Maryland

States - Big Screen

The numerous efforts to support individuals with disabilities in securing and sustaining competitive, integrated employment in the Old Line State of Maryland are more than you can imagine. We're open for business, and welcome the skills and talents of workers with disabilities! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Maryland’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.59%
Change from
2016 to 2017
6,052,177
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
335,461
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
141,870
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.79%
Change from
2016 to 2017
42.29%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.27%
Change from
2016 to 2017
80.43%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 6,006,401 6,016,447 6,052,177
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 328,697 334,505 335,461
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 131,573 137,517 141,870
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,702,355 2,716,777 2,733,682
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.03% 41.11% 42.29%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.25% 80.21% 80.43%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.10% 4.30% 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 16.90% 17.70% 17.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.90% 8.70% 8.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 302,977 303,117 304,396
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 341,118 353,003 355,747
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 394,100 405,250 384,006
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 200,943 200,243 212,801
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 30,255 34,281 38,339
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,314 2,983 3,041
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 19,939 22,124 25,795
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 559 N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 16,358 14,959 18,249
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 9,882 10,239 16,000

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,165 6,308 6,375
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.80% 5.90% 5.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 131,074 130,269 129,481

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 17,019 12,955 13,764
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 37,890 31,395 32,876
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 74,986 59,031 58,225
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.70% 21.90% 23.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 5.20% 5.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 18.10% 18.70%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 5.30% 5.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A 3,268 2,675
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A 11,435 10,146
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A 3,362 3,186
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 10,425 9,388 8,821
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06 0.07 0.08

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 56 56 96
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 35 34 50
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00% 61.00% 52.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.59 0.57 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,290
4,222
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 240 209 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 287 253 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 549 531 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,227 1,359 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 797 764 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,183 1,103 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.60% 35.20% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,033 10,178 10,569
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 208,223 204,612 207,082
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 183 166 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 301 328 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $75,204,000 $75,498,000 $59,262,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $144,015,000 $0 $171,675,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $10,955,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 39.00% 37.00% 33.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A N/A 676
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A N/A 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 8,051 N/A 9,131
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 85.20 81.80 11.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.86% 68.95% 69.73%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.12% 12.95% 12.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 6.89% 6.93% 6.86%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.66% 98.49% 98.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 23.90% 23.45% 22.66%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 49.18% 54.63% 58.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 56.32% 61.47% 72.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 25.28% 31.18% 35.43%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 4,727,875
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 5,994
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 267,634
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 2,927,591
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,195,225
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 162
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 2,256
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,418
AbilityOne wages (products). $2,320,330
AbilityOne wages (services). $37,326,061

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 5 2 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 35 35 22
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3 3 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 43 40 25
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 885 408 172
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,469 3,470 2,056
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 393 393 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,747 4,271 2,229

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

Maryland’s workforce system will play a key role in embracing nationally recognized best practices including Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals with significant disabilities can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate support. (Page 40)

The Council recommends that Department of rehabilitation services continue collaboration with local providers, the Maryland Department of Disabilities, and the Developmental Disabilities Administration at the State and local levels, as related to the Employment First initiative. This should include an exploration of programmatic barriers to success and cross-agency training needs. (Page 221)

DORS looks forward to continuing to collaborate with other agencies, including the WIOA Partners, regarding Employment First.  Employment First is an initiative that assures that employment is considered on, developmental/intellectual disabilities. DORS expects that there will be more progress toward Employment First in Maryland this coming year with new leadership in place at the Maryland Developmental Disabilities Administration. (Pages 222, 226, 227)

 These formal interagency cooperative agreements will: identify policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated among the agencies (particularly definitions, standards for eligibility, the joint sharing and use of evaluations and assessments, and procedures for making referrals), identify available resources and define the financial responsibility of each agency for paying for necessary services (consistent with State law) and procedures for resolving disputes between agencies, and include all additional components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation and coordination. For Evidenced Based Supported Employment DORS has implemented a milestone payment system for psychiatric rehabilitation programs offering Evidence-Based Supported Employment services. The milestone payment system significantly streamlines provision of services for DORS and provider staff by substantially reducing preparation of authorizations and invoices, tracking of hours of services, and simplifying reporting. Employment First DORS is a partner with other State agencies (including WIOA Partner, DLLR) and Community Rehabilitation Programs in implementing Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals, including those with significant disabilities, consider employment on a preferred basis in planning for their lives. (Page 236)

DORS and DDA updated and approved the Cooperative Agreement, Employment Services, in October 2013. The agreement focuses on the implementation of Employment First in Maryland. It addresses referral between agencies, specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, and describes cross-training activities. (Pages 241, 246, 266, 256, 266, 269, 276, 299, 314, 323, 326, 339)

Customized Employment

Additional trainings regarding job carving, customized employment, and job development in general; 

  • Increased assistance to help the consumers with their transportation needs including: comprehensive travel training and reduced delays in transportation funding for consumers
  • Opportunities to interface with DORS staff and expand collaborative efforts in job development to include employment specialists and local businesses, opportunities for brainstorming client cases, and for employment specialists across agencies to share strategies and job leads
  • The hourly rates for services have not been increased in over five years. The low rates make it difficult for Community Rehabilitation Programs to hire effective job developers. (Page 267)

9.   Update the MOU with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Developmental Disabilities Administration that defines the roles of each agency in establishing a collaborative process toward the provision of customized employment and supported employment services in support of individuals moving from sheltered work to competitive integrated employment,

10. Align services, rates, and reporting requirements in support of pre-employment transition services and supported employment job placement/support services,

11. Identify, develop, and implement a more seamless services delivery system among workforce partners in Maryland

12. Continue collaboration between Maryland DORS and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Behavioral Health Administration in the implementation of a braided funding model that enhances and expands the ability of both DORS and BHA to fund services and increase capacity in the number of individuals eligible for mental health supported employment. (Page 276)

Performance Measures by September 30, 2016: 

  • DORS Rehabilitation Services Manuals will be updated consistent with changes in the Rehabilitation Act, as amended by WIOA, and in consultation with WIOA Partners;
  • Training will be provided to DORS staff on changes resulting from the reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act (e.g. pre-employment transition services, customized employment, limitations on use of subminimum wage, “competitive integrated employment” criteria, and services to employers) in coordination with WIOA Partners; a. DORS will continue to collaborate with WIOA Partners in the development and implementation of the Maryland WIOA State Plan. (Page 278)

Expanding & Improving Services to Individuals with Disabilities 

  • DORS will continually analyze office locations, staff deployment, staff positions and responsibilities, in accordance with DORS mission to more effectively serve students and adults with disabilities, and in collaboration with the WIOA Partners;
  • The 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment will include an assessment and recommendations for expanding and improving services to students and adults with disabilities;
  • In collaboration with the WIOA Partners, DORS will establish linkages with businesses and employers to include training, customized employment, education and disability awareness, on-site worksite assistive technology services, and mentoring/internship activities;
  • DORS will continue to enhance relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs to ensure availability of Community Rehabilitation Program services statewide;
  • DORS will continue to expand services and outreach to individuals who are deaf-blind and provide technical assistance to staff and WIOA Partners serving this population;
  • In collaboration with WIOA Partners, DORS will develop relationships with employers and analyze labor trends, to increase opportunities for employment of populations that are unserved or underserved. (Page 285)
Blending/ Braiding Resources

Development & Adult Learning 

  • Goodwill
  • Mid-Maryland Workforce Investment Area
  • Montgomery County Division of Workforce Investment Services
  • Tri County Council for Southern Maryland. Use of funds (braiding and leveraging)
  • Maryland Association for Adult Community and Continuing Education Maryland DHR-Family Investment Administration
  • Maryland DLLR-Division of Workforce Development & Adult Learning
  • Maryland State Dept. of Education-Division of Rehabilitation Services
  • Susquehanna Workforce Network, Inc. (Page 80)  

The Division enters into cooperative agreements with the Developmental Disabilities Administration and the Behavioral Health Administration in order to provide for increased interagency cooperation, to ensure the maximum utilization of appropriate programs and resources in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, to expand and improve services to individuals with significant disabilities, and to maximize the use of comparable benefits. (Page 236)

DEI/DRC

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

Maryland will focus resources toward improving the rate at which students’ transition from adult education programs to postsecondary education or training and employment. All academic instruction funded through AEFLA will be delivered concurrently with Workforce Preparation activities. State initiatives including implementation of the Integrating Career Awareness curriculum and integrated education and training (IET) pilots demonstrated that students need to master preliminary skills in order to succeed in academic and career training. Contextualized instruction incorporating the concurrently delivery of basic academic skills, critical thinking, and digital literacy and self-management skills in all levels of instruction will assist students to prepare for the rigor of a college curriculum, (Page 202)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Collaboration with various federal, state, local, business, and community partners ensures that soon to be released inmates have the necessary career training, work habits, teamwork, conflict resolution skills, and interview techniques that will enable them to land and keep good jobs with a self–sustaining salary. Workforce development professionals and career development facilitators work with individuals on financial literacy and communication strategies. They support efforts to re–unify family members and encourage custodial and non–custodial parents to be “responsible” parents. Staff works with recommended offenders until job placement occurs and continues with post–employment follow–up. The goal is to encourage the ex–offenders’ adjustment to living and working in a non–restrictive environment and to be competitively employed in an economically viable career pathway. The initiative reduces inmate recidivism and supports the formulation and maintenance of two–parent families (Page 362)  

School to Work Transition
  • Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) Program was developed by the USDOL in an effort to reduce the number of weeks that UI claimants receive benefits, by assisting them in quickly returning to the workforce. The RESEA Program is designed to help claimants to identify potential barriers to employment and assesses work search progress. It also includes an eligibility review, which in turn helps the DLLR Division of Unemployment Insurance to identify claimants that may be out of compliance with basic UI laws and policies regarding ability and availability to work, school attendance, and active work search. (Page 84)  

Maryland’s American Job Centers are required to provide reasonable accommodation for individuals with disabilities to ensure equal access and opportunity. The term “reasonable accommodation” is defined as “modifications or adjustments to an application/registration process that enables a qualified applicant/registrant with a disability to be considered for the aid, benefits, services, training or employment that the qualified applicant/registrant desires;” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to perform the essential functions of a job, or receive aid, benefits, services, or training equal to that provided to qualified individuals without disabilities,” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to enjoy the same benefits and privileges of the aid. (Page 124)

DORS will determine what information may be gleaned from the case management system related to waiting list and benefits status, and advise the Council. Through its active participation in the WIOA Alignment Group, the WIOA Jobseeker Advisory Focus Groups (to be planned), and the WIOA Workgroups, DORS will explore ways to better assist individuals with disabilities through the entire workforce system. (Page 222)

DORS belief that individuals with disabilities, even the most significant disabilities, can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate supports. Supported employment is appropriate for individuals in Employment First and is the means to assure the best chance for success in employment. Benefits planning is an important part of services for individuals served through Employment First. Governor’s Employment Program for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury, The Governor’s Employment Program for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI Project) provides intensive vocational rehabilitation and long-term supports to individuals with acquired brain injuries. This often includes needed neuropsychological and other assessments, training and supported employment services, and long-term job coaching. (Page 236)

Training and technical assistance to employers and WIOA Partners to promote the awareness of the skills and benefits that people with disabilities can bring to their workforce. Types of training included: information on DORS services and training programs, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and federal contractor compliance with Section 503. (Pages 239, 241, 267, 292, 307,326, 341, 342, 343, 35)

Career Pathways

Maryland State Dept. of Education works to develop policies to increase work study (School to Work)

  • Maryland Dept. of Disabilities
  • Maryland DLLR-Division of Workforce Development & Adult Learning. (Page 81) 

Under the order of selection, DORS will continue to emphasize and enhance services to students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. Description of Priority Categories An individual with a most significant disability (Category I) is an eligible individual (sic). (Page 280)

  • Employment development, such as school–to–work opportunities in partnership with private business and public agencies; and,
  • Health initiatives, such as improved access to birth control counseling and services for sexually active adolescents and parenting classes for every pregnant teenager and her partner. (Page 373)
Work Incentives & Benefits

The career pathways approach will require a workforce system transformation and can benefit a wide variety of participants, including low-skilled adults, high school students, disconnected youth, veterans, incumbent workers, individuals with disabilities, and other target populations. The system requires aligned and transparent educational progression with multiple entry points and clearly defined “on and off ramps.” The system warrants a source of funding to scale up and sustain initiatives, maintain the partnerships that are critical to the process, and must include tools to measure and evaluate outcomes.  (Page 66)

Employer Engagement

C.   THE DESIGNATED STATE UNIT WILL COORDINATE ACTIVITIES WITH ANY OTHER STATE AGENCY THAT IS FUNCTIONING AS AN EMPLOYMENT NETWORK UNDER THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM UNDER SECTION 1148 OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT.

  • FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION OF THE SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM:
    • THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY ASSURES THAT IT WILL EXPEND NO MORE THAN 2.5 PERCENT OF THE STATE’S ALLOTMENT UNDER TITLE VI FOR ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS OF CARRYING OUT THIS PROGRAM; AND, THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY OR AGENCIES WILL PROVIDE, DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY THROUGH PUBLIC OR PRIVATE ENTITIES, NON-FEDERAL CONTRIBUTIONS IN AN AMOUNT THAT IS NOT LESS THAN 10 PERCENT OF THECOSTS OF CARRYING OUT SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES PROVIDED TO YOUTH WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES WITH THE FUNDS RESERVED FOR SUCH PURPOSE UNDER SECTION 603(D) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 606(B)(7)(G) AND (H) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
    • THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY ASSURES THAT IT WILL USE FUNDS MADE AVAILABLE UNDER TITLE VI OF THE REHABILITATION ACT ONLY TO PROVIDE SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES, INCLUDING EXTENDED SERVICES TO YOUTH WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES, WHO ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE SUCH SERVICES; AND, THAT SUCH FUNDS ARE USED ONLY TO SUPPLEMENT AND NOT SUPPLANT THE FUNDS PROVIDED UNDER TITLE I OF THE REHABILITATION ACT, WHEN PROVIDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES SPECIFIED IN THE INDIVIDUALIZED PLAN FOR EMPLOYMENT, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 606(B)(7)(A) AND (D), OF THE REHABILITATION ACT. (Page 336)
511

The MWE is utilized to manage and validate operational activities, via an internet-accessible participant reporting and data collection system that all DLLR and local workforce area case managers use to report, collect, verify, and manage participant data from each of the local and regional teams. The system’s case management capabilities allow staff to determine program eligibility, track services, and report results to federal funding sources. (Page 74)

Professional development and ongoing technical assistance will be provided to local program administrators, teachers and partners on best practices incorporating the experience of the MI–BEST and ACE programs including recruitment, training selection, team teaching, support services, employer participation, outcomes, and data collection. (Page 203)

Utilize DORS and Developmental Disabilities Administration data collection systems to track anticipated increases in transitioning youth served through the Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative and their outcomes. (Pages 266, 287)

Mental Health

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 124 -127) 

  • Section 188 implements the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA, which are contained in Section 188 of the statute.
  • Section 188 prohibits discrimination on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, among other bases.
  • Section 188 also requires that reasonable accommodations be provided to qualified individuals with disabilities in certain circumstances. (Page 125)
Displaying 21 - 30 of 77

“Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities” - 09/30/2016

“The primary responsibility of the IATC is to review, revise and update annually the Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities to ensure effective interagency planning and delivery of services for secondary students with disabilities. Additionally, the IATC is tasked with identifying and reporting activities of each partner which impact the delivery, quality and availability of transition services. The IATC also serves in an advisory capacity to all transition-related federal grants.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD HCBS Transition Plan - 09/02/2016

Maryland receives funding from the federal government to help pay for services provided in programs such as the Autism, Brain Injury, Community Pathways, Community Options, Model, and Medical Day Waivers and a program that helps children, youth and families. Last year, the federal government put out new rules that states must follow to continue to receive funding to pay for services. Maryland reviewed programs and found areas that do not meet the rules and must be changed. This plan gives information about the new rules; the States review of programs and the plan to fix areas; and input received from various stakeholders like participants, family members, self-advocates, and others.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Guide to Maryland Medical Assistance Coverage” - 08/01/2016

“The purpose of a home and community based services waiver program, also known as a “1915(c) waiver,” is to enable children or aged, blind, or disabled adults requiring a nursing facility level of care to reside in their homes or community settings rather than in a medical institution. • Services for waiver participants are federally matched expenses, although these services are not included in the State Medicaid Plan. • Each waiver program has different medical and other non-financial criteria for its targeted population.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities - 07/01/2016

This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

“FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities” - 07/01/2016

“This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment.” It consists of a set of tables, one for each goal, that lists the measures and strategies that have been developed for the goal,and the data sources and agencies that are involved in each one.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HB 420/SB 417: Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA) - 05/19/2016

MDLC Board member Ken Capone, People on the Go, MDLC, and other advocates and coalition partners led this strong and successful effort to abolish the payment of subminimum wages to people with disabilities in Maryland. Like SB 765, the bill will become a national model when signed into law and make Maryland the second U.S. state to eliminate this discriminatory exception to Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. The EEA will phase out “sheltered workshops” that pay people as little as pennies per hour and require the Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration to implement a 4-year transition plan to move individuals from segregated day programs to competitive integrated employment. MDLC participates on the Employment First Steering Committee that is developing the policies and infrastructure to support transition to competitive integrated employment.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

HB 431/SB 355: ABLE Act - 04/12/2016

 Federal law enacted in December 2014 authorized states to establish tax-advantaged savings program to help people with disabilities save limited amounts for disability-related expenses (such as health care, assistive technology, education, employment supports and housing) without losing eligibility for certain public benefits. Maryland legislation enacted in 2015 established the ABLE Task Force to make recommendations for an ABLE Program, resulting in this year’s bill. College Savings Plans of Maryland and the Maryland Department of Disabilities and will co-manage the program. Governor Hogan committed $745,000 for program start-up costs and signed the legislation into law on April 12, 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Montgomery County, MD Customized Employment Intern Project (MCPIP) - 10/09/2015

An example of a successful County program serving individuals with significant disabilities is the Montgomery County Customized Employment Public Intern Project (MCPIP). Created in 2007, MCPIP provides flexible employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities to fulfill the work requirements of County departments. Department representatives work with a customized employment career specialist to identify and create part-time positions based on a department’s workforce needs. 

MCPIP participants serve as paid interns in department positions based on their individual job interests, skills and competencies. MCPIP interns gain valuable work experience by developing on-the-job skills to help them compete for County merit positions or opportunities in other organizations

Maryland’s Montgomery County government has adopted a policy to create internships for career seekers with significant disabilities, based on a Customized Employment (CE) strategy. This demand-driven CE policy creates the position for a CE Specialist at TransCen, Inc., a local workforce development intermediary, to conduct an analysis of a department’s need within the Montgomery County government.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland HB 473 - 05/12/2015

Altering the amount of a credit against specified State taxes for wages and child care or transportation expenses related to qualified employees with disabilities; and applying the Act to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2014.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Maryland SB 761 - 05/12/2015

“BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND, That: (a) “Maryland ABLE Program” means a program in Maryland allowing disabled individuals or their families to establish savings accounts to pay qualified expenses for disabled individuals authorized under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience  (ABLE) Act.  (b) It is the intent of the General Assembly that the State establish a Maryland ABLE Program.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Maryland Minimum Wage Act of 2014 (HB 0295/CH0262) - 07/01/2018

“Incrementally increasing the State minimum wage rate to $10.10 beginning July 1, 2018; authorizing specified employers to pay employees under the age of 20 years a specified wage under specified circumstances; requiring the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to increase reimbursement of community providers serving individuals with developmental disabilities; requiring the Governor, in specified fiscal years, to include in a specified budget proposal specified funding increases; etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

SB 0344/HB0448 “Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program - Account Clarifications” - 04/11/2017

~~“Clarifying that a specified amount may be contributed in each calendar year to an account for a disabled individual under the Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program; providing that contributions to an ABLE account may not exceed a specified maximum amount; and requiring the Maryland 529 Board to adopt specified procedures to ensure that specified contributions to ABLE accounts do not exceed a specified maximum limit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

HB 420/SB 417: Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA) - 05/19/2016

MDLC Board member Ken Capone, People on the Go, MDLC, and other advocates and coalition partners led this strong and successful effort to abolish the payment of subminimum wages to people with disabilities in Maryland. Like SB 765, the bill will become a national model when signed into law and make Maryland the second U.S. state to eliminate this discriminatory exception to Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. The EEA will phase out “sheltered workshops” that pay people as little as pennies per hour and require the Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration to implement a 4-year transition plan to move individuals from segregated day programs to competitive integrated employment. MDLC participates on the Employment First Steering Committee that is developing the policies and infrastructure to support transition to competitive integrated employment.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

HB 431/SB 355: ABLE Act - 04/12/2016

 Federal law enacted in December 2014 authorized states to establish tax-advantaged savings program to help people with disabilities save limited amounts for disability-related expenses (such as health care, assistive technology, education, employment supports and housing) without losing eligibility for certain public benefits. Maryland legislation enacted in 2015 established the ABLE Task Force to make recommendations for an ABLE Program, resulting in this year’s bill. College Savings Plans of Maryland and the Maryland Department of Disabilities and will co-manage the program. Governor Hogan committed $745,000 for program start-up costs and signed the legislation into law on April 12, 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maryland HB 473 - 05/12/2015

Altering the amount of a credit against specified State taxes for wages and child care or transportation expenses related to qualified employees with disabilities; and applying the Act to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2014.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Maryland SB 761 - 05/12/2015

“BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND, That: (a) “Maryland ABLE Program” means a program in Maryland allowing disabled individuals or their families to establish savings accounts to pay qualified expenses for disabled individuals authorized under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience  (ABLE) Act.  (b) It is the intent of the General Assembly that the State establish a Maryland ABLE Program.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

An Act Concerning Reasonable Accommodations For Disabilities Due to Pregnancy (HB804/SB784) - 04/08/2013

“[The Act] will require employers with more than 15 employees to provide reasonable accommodations to workers experiencing a disability caused or contributed by pregnancy. […] The Act prohibits an employer from refusing to make a reasonable accommodation for the known disability of a worker that is caused by pregnancy […]” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Executive Order 01.01.2017.23 Maryland Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/10/2017

“Now, therefore, I, Lawrence J. Hogan, Jr., Governor of the State of Maryland, by virtue of the power invested in my by the constitution and the laws of Maryland, declare the following:

 

Each State department, board, agency, authority, board, or instrumentality controlled by the Governor (an “Executive unit”) shall annually observe October as Disability Employment Awareness Month to celebrate the many and varied contributions of people with disabilities.The Department of Disabilities […] shall: reinforce the value and talents people with disabilities add to Maryland’s workplaces and communitiesIncreasing public awarenessTo promote individuals with disabilities’ access to technology”

 

Rescinds Executive Order 01.01.2009.10

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order 01.01.2009.10 Maryland Disability History and Awareness Month - 07/26/2009

“Now, therefore, I, Martin O’Malley, Governor of the State of Maryland […] hereby proclaim the following executive order, effective immediately.

