiana Rehabilitation Services’ (Vocational Rehabilitation [VR] program) federal draw down will increase and eventually include the entire federal VR grant award.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

“LOUISIANA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION POSTS DRAFT ESSA PLAN FOR PUBLIC COMMENT” - 02/20/2017

~~“ESSA's provisions become effective July 1, 2017. Per the law, the United States Secretary of Education must approve or deny a plan within 120 days of a state submitting its plan to the U.S. Department of Education. Because completion of the plan prior to the start of the school year in which it becomes effective is critically important for Louisiana administrators, educators and parents, Louisiana commenced public development of its plan more than a year in advance of the law taking effect.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Louisiana Awarded $2 Million to Improve Career Education” - 01/11/2017

~~“The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and JPMorgan Chase & Co. on Wednesday announced Louisiana is one of 10 states to receive a three-year, $2 million grant through phase two of the New Skills for Youth (NSFY) grant opportunity to strengthen and expand career-education pathways for students.

 "This New Skills for Youth grant will provide tremendous support for our state's high school teachers and students in accessing high-quality workforce training, particularly in rural school districts and in support of our students with disabilities," said Gov. John Bel Edwards. "I'm confident that Louisiana's team of state and local education, economic development and workforce partners will make excellent use of these funds to dramatically improve the number of our young citizens prepared for college, career and life success."

 The phase two grant funds will be used to expand Jump Start, the state's innovative career and technical education program, said State Superintendent of Education John White. "These funds will allow our state to build upon Jump Start's strong foundation, expanding opportunities and resources that enable our students to earn the industry credentials they need to attain employment in Louisiana's most important industries."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“THE HEART OF ESSA: REFLECT ON RESULTS, PLAN AND PRIORITIZE, AND FUND PRIORITIES” - 01/09/2017

~~“Career education access: Louisiana developed a career education initiative, Jump Start, as well as a diverse course delivery program known as Course Choice. Using funds won through the New Skills for Youth grant, Louisiana conducted an inventory of every pathway offered in every high school in the state. Further grant funding will in part go toward bolstering connections among employers, higher education, and high schools. Students with disabilities eligible to pursue a high school diploma via an alternate pathway may also select a Jump Start pathway to earn a career diploma and a recognized workforce credential. All Jump Start pathways are accessible to these students, with the student’s IEP team setting alternate exit and performance criteria.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Governor’s Advisory Council on Disability Affairs (GACDA) Annual Report 2017 - 01/01/2017

“The Governor’s Advisory Council on Disabilities Affairs (GACDA) was established by Governor John Bel Edwards through Executive Order NO. JBE 2016-10 on April 7, 2016 to monitor state compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and to advise the governor on the needs of individuals with disabilities in Louisiana. GACDA is also charged with assisting the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs with the resolution of state disability issues and provide education, communication, and networking services concerning disability issues and needs for all Louisiana citizens. GACDA is composed of 31 members appointed by governor Edwards. Support staff, facilities and resources for GACDA are provided by the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs within the Governor’s Office of Programs and Planning.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana’s “Every Student Succeeds Act” (ESSA) Framework - 09/28/2016

“Long-term indicators: To foster a better understanding of how skills taught in schools translate to life after high school, Louisiana will provide to schools and school systems an annual series of reports on the postsecondary success and economic productivity of their graduates as a group. These reports will provide local communities and educators with aggregated data regarding the measurable life outcomes experienced by recent graduates, including income, employment, and education attainment information

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

First-of-its kind workforce collaboration in Louisiana - 10/19/2017

“South Louisiana Community College, the board of directors for Local Workforce Development Board #40, and area parish presidents in Acadiana are partnering to improve workforce development in the region. The collaboration – a first for a community college in Louisiana – falls under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) enacted in 2014.

