Michigan

States - Big Screen

Employers in the Great Lakes State know you can "Give Your Business the Upper Hand" in Michigan by creating job opportunities for workers with disabilities to reach their full potential and live the lives they choose.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Michigan’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2017 to 2018
9,995,915
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.46%
Change from
2017 to 2018
730,791
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.08%
Change from
2017 to 2018
259,363
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.65%
Change from
2017 to 2018
35.49%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.72%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.65%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 9,928,300 9,962,311 9,995,915
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 764,334 727,451 730,791
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 254,334 246,196 259,363
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,042,733 4,106,166 4,128,006
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.28% 33.84% 35.49%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.35% 77.09% 77.65%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90% 4.60% 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.70% 21.80% 21.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.80% 12.90% 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 693,065 670,112 678,980
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 730,326 720,198 728,739
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,099,891 1,078,912 1,098,144
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 238,754 235,280 233,479
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 52,499 51,272 50,537
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 10,757 11,410 10,253
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 16,032 13,560 17,919
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 333 299 575
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 43,925 40,081 35,067
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 13,699 10,768 12,282

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 13,620 14,154 14,401
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.30% 5.50% 5.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 346,000 341,200 334,642

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 21,634 18,521 19,479
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 62,706 70,782 75,923
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 169,872 142,442 145,811
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 12.70% 13.00% 13.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.20% 3.90% 3.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.30% 2.10% 1.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.30% 4.80% 4.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,303 2,824 3,648
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,305 1,518 1,279
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 4,469 3,422 3,914
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 13,105 12,064 11,432
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 156 132 109
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 117 116 86
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 75.00% 88.00% 79.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.18 1.17 0.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
11,440
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 64 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 2,473 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,063 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 3,443 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,767 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,630 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 38.80% 36.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,033 7,444 7,474
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 538,310 534,332 529,956
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 201 174 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 497 383 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $25,299,000 $27,242,000 $29,223,562
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $38,584,000 $46,790,000 $37,185,858
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $36,195,000 $47,081,000 $37,398,586
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $57,051,000 $36,344,000 $55,648,528
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00% 26.00% 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 6,465 13,634 12,880
Number of people served in facility based work. 4,920 4,458 3,290
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,824 4,880 3,553
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 42.80 44.80 43.89

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.39% 66.89% 67.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.86% 10.90% 11.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 5.16% 4.96% 4.83%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 78.34% 81.23% 81.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 32.36% 32.56% 29.18%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 63.31% 62.96% 64.85%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 76.82% 76.93% 77.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.95% 30.40% 35.67%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 4,169,358
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 6,288
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 631,296
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,489,918
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 2,121,213
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 964
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,300
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,264
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,129,959
AbilityOne wages (services). $21,448,161

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 2 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 28 34 25
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 30 37 27
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 39 19
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 30 26 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 4,329 5,184 3,103
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,360 5,249 3,122

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Employment First. Executive Order 2015-15 established Employment First in Michigan. It sets forth a mission to establish the expectation and promote opportunities for all working-age individuals with disabilities in Michigan to gain competitive employment within an integrated setting, with or without supports, and to engage businesses and organizations that value the contributions of employees with disabilities. All state departments and agencies that provide services and support to persons with disabilities, and all state departments and agencies that provide employment, economic development, or other related services, shall implement Employment First in Michigan by coordinating efforts and collaborating to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures, and funding support competitive employment within an integrated setting as the first priority and optimal outcome for persons with disabilities. (Pages 83-84) Title I

Michigan is an Employment First state and Michigan Rehabilitation Services is working closely with multiple stakeholders to improve employment outcomes for customers with disabilities. Several workgroups have formed, one of which focuses on school-to work improvement outcomes for students with disabilities. Technical assistance is being provided by TransCen, Inc. Career and Workforce Development, to implement the seamless transition model. (Page 256) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services is aligned with agency and community partners as part of the Employment First initiative in Michigan. This initiative’s purpose is to promote diversity and inclusive employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This is achieved by engaging businesses regarding the value employees with disabilities bring to their organizations. (Page 265) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services, Michigan Department of Education, the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration and other stakeholders are participating in Employment First efforts to improve competitive integrated employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities. These efforts, along with the newly signed Memorandum of Understanding, are designed to improve Supported Employment programming and outcomes. (Page 315) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~Vocational Rehabilitation is exploring ways to develop staff/vendor skills in customized employment and to export appropriate training across the state. (Page 113) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services has updated its policy manual to align with Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act mandates. This includes guidance for the provision of Extended Services for youth populations with the most significant disabilities. Extended Services may be provided for up to 4 years. In addition, Customized Employment is clarified within the policy as a Vocational Rehabilitation service option. (Page 264) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services established a Memorandum of Understanding with the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration to ensure individuals with developmental disabilities who are dually eligible for both agencies’ programs have
collaborative supports and services toward competitive integrated employment outcomes. The Memorandum of Understanding outlines the coordination of services, including Extended Services, Supported Employment, and Customized Employment. (Pages 266-267) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services offers statewide Supported Employment services, including Customized Employment, for individuals and youth with the most significant disabilities reach competitive integrated employment outcomes. Michigan Rehabilitation Services updated its policy manual to align with WIOA mandates. (Page 314) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services builds on the person-centered planning process used by local community mental health providers to develop quality individualized plans for employment. This includes required services and supports, service providers, Supported Employment goal, and may include Extended Service providers. Individualized services provided include, but are not limited to: individual community-based placement; trial work experiences; psychosocial rehabilitation via clubhouse programs; job coaching; job referral; Customized Employment; job development; job placement; and long-term follow along (including natural supports). (Page 315) Title IV