State of Maryland Executive Branch agencies shall annually observe October as Disability History and Awareness Month.

The Department of Disabilities shall take steps to increase public awareness of the history of disabilities and the disability rights movement […]

The Maryland State Department of Education shall encourage and assist local boards of education to provide instruction in the history of disabilities, people with disabilities, and the disability rights movement during the observance of Disability History Awareness Month.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Executive Order 01.01.2007.13 - 08/02/2007

"It is the policy of the State of Maryland to ensure a smooth and effective transition for all students with disabilities from secondary education to adult services such as postsecondary education and employment; and to provide transition planning for students and families that is student focused and family-centered, based on individual strengths and needs, utilizes best practices, and leads to outcomes in the most integrated setting appropriate; and It is deemed necessary to establish an Interagency Transition Council to recommend policies and identify the funding requirements to ensure effective, efficient, and comprehensive delivery of services that will most effectively meet the transition needs of Maryland students with disabilities."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Temporary Disability Assistance

“The Temporary Disability Assistance Program (TDAP) is available to help low-income, disabled Marylanders through a period of short-term disability or while they are awaiting approval of federal disability support. The program is funded through the State of Maryland to provide help to individuals without dependent children.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maryland Workforce Promise Customized Employment Definition

“Customized Employment is…”

Individualizing the employment relationship between employees and employers in ways that meet the needs of both A person centered approach to employment that is based on the individual’s Strengths Needs Interests Blend of services designed to increase employment options for individuals with significant disabilities  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Public Engagement Strategies Redefine “No Wrong Door” in Maryland

For over ten years Maryland has refined its NWD/ADRC initiative, known as Maryland Access Points (MAP). The term “Maryland Access Point” was chosen to remove any semblance of preferences for “aging” or “disability” being first in the name, as Maryland wanted its NWD/ADRC to be seen as access points for all individuals needing LTSS. Starting in 2008, Maryland formally initiated its branding process and hired a consultant to construct a marketing plan for consumers and providers that eliminated system fragmentation, increased awareness of LTSS, and focused on prevention of crises. The state launched a toll free number in August 2014 and a new website in February 2015.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Department of Human Resources, Office of Employment and Program Equity

The Maryland Department of Human Resources is committed to the principle of fair practices and equal opportunity for all of its employees and customers. The Office of Employment and Program Equity has the primary responsibility for ensuring the effectiveness and success of the Department’s comprehensive Equal Opportunity Program. Programs include:

1.        Equal Employment Opportunity

2.        Affirmative Action

3.        Minority Business Enterprises

4.        Americans with Disabilities Act Compliance Program

5.        Title VI Compliance

6.        Program Equity

7.        Complaint Investigations

8.        DHR Mediation Program

          9.        Training and Technical Support

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Maryland Department of Education “Understanding the Evaluation, Eligibility and Individualized Education Program (IEP) Process in Maryland”

The public agency uses a team process to decide whether a child is a student with a disability as defined by the IDEA and the educational needs of the child. Each public agency is responsible for initiating and conducting meetings for the purposes of developing, reviewing, and revising the IEP of a student with a disability, and determining the child’s educational placement. The parents of each student with a disability must be notified and afforded the opportunity to participate in any IEP team meeting conducted for their child.  Parents are members of the IEP team that makes decisions regarding the child’s educational placement. The public agency shall make reasonable efforts to ensure that the parents understand, and are able to participate in any group discussions relating to the educational placement of their child, including arranging for an interpreter for parents with deafness, or whose native language is not English.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Rehabilitation Services “Training Customized for Your Business”

On-the-Job Training

DORS can provide funding for on-the-job training for a new employee and reimburse a business for a percentage of the new employees’ wages while they are in training.DORS also offers technical assistance and follow-along services to the trainee and the business.

Customized & Partnership Training

DORS partners with businesses and educational institutions to identify specific needs and design customized training programs to meet those needs. Training may take place at the DORS Workforce & Technology Center, on the job site, by an outside vendor, or by a combination of these settings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Maryland Department of Disabilities, Response to FY 2016 Budget Hearings

In November of 2014, MDOD was designated the Lead State Agency for a technical assistance opportunity through the US Department of Labor Office on Disability Employment Policy (ODEP). The Employment First Core State Leadership Mentoring Program will provide training and assess six (6) community providers to build capacity and transform community providers on customized employment. MDOD and the State and external partners will also develop recommendations for core competencies related to customized employment within the State and identify ways to infuse Employment First initiatives into the nonresidential portion of the State’s Home and Community Based Services Waivers delivered through Medicaid.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Maryland

In 2008/2009, the Developmental Disabilities Administration’s (DDA) engaged stakeholders in an intensive strategic planning process, including planning to improve employment outcomes for people with developmental disabilities in Maryland.   The following position statement is in support of the DDA’s broader values, mission and vision and is a product of that strategic planning process.   “The DDA believes that all people with developmental disabilities CAN work, and contribute to their community, when given opportunity, training, and supports that build on their strengths.  Employment will be the first option considered for all people of working age who receive DDA services.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD Developmental Disabilities Administration Position Statement on Employment Services

"In 2008, the Developmental Disabilities Administration’s (DDA) engaged stakeholders in an intensive strategic planning process, including planning to improve employment outcomes for people with developmental disabilities in Maryland. The following position statement is in support of the DDA’s broader values, mission and vision and is a product of the strategic planning process.

Commitment: The DDA believes that all people with developmental disabilities CAN work, and contribute to their community, when given opportunity, training, and supports that build on their strengths. Position Statement: Employment will be the “first” option considered for all people of working age who receive DDA services. Vision: Every Marylander maximizes his/her career potential and employers have access to the human resources they need to be successful."  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

MD DDA Definition of Day and Employment Services

SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT “Employment in an integrated work setting. This is defined as a workplace in the community, where the majority of individuals do not have disabilities, and which provides opportunities to interact with non-disabled individual to the same extent that individuals employed in comparable position would interact. Individuals are working in individualized, integrated jobs in the community business for pay at or above minimum wage.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council “2017 Legislative Overview” - 04/01/2017

~~“DDA FY2018 Budget Expansion: Approximately 789 young adults with developmental disabilities leaving school will receive employment or other day services. DDA projects that 100% of transitioning youth will receive this support.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities - 09/30/2016

~~"The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities.  “

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities - 07/01/2016

This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD Governor’s Interagency Transition Council (IATC) - 08/02/2007

~~The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Navigating the Transition Years Handbook 2010

If your child has an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), a team of staff members is responsible for helping them with their transition planning and the implementation of their plan. If your child is on a 504 plan, they still have access to the services of a guidance counselor, transition coordinator, and Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) counselor, but you and your child may be responsible for initiating contact to access their support

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Customized Employment Project

The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s Mental Health

"Incorporated in 1999 as a private, nonprofit organization, MCF is Maryland’s statewide family network organization, a designation from the federal Substance Use and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). MCF changed its name from "Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s Mental Health" to the "Maryland Coalition of Families" in 2016. MCF is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors comprised of at least 51% adult caregivers of a child or adolescent with a diagnosable emotional or behavioral disability. All of our family support staff are parents who have cared for a child with behavioral health needs and have been trained to help other families."
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Learning Links - Transition 101

Maryland Learning Links is a site developed under federal funding through a State Improvement Grant.  It is co-owned by the Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Special Education and Early Intervention Services (MSDE), and other community stakeholders. The Transition section of the site, “ is primarily meant to provide parents with the information they need to support the successful transition of their children to adulthood.   It’s filled with… information and tools… and several timelines that can help [parents] better understand and make the most of Transition Planning and Services…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative (GTYI)

The Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative (GTYI) is a collaboration funded through a partnership between the Maryland Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) and the Maryland Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA).  The purpose of the Initiative is to show that all students with disabilities can work and contribute to Maryland’s future after leaving school.  The Governor's Transitioning Youth Initiative earmarks funds in the DDA budget for eligible students leaving school, regardless of the severity of their situation and their relative need for immediate services.  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene “Provider Enrollment”

~The Maryland Department of Health has reviewed the  Senior Center Plus sites in the state and has found that currently all of the sites are community based and meet the criteria of the Community Settings regulations. The Maryland Department of Health invites public comment on the Senior Center Plus providers. A public comment period will be open from May 25, 2018 to June 25, 2018. Once the public comment period is complete, this information and the comments will be submitted to CMS for review. Please send all comments to mdh.hcbssetting@maryland.gov or Rebecca Oliver, Health Policy Analyst Advanced, Room 134, 201 W Preston St, Baltimore, MD 21201. 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Maryland Customized Employment Project

The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland EID Program

The EID Program, administered by the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH), provides Medical Assistance (also called Medicaid) to working Marylanders with disabilities who meet a few conditions.  Medical Assistance:    • Covers most medical services for individuals who have no other health insurance,    • Saves individuals with Medicare $1,000 - $12,000 a year    • Supplements private insurance, paying for some services that the other insurance does not cover  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) in Maryland will help people transition from an institution, for example a nursing facility, to community living in an apartment, private home, or small group setting. MFP initiatives increase outreach to individuals in institutions and decrease barriers to transition. New efforts under MFP include peer mentoring, enhanced transition assistance, improved information technology, housing assistance, flexible transition funds, and the addition of waiver services to existing waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Community First Choice

“The program provide assistance with activities of daily living to Medicaid recipients who have a chronic illness, medical condition or disability. Services are provided in the eligible individual's home or community residence (waiver participants may receive services in an assisted living facility). Other services in each program vary.  Please see each program’s fact sheet for information about the specific services provided through the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Balancing Incentive Program

“The Balancing Incentive Program authorizes grants to States to increase access to non-institutional long-term services and supports…The Balancing Incentive Program will help States transform their long-term care systems by, [l]owering costs through improved systems performance & efficiency, [c]reating tools to help consumers with care planning & assessment, [and], [i]mproving quality measurement & oversight.  The Balancing Incentive Program also provides new ways to serve more people in home and community-based settings, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as required by the Olmstead decision.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Annual Maryland Transition Conference

Sponsored by the Governor's Interagency Transition Council, for Youth with Disabilities. Topics Include:

Employment Postsecondary Education Adult Service Linkages Accommodations & Supports Youth Development & Leadership Housing  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities

The Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities (MCDD) at Kennedy Krieger Institute is dedicated to leadership in the field of developmental and other disabilities, so that people of all ages can maximize their potential and achieve independence, productivity, and inclusion within their communities   The Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities staff are engaged in four core functions:    • Interdisciplinary Pre-Service Training    • Community Service and Technical Assistance    • Research and Evaluation    • Dissemination Activities  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

United States vs. Baltimore County, MD - 08/07/2012

The decree requires the County to  adopt new policies and procedures regarding the administration of medical examinations and inquiries and provide training on the ADA to all current supervisory employees and all employees who participate in making personnel decisions

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Maryland Medicaid Community Options Waiver (formerly Waiver for Older Adults) - 01/01/2018

“Until recently, the Maryland Community Options Medicaid Waiver was called the Waiver for Older Adults. That program and the Living at Home Medicaid Waiver are now merged under this new title. This waiver is also called the Home and Community-Based Options (HCBO) Waiver and, in this article, it is referred to as simply the CO Waiver.

 

The new CO waiver allows elderly individuals and those with physical disabilities who need nursing home level care to receive care services in their home or a group living community facility instead. Group living communities can include assisted living residences, provided they are participating in the program and willing to accept the Medicaid payment rates.

 

The CO Waiver is popular both with families and the state of Maryland, but for different reasons. Participants generally prefer to remain living at home for as long as possible; this waiver assists them in doing so. The cost of caring for someone at home is also less expensive for the state than it would be to place the individual in a nursing home. This is because home care utilizes caregiving assistance from family members.

 

Maryland Medicaid programs in general are sometimes referred to as Medical Assistance (MA).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1115 HealthChoice Waiver Renewal - 01/01/2017

~The Maryland Department of Health (the Department) is proposing an amendment to its §1115 demonstration waiver known as HealthChoice, which the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has authorized through December 31, 2021. HealthChoice, first implemented in 1997 under the authority of §1115 of the Social Security Act, is Maryland’s statewide mandatory managed care program for Medicaid enrollees. Under HealthChoice, eligible families and individuals are required to enroll in a managed care organization (MCO) that has been approved by the Department. Each MCO is responsible for ensuring that HealthChoice enrollees have access to a network of medical providers that can meet their health needs.

The State’s 30-day public comment period was open from May 21, 2018 through June 19, 2018. The draft waiver amendment application is available here. The final submitted waiver amendment application is available here. Hard copies of the application may be obtained by calling (410) 767-5677.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MD HCBS Transition Plan - 09/02/2016

Maryland receives funding from the federal government to help pay for services provided in programs such as the Autism, Brain Injury, Community Pathways, Community Options, Model, and Medical Day Waivers and a program that helps children, youth and families. Last year, the federal government put out new rules that states must follow to continue to receive funding to pay for services. Maryland reviewed programs and found areas that do not meet the rules and must be changed. This plan gives information about the new rules; the States review of programs and the plan to fix areas; and input received from various stakeholders like participants, family members, self-advocates, and others.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Guide to Maryland Medical Assistance Coverage” - 08/01/2016

“The purpose of a home and community based services waiver program, also known as a “1915(c) waiver,” is to enable children or aged, blind, or disabled adults requiring a nursing facility level of care to reside in their homes or community settings rather than in a medical institution. • Services for waiver participants are federally matched expenses, although these services are not included in the State Medicaid Plan. • Each waiver program has different medical and other non-financial criteria for its targeted population.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MD Community Pathways (0023.R06.00) - 07/01/2013

Provides community residential hab, community supported living arrangements, expanded day hab-employment discovery and customization, expanded day hab-supported employment, live-in caregiver, medical day care, resource coordination, respite, traditional day hab, assistive technology and adaptive equipment, behavioral supports, environmental accessibility adaptations, expanded day hab-community learning, family/individual support, residential hab II, transition, transportation for individual w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland DoE ESEA Flexibility Waiver - 05/29/2012

“MSDE’s core values of commitment to every student, belief that all students can and must learn, certainty that schools  must help students grow, and conviction that the educator evaluation system must be equitable are achieved through data-driven accountability systems, high standards of excellence from teachers and principals and dynamic collaboration between Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and MSDE.  Maryland’s ambitious mission is to provide every student with a world-class education that ensures post-graduation college- and career-readiness”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD New Directions Independence Plus Waiver (0424.R01.00) - 07/01/2008

Provides community supported living arrangements, expanded day hab-supported employment, expanded day hab-employment discovery and customization, live-in caregiver, medical day care, resource coordination, respite, traditional day hab, support brokerage, assistive technology and adaptative equipment, behavioral supports, environmental accessibility adaptation, expanded day hab-community learning, family/individual support, transition, transportation for individuals w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age.

This waiver expired 06/30/2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) in Maryland will help people transition from an institution, for example a nursing facility, to community living in an apartment, private home, or small group setting. MFP initiatives increase outreach to individuals in institutions and decrease barriers to transition. New efforts under MFP include peer mentoring, enhanced transition assistance, improved information technology, housing assistance, flexible transition funds, and the addition of waiver services to existing waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Community First Choice

“The program provide assistance with activities of daily living to Medicaid recipients who have a chronic illness, medical condition or disability. Services are provided in the eligible individual's home or community residence (waiver participants may receive services in an assisted living facility). Other services in each program vary.  Please see each program’s fact sheet for information about the specific services provided through the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The numerous efforts to support individuals with disabilities in securing and sustaining competitive, integrated employment in the Old Line State of Maryland are more than you can imagine. We're open for business, and welcome the skills and talents of workers with disabilities! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Maryland’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.59%
Change from
2016 to 2017
6,052,177
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
335,461
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
141,870
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.79%
Change from
2016 to 2017
42.29%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.27%
Change from
2016 to 2017
80.43%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 6,006,401 6,016,447 6,052,177
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 328,697 334,505 335,461
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 131,573 137,517 141,870
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,702,355 2,716,777 2,733,682
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.03% 41.11% 42.29%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.25% 80.21% 80.43%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.10% 4.30% 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 16.90% 17.70% 17.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.90% 8.70% 8.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 302,977 303,117 304,396
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 341,118 353,003 355,747
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 394,100 405,250 384,006
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 200,943 200,243 212,801
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 30,255 34,281 38,339
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,314 2,983 3,041
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 19,939 22,124 25,795
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 559 N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 16,358 14,959 18,249
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 9,882 10,239 16,000

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,165 6,308 6,375
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.80% 5.90% 5.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 131,074 130,269 129,481

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 17,019 12,955 13,764
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 37,890 31,395 32,876
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 74,986 59,031 58,225
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.70% 21.90% 23.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 5.20% 5.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 18.10% 18.70%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 5.30% 5.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A 3,268 2,675
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A 11,435 10,146
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A 3,362 3,186
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 10,425 9,388 8,821
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06 0.07 0.08

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 56 56 96
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 35 34 50
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00% 61.00% 52.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.59 0.57 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,290
4,222
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 240 209 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 287 253 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 549 531 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,227 1,359 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 797 764 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,183 1,103 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.60% 35.20% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,033 10,178 10,569
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 208,223 204,612 207,082
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 183 166 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 301 328 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $75,204,000 $75,498,000 $59,262,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $144,015,000 $0 $171,675,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $10,955,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 39.00% 37.00% 33.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A N/A 676
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A N/A 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 8,051 N/A 9,131
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 85.20 81.80 11.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.86% 68.95% 69.73%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.12% 12.95% 12.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 6.89% 6.93% 6.86%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.66% 98.49% 98.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 23.90% 23.45% 22.66%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 49.18% 54.63% 58.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 56.32% 61.47% 72.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 25.28% 31.18% 35.43%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 4,727,875
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 5,994
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 267,634
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 2,927,591
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,195,225
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 162
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 2,256
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,418
AbilityOne wages (products). $2,320,330
AbilityOne wages (services). $37,326,061

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 5 2 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 35 35 22
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3 3 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 43 40 25
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 885 408 172
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,469 3,470 2,056
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 393 393 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,747 4,271 2,229

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

Maryland’s workforce system will play a key role in embracing nationally recognized best practices including Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals with significant disabilities can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate support. (Page 40)

The Council recommends that Department of rehabilitation services continue collaboration with local providers, the Maryland Department of Disabilities, and the Developmental Disabilities Administration at the State and local levels, as related to the Employment First initiative. This should include an exploration of programmatic barriers to success and cross-agency training needs. (Page 221)

DORS looks forward to continuing to collaborate with other agencies, including the WIOA Partners, regarding Employment First.  Employment First is an initiative that assures that employment is considered on, developmental/intellectual disabilities. DORS expects that there will be more progress toward Employment First in Maryland this coming year with new leadership in place at the Maryland Developmental Disabilities Administration. (Pages 222, 226, 227)

 These formal interagency cooperative agreements will: identify policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated among the agencies (particularly definitions, standards for eligibility, the joint sharing and use of evaluations and assessments, and procedures for making referrals), identify available resources and define the financial responsibility of each agency for paying for necessary services (consistent with State law) and procedures for resolving disputes between agencies, and include all additional components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation and coordination. For Evidenced Based Supported Employment DORS has implemented a milestone payment system for psychiatric rehabilitation programs offering Evidence-Based Supported Employment services. The milestone payment system significantly streamlines provision of services for DORS and provider staff by substantially reducing preparation of authorizations and invoices, tracking of hours of services, and simplifying reporting. Employment First DORS is a partner with other State agencies (including WIOA Partner, DLLR) and Community Rehabilitation Programs in implementing Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals, including those with significant disabilities, consider employment on a preferred basis in planning for their lives. (Page 236)

DORS and DDA updated and approved the Cooperative Agreement, Employment Services, in October 2013. The agreement focuses on the implementation of Employment First in Maryland. It addresses referral between agencies, specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, and describes cross-training activities. (Pages 241, 246, 266, 256, 266, 269, 276, 299, 314, 323, 326, 339)

Customized Employment

Additional trainings regarding job carving, customized employment, and job development in general; 

  • Increased assistance to help the consumers with their transportation needs including: comprehensive travel training and reduced delays in transportation funding for consumers
  • Opportunities to interface with DORS staff and expand collaborative efforts in job development to include employment specialists and local businesses, opportunities for brainstorming client cases, and for employment specialists across agencies to share strategies and job leads
  • The hourly rates for services have not been increased in over five years. The low rates make it difficult for Community Rehabilitation Programs to hire effective job developers. (Page 267)

9.   Update the MOU with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Developmental Disabilities Administration that defines the roles of each agency in establishing a collaborative process toward the provision of customized employment and supported employment services in support of individuals moving from sheltered work to competitive integrated employment,

10. Align services, rates, and reporting requirements in support of pre-employment transition services and supported employment job placement/support services,

11. Identify, develop, and implement a more seamless services delivery system among workforce partners in Maryland

12. Continue collaboration between Maryland DORS and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Behavioral Health Administration in the implementation of a braided funding model that enhances and expands the ability of both DORS and BHA to fund services and increase capacity in the number of individuals eligible for mental health supported employment. (Page 276)

Performance Measures by September 30, 2016: 

  • DORS Rehabilitation Services Manuals will be updated consistent with changes in the Rehabilitation Act, as amended by WIOA, and in consultation with WIOA Partners;
  • Training will be provided to DORS staff on changes resulting from the reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act (e.g. pre-employment transition services, customized employment, limitations on use of subminimum wage, “competitive integrated employment” criteria, and services to employers) in coordination with WIOA Partners; a. DORS will continue to collaborate with WIOA Partners in the development and implementation of the Maryland WIOA State Plan. (Page 278)