“The Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act puts great emphasis on the out-of-school youth, collaborations with re-entry and adult education partners, individuals with disabilities, in addition to the unemployed and underemployed populations. The board of LWDB #40 is confident that SLCC will be successful in coordinating the alignment of services among the One-Stop partners that will promote and increase successful outcomes to both the individual and the employer. Special gratitude to the parish presidents, Louisiana Workforce Commission Office of Workforce Development, LWDB #40 board of directors, One-Stop Committee members, attorney, CPA, partners and most importantly, the dedicated team of SLPG/LWDB #40 for continuous improvement of our Workforce Development programs,” said Brenda Hubbard-Thomas, LWDB #40 WIOA Executive Director.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Workgroup - 02/17/2017

~~“The first meeting of the Employment First Workgroup was held Thursday, February 16. The Workgroup is comprised of federal, state, regional and local agency stakeholders as well as community advocates, other professionals, business leaders, families, and individuals with disabilities to address barriers to employment and improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. During the meeting, members of the workgroup shared information and perspectives related to education, individuals and families, developmental disabilities, and services for people with disabilities. Attendees also shared their experiences regarding seeking employment and applying to receive services.The workgroup will meet monthly and will report its work by June 30, 2017. The next meeting will take place on March 23, 2017 at 10 a.m. at the Louisiana State Capitol on the 4th floor. The meeting will be open and all interested parties are encouraged to participate.” 

Systems
  • Other

Louisiana's Demand-Driven Workforce Investment Plan - 07/01/2012

Vocational Rehabilitation

“As a mandated partner in the Workforce Investment Act, the Vocational Rehabilitation Program is instrumental in meeting the workforce needs of individuals with disabilities in the state of Louisiana. The purpose of the VR Program is, in part, ‘to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society.’ The VR Program operates a statewide comprehensive program to assess, plan, develop and provide vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities, ‘consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice, so that such individuals may prepare for and engage in gainful employment.’”

 

W-P Section 8(b) 20 CFR 652.211

“The state has designated at least one person in each state or Federal employment office to promote and develop employment opportunities, job counseling, and placement for individuals with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Louisiana Workforce Commission.

“LRS continues to collaborate with LWC in identifying effective ways to integrate services in BCSCs [Business and Career Solution Centers]. LRS is represented on each of the LWIBs and attends meetings as scheduled. The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) established with each of the WIBs is updated annually. Within the 18 WIAs, 63 BCSCs have been established, 18 cost allocation plans have been completed by the WIBs and approved by all parties. LRS continues to pay expenses to the local centers for participation, as per the local cost allocation plans.”

“LWC is working with the Shared Youth Vision workgroup on youth, local workforce boards, youth councils, and community-based organizations to continue development of the systems needed to provide these comprehensive services to eligible youth, including coordination with Job Corps and other youth programs within each local workforce investment area. Vocational rehabilitation is involved in the development of these service strategies to ensure that youth with disabilities or other barriers to employment are included in the comprehensive service strategy.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Louisiana FY 2011 Block Grant State Plan

The Office of Behavioral Health (OBH) is a member of the WORK PAY$ committee. “This committee is comprised of community partners and is intended to further the employment of individuals with disabilities in the state of Louisiana. OBH is also working as a collaborative partner on both a state and regional level in the development and implementation of job fairs for individuals with disabilities throughout the state.”

“The Louisiana Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (LAWIPA) program helps Social Security beneficiaries work through issues relating to social security benefits and employment. The program is a coalition between the Advocacy Center of Louisiana and the LSU Health Sciences Center’s Human Development Center. Many individuals with disabilities who receive SSDI and/ or SSI benefits want to work or increase their work activity. One barrier for these individuals is the fear of losing health care and other benefits if they work. Valuable work incentive programs can extend benefits, but are often poorly understood and underutilized. The LAWIPA coalition educates clients and assists them in overcoming work barriers, perceived or real; and also focuses on improved community partnerships. Benefit specialists, called Community Work Incentive Coordinators, provide services to all Louisiana SSDI and SSI beneficiaries age 14 and older who have disabilities. CMHC staff and clients are able to work with Coordinators to help navigate the various work related resources (as offered in conjunction with the Ticket to Work program), and identify on an individualized basis the way their benefits will be impacted by going to work. The ultimate goal of the new WIPA coalition is to support the successful employment of beneficiaries with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
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