Customized employment of persons who are blind or visually impaired is paramount to every placement. The unique needs and accommodations that BSBP consumers may require lends itself heavily to customization. BSBP works closely with Community Rehabilitation Programs or fee for service vendors where we purchase service in order to assist them in understanding the complex needs of BSBP’s consumer base. BSBP’s Training Center provides blindness specific training to community partners to assist in the education and training of service providers. This practice speaks to the customization of the employment process. (Page 338) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Jobs Strategy: Our jobs strategy is integrated into the Governor’s overall strategic plan for Michigan’s reinvention. Michigan’s primary workforce development strategy is a demand-driven system that focuses on aligning all efforts, initiatives, programs, and funding around key industry clusters. This strategy includes the alignment of policies, operations, and administrative systems to avoid duplication of workforce programs and activities, as well as providing a way to leverage discretionary funding and formula-based investment across all programs. Our collaboration with workforce agencies, employers, economic developers, post-secondary education providers, and other partners with shared interests provides us with opportunities to leverage partner funds for services not funded under the WIOA. Our workforce programs are being implemented with innovation and efficiency in mind to deliver results-driven training and services in order to provide more and better jobs, assist employers with their workforce training needs, and revitalize our education system to better prepare youth. (Page 7) Title I

Our vision encompasses key actions related to workforce employment, training and educational programs as identified in the Governor’s strategy for Michigan’s reinvention. Key actions included:
• Creating WIOA planning regions across the State, thereby allowing local areas to devote their resources to leverage State resources that help create more and better jobs and training, (Page 74) Title I

Collaboration with other State of Michigan departments and agencies includes Michigan Rehabilitation Services, the Bureau of Services for Blind Persons, the Michigan Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Civil Rights among other state agencies, the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, and the Advisory Council on Deaf and Hard of Hearing align disability related programs by linking the state’s workforce and economic development agendas. To achieve necessary collaboration, the workgroup is moving forward with the formation of an ad hoc committee to identify and address the needs of individuals with disabilities and those agencies and respective services that can be leveraged for the purpose of putting qualified individuals back to work.  (Page 107) Title I

How the State will leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Michigan Rehabilitation Services is working to leverage other public and private funds by working strategically with Michigan businesses to expand the array of services to business through innovative approaches. Proposed strategies include:
o Assigning staff to specific businesses, providing customized services including Supported Employment. 
o Expanding community work experience options for transition youth with significant disabilities to create Supported Employment opportunities. 
o Aligning the business community with educational partners to provide additional resources, funding, and innovative programming through cooperative agreements and Memorandums of Understanding.
These strategies will assist Michigan Rehabilitation Services in leveraging resources for Extended Services and expanding Supported Employment. (Page 299) Title IV

How the State will leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities.
When BSBP consumers who are receiving Medicaid funding and who are receiving services from Community Mental Health agencies can leverage those resources to receive extended services. (Page 350) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Bureau’s Staff Developmental Unit subscribes and shares, as appropriate, information, facts, materials, news and reports from resources such as the Institute on Rehabilitation Issues (IRI), the National Center for Rehabilitation Training Materials (NCRTM) and The LEAD which is a collaborative of disability, workforce and economic empowerment organizations dedicated to improving employment and economic advancement outcomes for all people with disabilities. In addition, information is posted using the Bureau’s Knowledge Management System and Online Learning Center known as eLearn. (Page 272) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~The Project SEARCH program is one initiative launched by the State of Michigan to promote Executive Directive 2014-1. Project SEARCH is a one-year internship for students with disabilities, ages 18-26, ready for their last year of high school and with a goal of competitive employment. The purpose is to provide both classroom training and real-life work experience to prepare students for employment following completion of the program. Nine state departments have identified internships and two additional departments have expressed an interest in hosting an intern during the 2018-2019 school year. Options, including the establishment of a Project SEARCH Worker classification, are being considered to allow for permanent placement of interns upon successful completion of the program. (Page 91) Title I

Bureau of Services for Blind Persons is working with the One Stop centers to provide services to Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) students and youth in order to allow for summer work experiences and the development of work based learning. We know that that this is an ongoing area where partnership is needed as the relationships vary in intensity across the state. (Page 92) Title IV