Expanding & Improving Services to Individuals with Disabilities 

  • DORS will continually analyze office locations, staff deployment, staff positions and responsibilities, in accordance with DORS mission to more effectively serve students and adults with disabilities, and in collaboration with the WIOA Partners;
  • The 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment will include an assessment and recommendations for expanding and improving services to students and adults with disabilities;
  • In collaboration with the WIOA Partners, DORS will establish linkages with businesses and employers to include training, customized employment, education and disability awareness, on-site worksite assistive technology services, and mentoring/internship activities;
  • DORS will continue to enhance relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs to ensure availability of Community Rehabilitation Program services statewide;
  • DORS will continue to expand services and outreach to individuals who are deaf-blind and provide technical assistance to staff and WIOA Partners serving this population;
  • In collaboration with WIOA Partners, DORS will develop relationships with employers and analyze labor trends, to increase opportunities for employment of populations that are unserved or underserved. (Page 285)
Blending/ Braiding Resources

Development & Adult Learning 

  • Goodwill
  • Mid-Maryland Workforce Investment Area
  • Montgomery County Division of Workforce Investment Services
  • Tri County Council for Southern Maryland. Use of funds (braiding and leveraging)
  • Maryland Association for Adult Community and Continuing Education Maryland DHR-Family Investment Administration
  • Maryland DLLR-Division of Workforce Development & Adult Learning
  • Maryland State Dept. of Education-Division of Rehabilitation Services
  • Susquehanna Workforce Network, Inc. (Page 80)  

The Division enters into cooperative agreements with the Developmental Disabilities Administration and the Behavioral Health Administration in order to provide for increased interagency cooperation, to ensure the maximum utilization of appropriate programs and resources in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, to expand and improve services to individuals with significant disabilities, and to maximize the use of comparable benefits. (Page 236)

DEI/DRC

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

Maryland will focus resources toward improving the rate at which students’ transition from adult education programs to postsecondary education or training and employment. All academic instruction funded through AEFLA will be delivered concurrently with Workforce Preparation activities. State initiatives including implementation of the Integrating Career Awareness curriculum and integrated education and training (IET) pilots demonstrated that students need to master preliminary skills in order to succeed in academic and career training. Contextualized instruction incorporating the concurrently delivery of basic academic skills, critical thinking, and digital literacy and self-management skills in all levels of instruction will assist students to prepare for the rigor of a college curriculum, (Page 202)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Collaboration with various federal, state, local, business, and community partners ensures that soon to be released inmates have the necessary career training, work habits, teamwork, conflict resolution skills, and interview techniques that will enable them to land and keep good jobs with a self–sustaining salary. Workforce development professionals and career development facilitators work with individuals on financial literacy and communication strategies. They support efforts to re–unify family members and encourage custodial and non–custodial parents to be “responsible” parents. Staff works with recommended offenders until job placement occurs and continues with post–employment follow–up. The goal is to encourage the ex–offenders’ adjustment to living and working in a non–restrictive environment and to be competitively employed in an economically viable career pathway. The initiative reduces inmate recidivism and supports the formulation and maintenance of two–parent families (Page 362)  

School to Work Transition
  • Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) Program was developed by the USDOL in an effort to reduce the number of weeks that UI claimants receive benefits, by assisting them in quickly returning to the workforce. The RESEA Program is designed to help claimants to identify potential barriers to employment and assesses work search progress. It also includes an eligibility review, which in turn helps the DLLR Division of Unemployment Insurance to identify claimants that may be out of compliance with basic UI laws and policies regarding ability and availability to work, school attendance, and active work search. (Page 84)  

Maryland’s American Job Centers are required to provide reasonable accommodation for individuals with disabilities to ensure equal access and opportunity. The term “reasonable accommodation” is defined as “modifications or adjustments to an application/registration process that enables a qualified applicant/registrant with a disability to be considered for the aid, benefits, services, training or employment that the qualified applicant/registrant desires;” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to perform the essential functions of a job, or receive aid, benefits, services, or training equal to that provided to qualified individuals without disabilities,” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to enjoy the same benefits and privileges of the aid. (Page 124)

DORS will determine what information may be gleaned from the case management system related to waiting list and benefits status, and advise the Council. Through its active participation in the WIOA Alignment Group, the WIOA Jobseeker Advisory Focus Groups (to be planned), and the WIOA Workgroups, DORS will explore ways to better assist individuals with disabilities through the entire workforce system. (Page 222)

DORS belief that individuals with disabilities, even the most significant disabilities, can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate supports. Supported employment is appropriate for individuals in Employment First and is the means to assure the best chance for success in employment. Benefits planning is an important part of services for individuals served through Employment First. Governor’s Employment Program for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury, The Governor’s Employment Program for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI Project) provides intensive vocational rehabilitation and long-term supports to individuals with acquired brain injuries. This often includes needed neuropsychological and other assessments, training and supported employment services, and long-term job coaching. (Page 236)

Training and technical assistance to employers and WIOA Partners to promote the awareness of the skills and benefits that people with disabilities can bring to their workforce. Types of training included: information on DORS services and training programs, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and federal contractor compliance with Section 503. (Pages 239, 241, 267, 292, 307,326, 341, 342, 343, 35)

Career Pathways

Maryland State Dept. of Education works to develop policies to increase work study (School to Work)

  • Maryland Dept. of Disabilities
  • Maryland DLLR-Division of Workforce Development & Adult Learning. (Page 81) 

Under the order of selection, DORS will continue to emphasize and enhance services to students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. Description of Priority Categories An individual with a most significant disability (Category I) is an eligible individual (sic). (Page 280)

  • Employment development, such as school–to–work opportunities in partnership with private business and public agencies; and,
  • Health initiatives, such as improved access to birth control counseling and services for sexually active adolescents and parenting classes for every pregnant teenager and her partner. (Page 373)
Work Incentives & Benefits

The career pathways approach will require a workforce system transformation and can benefit a wide variety of participants, including low-skilled adults, high school students, disconnected youth, veterans, incumbent workers, individuals with disabilities, and other target populations. The system requires aligned and transparent educational progression with multiple entry points and clearly defined “on and off ramps.” The system warrants a source of funding to scale up and sustain initiatives, maintain the partnerships that are critical to the process, and must include tools to measure and evaluate outcomes.  (Page 66)

Employer Engagement

C.   THE DESIGNATED STATE UNIT WILL COORDINATE ACTIVITIES WITH ANY OTHER STATE AGENCY THAT IS FUNCTIONING AS AN EMPLOYMENT NETWORK UNDER THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM UNDER SECTION 1148 OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT.

  • FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION OF THE SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM:
    • THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY ASSURES THAT IT WILL EXPEND NO MORE THAN 2.5 PERCENT OF THE STATE’S ALLOTMENT UNDER TITLE VI FOR ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS OF CARRYING OUT THIS PROGRAM; AND, THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY OR AGENCIES WILL PROVIDE, DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY THROUGH PUBLIC OR PRIVATE ENTITIES, NON-FEDERAL CONTRIBUTIONS IN AN AMOUNT THAT IS NOT LESS THAN 10 PERCENT OF THECOSTS OF CARRYING OUT SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES PROVIDED TO YOUTH WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES WITH THE FUNDS RESERVED FOR SUCH PURPOSE UNDER SECTION 603(D) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 606(B)(7)(G) AND (H) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
    • THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY ASSURES THAT IT WILL USE FUNDS MADE AVAILABLE UNDER TITLE VI OF THE REHABILITATION ACT ONLY TO PROVIDE SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES, INCLUDING EXTENDED SERVICES TO YOUTH WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES, WHO ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE SUCH SERVICES; AND, THAT SUCH FUNDS ARE USED ONLY TO SUPPLEMENT AND NOT SUPPLANT THE FUNDS PROVIDED UNDER TITLE I OF THE REHABILITATION ACT, WHEN PROVIDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES SPECIFIED IN THE INDIVIDUALIZED PLAN FOR EMPLOYMENT, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 606(B)(7)(A) AND (D), OF THE REHABILITATION ACT. (Page 336)
511

The MWE is utilized to manage and validate operational activities, via an internet-accessible participant reporting and data collection system that all DLLR and local workforce area case managers use to report, collect, verify, and manage participant data from each of the local and regional teams. The system’s case management capabilities allow staff to determine program eligibility, track services, and report results to federal funding sources. (Page 74)

Professional development and ongoing technical assistance will be provided to local program administrators, teachers and partners on best practices incorporating the experience of the MI–BEST and ACE programs including recruitment, training selection, team teaching, support services, employer participation, outcomes, and data collection. (Page 203)

Utilize DORS and Developmental Disabilities Administration data collection systems to track anticipated increases in transitioning youth served through the Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative and their outcomes. (Pages 266, 287)

Mental Health

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 124 -127) 

  • Section 188 implements the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA, which are contained in Section 188 of the statute.
  • Section 188 prohibits discrimination on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, among other bases.
  • Section 188 also requires that reasonable accommodations be provided to qualified individuals with disabilities in certain circumstances. (Page 125)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 21 - 30 of 77

“Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities” - 09/30/2016

“The primary responsibility of the IATC is to review, revise and update annually the Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities to ensure effective interagency planning and delivery of services for secondary students with disabilities. Additionally, the IATC is tasked with identifying and reporting activities of each partner which impact the delivery, quality and availability of transition services. The IATC also serves in an advisory capacity to all transition-related federal grants.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD HCBS Transition Plan - 09/02/2016

Maryland receives funding from the federal government to help pay for services provided in programs such as the Autism, Brain Injury, Community Pathways, Community Options, Model, and Medical Day Waivers and a program that helps children, youth and families. Last year, the federal government put out new rules that states must follow to continue to receive funding to pay for services. Maryland reviewed programs and found areas that do not meet the rules and must be changed. This plan gives information about the new rules; the States review of programs and the plan to fix areas; and input received from various stakeholders like participants, family members, self-advocates, and others.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Guide to Maryland Medical Assistance Coverage” - 08/01/2016

“The purpose of a home and community based services waiver program, also known as a “1915(c) waiver,” is to enable children or aged, blind, or disabled adults requiring a nursing facility level of care to reside in their homes or community settings rather than in a medical institution. • Services for waiver participants are federally matched expenses, although these services are not included in the State Medicaid Plan. • Each waiver program has different medical and other non-financial criteria for its targeted population.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities - 07/01/2016

This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

“FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities” - 07/01/2016

“This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment.” It consists of a set of tables, one for each goal, that lists the measures and strategies that have been developed for the goal,and the data sources and agencies that are involved in each one.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HB 420/SB 417: Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA) - 05/19/2016

MDLC Board member Ken Capone, People on the Go, MDLC, and other advocates and coalition partners led this strong and successful effort to abolish the payment of subminimum wages to people with disabilities in Maryland. Like SB 765, the bill will become a national model when signed into law and make Maryland the second U.S. state to eliminate this discriminatory exception to Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. The EEA will phase out “sheltered workshops” that pay people as little as pennies per hour and require the Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration to implement a 4-year transition plan to move individuals from segregated day programs to competitive integrated employment. MDLC participates on the Employment First Steering Committee that is developing the policies and infrastructure to support transition to competitive integrated employment.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

HB 431/SB 355: ABLE Act - 04/12/2016

 Federal law enacted in December 2014 authorized states to establish tax-advantaged savings program to help people with disabilities save limited amounts for disability-related expenses (such as health care, assistive technology, education, employment supports and housing) without losing eligibility for certain public benefits. Maryland legislation enacted in 2015 established the ABLE Task Force to make recommendations for an ABLE Program, resulting in this year’s bill. College Savings Plans of Maryland and the Maryland Department of Disabilities and will co-manage the program. Governor Hogan committed $745,000 for program start-up costs and signed the legislation into law on April 12, 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Montgomery County, MD Customized Employment Intern Project (MCPIP) - 10/09/2015

An example of a successful County program serving individuals with significant disabilities is the Montgomery County Customized Employment Public Intern Project (MCPIP). Created in 2007, MCPIP provides flexible employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities to fulfill the work requirements of County departments. Department representatives work with a customized employment career specialist to identify and create part-time positions based on a department’s workforce needs. 

MCPIP participants serve as paid interns in department positions based on their individual job interests, skills and competencies. MCPIP interns gain valuable work experience by developing on-the-job skills to help them compete for County merit positions or opportunities in other organizations

Maryland’s Montgomery County government has adopted a policy to create internships for career seekers with significant disabilities, based on a Customized Employment (CE) strategy. This demand-driven CE policy creates the position for a CE Specialist at TransCen, Inc., a local workforce development intermediary, to conduct an analysis of a department’s need within the Montgomery County government.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland HB 473 - 05/12/2015

Altering the amount of a credit against specified State taxes for wages and child care or transportation expenses related to qualified employees with disabilities; and applying the Act to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2014.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Maryland SB 761 - 05/12/2015

“BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND, That: (a) “Maryland ABLE Program” means a program in Maryland allowing disabled individuals or their families to establish savings accounts to pay qualified expenses for disabled individuals authorized under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience  (ABLE) Act.  (b) It is the intent of the General Assembly that the State establish a Maryland ABLE Program.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Maryland Minimum Wage Act of 2014 (HB 0295/CH0262) - 07/01/2018

“Incrementally increasing the State minimum wage rate to $10.10 beginning July 1, 2018; authorizing specified employers to pay employees under the age of 20 years a specified wage under specified circumstances; requiring the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to increase reimbursement of community providers serving individuals with developmental disabilities; requiring the Governor, in specified fiscal years, to include in a specified budget proposal specified funding increases; etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

SB 0344/HB0448 “Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program - Account Clarifications” - 04/11/2017

~~“Clarifying that a specified amount may be contributed in each calendar year to an account for a disabled individual under the Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program; providing that contributions to an ABLE account may not exceed a specified maximum amount; and requiring the Maryland 529 Board to adopt specified procedures to ensure that specified contributions to ABLE accounts do not exceed a specified maximum limit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

HB 420/SB 417: Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA) - 05/19/2016

MDLC Board member Ken Capone, People on the Go, MDLC, and other advocates and coalition partners led this strong and successful effort to abolish the payment of subminimum wages to people with disabilities in Maryland. Like SB 765, the bill will become a national model when signed into law and make Maryland the second U.S. state to eliminate this discriminatory exception to Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. The EEA will phase out “sheltered workshops” that pay people as little as pennies per hour and require the Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration to implement a 4-year transition plan to move individuals from segregated day programs to competitive integrated employment. MDLC participates on the Employment First Steering Committee that is developing the policies and infrastructure to support transition to competitive integrated employment.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

HB 431/SB 355: ABLE Act - 04/12/2016

 Federal law enacted in December 2014 authorized states to establish tax-advantaged savings program to help people with disabilities save limited amounts for disability-related expenses (such as health care, assistive technology, education, employment supports and housing) without losing eligibility for certain public benefits. Maryland legislation enacted in 2015 established the ABLE Task Force to make recommendations for an ABLE Program, resulting in this year’s bill. College Savings Plans of Maryland and the Maryland Department of Disabilities and will co-manage the program. Governor Hogan committed $745,000 for program start-up costs and signed the legislation into law on April 12, 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maryland HB 473 - 05/12/2015

Altering the amount of a credit against specified State taxes for wages and child care or transportation expenses related to qualified employees with disabilities; and applying the Act to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2014.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Maryland SB 761 - 05/12/2015

“BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND, That: (a) “Maryland ABLE Program” means a program in Maryland allowing disabled individuals or their families to establish savings accounts to pay qualified expenses for disabled individuals authorized under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience  (ABLE) Act.  (b) It is the intent of the General Assembly that the State establish a Maryland ABLE Program.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

An Act Concerning Reasonable Accommodations For Disabilities Due to Pregnancy (HB804/SB784) - 04/08/2013

“[The Act] will require employers with more than 15 employees to provide reasonable accommodations to workers experiencing a disability caused or contributed by pregnancy. […] The Act prohibits an employer from refusing to make a reasonable accommodation for the known disability of a worker that is caused by pregnancy […]” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Executive Order 01.01.2017.23 Maryland Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/10/2017

“Now, therefore, I, Lawrence J. Hogan, Jr., Governor of the State of Maryland, by virtue of the power invested in my by the constitution and the laws of Maryland, declare the following:

 

Each State department, board, agency, authority, board, or instrumentality controlled by the Governor (an “Executive unit”) shall annually observe October as Disability Employment Awareness Month to celebrate the many and varied contributions of people with disabilities.The Department of Disabilities […] shall: reinforce the value and talents people with disabilities add to Maryland’s workplaces and communitiesIncreasing public awarenessTo promote individuals with disabilities’ access to technology”

 

Rescinds Executive Order 01.01.2009.10

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order 01.01.2009.10 Maryland Disability History and Awareness Month - 07/26/2009

“Now, therefore, I, Martin O’Malley, Governor of the State of Maryland […] hereby proclaim the following executive order, effective immediately.

State of Maryland Executive Branch agencies shall annually observe October as Disability History and Awareness Month.

The Department of Disabilities shall take steps to increase public awareness of the history of disabilities and the disability rights movement […]

The Maryland State Department of Education shall encourage and assist local boards of education to provide instruction in the history of disabilities, people with disabilities, and the disability rights movement during the observance of Disability History Awareness Month.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Executive Order 01.01.2007.13 - 08/02/2007

"It is the policy of the State of Maryland to ensure a smooth and effective transition for all students with disabilities from secondary education to adult services such as postsecondary education and employment; and to provide transition planning for students and families that is student focused and family-centered, based on individual strengths and needs, utilizes best practices, and leads to outcomes in the most integrated setting appropriate; and It is deemed necessary to establish an Interagency Transition Council to recommend policies and identify the funding requirements to ensure effective, efficient, and comprehensive delivery of services that will most effectively meet the transition needs of Maryland students with disabilities."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Temporary Disability Assistance

“The Temporary Disability Assistance Program (TDAP) is available to help low-income, disabled Marylanders through a period of short-term disability or while they are awaiting approval of federal disability support. The program is funded through the State of Maryland to provide help to individuals without dependent children.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maryland Workforce Promise Customized Employment Definition

“Customized Employment is…”

Individualizing the employment relationship between employees and employers in ways that meet the needs of both A person centered approach to employment that is based on the individual’s Strengths Needs Interests Blend of services designed to increase employment options for individuals with significant disabilities  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Public Engagement Strategies Redefine “No Wrong Door” in Maryland

For over ten years Maryland has refined its NWD/ADRC initiative, known as Maryland Access Points (MAP). The term “Maryland Access Point” was chosen to remove any semblance of preferences for “aging” or “disability” being first in the name, as Maryland wanted its NWD/ADRC to be seen as access points for all individuals needing LTSS. Starting in 2008, Maryland formally initiated its branding process and hired a consultant to construct a marketing plan for consumers and providers that eliminated system fragmentation, increased awareness of LTSS, and focused on prevention of crises. The state launched a toll free number in August 2014 and a new website in February 2015.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Department of Human Resources, Office of Employment and Program Equity

The Maryland Department of Human Resources is committed to the principle of fair practices and equal opportunity for all of its employees and customers. The Office of Employment and Program Equity has the primary responsibility for ensuring the effectiveness and success of the Department’s comprehensive Equal Opportunity Program. Programs include:

1.        Equal Employment Opportunity

2.        Affirmative Action

3.        Minority Business Enterprises

4.        Americans with Disabilities Act Compliance Program

5.        Title VI Compliance

6.        Program Equity

7.        Complaint Investigations

8.        DHR Mediation Program

          9.        Training and Technical Support

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Maryland Department of Education “Understanding the Evaluation, Eligibility and Individualized Education Program (IEP) Process in Maryland”

The public agency uses a team process to decide whether a child is a student with a disability as defined by the IDEA and the educational needs of the child. Each public agency is responsible for initiating and conducting meetings for the purposes of developing, reviewing, and revising the IEP of a student with a disability, and determining the child’s educational placement. The parents of each student with a disability must be notified and afforded the opportunity to participate in any IEP team meeting conducted for their child.  Parents are members of the IEP team that makes decisions regarding the child’s educational placement. The public agency shall make reasonable efforts to ensure that the parents understand, and are able to participate in any group discussions relating to the educational placement of their child, including arranging for an interpreter for parents with deafness, or whose native language is not English.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Rehabilitation Services “Training Customized for Your Business”

On-the-Job Training

DORS can provide funding for on-the-job training for a new employee and reimburse a business for a percentage of the new employees’ wages while they are in training.DORS also offers technical assistance and follow-along services to the trainee and the business.

Customized & Partnership Training

DORS partners with businesses and educational institutions to identify specific needs and design customized training programs to meet those needs. Training may take place at the DORS Workforce & Technology Center, on the job site, by an outside vendor, or by a combination of these settings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Maryland Department of Disabilities, Response to FY 2016 Budget Hearings

In November of 2014, MDOD was designated the Lead State Agency for a technical assistance opportunity through the US Department of Labor Office on Disability Employment Policy (ODEP). The Employment First Core State Leadership Mentoring Program will provide training and assess six (6) community providers to build capacity and transform community providers on customized employment. MDOD and the State and external partners will also develop recommendations for core competencies related to customized employment within the State and identify ways to infuse Employment First initiatives into the nonresidential portion of the State’s Home and Community Based Services Waivers delivered through Medicaid.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Maryland

In 2008/2009, the Developmental Disabilities Administration’s (DDA) engaged stakeholders in an intensive strategic planning process, including planning to improve employment outcomes for people with developmental disabilities in Maryland.   The following position statement is in support of the DDA’s broader values, mission and vision and is a product of that strategic planning process.   “The DDA believes that all people with developmental disabilities CAN work, and contribute to their community, when given opportunity, training, and supports that build on their strengths.  Employment will be the first option considered for all people of working age who receive DDA services.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD Developmental Disabilities Administration Position Statement on Employment Services

"In 2008, the Developmental Disabilities Administration’s (DDA) engaged stakeholders in an intensive strategic planning process, including planning to improve employment outcomes for people with developmental disabilities in Maryland. The following position statement is in support of the DDA’s broader values, mission and vision and is a product of the strategic planning process.

Commitment: The DDA believes that all people with developmental disabilities CAN work, and contribute to their community, when given opportunity, training, and supports that build on their strengths. Position Statement: Employment will be the “first” option considered for all people of working age who receive DDA services. Vision: Every Marylander maximizes his/her career potential and employers have access to the human resources they need to be successful."  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

MD DDA Definition of Day and Employment Services

SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT “Employment in an integrated work setting. This is defined as a workplace in the community, where the majority of individuals do not have disabilities, and which provides opportunities to interact with non-disabled individual to the same extent that individuals employed in comparable position would interact. Individuals are working in individualized, integrated jobs in the community business for pay at or above minimum wage.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council “2017 Legislative Overview” - 04/01/2017

~~“DDA FY2018 Budget Expansion: Approximately 789 young adults with developmental disabilities leaving school will receive employment or other day services. DDA projects that 100% of transitioning youth will receive this support.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities - 09/30/2016

~~"The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities.  “

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities - 07/01/2016

This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD Governor’s Interagency Transition Council (IATC) - 08/02/2007

~~The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Navigating the Transition Years Handbook 2010

If your child has an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), a team of staff members is responsible for helping them with their transition planning and the implementation of their plan. If your child is on a 504 plan, they still have access to the services of a guidance counselor, transition coordinator, and Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) counselor, but you and your child may be responsible for initiating contact to access their support

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Customized Employment Project

The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s Mental Health

"Incorporated in 1999 as a private, nonprofit organization, MCF is Maryland’s statewide family network organization, a designation from the federal Substance Use and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). MCF changed its name from "Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s Mental Health" to the "Maryland Coalition of Families" in 2016. MCF is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors comprised of at least 51% adult caregivers of a child or adolescent with a diagnosable emotional or behavioral disability. All of our family support staff are parents who have cared for a child with behavioral health needs and have been trained to help other families."
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Learning Links - Transition 101

Maryland Learning Links is a site developed under federal funding through a State Improvement Grant.  It is co-owned by the Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Special Education and Early Intervention Services (MSDE), and other community stakeholders. The Transition section of the site, “ is primarily meant to provide parents with the information they need to support the successful transition of their children to adulthood.   It’s filled with… information and tools… and several timelines that can help [parents] better understand and make the most of Transition Planning and Services…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative (GTYI)

The Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative (GTYI) is a collaboration funded through a partnership between the Maryland Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) and the Maryland Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA).  The purpose of the Initiative is to show that all students with disabilities can work and contribute to Maryland’s future after leaving school.  The Governor's Transitioning Youth Initiative earmarks funds in the DDA budget for eligible students leaving school, regardless of the severity of their situation and their relative need for immediate services.  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene “Provider Enrollment”

~The Maryland Department of Health has reviewed the  Senior Center Plus sites in the state and has found that currently all of the sites are community based and meet the criteria of the Community Settings regulations. The Maryland Department of Health invites public comment on the Senior Center Plus providers. A public comment period will be open from May 25, 2018 to June 25, 2018. Once the public comment period is complete, this information and the comments will be submitted to CMS for review. Please send all comments to mdh.hcbssetting@maryland.gov or Rebecca Oliver, Health Policy Analyst Advanced, Room 134, 201 W Preston St, Baltimore, MD 21201. 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Maryland Customized Employment Project

The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland EID Program

The EID Program, administered by the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH), provides Medical Assistance (also called Medicaid) to working Marylanders with disabilities who meet a few conditions.  Medical Assistance:    • Covers most medical services for individuals who have no other health insurance,    • Saves individuals with Medicare $1,000 - $12,000 a year    • Supplements private insurance, paying for some services that the other insurance does not cover  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) in Maryland will help people transition from an institution, for example a nursing facility, to community living in an apartment, private home, or small group setting. MFP initiatives increase outreach to individuals in institutions and decrease barriers to transition. New efforts under MFP include peer mentoring, enhanced transition assistance, improved information technology, housing assistance, flexible transition funds, and the addition of waiver services to existing waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Community First Choice

“The program provide assistance with activities of daily living to Medicaid recipients who have a chronic illness, medical condition or disability. Services are provided in the eligible individual's home or community residence (waiver participants may receive services in an assisted living facility). Other services in each program vary.  Please see each program’s fact sheet for information about the specific services provided through the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Balancing Incentive Program

“The Balancing Incentive Program authorizes grants to States to increase access to non-institutional long-term services and supports…The Balancing Incentive Program will help States transform their long-term care systems by, [l]owering costs through improved systems performance & efficiency, [c]reating tools to help consumers with care planning & assessment, [and], [i]mproving quality measurement & oversight.  The Balancing Incentive Program also provides new ways to serve more people in home and community-based settings, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as required by the Olmstead decision.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Annual Maryland Transition Conference

Sponsored by the Governor's Interagency Transition Council, for Youth with Disabilities. Topics Include:

Employment Postsecondary Education Adult Service Linkages Accommodations & Supports Youth Development & Leadership Housing  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities

The Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities (MCDD) at Kennedy Krieger Institute is dedicated to leadership in the field of developmental and other disabilities, so that people of all ages can maximize their potential and achieve independence, productivity, and inclusion within their communities   The Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities staff are engaged in four core functions:    • Interdisciplinary Pre-Service Training    • Community Service and Technical Assistance    • Research and Evaluation    • Dissemination Activities  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

United States vs. Baltimore County, MD - 08/07/2012

The decree requires the County to  adopt new policies and procedures regarding the administration of medical examinations and inquiries and provide training on the ADA to all current supervisory employees and all employees who participate in making personnel decisions

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Maryland Medicaid Community Options Waiver (formerly Waiver for Older Adults) - 01/01/2018

“Until recently, the Maryland Community Options Medicaid Waiver was called the Waiver for Older Adults. That program and the Living at Home Medicaid Waiver are now merged under this new title. This waiver is also called the Home and Community-Based Options (HCBO) Waiver and, in this article, it is referred to as simply the CO Waiver.

 

The new CO waiver allows elderly individuals and those with physical disabilities who need nursing home level care to receive care services in their home or a group living community facility instead. Group living communities can include assisted living residences, provided they are participating in the program and willing to accept the Medicaid payment rates.

 

The CO Waiver is popular both with families and the state of Maryland, but for different reasons. Participants generally prefer to remain living at home for as long as possible; this waiver assists them in doing so. The cost of caring for someone at home is also less expensive for the state than it would be to place the individual in a nursing home. This is because home care utilizes caregiving assistance from family members.

 

Maryland Medicaid programs in general are sometimes referred to as Medical Assistance (MA).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1115 HealthChoice Waiver Renewal - 01/01/2017

~The Maryland Department of Health (the Department) is proposing an amendment to its §1115 demonstration waiver known as HealthChoice, which the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has authorized through December 31, 2021. HealthChoice, first implemented in 1997 under the authority of §1115 of the Social Security Act, is Maryland’s statewide mandatory managed care program for Medicaid enrollees. Under HealthChoice, eligible families and individuals are required to enroll in a managed care organization (MCO) that has been approved by the Department. Each MCO is responsible for ensuring that HealthChoice enrollees have access to a network of medical providers that can meet their health needs.

The State’s 30-day public comment period was open from May 21, 2018 through June 19, 2018. The draft waiver amendment application is available here. The final submitted waiver amendment application is available here. Hard copies of the application may be obtained by calling (410) 767-5677.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MD HCBS Transition Plan - 09/02/2016

Maryland receives funding from the federal government to help pay for services provided in programs such as the Autism, Brain Injury, Community Pathways, Community Options, Model, and Medical Day Waivers and a program that helps children, youth and families. Last year, the federal government put out new rules that states must follow to continue to receive funding to pay for services. Maryland reviewed programs and found areas that do not meet the rules and must be changed. This plan gives information about the new rules; the States review of programs and the plan to fix areas; and input received from various stakeholders like participants, family members, self-advocates, and others.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Guide to Maryland Medical Assistance Coverage” - 08/01/2016

“The purpose of a home and community based services waiver program, also known as a “1915(c) waiver,” is to enable children or aged, blind, or disabled adults requiring a nursing facility level of care to reside in their homes or community settings rather than in a medical institution. • Services for waiver participants are federally matched expenses, although these services are not included in the State Medicaid Plan. • Each waiver program has different medical and other non-financial criteria for its targeted population.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MD Community Pathways (0023.R06.00) - 07/01/2013

Provides community residential hab, community supported living arrangements, expanded day hab-employment discovery and customization, expanded day hab-supported employment, live-in caregiver, medical day care, resource coordination, respite, traditional day hab, assistive technology and adaptive equipment, behavioral supports, environmental accessibility adaptations, expanded day hab-community learning, family/individual support, residential hab II, transition, transportation for individual w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland DoE ESEA Flexibility Waiver - 05/29/2012

“MSDE’s core values of commitment to every student, belief that all students can and must learn, certainty that schools  must help students grow, and conviction that the educator evaluation system must be equitable are achieved through data-driven accountability systems, high standards of excellence from teachers and principals and dynamic collaboration between Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and MSDE.  Maryland’s ambitious mission is to provide every student with a world-class education that ensures post-graduation college- and career-readiness”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD New Directions Independence Plus Waiver (0424.R01.00) - 07/01/2008

Provides community supported living arrangements, expanded day hab-supported employment, expanded day hab-employment discovery and customization, live-in caregiver, medical day care, resource coordination, respite, traditional day hab, support brokerage, assistive technology and adaptative equipment, behavioral supports, environmental accessibility adaptation, expanded day hab-community learning, family/individual support, transition, transportation for individuals w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age.

This waiver expired 06/30/2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) in Maryland will help people transition from an institution, for example a nursing facility, to community living in an apartment, private home, or small group setting. MFP initiatives increase outreach to individuals in institutions and decrease barriers to transition. New efforts under MFP include peer mentoring, enhanced transition assistance, improved information technology, housing assistance, flexible transition funds, and the addition of waiver services to existing waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Community First Choice

“The program provide assistance with activities of daily living to Medicaid recipients who have a chronic illness, medical condition or disability. Services are provided in the eligible individual's home or community residence (waiver participants may receive services in an assisted living facility). Other services in each program vary.  Please see each program’s fact sheet for information about the specific services provided through the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The numerous efforts to support individuals with disabilities in securing and sustaining competitive, integrated employment in the Old Line State of Maryland are more than you can imagine. We're open for business, and welcome the skills and talents of workers with disabilities! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Maryland’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.59%
Change from
2016 to 2017
6,052,177
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
335,461
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
141,870
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.79%
Change from
2016 to 2017
42.29%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.27%
Change from
2016 to 2017
80.43%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 6,006,401 6,016,447 6,052,177
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 328,697 334,505 335,461
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 131,573 137,517 141,870
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,702,355 2,716,777 2,733,682
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.03% 41.11% 42.29%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.25% 80.21% 80.43%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.10% 4.30% 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 16.90% 17.70% 17.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.90% 8.70% 8.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 302,977 303,117 304,396
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 341,118 353,003 355,747
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 394,100 405,250 384,006
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 200,943 200,243 212,801
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 30,255 34,281 38,339
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,314 2,983 3,041
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 19,939 22,124 25,795
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 559 N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 16,358 14,959 18,249
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 9,882 10,239 16,000

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,165 6,308 6,375
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.80% 5.90% 5.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 131,074 130,269 129,481

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 17,019 12,955 13,764
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 37,890 31,395 32,876
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 74,986 59,031 58,225
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.70% 21.90% 23.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 5.20% 5.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 18.10% 18.70%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 5.30% 5.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A 3,268 2,675
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A 11,435 10,146
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A 3,362 3,186
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 10,425 9,388 8,821
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06 0.07 0.08

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 56 56 96
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 35 34 50
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00% 61.00% 52.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.59 0.57 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,290
4,222
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 240 209 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 287 253 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 549 531 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,227 1,359 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 797 764 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,183 1,103 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.60% 35.20% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,033 10,178 10,569
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 208,223 204,612 207,082
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 183 166 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 301 328 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $75,204,000 $75,498,000 $59,262,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $144,015,000 $0 $171,675,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $10,955,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 39.00% 37.00% 33.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A N/A 676
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A N/A 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 8,051 N/A 9,131
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 85.20 81.80 11.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.86% 68.95% 69.73%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.12% 12.95% 12.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 6.89% 6.93% 6.86%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.66% 98.49% 98.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 23.90% 23.45% 22.66%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 49.18% 54.63% 58.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 56.32% 61.47% 72.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 25.28% 31.18% 35.43%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 4,727,875
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 5,994
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 267,634
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 2,927,591
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,195,225
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 162
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 2,256
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,418
AbilityOne wages (products). $2,320,330
AbilityOne wages (services). $37,326,061

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 5 2 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 35 35 22
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3 3 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 43 40 25
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 885 408 172
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,469 3,470 2,056
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 393 393 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,747 4,271 2,229

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

Maryland’s workforce system will play a key role in embracing nationally recognized best practices including Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals with significant disabilities can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate support. (Page 40)

The Council recommends that Department of rehabilitation services continue collaboration with local providers, the Maryland Department of Disabilities, and the Developmental Disabilities Administration at the State and local levels, as related to the Employment First initiative. This should include an exploration of programmatic barriers to success and cross-agency training needs. (Page 221)

DORS looks forward to continuing to collaborate with other agencies, including the WIOA Partners, regarding Employment First.  Employment First is an initiative that assures that employment is considered on, developmental/intellectual disabilities. DORS expects that there will be more progress toward Employment First in Maryland this coming year with new leadership in place at the Maryland Developmental Disabilities Administration. (Pages 222, 226, 227)

 These formal interagency cooperative agreements will: identify policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated among the agencies (particularly definitions, standards for eligibility, the joint sharing and use of evaluations and assessments, and procedures for making referrals), identify available resources and define the financial responsibility of each agency for paying for necessary services (consistent with State law) and procedures for resolving disputes between agencies, and include all additional components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation and coordination. For Evidenced Based Supported Employment DORS has implemented a milestone payment system for psychiatric rehabilitation programs offering Evidence-Based Supported Employment services. The milestone payment system significantly streamlines provision of services for DORS and provider staff by substantially reducing preparation of authorizations and invoices, tracking of hours of services, and simplifying reporting. Employment First DORS is a partner with other State agencies (including WIOA Partner, DLLR) and Community Rehabilitation Programs in implementing Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals, including those with significant disabilities, consider employment on a preferred basis in planning for their lives. (Page 236)

DORS and DDA updated and approved the Cooperative Agreement, Employment Services, in October 2013. The agreement focuses on the implementation of Employment First in Maryland. It addresses referral between agencies, specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, and describes cross-training activities. (Pages 241, 246, 266, 256, 266, 269, 276, 299, 314, 323, 326, 339)

Customized Employment

Additional trainings regarding job carving, customized employment, and job development in general; 

  • Increased assistance to help the consumers with their transportation needs including: comprehensive travel training and reduced delays in transportation funding for consumers
  • Opportunities to interface with DORS staff and expand collaborative efforts in job development to include employment specialists and local businesses, opportunities for brainstorming client cases, and for employment specialists across agencies to share strategies and job leads
  • The hourly rates for services have not been increased in over five years. The low rates make it difficult for Community Rehabilitation Programs to hire effective job developers. (Page 267)

9.   Update the MOU with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Developmental Disabilities Administration that defines the roles of each agency in establishing a collaborative process toward the provision of customized employment and supported employment services in support of individuals moving from sheltered work to competitive integrated employment,

10. Align services, rates, and reporting requirements in support of pre-employment transition services and supported employment job placement/support services,

11. Identify, develop, and implement a more seamless services delivery system among workforce partners in Maryland

12. Continue collaboration between Maryland DORS and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Behavioral Health Administration in the implementation of a braided funding model that enhances and expands the ability of both DORS and BHA to fund services and increase capacity in the number of individuals eligible for mental health supported employment. (Page 276)

Performance Measures by September 30, 2016: 

  • DORS Rehabilitation Services Manuals will be updated consistent with changes in the Rehabilitation Act, as amended by WIOA, and in consultation with WIOA Partners;
  • Training will be provided to DORS staff on changes resulting from the reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act (e.g. pre-employment transition services, customized employment, limitations on use of subminimum wage, “competitive integrated employment” criteria, and services to employers) in coordination with WIOA Partners; a. DORS will continue to collaborate with WIOA Partners in the development and implementation of the Maryland WIOA State Plan. (Page 278)

Expanding & Improving Services to Individuals with Disabilities 

  • DORS will continually analyze office locations, staff deployment, staff positions and responsibilities, in accordance with DORS mission to more effectively serve students and adults with disabilities, and in collaboration with the WIOA Partners;
  • The 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment will include an assessment and recommendations for expanding and improving services to students and adults with disabilities;
  • In collaboration with the WIOA Partners, DORS will establish linkages with businesses and employers to include training, customized employment, education and disability awareness, on-site worksite assistive technology services, and mentoring/internship activities;
  • DORS will continue to enhance relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs to ensure availability of Community Rehabilitation Program services statewide;
  • DORS will continue to expand services and outreach to individuals who are deaf-blind and provide technical assistance to staff and WIOA Partners serving this population;
  • In collaboration with WIOA Partners, DORS will develop relationships with employers and analyze labor trends, to increase opportunities for employment of populations that are unserved or underserved. (Page 285)
Blending/ Braiding Resources

Development & Adult Learning 

  • Goodwill
  • Mid-Maryland Workforce Investment Area
  • Montgomery County Division of Workforce Investment Services
  • Tri County Council for Southern Maryland. Use of funds (braiding and leveraging)
  • Maryland Association for Adult Community and Continuing Education Maryland DHR-Family Investment Administration
  • Maryland DLLR-Division of Workforce Development & Adult Learning
  • Maryland State Dept. of Education-Division of Rehabilitation Services
  • Susquehanna Workforce Network, Inc. (Page 80)  

The Division enters into cooperative agreements with the Developmental Disabilities Administration and the Behavioral Health Administration in order to provide for increased interagency cooperation, to ensure the maximum utilization of appropriate programs and resources in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, to expand and improve services to individuals with significant disabilities, and to maximize the use of comparable benefits. (Page 236)

DEI/DRC

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

Maryland will focus resources toward improving the rate at which students’ transition from adult education programs to postsecondary education or training and employment. All academic instruction funded through AEFLA will be delivered concurrently with Workforce Preparation activities. State initiatives including implementation of the Integrating Career Awareness curriculum and integrated education and training (IET) pilots demonstrated that students need to master preliminary skills in order to succeed in academic and career training. Contextualized instruction incorporating the concurrently delivery of basic academic skills, critical thinking, and digital literacy and self-management skills in all levels of instruction will assist students to prepare for the rigor of a college curriculum, (Page 202)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Collaboration with various federal, state, local, business, and community partners ensures that soon to be released inmates have the necessary career training, work habits, teamwork, conflict resolution skills, and interview techniques that will enable them to land and keep good jobs with a self–sustaining salary. Workforce development professionals and career development facilitators work with individuals on financial literacy and communication strategies. They support efforts to re–unify family members and encourage custodial and non–custodial parents to be “responsible” parents. Staff works with recommended offenders until job placement occurs and continues with post–employment follow–up. The goal is to encourage the ex–offenders’ adjustment to living and working in a non–restrictive environment and to be competitively employed in an economically viable career pathway. The initiative reduces inmate recidivism and supports the formulation and maintenance of two–parent families (Page 362)  

School to Work Transition
  • Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) Program was developed by the USDOL in an effort to reduce the number of weeks that UI claimants receive benefits, by assisting them in quickly returning to the workforce. The RESEA Program is designed to help claimants to identify potential barriers to employment and assesses work search progress. It also includes an eligibility review, which in turn helps the DLLR Division of Unemployment Insurance to identify claimants that may be out of compliance with basic UI laws and policies regarding ability and availability to work, school attendance, and active work search. (Page 84)  

Maryland’s American Job Centers are required to provide reasonable accommodation for individuals with disabilities to ensure equal access and opportunity. The term “reasonable accommodation” is defined as “modifications or adjustments to an application/registration process that enables a qualified applicant/registrant with a disability to be considered for the aid, benefits, services, training or employment that the qualified applicant/registrant desires;” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to perform the essential functions of a job, or receive aid, benefits, services, or training equal to that provided to qualified individuals without disabilities,” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to enjoy the same benefits and privileges of the aid. (Page 124)

DORS will determine what information may be gleaned from the case management system related to waiting list and benefits status, and advise the Council. Through its active participation in the WIOA Alignment Group, the WIOA Jobseeker Advisory Focus Groups (to be planned), and the WIOA Workgroups, DORS will explore ways to better assist individuals with disabilities through the entire workforce system. (Page 222)

DORS belief that individuals with disabilities, even the most significant disabilities, can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate supports. Supported employment is appropriate for individuals in Employment First and is the means to assure the best chance for success in employment. Benefits planning is an important part of services for individuals served through Employment First. Governor’s Employment Program for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury, The Governor’s Employment Program for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI Project) provides intensive vocational rehabilitation and long-term supports to individuals with acquired brain injuries. This often includes needed neuropsychological and other assessments, training and supported employment services, and long-term job coaching. (Page 236)

Training and technical assistance to employers and WIOA Partners to promote the awareness of the skills and benefits that people with disabilities can bring to their workforce. Types of training included: information on DORS services and training programs, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and federal contractor compliance with Section 503. (Pages 239, 241, 267, 292, 307,326, 341, 342, 343, 35)

Career Pathways

Maryland State Dept. of Education works to develop policies to increase work study (School to Work)

  • Maryland Dept. of Disabilities
  • Maryland DLLR-Division of Workforce Development & Adult Learning. (Page 81) 

Under the order of selection, DORS will continue to emphasize and enhance services to students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. Description of Priority Categories An individual with a most significant disability (Category I) is an eligible individual (sic). (Page 280)

  • Employment development, such as school–to–work opportunities in partnership with private business and public agencies; and,
  • Health initiatives, such as improved access to birth control counseling and services for sexually active adolescents and parenting classes for every pregnant teenager and her partner. (Page 373)
Work Incentives & Benefits

The career pathways approach will require a workforce system transformation and can benefit a wide variety of participants, including low-skilled adults, high school students, disconnected youth, veterans, incumbent workers, individuals with disabilities, and other target populations. The system requires aligned and transparent educational progression with multiple entry points and clearly defined “on and off ramps.” The system warrants a source of funding to scale up and sustain initiatives, maintain the partnerships that are critical to the process, and must include tools to measure and evaluate outcomes.  (Page 66)

Employer Engagement

C.   THE DESIGNATED STATE UNIT WILL COORDINATE ACTIVITIES WITH ANY OTHER STATE AGENCY THAT IS FUNCTIONING AS AN EMPLOYMENT NETWORK UNDER THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM UNDER SECTION 1148 OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT.

  • FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION OF THE SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM:
    • THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY ASSURES THAT IT WILL EXPEND NO MORE THAN 2.5 PERCENT OF THE STATE’S ALLOTMENT UNDER TITLE VI FOR ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS OF CARRYING OUT THIS PROGRAM; AND, THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY OR AGENCIES WILL PROVIDE, DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY THROUGH PUBLIC OR PRIVATE ENTITIES, NON-FEDERAL CONTRIBUTIONS IN AN AMOUNT THAT IS NOT LESS THAN 10 PERCENT OF THECOSTS OF CARRYING OUT SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES PROVIDED TO YOUTH WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES WITH THE FUNDS RESERVED FOR SUCH PURPOSE UNDER SECTION 603(D) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 606(B)(7)(G) AND (H) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
    • THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY ASSURES THAT IT WILL USE FUNDS MADE AVAILABLE UNDER TITLE VI OF THE REHABILITATION ACT ONLY TO PROVIDE SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES, INCLUDING EXTENDED SERVICES TO YOUTH WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES, WHO ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE SUCH SERVICES; AND, THAT SUCH FUNDS ARE USED ONLY TO SUPPLEMENT AND NOT SUPPLANT THE FUNDS PROVIDED UNDER TITLE I OF THE REHABILITATION ACT, WHEN PROVIDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES SPECIFIED IN THE INDIVIDUALIZED PLAN FOR EMPLOYMENT, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 606(B)(7)(A) AND (D), OF THE REHABILITATION ACT. (Page 336)
511

The MWE is utilized to manage and validate operational activities, via an internet-accessible participant reporting and data collection system that all DLLR and local workforce area case managers use to report, collect, verify, and manage participant data from each of the local and regional teams. The system’s case management capabilities allow staff to determine program eligibility, track services, and report results to federal funding sources. (Page 74)

Professional development and ongoing technical assistance will be provided to local program administrators, teachers and partners on best practices incorporating the experience of the MI–BEST and ACE programs including recruitment, training selection, team teaching, support services, employer participation, outcomes, and data collection. (Page 203)

Utilize DORS and Developmental Disabilities Administration data collection systems to track anticipated increases in transitioning youth served through the Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative and their outcomes. (Pages 266, 287)

Mental Health

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 124 -127) 

  • Section 188 implements the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA, which are contained in Section 188 of the statute.
  • Section 188 prohibits discrimination on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, among other bases.
  • Section 188 also requires that reasonable accommodations be provided to qualified individuals with disabilities in certain circumstances. (Page 125)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 21 - 30 of 77

“Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities” - 09/30/2016

“The primary responsibility of the IATC is to review, revise and update annually the Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities to ensure effective interagency planning and delivery of services for secondary students with disabilities. Additionally, the IATC is tasked with identifying and reporting activities of each partner which impact the delivery, quality and availability of transition services. The IATC also serves in an advisory capacity to all transition-related federal grants.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD HCBS Transition Plan - 09/02/2016

Maryland receives funding from the federal government to help pay for services provided in programs such as the Autism, Brain Injury, Community Pathways, Community Options, Model, and Medical Day Waivers and a program that helps children, youth and families. Last year, the federal government put out new rules that states must follow to continue to receive funding to pay for services. Maryland reviewed programs and found areas that do not meet the rules and must be changed. This plan gives information about the new rules; the States review of programs and the plan to fix areas; and input received from various stakeholders like participants, family members, self-advocates, and others.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Guide to Maryland Medical Assistance Coverage” - 08/01/2016

“The purpose of a home and community based services waiver program, also known as a “1915(c) waiver,” is to enable children or aged, blind, or disabled adults requiring a nursing facility level of care to reside in their homes or community settings rather than in a medical institution. • Services for waiver participants are federally matched expenses, although these services are not included in the State Medicaid Plan. • Each waiver program has different medical and other non-financial criteria for its targeted population.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities - 07/01/2016

This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

“FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities” - 07/01/2016

“This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment.” It consists of a set of tables, one for each goal, that lists the measures and strategies that have been developed for the goal,and the data sources and agencies that are involved in each one.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HB 420/SB 417: Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA) - 05/19/2016

MDLC Board member Ken Capone, People on the Go, MDLC, and other advocates and coalition partners led this strong and successful effort to abolish the payment of subminimum wages to people with disabilities in Maryland. Like SB 765, the bill will become a national model when signed into law and make Maryland the second U.S. state to eliminate this discriminatory exception to Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. The EEA will phase out “sheltered workshops” that pay people as little as pennies per hour and require the Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration to implement a 4-year transition plan to move individuals from segregated day programs to competitive integrated employment. MDLC participates on the Employment First Steering Committee that is developing the policies and infrastructure to support transition to competitive integrated employment.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

HB 431/SB 355: ABLE Act - 04/12/2016

 Federal law enacted in December 2014 authorized states to establish tax-advantaged savings program to help people with disabilities save limited amounts for disability-related expenses (such as health care, assistive technology, education, employment supports and housing) without losing eligibility for certain public benefits. Maryland legislation enacted in 2015 established the ABLE Task Force to make recommendations for an ABLE Program, resulting in this year’s bill. College Savings Plans of Maryland and the Maryland Department of Disabilities and will co-manage the program. Governor Hogan committed $745,000 for program start-up costs and signed the legislation into law on April 12, 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Montgomery County, MD Customized Employment Intern Project (MCPIP) - 10/09/2015

An example of a successful County program serving individuals with significant disabilities is the Montgomery County Customized Employment Public Intern Project (MCPIP). Created in 2007, MCPIP provides flexible employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities to fulfill the work requirements of County departments. Department representatives work with a customized employment career specialist to identify and create part-time positions based on a department’s workforce needs. 

MCPIP participants serve as paid interns in department positions based on their individual job interests, skills and competencies. MCPIP interns gain valuable work experience by developing on-the-job skills to help them compete for County merit positions or opportunities in other organizations

Maryland’s Montgomery County government has adopted a policy to create internships for career seekers with significant disabilities, based on a Customized Employment (CE) strategy. This demand-driven CE policy creates the position for a CE Specialist at TransCen, Inc., a local workforce development intermediary, to conduct an analysis of a department’s need within the Montgomery County government.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland HB 473 - 05/12/2015

Altering the amount of a credit against specified State taxes for wages and child care or transportation expenses related to qualified employees with disabilities; and applying the Act to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2014.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Maryland SB 761 - 05/12/2015

“BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND, That: (a) “Maryland ABLE Program” means a program in Maryland allowing disabled individuals or their families to establish savings accounts to pay qualified expenses for disabled individuals authorized under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience  (ABLE) Act.  (b) It is the intent of the General Assembly that the State establish a Maryland ABLE Program.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Maryland Minimum Wage Act of 2014 (HB 0295/CH0262) - 07/01/2018

“Incrementally increasing the State minimum wage rate to $10.10 beginning July 1, 2018; authorizing specified employers to pay employees under the age of 20 years a specified wage under specified circumstances; requiring the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to increase reimbursement of community providers serving individuals with developmental disabilities; requiring the Governor, in specified fiscal years, to include in a specified budget proposal specified funding increases; etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

SB 0344/HB0448 “Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program - Account Clarifications” - 04/11/2017

~~“Clarifying that a specified amount may be contributed in each calendar year to an account for a disabled individual under the Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program; providing that contributions to an ABLE account may not exceed a specified maximum amount; and requiring the Maryland 529 Board to adopt specified procedures to ensure that specified contributions to ABLE accounts do not exceed a specified maximum limit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

HB 420/SB 417: Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA) - 05/19/2016

MDLC Board member Ken Capone, People on the Go, MDLC, and other advocates and coalition partners led this strong and successful effort to abolish the payment of subminimum wages to people with disabilities in Maryland. Like SB 765, the bill will become a national model when signed into law and make Maryland the second U.S. state to eliminate this discriminatory exception to Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. The EEA will phase out “sheltered workshops” that pay people as little as pennies per hour and require the Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration to implement a 4-year transition plan to move individuals from segregated day programs to competitive integrated employment. MDLC participates on the Employment First Steering Committee that is developing the policies and infrastructure to support transition to competitive integrated employment.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

HB 431/SB 355: ABLE Act - 04/12/2016

 Federal law enacted in December 2014 authorized states to establish tax-advantaged savings program to help people with disabilities save limited amounts for disability-related expenses (such as health care, assistive technology, education, employment supports and housing) without losing eligibility for certain public benefits. Maryland legislation enacted in 2015 established the ABLE Task Force to make recommendations for an ABLE Program, resulting in this year’s bill. College Savings Plans of Maryland and the Maryland Department of Disabilities and will co-manage the program. Governor Hogan committed $745,000 for program start-up costs and signed the legislation into law on April 12, 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maryland HB 473 - 05/12/2015

Altering the amount of a credit against specified State taxes for wages and child care or transportation expenses related to qualified employees with disabilities; and applying the Act to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2014.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Maryland SB 761 - 05/12/2015

“BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND, That: (a) “Maryland ABLE Program” means a program in Maryland allowing disabled individuals or their families to establish savings accounts to pay qualified expenses for disabled individuals authorized under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience  (ABLE) Act.  (b) It is the intent of the General Assembly that the State establish a Maryland ABLE Program.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

An Act Concerning Reasonable Accommodations For Disabilities Due to Pregnancy (HB804/SB784) - 04/08/2013

“[The Act] will require employers with more than 15 employees to provide reasonable accommodations to workers experiencing a disability caused or contributed by pregnancy. […] The Act prohibits an employer from refusing to make a reasonable accommodation for the known disability of a worker that is caused by pregnancy […]” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Executive Order 01.01.2017.23 Maryland Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/10/2017

“Now, therefore, I, Lawrence J. Hogan, Jr., Governor of the State of Maryland, by virtue of the power invested in my by the constitution and the laws of Maryland, declare the following:

 

Each State department, board, agency, authority, board, or instrumentality controlled by the Governor (an “Executive unit”) shall annually observe October as Disability Employment Awareness Month to celebrate the many and varied contributions of people with disabilities.The Department of Disabilities […] shall: reinforce the value and talents people with disabilities add to Maryland’s workplaces and communitiesIncreasing public awarenessTo promote individuals with disabilities’ access to technology”

 

Rescinds Executive Order 01.01.2009.10

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order 01.01.2009.10 Maryland Disability History and Awareness Month - 07/26/2009

“Now, therefore, I, Martin O’Malley, Governor of the State of Maryland […] hereby proclaim the following executive order, effective immediately.

State of Maryland Executive Branch agencies shall annually observe October as Disability History and Awareness Month.

The Department of Disabilities shall take steps to increase public awareness of the history of disabilities and the disability rights movement […]

The Maryland State Department of Education shall encourage and assist local boards of education to provide instruction in the history of disabilities, people with disabilities, and the disability rights movement during the observance of Disability History Awareness Month.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Executive Order 01.01.2007.13 - 08/02/2007

"It is the policy of the State of Maryland to ensure a smooth and effective transition for all students with disabilities from secondary education to adult services such as postsecondary education and employment; and to provide transition planning for students and families that is student focused and family-centered, based on individual strengths and needs, utilizes best practices, and leads to outcomes in the most integrated setting appropriate; and It is deemed necessary to establish an Interagency Transition Council to recommend policies and identify the funding requirements to ensure effective, efficient, and comprehensive delivery of services that will most effectively meet the transition needs of Maryland students with disabilities."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Temporary Disability Assistance

“The Temporary Disability Assistance Program (TDAP) is available to help low-income, disabled Marylanders through a period of short-term disability or while they are awaiting approval of federal disability support. The program is funded through the State of Maryland to provide help to individuals without dependent children.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maryland Workforce Promise Customized Employment Definition

“Customized Employment is…”

Individualizing the employment relationship between employees and employers in ways that meet the needs of both A person centered approach to employment that is based on the individual’s Strengths Needs Interests Blend of services designed to increase employment options for individuals with significant disabilities  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Public Engagement Strategies Redefine “No Wrong Door” in Maryland

For over ten years Maryland has refined its NWD/ADRC initiative, known as Maryland Access Points (MAP). The term “Maryland Access Point” was chosen to remove any semblance of preferences for “aging” or “disability” being first in the name, as Maryland wanted its NWD/ADRC to be seen as access points for all individuals needing LTSS. Starting in 2008, Maryland formally initiated its branding process and hired a consultant to construct a marketing plan for consumers and providers that eliminated system fragmentation, increased awareness of LTSS, and focused on prevention of crises. The state launched a toll free number in August 2014 and a new website in February 2015.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Department of Human Resources, Office of Employment and Program Equity

The Maryland Department of Human Resources is committed to the principle of fair practices and equal opportunity for all of its employees and customers. The Office of Employment and Program Equity has the primary responsibility for ensuring the effectiveness and success of the Department’s comprehensive Equal Opportunity Program. Programs include:

1.        Equal Employment Opportunity

2.        Affirmative Action

3.        Minority Business Enterprises

4.        Americans with Disabilities Act Compliance Program

5.        Title VI Compliance

6.        Program Equity

7.        Complaint Investigations

8.        DHR Mediation Program

          9.        Training and Technical Support

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Maryland Department of Education “Understanding the Evaluation, Eligibility and Individualized Education Program (IEP) Process in Maryland”

The public agency uses a team process to decide whether a child is a student with a disability as defined by the IDEA and the educational needs of the child. Each public agency is responsible for initiating and conducting meetings for the purposes of developing, reviewing, and revising the IEP of a student with a disability, and determining the child’s educational placement. The parents of each student with a disability must be notified and afforded the opportunity to participate in any IEP team meeting conducted for their child.  Parents are members of the IEP team that makes decisions regarding the child’s educational placement. The public agency shall make reasonable efforts to ensure that the parents understand, and are able to participate in any group discussions relating to the educational placement of their child, including arranging for an interpreter for parents with deafness, or whose native language is not English.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Rehabilitation Services “Training Customized for Your Business”

On-the-Job Training

DORS can provide funding for on-the-job training for a new employee and reimburse a business for a percentage of the new employees’ wages while they are in training.DORS also offers technical assistance and follow-along services to the trainee and the business.

Customized & Partnership Training

DORS partners with businesses and educational institutions to identify specific needs and design customized training programs to meet those needs. Training may take place at the DORS Workforce & Technology Center, on the job site, by an outside vendor, or by a combination of these settings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Maryland Department of Disabilities, Response to FY 2016 Budget Hearings

In November of 2014, MDOD was designated the Lead State Agency for a technical assistance opportunity through the US Department of Labor Office on Disability Employment Policy (ODEP). The Employment First Core State Leadership Mentoring Program will provide training and assess six (6) community providers to build capacity and transform community providers on customized employment. MDOD and the State and external partners will also develop recommendations for core competencies related to customized employment within the State and identify ways to infuse Employment First initiatives into the nonresidential portion of the State’s Home and Community Based Services Waivers delivered through Medicaid.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Maryland

In 2008/2009, the Developmental Disabilities Administration’s (DDA) engaged stakeholders in an intensive strategic planning process, including planning to improve employment outcomes for people with developmental disabilities in Maryland.   The following position statement is in support of the DDA’s broader values, mission and vision and is a product of that strategic planning process.   “The DDA believes that all people with developmental disabilities CAN work, and contribute to their community, when given opportunity, training, and supports that build on their strengths.  Employment will be the first option considered for all people of working age who receive DDA services.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD Developmental Disabilities Administration Position Statement on Employment Services

"In 2008, the Developmental Disabilities Administration’s (DDA) engaged stakeholders in an intensive strategic planning process, including planning to improve employment outcomes for people with developmental disabilities in Maryland. The following position statement is in support of the DDA’s broader values, mission and vision and is a product of the strategic planning process.

Commitment: The DDA believes that all people with developmental disabilities CAN work, and contribute to their community, when given opportunity, training, and supports that build on their strengths. Position Statement: Employment will be the “first” option considered for all people of working age who receive DDA services. Vision: Every Marylander maximizes his/her career potential and employers have access to the human resources they need to be successful."  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

MD DDA Definition of Day and Employment Services

SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT “Employment in an integrated work setting. This is defined as a workplace in the community, where the majority of individuals do not have disabilities, and which provides opportunities to interact with non-disabled individual to the same extent that individuals employed in comparable position would interact. Individuals are working in individualized, integrated jobs in the community business for pay at or above minimum wage.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council “2017 Legislative Overview” - 04/01/2017

~~“DDA FY2018 Budget Expansion: Approximately 789 young adults with developmental disabilities leaving school will receive employment or other day services. DDA projects that 100% of transitioning youth will receive this support.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities - 09/30/2016

~~"The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities.  “

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities - 07/01/2016

This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD Governor’s Interagency Transition Council (IATC) - 08/02/2007

~~The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Navigating the Transition Years Handbook 2010

If your child has an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), a team of staff members is responsible for helping them with their transition planning and the implementation of their plan. If your child is on a 504 plan, they still have access to the services of a guidance counselor, transition coordinator, and Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) counselor, but you and your child may be responsible for initiating contact to access their support

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Customized Employment Project

The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s Mental Health

"Incorporated in 1999 as a private, nonprofit organization, MCF is Maryland’s statewide family network organization, a designation from the federal Substance Use and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). MCF changed its name from "Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s Mental Health" to the "Maryland Coalition of Families" in 2016. MCF is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors comprised of at least 51% adult caregivers of a child or adolescent with a diagnosable emotional or behavioral disability. All of our family support staff are parents who have cared for a child with behavioral health needs and have been trained to help other families."
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Learning Links - Transition 101

Maryland Learning Links is a site developed under federal funding through a State Improvement Grant.  It is co-owned by the Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Special Education and Early Intervention Services (MSDE), and other community stakeholders. The Transition section of the site, “ is primarily meant to provide parents with the information they need to support the successful transition of their children to adulthood.   It’s filled with… information and tools… and several timelines that can help [parents] better understand and make the most of Transition Planning and Services…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative (GTYI)

The Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative (GTYI) is a collaboration funded through a partnership between the Maryland Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) and the Maryland Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA).  The purpose of the Initiative is to show that all students with disabilities can work and contribute to Maryland’s future after leaving school.  The Governor's Transitioning Youth Initiative earmarks funds in the DDA budget for eligible students leaving school, regardless of the severity of their situation and their relative need for immediate services.  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene “Provider Enrollment”

~The Maryland Department of Health has reviewed the  Senior Center Plus sites in the state and has found that currently all of the sites are community based and meet the criteria of the Community Settings regulations. The Maryland Department of Health invites public comment on the Senior Center Plus providers. A public comment period will be open from May 25, 2018 to June 25, 2018. Once the public comment period is complete, this information and the comments will be submitted to CMS for review. Please send all comments to mdh.hcbssetting@maryland.gov or Rebecca Oliver, Health Policy Analyst Advanced, Room 134, 201 W Preston St, Baltimore, MD 21201. 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Maryland Customized Employment Project

The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland EID Program

The EID Program, administered by the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH), provides Medical Assistance (also called Medicaid) to working Marylanders with disabilities who meet a few conditions.  Medical Assistance:    • Covers most medical services for individuals who have no other health insurance,    • Saves individuals with Medicare $1,000 - $12,000 a year    • Supplements private insurance, paying for some services that the other insurance does not cover  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) in Maryland will help people transition from an institution, for example a nursing facility, to community living in an apartment, private home, or small group setting. MFP initiatives increase outreach to individuals in institutions and decrease barriers to transition. New efforts under MFP include peer mentoring, enhanced transition assistance, improved information technology, housing assistance, flexible transition funds, and the addition of waiver services to existing waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Community First Choice

“The program provide assistance with activities of daily living to Medicaid recipients who have a chronic illness, medical condition or disability. Services are provided in the eligible individual's home or community residence (waiver participants may receive services in an assisted living facility). Other services in each program vary.  Please see each program’s fact sheet for information about the specific services provided through the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Balancing Incentive Program

“The Balancing Incentive Program authorizes grants to States to increase access to non-institutional long-term services and supports…The Balancing Incentive Program will help States transform their long-term care systems by, [l]owering costs through improved systems performance & efficiency, [c]reating tools to help consumers with care planning & assessment, [and], [i]mproving quality measurement & oversight.  The Balancing Incentive Program also provides new ways to serve more people in home and community-based settings, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as required by the Olmstead decision.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Annual Maryland Transition Conference

Sponsored by the Governor's Interagency Transition Council, for Youth with Disabilities. Topics Include:

Employment Postsecondary Education Adult Service Linkages Accommodations & Supports Youth Development & Leadership Housing  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities

The Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities (MCDD) at Kennedy Krieger Institute is dedicated to leadership in the field of developmental and other disabilities, so that people of all ages can maximize their potential and achieve independence, productivity, and inclusion within their communities   The Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities staff are engaged in four core functions:    • Interdisciplinary Pre-Service Training    • Community Service and Technical Assistance    • Research and Evaluation    • Dissemination Activities  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

United States vs. Baltimore County, MD - 08/07/2012

The decree requires the County to  adopt new policies and procedures regarding the administration of medical examinations and inquiries and provide training on the ADA to all current supervisory employees and all employees who participate in making personnel decisions

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Maryland Medicaid Community Options Waiver (formerly Waiver for Older Adults) - 01/01/2018

“Until recently, the Maryland Community Options Medicaid Waiver was called the Waiver for Older Adults. That program and the Living at Home Medicaid Waiver are now merged under this new title. This waiver is also called the Home and Community-Based Options (HCBO) Waiver and, in this article, it is referred to as simply the CO Waiver.

 

The new CO waiver allows elderly individuals and those with physical disabilities who need nursing home level care to receive care services in their home or a group living community facility instead. Group living communities can include assisted living residences, provided they are participating in the program and willing to accept the Medicaid payment rates.

 

The CO Waiver is popular both with families and the state of Maryland, but for different reasons. Participants generally prefer to remain living at home for as long as possible; this waiver assists them in doing so. The cost of caring for someone at home is also less expensive for the state than it would be to place the individual in a nursing home. This is because home care utilizes caregiving assistance from family members.

 

Maryland Medicaid programs in general are sometimes referred to as Medical Assistance (MA).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1115 HealthChoice Waiver Renewal - 01/01/2017

~The Maryland Department of Health (the Department) is proposing an amendment to its §1115 demonstration waiver known as HealthChoice, which the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has authorized through December 31, 2021. HealthChoice, first implemented in 1997 under the authority of §1115 of the Social Security Act, is Maryland’s statewide mandatory managed care program for Medicaid enrollees. Under HealthChoice, eligible families and individuals are required to enroll in a managed care organization (MCO) that has been approved by the Department. Each MCO is responsible for ensuring that HealthChoice enrollees have access to a network of medical providers that can meet their health needs.

The State’s 30-day public comment period was open from May 21, 2018 through June 19, 2018. The draft waiver amendment application is available here. The final submitted waiver amendment application is available here. Hard copies of the application may be obtained by calling (410) 767-5677.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MD HCBS Transition Plan - 09/02/2016

Maryland receives funding from the federal government to help pay for services provided in programs such as the Autism, Brain Injury, Community Pathways, Community Options, Model, and Medical Day Waivers and a program that helps children, youth and families. Last year, the federal government put out new rules that states must follow to continue to receive funding to pay for services. Maryland reviewed programs and found areas that do not meet the rules and must be changed. This plan gives information about the new rules; the States review of programs and the plan to fix areas; and input received from various stakeholders like participants, family members, self-advocates, and others.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Guide to Maryland Medical Assistance Coverage” - 08/01/2016

“The purpose of a home and community based services waiver program, also known as a “1915(c) waiver,” is to enable children or aged, blind, or disabled adults requiring a nursing facility level of care to reside in their homes or community settings rather than in a medical institution. • Services for waiver participants are federally matched expenses, although these services are not included in the State Medicaid Plan. • Each waiver program has different medical and other non-financial criteria for its targeted population.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MD Community Pathways (0023.R06.00) - 07/01/2013

Provides community residential hab, community supported living arrangements, expanded day hab-employment discovery and customization, expanded day hab-supported employment, live-in caregiver, medical day care, resource coordination, respite, traditional day hab, assistive technology and adaptive equipment, behavioral supports, environmental accessibility adaptations, expanded day hab-community learning, family/individual support, residential hab II, transition, transportation for individual w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland DoE ESEA Flexibility Waiver - 05/29/2012

“MSDE’s core values of commitment to every student, belief that all students can and must learn, certainty that schools  must help students grow, and conviction that the educator evaluation system must be equitable are achieved through data-driven accountability systems, high standards of excellence from teachers and principals and dynamic collaboration between Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and MSDE.  Maryland’s ambitious mission is to provide every student with a world-class education that ensures post-graduation college- and career-readiness”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD New Directions Independence Plus Waiver (0424.R01.00) - 07/01/2008

Provides community supported living arrangements, expanded day hab-supported employment, expanded day hab-employment discovery and customization, live-in caregiver, medical day care, resource coordination, respite, traditional day hab, support brokerage, assistive technology and adaptative equipment, behavioral supports, environmental accessibility adaptation, expanded day hab-community learning, family/individual support, transition, transportation for individuals w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age.

This waiver expired 06/30/2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) in Maryland will help people transition from an institution, for example a nursing facility, to community living in an apartment, private home, or small group setting. MFP initiatives increase outreach to individuals in institutions and decrease barriers to transition. New efforts under MFP include peer mentoring, enhanced transition assistance, improved information technology, housing assistance, flexible transition funds, and the addition of waiver services to existing waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Community First Choice

“The program provide assistance with activities of daily living to Medicaid recipients who have a chronic illness, medical condition or disability. Services are provided in the eligible individual's home or community residence (waiver participants may receive services in an assisted living facility). Other services in each program vary.  Please see each program’s fact sheet for information about the specific services provided through the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The numerous efforts to support individuals with disabilities in securing and sustaining competitive, integrated employment in the Old Line State of Maryland are more than you can imagine. We're open for business, and welcome the skills and talents of workers with disabilities! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Maryland’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.59%
Change from
2016 to 2017
6,052,177
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
335,461
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
141,870
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.79%
Change from
2016 to 2017
42.29%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.27%
Change from
2016 to 2017
80.43%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 6,052,177
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 335,461
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 141,870
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,733,682
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 42.29%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.43%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 304,396
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 355,747
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 384,006
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 212,801
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 38,339
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,041
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 25,795
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 18,249
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 16,000

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,375
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 129,481

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 13,764
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 32,876
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 58,225
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 23.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 18.70%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,675
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 10,146
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,186
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 8,821
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.08

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 96
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 50
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,569
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 207,082
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $59,262,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $171,675,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $10,955,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 33.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 676
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 9,131
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 69.73%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 12.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 6.86%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.66%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 72.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.43%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 4,727,875
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 5,994
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 267,634
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 2,927,591
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,195,225
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 162
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 2,256
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,418
AbilityOne wages (products). $2,320,330
AbilityOne wages (services). $37,326,061

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 22
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 25
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 172
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,056
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,229

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

Maryland’s workforce system will play a key role in embracing nationally recognized best practices including Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals with significant disabilities can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate support. (Page 40)

The Council recommends that Department of rehabilitation services continue collaboration with local providers, the Maryland Department of Disabilities, and the Developmental Disabilities Administration at the State and local levels, as related to the Employment First initiative. This should include an exploration of programmatic barriers to success and cross-agency training needs. (Page 221)

DORS looks forward to continuing to collaborate with other agencies, including the WIOA Partners, regarding Employment First.  Employment First is an initiative that assures that employment is considered on, developmental/intellectual disabilities. DORS expects that there will be more progress toward Employment First in Maryland this coming year with new leadership in place at the Maryland Developmental Disabilities Administration. (Pages 222, 226, 227)

 These formal interagency cooperative agreements will: identify policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated among the agencies (particularly definitions, standards for eligibility, the joint sharing and use of evaluations and assessments, and procedures for making referrals), identify available resources and define the financial responsibility of each agency for paying for necessary services (consistent with State law) and procedures for resolving disputes between agencies, and include all additional components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation and coordination. For Evidenced Based Supported Employment DORS has implemented a milestone payment system for psychiatric rehabilitation programs offering Evidence-Based Supported Employment services. The milestone payment system significantly streamlines provision of services for DORS and provider staff by substantially reducing preparation of authorizations and invoices, tracking of hours of services, and simplifying reporting. Employment First DORS is a partner with other State agencies (including WIOA Partner, DLLR) and Community Rehabilitation Programs in implementing Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals, including those with significant disabilities, consider employment on a preferred basis in planning for their lives. (Page 236)

DORS and DDA updated and approved the Cooperative Agreement, Employment Services, in October 2013. The agreement focuses on the implementation of Employment First in Maryland. It addresses referral between agencies, specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, and describes cross-training activities. (Pages 241, 246, 266, 256, 266, 269, 276, 299, 314, 323, 326, 339)

Customized Employment

Additional trainings regarding job carving, customized employment, and job development in general; 

  • Increased assistance to help the consumers with their transportation needs including: comprehensive travel training and reduced delays in transportation funding for consumers
  • Opportunities to interface with DORS staff and expand collaborative efforts in job development to include employment specialists and local businesses, opportunities for brainstorming client cases, and for employment specialists across agencies to share strategies and job leads
  • The hourly rates for services have not been increased in over five years. The low rates make it difficult for Community Rehabilitation Programs to hire effective job developers. (Page 267)

9.   Update the MOU with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Developmental Disabilities Administration that defines the roles of each agency in establishing a collaborative process toward the provision of customized employment and supported employment services in support of individuals moving from sheltered work to competitive integrated employment,

10. Align services, rates, and reporting requirements in support of pre-employment transition services and supported employment job placement/support services,

11. Identify, develop, and implement a more seamless services delivery system among workforce partners in Maryland

12. Continue collaboration between Maryland DORS and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Behavioral Health Administration in the implementation of a braided funding model that enhances and expands the ability of both DORS and BHA to fund services and increase capacity in the number of individuals eligible for mental health supported employment. (Page 276)

Performance Measures by September 30, 2016: 

  • DORS Rehabilitation Services Manuals will be updated consistent with changes in the Rehabilitation Act, as amended by WIOA, and in consultation with WIOA Partners;
  • Training will be provided to DORS staff on changes resulting from the reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act (e.g. pre-employment transition services, customized employment, limitations on use of subminimum wage, “competitive integrated employment” criteria, and services to employers) in coordination with WIOA Partners; a. DORS will continue to collaborate with WIOA Partners in the development and implementation of the Maryland WIOA State Plan. (Page 278)

Expanding & Improving Services to Individuals with Disabilities 

  • DORS will continually analyze office locations, staff deployment, staff positions and responsibilities, in accordance with DORS mission to more effectively serve students and adults with disabilities, and in collaboration with the WIOA Partners;
  • The 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment will include an assessment and recommendations for expanding and improving services to students and adults with disabilities;
  • In collaboration with the WIOA Partners, DORS will establish linkages with businesses and employers to include training, customized employment, education and disability awareness, on-site worksite assistive technology services, and mentoring/internship activities;
  • DORS will continue to enhance relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs to ensure availability of Community Rehabilitation Program services statewide;
  • DORS will continue to expand services and outreach to individuals who are deaf-blind and provide technical assistance to staff and WIOA Partners serving this population;
  • In collaboration with WIOA Partners, DORS will develop relationships with employers and analyze labor trends, to increase opportunities for employment of populations that are unserved or underserved. (Page 285)
Blending/ Braiding Resources

Development & Adult Learning 

  • Goodwill
  • Mid-Maryland Workforce Investment Area
  • Montgomery County Division of Workforce Investment Services
  • Tri County Council for Southern Maryland. Use of funds (braiding and leveraging)
  • Maryland Association for Adult Community and Continuing Education Maryland DHR-Family Investment Administration
  • Maryland DLLR-Division of Workforce Development & Adult Learning
  • Maryland State Dept. of Education-Division of Rehabilitation Services
  • Susquehanna Workforce Network, Inc. (Page 80)  

The Division enters into cooperative agreements with the Developmental Disabilities Administration and the Behavioral Health Administration in order to provide for increased interagency cooperation, to ensure the maximum utilization of appropriate programs and resources in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, to expand and improve services to individuals with significant disabilities, and to maximize the use of comparable benefits. (Page 236)

DEI/DRC

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

Maryland will focus resources toward improving the rate at which students’ transition from adult education programs to postsecondary education or training and employment. All academic instruction funded through AEFLA will be delivered concurrently with Workforce Preparation activities. State initiatives including implementation of the Integrating Career Awareness curriculum and integrated education and training (IET) pilots demonstrated that students need to master preliminary skills in order to succeed in academic and career training. Contextualized instruction incorporating the concurrently delivery of basic academic skills, critical thinking, and digital literacy and self-management skills in all levels of instruction will assist students to prepare for the rigor of a college curriculum, (Page 202)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Collaboration with various federal, state, local, business, and community partners ensures that soon to be released inmates have the necessary career training, work habits, teamwork, conflict resolution skills, and interview techniques that will enable them to land and keep good jobs with a self–sustaining salary. Workforce development professionals and career development facilitators work with individuals on financial literacy and communication strategies. They support efforts to re–unify family members and encourage custodial and non–custodial parents to be “responsible” parents. Staff works with recommended offenders until job placement occurs and continues with post–employment follow–up. The goal is to encourage the ex–offenders’ adjustment to living and working in a non–restrictive environment and to be competitively employed in an economically viable career pathway. The initiative reduces inmate recidivism and supports the formulation and maintenance of two–parent families (Page 362)  

School to Work Transition
  • Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) Program was developed by the USDOL in an effort to reduce the number of weeks that UI claimants receive benefits, by assisting them in quickly returning to the workforce. The RESEA Program is designed to help claimants to identify potential barriers to employment and assesses work search progress. It also includes an eligibility review, which in turn helps the DLLR Division of Unemployment Insurance to identify claimants that may be out of compliance with basic UI laws and policies regarding ability and availability to work, school attendance, and active work search. (Page 84)  

Maryland’s American Job Centers are required to provide reasonable accommodation for individuals with disabilities to ensure equal access and opportunity. The term “reasonable accommodation” is defined as “modifications or adjustments to an application/registration process that enables a qualified applicant/registrant with a disability to be considered for the aid, benefits, services, training or employment that the qualified applicant/registrant desires;” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to perform the essential functions of a job, or receive aid, benefits, services, or training equal to that provided to qualified individuals without disabilities,” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to enjoy the same benefits and privileges of the aid. (Page 124)

DORS will determine what information may be gleaned from the case management system related to waiting list and benefits status, and advise the Council. Through its active participation in the WIOA Alignment Group, the WIOA Jobseeker Advisory Focus Groups (to be planned), and the WIOA Workgroups, DORS will explore ways to better assist individuals with disabilities through the entire workforce system. (Page 222)

DORS belief that individuals with disabilities, even the most significant disabilities, can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate supports. Supported employment is appropriate for individuals in Employment First and is the means to assure the best chance for success in employment. Benefits planning is an important part of services for individuals served through Employment First. Governor’s Employment Program for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury, The Governor’s Employment Program for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI Project) provides intensive vocational rehabilitation and long-term supports to individuals with acquired brain injuries. This often includes needed neuropsychological and other assessments, training and supported employment services, and long-term job coaching. (Page 236)

Training and technical assistance to employers and WIOA Partners to promote the awareness of the skills and benefits that people with disabilities can bring to their workforce. Types of training included: information on DORS services and training programs, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and federal contractor compliance with Section 503. (Pages 239, 241, 267, 292, 307,326, 341, 342, 343, 35)

Career Pathways

Maryland State Dept. of Education works to develop policies to increase work study (School to Work)

  • Maryland Dept. of Disabilities
  • Maryland DLLR-Division of Workforce Development & Adult Learning. (Page 81) 

Under the order of selection, DORS will continue to emphasize and enhance services to students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. Description of Priority Categories An individual with a most significant disability (Category I) is an eligible individual (sic). (Page 280)

  • Employment development, such as school–to–work opportunities in partnership with private business and public agencies; and,
  • Health initiatives, such as improved access to birth control counseling and services for sexually active adolescents and parenting classes for every pregnant teenager and her partner. (Page 373)
Work Incentives & Benefits

The career pathways approach will require a workforce system transformation and can benefit a wide variety of participants, including low-skilled adults, high school students, disconnected youth, veterans, incumbent workers, individuals with disabilities, and other target populations. The system requires aligned and transparent educational progression with multiple entry points and clearly defined “on and off ramps.” The system warrants a source of funding to scale up and sustain initiatives, maintain the partnerships that are critical to the process, and must include tools to measure and evaluate outcomes.  (Page 66)

Employer Engagement

C.   THE DESIGNATED STATE UNIT WILL COORDINATE ACTIVITIES WITH ANY OTHER STATE AGENCY THAT IS FUNCTIONING AS AN EMPLOYMENT NETWORK UNDER THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM UNDER SECTION 1148 OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT.

  • FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION OF THE SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM:
    • THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY ASSURES THAT IT WILL EXPEND NO MORE THAN 2.5 PERCENT OF THE STATE’S ALLOTMENT UNDER TITLE VI FOR ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS OF CARRYING OUT THIS PROGRAM; AND, THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY OR AGENCIES WILL PROVIDE, DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY THROUGH PUBLIC OR PRIVATE ENTITIES, NON-FEDERAL CONTRIBUTIONS IN AN AMOUNT THAT IS NOT LESS THAN 10 PERCENT OF THECOSTS OF CARRYING OUT SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES PROVIDED TO YOUTH WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES WITH THE FUNDS RESERVED FOR SUCH PURPOSE UNDER SECTION 603(D) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 606(B)(7)(G) AND (H) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
    • THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY ASSURES THAT IT WILL USE FUNDS MADE AVAILABLE UNDER TITLE VI OF THE REHABILITATION ACT ONLY TO PROVIDE SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES, INCLUDING EXTENDED SERVICES TO YOUTH WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES, WHO ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE SUCH SERVICES; AND, THAT SUCH FUNDS ARE USED ONLY TO SUPPLEMENT AND NOT SUPPLANT THE FUNDS PROVIDED UNDER TITLE I OF THE REHABILITATION ACT, WHEN PROVIDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES SPECIFIED IN THE INDIVIDUALIZED PLAN FOR EMPLOYMENT, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 606(B)(7)(A) AND (D), OF THE REHABILITATION ACT. (Page 336)
511

The MWE is utilized to manage and validate operational activities, via an internet-accessible participant reporting and data collection system that all DLLR and local workforce area case managers use to report, collect, verify, and manage participant data from each of the local and regional teams. The system’s case management capabilities allow staff to determine program eligibility, track services, and report results to federal funding sources. (Page 74)

Professional development and ongoing technical assistance will be provided to local program administrators, teachers and partners on best practices incorporating the experience of the MI–BEST and ACE programs including recruitment, training selection, team teaching, support services, employer participation, outcomes, and data collection. (Page 203)

Utilize DORS and Developmental Disabilities Administration data collection systems to track anticipated increases in transitioning youth served through the Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative and their outcomes. (Pages 266, 287)

Mental Health

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 124 -127) 

  • Section 188 implements the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA, which are contained in Section 188 of the statute.
  • Section 188 prohibits discrimination on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, among other bases.
  • Section 188 also requires that reasonable accommodations be provided to qualified individuals with disabilities in certain circumstances. (Page 125)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 21 - 30 of 77

“Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities” - 09/30/2016

“The primary responsibility of the IATC is to review, revise and update annually the Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities to ensure effective interagency planning and delivery of services for secondary students with disabilities. Additionally, the IATC is tasked with identifying and reporting activities of each partner which impact the delivery, quality and availability of transition services. The IATC also serves in an advisory capacity to all transition-related federal grants.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD HCBS Transition Plan - 09/02/2016

Maryland receives funding from the federal government to help pay for services provided in programs such as the Autism, Brain Injury, Community Pathways, Community Options, Model, and Medical Day Waivers and a program that helps children, youth and families. Last year, the federal government put out new rules that states must follow to continue to receive funding to pay for services. Maryland reviewed programs and found areas that do not meet the rules and must be changed. This plan gives information about the new rules; the States review of programs and the plan to fix areas; and input received from various stakeholders like participants, family members, self-advocates, and others.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Guide to Maryland Medical Assistance Coverage” - 08/01/2016

“The purpose of a home and community based services waiver program, also known as a “1915(c) waiver,” is to enable children or aged, blind, or disabled adults requiring a nursing facility level of care to reside in their homes or community settings rather than in a medical institution. • Services for waiver participants are federally matched expenses, although these services are not included in the State Medicaid Plan. • Each waiver program has different medical and other non-financial criteria for its targeted population.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities - 07/01/2016

This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

“FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities” - 07/01/2016

“This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment.” It consists of a set of tables, one for each goal, that lists the measures and strategies that have been developed for the goal,and the data sources and agencies that are involved in each one.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HB 420/SB 417: Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA) - 05/19/2016

MDLC Board member Ken Capone, People on the Go, MDLC, and other advocates and coalition partners led this strong and successful effort to abolish the payment of subminimum wages to people with disabilities in Maryland. Like SB 765, the bill will become a national model when signed into law and make Maryland the second U.S. state to eliminate this discriminatory exception to Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. The EEA will phase out “sheltered workshops” that pay people as little as pennies per hour and require the Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration to implement a 4-year transition plan to move individuals from segregated day programs to competitive integrated employment. MDLC participates on the Employment First Steering Committee that is developing the policies and infrastructure to support transition to competitive integrated employment.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

HB 431/SB 355: ABLE Act - 04/12/2016

 Federal law enacted in December 2014 authorized states to establish tax-advantaged savings program to help people with disabilities save limited amounts for disability-related expenses (such as health care, assistive technology, education, employment supports and housing) without losing eligibility for certain public benefits. Maryland legislation enacted in 2015 established the ABLE Task Force to make recommendations for an ABLE Program, resulting in this year’s bill. College Savings Plans of Maryland and the Maryland Department of Disabilities and will co-manage the program. Governor Hogan committed $745,000 for program start-up costs and signed the legislation into law on April 12, 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Montgomery County, MD Customized Employment Intern Project (MCPIP) - 10/09/2015

An example of a successful County program serving individuals with significant disabilities is the Montgomery County Customized Employment Public Intern Project (MCPIP). Created in 2007, MCPIP provides flexible employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities to fulfill the work requirements of County departments. Department representatives work with a customized employment career specialist to identify and create part-time positions based on a department’s workforce needs. 

MCPIP participants serve as paid interns in department positions based on their individual job interests, skills and competencies. MCPIP interns gain valuable work experience by developing on-the-job skills to help them compete for County merit positions or opportunities in other organizations

Maryland’s Montgomery County government has adopted a policy to create internships for career seekers with significant disabilities, based on a Customized Employment (CE) strategy. This demand-driven CE policy creates the position for a CE Specialist at TransCen, Inc., a local workforce development intermediary, to conduct an analysis of a department’s need within the Montgomery County government.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland HB 473 - 05/12/2015

Altering the amount of a credit against specified State taxes for wages and child care or transportation expenses related to qualified employees with disabilities; and applying the Act to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2014.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Maryland SB 761 - 05/12/2015

“BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND, That: (a) “Maryland ABLE Program” means a program in Maryland allowing disabled individuals or their families to establish savings accounts to pay qualified expenses for disabled individuals authorized under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience  (ABLE) Act.  (b) It is the intent of the General Assembly that the State establish a Maryland ABLE Program.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Maryland Minimum Wage Act of 2014 (HB 0295/CH0262) - 07/01/2018

“Incrementally increasing the State minimum wage rate to $10.10 beginning July 1, 2018; authorizing specified employers to pay employees under the age of 20 years a specified wage under specified circumstances; requiring the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to increase reimbursement of community providers serving individuals with developmental disabilities; requiring the Governor, in specified fiscal years, to include in a specified budget proposal specified funding increases; etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

SB 0344/HB0448 “Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program - Account Clarifications” - 04/11/2017

~~“Clarifying that a specified amount may be contributed in each calendar year to an account for a disabled individual under the Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program; providing that contributions to an ABLE account may not exceed a specified maximum amount; and requiring the Maryland 529 Board to adopt specified procedures to ensure that specified contributions to ABLE accounts do not exceed a specified maximum limit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

HB 420/SB 417: Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA) - 05/19/2016

MDLC Board member Ken Capone, People on the Go, MDLC, and other advocates and coalition partners led this strong and successful effort to abolish the payment of subminimum wages to people with disabilities in Maryland. Like SB 765, the bill will become a national model when signed into law and make Maryland the second U.S. state to eliminate this discriminatory exception to Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. The EEA will phase out “sheltered workshops” that pay people as little as pennies per hour and require the Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration to implement a 4-year transition plan to move individuals from segregated day programs to competitive integrated employment. MDLC participates on the Employment First Steering Committee that is developing the policies and infrastructure to support transition to competitive integrated employment.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

HB 431/SB 355: ABLE Act - 04/12/2016

 Federal law enacted in December 2014 authorized states to establish tax-advantaged savings program to help people with disabilities save limited amounts for disability-related expenses (such as health care, assistive technology, education, employment supports and housing) without losing eligibility for certain public benefits. Maryland legislation enacted in 2015 established the ABLE Task Force to make recommendations for an ABLE Program, resulting in this year’s bill. College Savings Plans of Maryland and the Maryland Department of Disabilities and will co-manage the program. Governor Hogan committed $745,000 for program start-up costs and signed the legislation into law on April 12, 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maryland HB 473 - 05/12/2015

Altering the amount of a credit against specified State taxes for wages and child care or transportation expenses related to qualified employees with disabilities; and applying the Act to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2014.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Maryland SB 761 - 05/12/2015

“BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND, That: (a) “Maryland ABLE Program” means a program in Maryland allowing disabled individuals or their families to establish savings accounts to pay qualified expenses for disabled individuals authorized under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience  (ABLE) Act.  (b) It is the intent of the General Assembly that the State establish a Maryland ABLE Program.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

An Act Concerning Reasonable Accommodations For Disabilities Due to Pregnancy (HB804/SB784) - 04/08/2013

“[The Act] will require employers with more than 15 employees to provide reasonable accommodations to workers experiencing a disability caused or contributed by pregnancy. […] The Act prohibits an employer from refusing to make a reasonable accommodation for the known disability of a worker that is caused by pregnancy […]” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Executive Order 01.01.2017.23 Maryland Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/10/2017

“Now, therefore, I, Lawrence J. Hogan, Jr., Governor of the State of Maryland, by virtue of the power invested in my by the constitution and the laws of Maryland, declare the following:

 

Each State department, board, agency, authority, board, or instrumentality controlled by the Governor (an “Executive unit”) shall annually observe October as Disability Employment Awareness Month to celebrate the many and varied contributions of people with disabilities.The Department of Disabilities […] shall: reinforce the value and talents people with disabilities add to Maryland’s workplaces and communitiesIncreasing public awarenessTo promote individuals with disabilities’ access to technology”

 

Rescinds Executive Order 01.01.2009.10

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order 01.01.2009.10 Maryland Disability History and Awareness Month - 07/26/2009

“Now, therefore, I, Martin O’Malley, Governor of the State of Maryland […] hereby proclaim the following executive order, effective immediately.

State of Maryland Executive Branch agencies shall annually observe October as Disability History and Awareness Month.

The Department of Disabilities shall take steps to increase public awareness of the history of disabilities and the disability rights movement […]

The Maryland State Department of Education shall encourage and assist local boards of education to provide instruction in the history of disabilities, people with disabilities, and the disability rights movement during the observance of Disability History Awareness Month.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Executive Order 01.01.2007.13 - 08/02/2007

"It is the policy of the State of Maryland to ensure a smooth and effective transition for all students with disabilities from secondary education to adult services such as postsecondary education and employment; and to provide transition planning for students and families that is student focused and family-centered, based on individual strengths and needs, utilizes best practices, and leads to outcomes in the most integrated setting appropriate; and It is deemed necessary to establish an Interagency Transition Council to recommend policies and identify the funding requirements to ensure effective, efficient, and comprehensive delivery of services that will most effectively meet the transition needs of Maryland students with disabilities."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Temporary Disability Assistance

“The Temporary Disability Assistance Program (TDAP) is available to help low-income, disabled Marylanders through a period of short-term disability or while they are awaiting approval of federal disability support. The program is funded through the State of Maryland to provide help to individuals without dependent children.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maryland Workforce Promise Customized Employment Definition

“Customized Employment is…”

Individualizing the employment relationship between employees and employers in ways that meet the needs of both A person centered approach to employment that is based on the individual’s Strengths Needs Interests Blend of services designed to increase employment options for individuals with significant disabilities  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Public Engagement Strategies Redefine “No Wrong Door” in Maryland

For over ten years Maryland has refined its NWD/ADRC initiative, known as Maryland Access Points (MAP). The term “Maryland Access Point” was chosen to remove any semblance of preferences for “aging” or “disability” being first in the name, as Maryland wanted its NWD/ADRC to be seen as access points for all individuals needing LTSS. Starting in 2008, Maryland formally initiated its branding process and hired a consultant to construct a marketing plan for consumers and providers that eliminated system fragmentation, increased awareness of LTSS, and focused on prevention of crises. The state launched a toll free number in August 2014 and a new website in February 2015.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Department of Human Resources, Office of Employment and Program Equity

The Maryland Department of Human Resources is committed to the principle of fair practices and equal opportunity for all of its employees and customers. The Office of Employment and Program Equity has the primary responsibility for ensuring the effectiveness and success of the Department’s comprehensive Equal Opportunity Program. Programs include:

1.        Equal Employment Opportunity

2.        Affirmative Action

3.        Minority Business Enterprises

4.        Americans with Disabilities Act Compliance Program

5.        Title VI Compliance

6.        Program Equity

7.        Complaint Investigations

8.        DHR Mediation Program

          9.        Training and Technical Support

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Maryland Department of Education “Understanding the Evaluation, Eligibility and Individualized Education Program (IEP) Process in Maryland”

The public agency uses a team process to decide whether a child is a student with a disability as defined by the IDEA and the educational needs of the child. Each public agency is responsible for initiating and conducting meetings for the purposes of developing, reviewing, and revising the IEP of a student with a disability, and determining the child’s educational placement. The parents of each student with a disability must be notified and afforded the opportunity to participate in any IEP team meeting conducted for their child.  Parents are members of the IEP team that makes decisions regarding the child’s educational placement. The public agency shall make reasonable efforts to ensure that the parents understand, and are able to participate in any group discussions relating to the educational placement of their child, including arranging for an interpreter for parents with deafness, or whose native language is not English.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Rehabilitation Services “Training Customized for Your Business”

On-the-Job Training

DORS can provide funding for on-the-job training for a new employee and reimburse a business for a percentage of the new employees’ wages while they are in training.DORS also offers technical assistance and follow-along services to the trainee and the business.

Customized & Partnership Training

DORS partners with businesses and educational institutions to identify specific needs and design customized training programs to meet those needs. Training may take place at the DORS Workforce & Technology Center, on the job site, by an outside vendor, or by a combination of these settings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Maryland Department of Disabilities, Response to FY 2016 Budget Hearings

In November of 2014, MDOD was designated the Lead State Agency for a technical assistance opportunity through the US Department of Labor Office on Disability Employment Policy (ODEP). The Employment First Core State Leadership Mentoring Program will provide training and assess six (6) community providers to build capacity and transform community providers on customized employment. MDOD and the State and external partners will also develop recommendations for core competencies related to customized employment within the State and identify ways to infuse Employment First initiatives into the nonresidential portion of the State’s Home and Community Based Services Waivers delivered through Medicaid.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Maryland

In 2008/2009, the Developmental Disabilities Administration’s (DDA) engaged stakeholders in an intensive strategic planning process, including planning to improve employment outcomes for people with developmental disabilities in Maryland.   The following position statement is in support of the DDA’s broader values, mission and vision and is a product of that strategic planning process.   “The DDA believes that all people with developmental disabilities CAN work, and contribute to their community, when given opportunity, training, and supports that build on their strengths.  Employment will be the first option considered for all people of working age who receive DDA services.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD Developmental Disabilities Administration Position Statement on Employment Services

"In 2008, the Developmental Disabilities Administration’s (DDA) engaged stakeholders in an intensive strategic planning process, including planning to improve employment outcomes for people with developmental disabilities in Maryland. The following position statement is in support of the DDA’s broader values, mission and vision and is a product of the strategic planning process.

Commitment: The DDA believes that all people with developmental disabilities CAN work, and contribute to their community, when given opportunity, training, and supports that build on their strengths. Position Statement: Employment will be the “first” option considered for all people of working age who receive DDA services. Vision: Every Marylander maximizes his/her career potential and employers have access to the human resources they need to be successful."  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

MD DDA Definition of Day and Employment Services

SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT “Employment in an integrated work setting. This is defined as a workplace in the community, where the majority of individuals do not have disabilities, and which provides opportunities to interact with non-disabled individual to the same extent that individuals employed in comparable position would interact. Individuals are working in individualized, integrated jobs in the community business for pay at or above minimum wage.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council “2017 Legislative Overview” - 04/01/2017

~~“DDA FY2018 Budget Expansion: Approximately 789 young adults with developmental disabilities leaving school will receive employment or other day services. DDA projects that 100% of transitioning youth will receive this support.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities - 09/30/2016

~~"The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities.  “

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities - 07/01/2016

This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD Governor’s Interagency Transition Council (IATC) - 08/02/2007

~~The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Navigating the Transition Years Handbook 2010

If your child has an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), a team of staff members is responsible for helping them with their transition planning and the implementation of their plan. If your child is on a 504 plan, they still have access to the services of a guidance counselor, transition coordinator, and Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) counselor, but you and your child may be responsible for initiating contact to access their support

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Customized Employment Project

The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s Mental Health

"Incorporated in 1999 as a private, nonprofit organization, MCF is Maryland’s statewide family network organization, a designation from the federal Substance Use and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). MCF changed its name from "Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s Mental Health" to the "Maryland Coalition of Families" in 2016. MCF is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors comprised of at least 51% adult caregivers of a child or adolescent with a diagnosable emotional or behavioral disability. All of our family support staff are parents who have cared for a child with behavioral health needs and have been trained to help other families."
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Learning Links - Transition 101

Maryland Learning Links is a site developed under federal funding through a State Improvement Grant.  It is co-owned by the Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Special Education and Early Intervention Services (MSDE), and other community stakeholders. The Transition section of the site, “ is primarily meant to provide parents with the information they need to support the successful transition of their children to adulthood.   It’s filled with… information and tools… and several timelines that can help [parents] better understand and make the most of Transition Planning and Services…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative (GTYI)

The Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative (GTYI) is a collaboration funded through a partnership between the Maryland Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) and the Maryland Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA).  The purpose of the Initiative is to show that all students with disabilities can work and contribute to Maryland’s future after leaving school.  The Governor's Transitioning Youth Initiative earmarks funds in the DDA budget for eligible students leaving school, regardless of the severity of their situation and their relative need for immediate services.  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene “Provider Enrollment”

~The Maryland Department of Health has reviewed the  Senior Center Plus sites in the state and has found that currently all of the sites are community based and meet the criteria of the Community Settings regulations. The Maryland Department of Health invites public comment on the Senior Center Plus providers. A public comment period will be open from May 25, 2018 to June 25, 2018. Once the public comment period is complete, this information and the comments will be submitted to CMS for review. Please send all comments to mdh.hcbssetting@maryland.gov or Rebecca Oliver, Health Policy Analyst Advanced, Room 134, 201 W Preston St, Baltimore, MD 21201. 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Maryland Customized Employment Project

The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland EID Program

The EID Program, administered by the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH), provides Medical Assistance (also called Medicaid) to working Marylanders with disabilities who meet a few conditions.  Medical Assistance:    • Covers most medical services for individuals who have no other health insurance,    • Saves individuals with Medicare $1,000 - $12,000 a year    • Supplements private insurance, paying for some services that the other insurance does not cover  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) in Maryland will help people transition from an institution, for example a nursing facility, to community living in an apartment, private home, or small group setting. MFP initiatives increase outreach to individuals in institutions and decrease barriers to transition. New efforts under MFP include peer mentoring, enhanced transition assistance, improved information technology, housing assistance, flexible transition funds, and the addition of waiver services to existing waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Community First Choice

“The program provide assistance with activities of daily living to Medicaid recipients who have a chronic illness, medical condition or disability. Services are provided in the eligible individual's home or community residence (waiver participants may receive services in an assisted living facility). Other services in each program vary.  Please see each program’s fact sheet for information about the specific services provided through the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Balancing Incentive Program

“The Balancing Incentive Program authorizes grants to States to increase access to non-institutional long-term services and supports…The Balancing Incentive Program will help States transform their long-term care systems by, [l]owering costs through improved systems performance & efficiency, [c]reating tools to help consumers with care planning & assessment, [and], [i]mproving quality measurement & oversight.  The Balancing Incentive Program also provides new ways to serve more people in home and community-based settings, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as required by the Olmstead decision.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Annual Maryland Transition Conference

Sponsored by the Governor's Interagency Transition Council, for Youth with Disabilities. Topics Include:

Employment Postsecondary Education Adult Service Linkages Accommodations & Supports Youth Development & Leadership Housing  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities

The Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities (MCDD) at Kennedy Krieger Institute is dedicated to leadership in the field of developmental and other disabilities, so that people of all ages can maximize their potential and achieve independence, productivity, and inclusion within their communities   The Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities staff are engaged in four core functions:    • Interdisciplinary Pre-Service Training    • Community Service and Technical Assistance    • Research and Evaluation    • Dissemination Activities  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

United States vs. Baltimore County, MD - 08/07/2012

The decree requires the County to  adopt new policies and procedures regarding the administration of medical examinations and inquiries and provide training on the ADA to all current supervisory employees and all employees who participate in making personnel decisions

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Maryland Medicaid Community Options Waiver (formerly Waiver for Older Adults) - 01/01/2018

“Until recently, the Maryland Community Options Medicaid Waiver was called the Waiver for Older Adults. That program and the Living at Home Medicaid Waiver are now merged under this new title. This waiver is also called the Home and Community-Based Options (HCBO) Waiver and, in this article, it is referred to as simply the CO Waiver.

 

The new CO waiver allows elderly individuals and those with physical disabilities who need nursing home level care to receive care services in their home or a group living community facility instead. Group living communities can include assisted living residences, provided they are participating in the program and willing to accept the Medicaid payment rates.

 

The CO Waiver is popular both with families and the state of Maryland, but for different reasons. Participants generally prefer to remain living at home for as long as possible; this waiver assists them in doing so. The cost of caring for someone at home is also less expensive for the state than it would be to place the individual in a nursing home. This is because home care utilizes caregiving assistance from family members.

 

Maryland Medicaid programs in general are sometimes referred to as Medical Assistance (MA).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1115 HealthChoice Waiver Renewal - 01/01/2017

~The Maryland Department of Health (the Department) is proposing an amendment to its §1115 demonstration waiver known as HealthChoice, which the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has authorized through December 31, 2021. HealthChoice, first implemented in 1997 under the authority of §1115 of the Social Security Act, is Maryland’s statewide mandatory managed care program for Medicaid enrollees. Under HealthChoice, eligible families and individuals are required to enroll in a managed care organization (MCO) that has been approved by the Department. Each MCO is responsible for ensuring that HealthChoice enrollees have access to a network of medical providers that can meet their health needs.

The State’s 30-day public comment period was open from May 21, 2018 through June 19, 2018. The draft waiver amendment application is available here. The final submitted waiver amendment application is available here. Hard copies of the application may be obtained by calling (410) 767-5677.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MD HCBS Transition Plan - 09/02/2016

Maryland receives funding from the federal government to help pay for services provided in programs such as the Autism, Brain Injury, Community Pathways, Community Options, Model, and Medical Day Waivers and a program that helps children, youth and families. Last year, the federal government put out new rules that states must follow to continue to receive funding to pay for services. Maryland reviewed programs and found areas that do not meet the rules and must be changed. This plan gives information about the new rules; the States review of programs and the plan to fix areas; and input received from various stakeholders like participants, family members, self-advocates, and others.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Guide to Maryland Medical Assistance Coverage” - 08/01/2016

“The purpose of a home and community based services waiver program, also known as a “1915(c) waiver,” is to enable children or aged, blind, or disabled adults requiring a nursing facility level of care to reside in their homes or community settings rather than in a medical institution. • Services for waiver participants are federally matched expenses, although these services are not included in the State Medicaid Plan. • Each waiver program has different medical and other non-financial criteria for its targeted population.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MD Community Pathways (0023.R06.00) - 07/01/2013

Provides community residential hab, community supported living arrangements, expanded day hab-employment discovery and customization, expanded day hab-supported employment, live-in caregiver, medical day care, resource coordination, respite, traditional day hab, assistive technology and adaptive equipment, behavioral supports, environmental accessibility adaptations, expanded day hab-community learning, family/individual support, residential hab II, transition, transportation for individual w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland DoE ESEA Flexibility Waiver - 05/29/2012

“MSDE’s core values of commitment to every student, belief that all students can and must learn, certainty that schools  must help students grow, and conviction that the educator evaluation system must be equitable are achieved through data-driven accountability systems, high standards of excellence from teachers and principals and dynamic collaboration between Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and MSDE.  Maryland’s ambitious mission is to provide every student with a world-class education that ensures post-graduation college- and career-readiness”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD New Directions Independence Plus Waiver (0424.R01.00) - 07/01/2008

Provides community supported living arrangements, expanded day hab-supported employment, expanded day hab-employment discovery and customization, live-in caregiver, medical day care, resource coordination, respite, traditional day hab, support brokerage, assistive technology and adaptative equipment, behavioral supports, environmental accessibility adaptation, expanded day hab-community learning, family/individual support, transition, transportation for individuals w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age.

This waiver expired 06/30/2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) in Maryland will help people transition from an institution, for example a nursing facility, to community living in an apartment, private home, or small group setting. MFP initiatives increase outreach to individuals in institutions and decrease barriers to transition. New efforts under MFP include peer mentoring, enhanced transition assistance, improved information technology, housing assistance, flexible transition funds, and the addition of waiver services to existing waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Community First Choice

“The program provide assistance with activities of daily living to Medicaid recipients who have a chronic illness, medical condition or disability. Services are provided in the eligible individual's home or community residence (waiver participants may receive services in an assisted living facility). Other services in each program vary.  Please see each program’s fact sheet for information about the specific services provided through the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

The numerous efforts to support individuals with disabilities in securing and sustaining competitive, integrated employment in the Old Line State of Maryland are more than you can imagine. We're open for business, and welcome the skills and talents of workers with disabilities! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Maryland’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.59%
Change from
2016 to 2017
6,052,177
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
335,461
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
141,870
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.79%
Change from
2016 to 2017
42.29%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.27%
Change from
2016 to 2017
80.43%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 6,052,177
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 335,461
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 141,870
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,733,682
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 42.29%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.43%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 304,396
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 355,747
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 384,006
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 212,801
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 38,339
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,041
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 25,795
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 18,249
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 16,000

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,375
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 129,481

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 13,764
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 32,876
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 58,225
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 23.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 18.70%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,675
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 10,146
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,186
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 8,821
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.08

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 96
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 50
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,569
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 207,082
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $59,262,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $171,675,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $10,955,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 33.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 676
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 9,131
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 69.73%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 12.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 6.86%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.66%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 72.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.43%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 4,727,875
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 5,994
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 267,634
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 2,927,591
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,195,225
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 162
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 2,256
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,418
AbilityOne wages (products). $2,320,330
AbilityOne wages (services). $37,326,061

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 22
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 25
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 172
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,056
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,229

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

Maryland’s workforce system will play a key role in embracing nationally recognized best practices including Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals with significant disabilities can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate support. (Page 40)

The Council recommends that Department of rehabilitation services continue collaboration with local providers, the Maryland Department of Disabilities, and the Developmental Disabilities Administration at the State and local levels, as related to the Employment First initiative. This should include an exploration of programmatic barriers to success and cross-agency training needs. (Page 221)

DORS looks forward to continuing to collaborate with other agencies, including the WIOA Partners, regarding Employment First.  Employment First is an initiative that assures that employment is considered on, developmental/intellectual disabilities. DORS expects that there will be more progress toward Employment First in Maryland this coming year with new leadership in place at the Maryland Developmental Disabilities Administration. (Pages 222, 226, 227)

 These formal interagency cooperative agreements will: identify policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated among the agencies (particularly definitions, standards for eligibility, the joint sharing and use of evaluations and assessments, and procedures for making referrals), identify available resources and define the financial responsibility of each agency for paying for necessary services (consistent with State law) and procedures for resolving disputes between agencies, and include all additional components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation and coordination. For Evidenced Based Supported Employment DORS has implemented a milestone payment system for psychiatric rehabilitation programs offering Evidence-Based Supported Employment services. The milestone payment system significantly streamlines provision of services for DORS and provider staff by substantially reducing preparation of authorizations and invoices, tracking of hours of services, and simplifying reporting. Employment First DORS is a partner with other State agencies (including WIOA Partner, DLLR) and Community Rehabilitation Programs in implementing Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals, including those with significant disabilities, consider employment on a preferred basis in planning for their lives. (Page 236)

DORS and DDA updated and approved the Cooperative Agreement, Employment Services, in October 2013. The agreement focuses on the implementation of Employment First in Maryland. It addresses referral between agencies, specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, and describes cross-training activities. (Pages 241, 246, 266, 256, 266, 269, 276, 299, 314, 323, 326, 339)

Customized Employment

Additional trainings regarding job carving, customized employment, and job development in general; 

  • Increased assistance to help the consumers with their transportation needs including: comprehensive travel training and reduced delays in transportation funding for consumers
  • Opportunities to interface with DORS staff and expand collaborative efforts in job development to include employment specialists and local businesses, opportunities for brainstorming client cases, and for employment specialists across agencies to share strategies and job leads
  • The hourly rates for services have not been increased in over five years. The low rates make it difficult for Community Rehabilitation Programs to hire effective job developers. (Page 267)

9.   Update the MOU with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Developmental Disabilities Administration that defines the roles of each agency in establishing a collaborative process toward the provision of customized employment and supported employment services in support of individuals moving from sheltered work to competitive integrated employment,

10. Align services, rates, and reporting requirements in support of pre-employment transition services and supported employment job placement/support services,

11. Identify, develop, and implement a more seamless services delivery system among workforce partners in Maryland

12. Continue collaboration between Maryland DORS and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Behavioral Health Administration in the implementation of a braided funding model that enhances and expands the ability of both DORS and BHA to fund services and increase capacity in the number of individuals eligible for mental health supported employment. (Page 276)

Performance Measures by September 30, 2016: 

  • DORS Rehabilitation Services Manuals will be updated consistent with changes in the Rehabilitation Act, as amended by WIOA, and in consultation with WIOA Partners;
  • Training will be provided to DORS staff on changes resulting from the reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act (e.g. pre-employment transition services, customized employment, limitations on use of subminimum wage, “competitive integrated employment” criteria, and services to employers) in coordination with WIOA Partners; a. DORS will continue to collaborate with WIOA Partners in the development and implementation of the Maryland WIOA State Plan. (Page 278)

Expanding & Improving Services to Individuals with Disabilities 

  • DORS will continually analyze office locations, staff deployment, staff positions and responsibilities, in accordance with DORS mission to more effectively serve students and adults with disabilities, and in collaboration with the WIOA Partners;
  • The 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment will include an assessment and recommendations for expanding and improving services to students and adults with disabilities;
  • In collaboration with the WIOA Partners, DORS will establish linkages with businesses and employers to include training, customized employment, education and disability awareness, on-site worksite assistive technology services, and mentoring/internship activities;
  • DORS will continue to enhance relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs to ensure availability of Community Rehabilitation Program services statewide;
  • DORS will continue to expand services and outreach to individuals who are deaf-blind and provide technical assistance to staff and WIOA Partners serving this population;
  • In collaboration with WIOA Partners, DORS will develop relationships with employers and analyze labor trends, to increase opportunities for employment of populations that are unserved or underserved. (Page 285)
Blending/ Braiding Resources

Development & Adult Learning 

  • Goodwill
  • Mid-Maryland Workforce Investment Area
  • Montgomery County Division of Workforce Investment Services
  • Tri County Council for Southern Maryland. Use of funds (braiding and leveraging)
  • Maryland Association for Adult Community and Continuing Education Maryland DHR-Family Investment Administration
  • Maryland DLLR-Division of Workforce Development & Adult Learning
  • Maryland State Dept. of Education-Division of Rehabilitation Services
  • Susquehanna Workforce Network, Inc. (Page 80)  

The Division enters into cooperative agreements with the Developmental Disabilities Administration and the Behavioral Health Administration in order to provide for increased interagency cooperation, to ensure the maximum utilization of appropriate programs and resources in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, to expand and improve services to individuals with significant disabilities, and to maximize the use of comparable benefits. (Page 236)

DEI/DRC

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

Maryland will focus resources toward improving the rate at which students’ transition from adult education programs to postsecondary education or training and employment. All academic instruction funded through AEFLA will be delivered concurrently with Workforce Preparation activities. State initiatives including implementation of the Integrating Career Awareness curriculum and integrated education and training (IET) pilots demonstrated that students need to master preliminary skills in order to succeed in academic and career training. Contextualized instruction incorporating the concurrently delivery of basic academic skills, critical thinking, and digital literacy and self-management skills in all levels of instruction will assist students to prepare for the rigor of a college curriculum, (Page 202)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Collaboration with various federal, state, local, business, and community partners ensures that soon to be released inmates have the necessary career training, work habits, teamwork, conflict resolution skills, and interview techniques that will enable them to land and keep good jobs with a self–sustaining salary. Workforce development professionals and career development facilitators work with individuals on financial literacy and communication strategies. They support efforts to re–unify family members and encourage custodial and non–custodial parents to be “responsible” parents. Staff works with recommended offenders until job placement occurs and continues with post–employment follow–up. The goal is to encourage the ex–offenders’ adjustment to living and working in a non–restrictive environment and to be competitively employed in an economically viable career pathway. The initiative reduces inmate recidivism and supports the formulation and maintenance of two–parent families (Page 362)  

School to Work Transition
  • Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) Program was developed by the USDOL in an effort to reduce the number of weeks that UI claimants receive benefits, by assisting them in quickly returning to the workforce. The RESEA Program is designed to help claimants to identify potential barriers to employment and assesses work search progress. It also includes an eligibility review, which in turn helps the DLLR Division of Unemployment Insurance to identify claimants that may be out of compliance with basic UI laws and policies regarding ability and availability to work, school attendance, and active work search. (Page 84)  

Maryland’s American Job Centers are required to provide reasonable accommodation for individuals with disabilities to ensure equal access and opportunity. The term “reasonable accommodation” is defined as “modifications or adjustments to an application/registration process that enables a qualified applicant/registrant with a disability to be considered for the aid, benefits, services, training or employment that the qualified applicant/registrant desires;” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to perform the essential functions of a job, or receive aid, benefits, services, or training equal to that provided to qualified individuals without disabilities,” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to enjoy the same benefits and privileges of the aid. (Page 124)

DORS will determine what information may be gleaned from the case management system related to waiting list and benefits status, and advise the Council. Through its active participation in the WIOA Alignment Group, the WIOA Jobseeker Advisory Focus Groups (to be planned), and the WIOA Workgroups, DORS will explore ways to better assist individuals with disabilities through the entire workforce system. (Page 222)

DORS belief that individuals with disabilities, even the most significant disabilities, can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate supports. Supported employment is appropriate for individuals in Employment First and is the means to assure the best chance for success in employment. Benefits planning is an important part of services for individuals served through Employment First. Governor’s Employment Program for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury, The Governor’s Employment Program for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI Project) provides intensive vocational rehabilitation and long-term supports to individuals with acquired brain injuries. This often includes needed neuropsychological and other assessments, training and supported employment services, and long-term job coaching. (Page 236)

Training and technical assistance to employers and WIOA Partners to promote the awareness of the skills and benefits that people with disabilities can bring to their workforce. Types of training included: information on DORS services and training programs, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and federal contractor compliance with Section 503. (Pages 239, 241, 267, 292, 307,326, 341, 342, 343, 35)

Career Pathways

Maryland State Dept. of Education works to develop policies to increase work study (School to Work)

  • Maryland Dept. of Disabilities
  • Maryland DLLR-Division of Workforce Development & Adult Learning. (Page 81) 

Under the order of selection, DORS will continue to emphasize and enhance services to students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. Description of Priority Categories An individual with a most significant disability (Category I) is an eligible individual (sic). (Page 280)

  • Employment development, such as school–to–work opportunities in partnership with private business and public agencies; and,
  • Health initiatives, such as improved access to birth control counseling and services for sexually active adolescents and parenting classes for every pregnant teenager and her partner. (Page 373)
Work Incentives & Benefits

The career pathways approach will require a workforce system transformation and can benefit a wide variety of participants, including low-skilled adults, high school students, disconnected youth, veterans, incumbent workers, individuals with disabilities, and other target populations. The system requires aligned and transparent educational progression with multiple entry points and clearly defined “on and off ramps.” The system warrants a source of funding to scale up and sustain initiatives, maintain the partnerships that are critical to the process, and must include tools to measure and evaluate outcomes.  (Page 66)

Employer Engagement

C.   THE DESIGNATED STATE UNIT WILL COORDINATE ACTIVITIES WITH ANY OTHER STATE AGENCY THAT IS FUNCTIONING AS AN EMPLOYMENT NETWORK UNDER THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM UNDER SECTION 1148 OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT.

  • FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION OF THE SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM:
    • THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY ASSURES THAT IT WILL EXPEND NO MORE THAN 2.5 PERCENT OF THE STATE’S ALLOTMENT UNDER TITLE VI FOR ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS OF CARRYING OUT THIS PROGRAM; AND, THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY OR AGENCIES WILL PROVIDE, DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY THROUGH PUBLIC OR PRIVATE ENTITIES, NON-FEDERAL CONTRIBUTIONS IN AN AMOUNT THAT IS NOT LESS THAN 10 PERCENT OF THECOSTS OF CARRYING OUT SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES PROVIDED TO YOUTH WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES WITH THE FUNDS RESERVED FOR SUCH PURPOSE UNDER SECTION 603(D) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 606(B)(7)(G) AND (H) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
    • THE DESIGNATED STATE AGENCY ASSURES THAT IT WILL USE FUNDS MADE AVAILABLE UNDER TITLE VI OF THE REHABILITATION ACT ONLY TO PROVIDE SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES, INCLUDING EXTENDED SERVICES TO YOUTH WITH THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES, WHO ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE SUCH SERVICES; AND, THAT SUCH FUNDS ARE USED ONLY TO SUPPLEMENT AND NOT SUPPLANT THE FUNDS PROVIDED UNDER TITLE I OF THE REHABILITATION ACT, WHEN PROVIDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES SPECIFIED IN THE INDIVIDUALIZED PLAN FOR EMPLOYMENT, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 606(B)(7)(A) AND (D), OF THE REHABILITATION ACT. (Page 336)
511

The MWE is utilized to manage and validate operational activities, via an internet-accessible participant reporting and data collection system that all DLLR and local workforce area case managers use to report, collect, verify, and manage participant data from each of the local and regional teams. The system’s case management capabilities allow staff to determine program eligibility, track services, and report results to federal funding sources. (Page 74)

Professional development and ongoing technical assistance will be provided to local program administrators, teachers and partners on best practices incorporating the experience of the MI–BEST and ACE programs including recruitment, training selection, team teaching, support services, employer participation, outcomes, and data collection. (Page 203)

Utilize DORS and Developmental Disabilities Administration data collection systems to track anticipated increases in transitioning youth served through the Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative and their outcomes. (Pages 266, 287)

Mental Health

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 124 -127) 

  • Section 188 implements the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA, which are contained in Section 188 of the statute.
  • Section 188 prohibits discrimination on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, among other bases.
  • Section 188 also requires that reasonable accommodations be provided to qualified individuals with disabilities in certain circumstances. (Page 125)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 21 - 30 of 77

“Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities” - 09/30/2016

“The primary responsibility of the IATC is to review, revise and update annually the Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities to ensure effective interagency planning and delivery of services for secondary students with disabilities. Additionally, the IATC is tasked with identifying and reporting activities of each partner which impact the delivery, quality and availability of transition services. The IATC also serves in an advisory capacity to all transition-related federal grants.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD HCBS Transition Plan - 09/02/2016

Maryland receives funding from the federal government to help pay for services provided in programs such as the Autism, Brain Injury, Community Pathways, Community Options, Model, and Medical Day Waivers and a program that helps children, youth and families. Last year, the federal government put out new rules that states must follow to continue to receive funding to pay for services. Maryland reviewed programs and found areas that do not meet the rules and must be changed. This plan gives information about the new rules; the States review of programs and the plan to fix areas; and input received from various stakeholders like participants, family members, self-advocates, and others.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Guide to Maryland Medical Assistance Coverage” - 08/01/2016

“The purpose of a home and community based services waiver program, also known as a “1915(c) waiver,” is to enable children or aged, blind, or disabled adults requiring a nursing facility level of care to reside in their homes or community settings rather than in a medical institution. • Services for waiver participants are federally matched expenses, although these services are not included in the State Medicaid Plan. • Each waiver program has different medical and other non-financial criteria for its targeted population.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities - 07/01/2016

This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

“FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities” - 07/01/2016

“This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment.” It consists of a set of tables, one for each goal, that lists the measures and strategies that have been developed for the goal,and the data sources and agencies that are involved in each one.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HB 420/SB 417: Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA) - 05/19/2016

MDLC Board member Ken Capone, People on the Go, MDLC, and other advocates and coalition partners led this strong and successful effort to abolish the payment of subminimum wages to people with disabilities in Maryland. Like SB 765, the bill will become a national model when signed into law and make Maryland the second U.S. state to eliminate this discriminatory exception to Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. The EEA will phase out “sheltered workshops” that pay people as little as pennies per hour and require the Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration to implement a 4-year transition plan to move individuals from segregated day programs to competitive integrated employment. MDLC participates on the Employment First Steering Committee that is developing the policies and infrastructure to support transition to competitive integrated employment.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

HB 431/SB 355: ABLE Act - 04/12/2016

 Federal law enacted in December 2014 authorized states to establish tax-advantaged savings program to help people with disabilities save limited amounts for disability-related expenses (such as health care, assistive technology, education, employment supports and housing) without losing eligibility for certain public benefits. Maryland legislation enacted in 2015 established the ABLE Task Force to make recommendations for an ABLE Program, resulting in this year’s bill. College Savings Plans of Maryland and the Maryland Department of Disabilities and will co-manage the program. Governor Hogan committed $745,000 for program start-up costs and signed the legislation into law on April 12, 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Montgomery County, MD Customized Employment Intern Project (MCPIP) - 10/09/2015

An example of a successful County program serving individuals with significant disabilities is the Montgomery County Customized Employment Public Intern Project (MCPIP). Created in 2007, MCPIP provides flexible employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities to fulfill the work requirements of County departments. Department representatives work with a customized employment career specialist to identify and create part-time positions based on a department’s workforce needs. 

MCPIP participants serve as paid interns in department positions based on their individual job interests, skills and competencies. MCPIP interns gain valuable work experience by developing on-the-job skills to help them compete for County merit positions or opportunities in other organizations

Maryland’s Montgomery County government has adopted a policy to create internships for career seekers with significant disabilities, based on a Customized Employment (CE) strategy. This demand-driven CE policy creates the position for a CE Specialist at TransCen, Inc., a local workforce development intermediary, to conduct an analysis of a department’s need within the Montgomery County government.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland HB 473 - 05/12/2015

Altering the amount of a credit against specified State taxes for wages and child care or transportation expenses related to qualified employees with disabilities; and applying the Act to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2014.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Maryland SB 761 - 05/12/2015

“BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND, That: (a) “Maryland ABLE Program” means a program in Maryland allowing disabled individuals or their families to establish savings accounts to pay qualified expenses for disabled individuals authorized under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience  (ABLE) Act.  (b) It is the intent of the General Assembly that the State establish a Maryland ABLE Program.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Maryland Minimum Wage Act of 2014 (HB 0295/CH0262) - 07/01/2018

“Incrementally increasing the State minimum wage rate to $10.10 beginning July 1, 2018; authorizing specified employers to pay employees under the age of 20 years a specified wage under specified circumstances; requiring the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to increase reimbursement of community providers serving individuals with developmental disabilities; requiring the Governor, in specified fiscal years, to include in a specified budget proposal specified funding increases; etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

SB 0344/HB0448 “Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program - Account Clarifications” - 04/11/2017

~~“Clarifying that a specified amount may be contributed in each calendar year to an account for a disabled individual under the Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program; providing that contributions to an ABLE account may not exceed a specified maximum amount; and requiring the Maryland 529 Board to adopt specified procedures to ensure that specified contributions to ABLE accounts do not exceed a specified maximum limit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

HB 420/SB 417: Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA) - 05/19/2016

MDLC Board member Ken Capone, People on the Go, MDLC, and other advocates and coalition partners led this strong and successful effort to abolish the payment of subminimum wages to people with disabilities in Maryland. Like SB 765, the bill will become a national model when signed into law and make Maryland the second U.S. state to eliminate this discriminatory exception to Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. The EEA will phase out “sheltered workshops” that pay people as little as pennies per hour and require the Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration to implement a 4-year transition plan to move individuals from segregated day programs to competitive integrated employment. MDLC participates on the Employment First Steering Committee that is developing the policies and infrastructure to support transition to competitive integrated employment.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

HB 431/SB 355: ABLE Act - 04/12/2016

 Federal law enacted in December 2014 authorized states to establish tax-advantaged savings program to help people with disabilities save limited amounts for disability-related expenses (such as health care, assistive technology, education, employment supports and housing) without losing eligibility for certain public benefits. Maryland legislation enacted in 2015 established the ABLE Task Force to make recommendations for an ABLE Program, resulting in this year’s bill. College Savings Plans of Maryland and the Maryland Department of Disabilities and will co-manage the program. Governor Hogan committed $745,000 for program start-up costs and signed the legislation into law on April 12, 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maryland HB 473 - 05/12/2015

Altering the amount of a credit against specified State taxes for wages and child care or transportation expenses related to qualified employees with disabilities; and applying the Act to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2014.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Maryland SB 761 - 05/12/2015

“BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND, That: (a) “Maryland ABLE Program” means a program in Maryland allowing disabled individuals or their families to establish savings accounts to pay qualified expenses for disabled individuals authorized under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience  (ABLE) Act.  (b) It is the intent of the General Assembly that the State establish a Maryland ABLE Program.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

An Act Concerning Reasonable Accommodations For Disabilities Due to Pregnancy (HB804/SB784) - 04/08/2013

“[The Act] will require employers with more than 15 employees to provide reasonable accommodations to workers experiencing a disability caused or contributed by pregnancy. […] The Act prohibits an employer from refusing to make a reasonable accommodation for the known disability of a worker that is caused by pregnancy […]” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Executive Order 01.01.2017.23 Maryland Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/10/2017

“Now, therefore, I, Lawrence J. Hogan, Jr., Governor of the State of Maryland, by virtue of the power invested in my by the constitution and the laws of Maryland, declare the following:

 

Each State department, board, agency, authority, board, or instrumentality controlled by the Governor (an “Executive unit”) shall annually observe October as Disability Employment Awareness Month to celebrate the many and varied contributions of people with disabilities.The Department of Disabilities […] shall: reinforce the value and talents people with disabilities add to Maryland’s workplaces and communitiesIncreasing public awarenessTo promote individuals with disabilities’ access to technology”

 

Rescinds Executive Order 01.01.2009.10

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order 01.01.2009.10 Maryland Disability History and Awareness Month - 07/26/2009

“Now, therefore, I, Martin O’Malley, Governor of the State of Maryland […] hereby proclaim the following executive order, effective immediately.

State of Maryland Executive Branch agencies shall annually observe October as Disability History and Awareness Month.

The Department of Disabilities shall take steps to increase public awareness of the history of disabilities and the disability rights movement […]

The Maryland State Department of Education shall encourage and assist local boards of education to provide instruction in the history of disabilities, people with disabilities, and the disability rights movement during the observance of Disability History Awareness Month.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Executive Order 01.01.2007.13 - 08/02/2007

"It is the policy of the State of Maryland to ensure a smooth and effective transition for all students with disabilities from secondary education to adult services such as postsecondary education and employment; and to provide transition planning for students and families that is student focused and family-centered, based on individual strengths and needs, utilizes best practices, and leads to outcomes in the most integrated setting appropriate; and It is deemed necessary to establish an Interagency Transition Council to recommend policies and identify the funding requirements to ensure effective, efficient, and comprehensive delivery of services that will most effectively meet the transition needs of Maryland students with disabilities."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Temporary Disability Assistance

“The Temporary Disability Assistance Program (TDAP) is available to help low-income, disabled Marylanders through a period of short-term disability or while they are awaiting approval of federal disability support. The program is funded through the State of Maryland to provide help to individuals without dependent children.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maryland Workforce Promise Customized Employment Definition

“Customized Employment is…”

Individualizing the employment relationship between employees and employers in ways that meet the needs of both A person centered approach to employment that is based on the individual’s Strengths Needs Interests Blend of services designed to increase employment options for individuals with significant disabilities  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Public Engagement Strategies Redefine “No Wrong Door” in Maryland

For over ten years Maryland has refined its NWD/ADRC initiative, known as Maryland Access Points (MAP). The term “Maryland Access Point” was chosen to remove any semblance of preferences for “aging” or “disability” being first in the name, as Maryland wanted its NWD/ADRC to be seen as access points for all individuals needing LTSS. Starting in 2008, Maryland formally initiated its branding process and hired a consultant to construct a marketing plan for consumers and providers that eliminated system fragmentation, increased awareness of LTSS, and focused on prevention of crises. The state launched a toll free number in August 2014 and a new website in February 2015.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Department of Human Resources, Office of Employment and Program Equity

The Maryland Department of Human Resources is committed to the principle of fair practices and equal opportunity for all of its employees and customers. The Office of Employment and Program Equity has the primary responsibility for ensuring the effectiveness and success of the Department’s comprehensive Equal Opportunity Program. Programs include:

1.        Equal Employment Opportunity

2.        Affirmative Action

3.        Minority Business Enterprises

4.        Americans with Disabilities Act Compliance Program

5.        Title VI Compliance

6.        Program Equity

7.        Complaint Investigations

8.        DHR Mediation Program

          9.        Training and Technical Support

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Maryland Department of Education “Understanding the Evaluation, Eligibility and Individualized Education Program (IEP) Process in Maryland”

The public agency uses a team process to decide whether a child is a student with a disability as defined by the IDEA and the educational needs of the child. Each public agency is responsible for initiating and conducting meetings for the purposes of developing, reviewing, and revising the IEP of a student with a disability, and determining the child’s educational placement. The parents of each student with a disability must be notified and afforded the opportunity to participate in any IEP team meeting conducted for their child.  Parents are members of the IEP team that makes decisions regarding the child’s educational placement. The public agency shall make reasonable efforts to ensure that the parents understand, and are able to participate in any group discussions relating to the educational placement of their child, including arranging for an interpreter for parents with deafness, or whose native language is not English.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Rehabilitation Services “Training Customized for Your Business”

On-the-Job Training

DORS can provide funding for on-the-job training for a new employee and reimburse a business for a percentage of the new employees’ wages while they are in training.DORS also offers technical assistance and follow-along services to the trainee and the business.

Customized & Partnership Training

DORS partners with businesses and educational institutions to identify specific needs and design customized training programs to meet those needs. Training may take place at the DORS Workforce & Technology Center, on the job site, by an outside vendor, or by a combination of these settings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Maryland Department of Disabilities, Response to FY 2016 Budget Hearings

In November of 2014, MDOD was designated the Lead State Agency for a technical assistance opportunity through the US Department of Labor Office on Disability Employment Policy (ODEP). The Employment First Core State Leadership Mentoring Program will provide training and assess six (6) community providers to build capacity and transform community providers on customized employment. MDOD and the State and external partners will also develop recommendations for core competencies related to customized employment within the State and identify ways to infuse Employment First initiatives into the nonresidential portion of the State’s Home and Community Based Services Waivers delivered through Medicaid.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Maryland

In 2008/2009, the Developmental Disabilities Administration’s (DDA) engaged stakeholders in an intensive strategic planning process, including planning to improve employment outcomes for people with developmental disabilities in Maryland.   The following position statement is in support of the DDA’s broader values, mission and vision and is a product of that strategic planning process.   “The DDA believes that all people with developmental disabilities CAN work, and contribute to their community, when given opportunity, training, and supports that build on their strengths.  Employment will be the first option considered for all people of working age who receive DDA services.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD Developmental Disabilities Administration Position Statement on Employment Services

"In 2008, the Developmental Disabilities Administration’s (DDA) engaged stakeholders in an intensive strategic planning process, including planning to improve employment outcomes for people with developmental disabilities in Maryland. The following position statement is in support of the DDA’s broader values, mission and vision and is a product of the strategic planning process.

Commitment: The DDA believes that all people with developmental disabilities CAN work, and contribute to their community, when given opportunity, training, and supports that build on their strengths. Position Statement: Employment will be the “first” option considered for all people of working age who receive DDA services. Vision: Every Marylander maximizes his/her career potential and employers have access to the human resources they need to be successful."  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

MD DDA Definition of Day and Employment Services

SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT “Employment in an integrated work setting. This is defined as a workplace in the community, where the majority of individuals do not have disabilities, and which provides opportunities to interact with non-disabled individual to the same extent that individuals employed in comparable position would interact. Individuals are working in individualized, integrated jobs in the community business for pay at or above minimum wage.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council “2017 Legislative Overview” - 04/01/2017

~~“DDA FY2018 Budget Expansion: Approximately 789 young adults with developmental disabilities leaving school will receive employment or other day services. DDA projects that 100% of transitioning youth will receive this support.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities - 09/30/2016

~~"The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities.  “

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities - 07/01/2016

This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD Governor’s Interagency Transition Council (IATC) - 08/02/2007

~~The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities. 

Systems