VR is also participating in an Office of Disability Employment Policy grant that is supporting four pilot sites in Michigan with the goal of Students with Disabilities achieving competitive integrated employment prior to exiting secondary education. The four pilot sites are utilizing a collaborative approach involving core partners where education and adult agencies (for example: Vocational Rehabilitation and Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration) provide early intervention and work experiences while the student is still in secondary education. (Page 93) Title IV

Pathways to Potential -- This human services program focuses on three critical elements: going into the community to where the individual is located, working one-on-one with families to identify and remove barriers and serve as connectors to a network of services, and engaging community partners and school personnel in efforts to help families find their pathway to success. Michigan Rehabilitation Services partners with Pathways to Potential to connect students with disabilities and their family members with disabilities to vocational rehabilitation services leading to competitive integrated employment. (Page 254) Title IV

To comply with the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act, Michigan Rehabilitation Services is collaborating with the Michigan Department of Education to update the Memorandum of Understanding. This agreement lays out how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education partner to provide a coordinated set of activities to facilitate a seamless transition of students with disabilities from school to competitive integrated employment.
The Memorandum of Understanding focuses on mandates for transition services described in the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004). This includes how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education will collaborate to fulfill mandates on behalf of students with disabilities. Key elements of the partnership are stated in the agreement and include: Authority; Purpose; Pre-Employment Transition Services Required Activities; Consultation and Technical Assistance; Transition Planning; Outreach and Identification of Students with Disabilities; Section 511 Subminimum Wage; Assurance; and Provision of Services and Reimbursement. (Page 255) Title IV

Michigan is an Employment First state and Michigan Rehabilitation Services is working closely with multiple stakeholders to improve employment outcomes for customers with disabilities. Several workgroups have formed, one of which focuses on school-to work improvement outcomes for students with disabilities. Technical assistance is being provided by TransCen, Inc. Career and Workforce Development, to implement the seamless transition model. (Page 256) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides Pre-Employment Transition Services to students with disabilities prior to, and after application. Approximately 30 counselors have been hired to provide Pre-Employment Transition Services prior to application.
Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided by Michigan Rehabilitation Services counselors for students who are interested in and need the program. Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided prior to application and during the stages of the vocational rehabilitation process which include: application, eligibility determination, and Individualized Plan for Employment. Transition and general counselors may serve customers meeting the definition of a student with a disability.
Michigan Rehabilitation Services coordinated with educational partners to deliver contracted Pre-Employment Transition Services through Michigan’s Centers for Independent Living. In addition, local district offices are coordinating with educational partners to develop Pre-Employment Transition Services programs to be provided by community rehabilitation organizations and other qualified vendors. (Page 256) Title IV

• Project SEARCH -Michigan currently has 16 Project Search sites impacting approximately 100 students with disabilities per year. Project SEARCH is a business-led model allowing students with disabilities in their last year of secondary education to participate in three unpaid internships at a business in their community for school credit. The goal of the program is for students to become employed at the host business or another business in the community after completion. Project SEARCH funding was an outcome of the 2013 Mental Health and Wellness Commission report recommending expansion of a minimum of 3 additional Project SEARCH sites per year. Michigan Rehabilitation Services has received dedicated Project SEARCH funds to support the expansion of new sites. The funding is used to provide technical assistance from Project SEARCH to Michigan and to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
• Post-secondary Education Rehabilitation Transition (PERT) Program -The PERT program is a one week comprehensive vocational and independent living assessment offered in a semi-structured residential environment at Michigan Career and Technical Institute for students enrolled in secondary education. In summer of 2017, 144 students with disabilities participated in the program. Students reside in dormitories, giving them the experience of independent living. After completion, students return to their local school districts where information they have learned is document in their Individualized Education Program.

This past year, the PERT program has been offered in local communities as a pilot. One benefit of making the program portable is more students can participate in the assessment process as they are not required to travel and stay on campus of Michigan Career and Technical Institute to participate.

• Pathways to Potential -This human services program focuses on three critical elements: going into the community to where the individual is located, working one-on-one with families to identify and remove barriers and serve as connectors to a network of services, and engaging community partners and school personnel in efforts to help families find their pathway to success. Michigan Rehabilitation Services partners with Pathways to Potential to connect students with disabilities and their family members with disabilities to vocational rehabilitation services leading to competitive integrated employment.
• Seamless Transition -The seamless transition model targets students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. A collaborative approach is used to prepare and support students with the outcome of competitive integrated employment prior to exit from secondary education. (Page 257-258) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides consultation and technical assistance to Michigan Department of Education and local educational agencies to assist in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, employment-related activities, Pre-Employment Transition Services and other vocational rehabilitation. Consultation and technical assistance may include, but is not limited to, the following topics:
•Disability awareness
•Accommodations and assistive technology
•MDHHS Michigan Rehabilitation Services application, eligibility, and services
•Community-based services
•Independent living
•Career Pathways
•Competitive integrated employment (Page 259) Title I

Transition planning occurs between the student/family/guardian, education staff and Michigan Rehabilitation Services staff to enhance the development of Individualized Education Programs. The Michigan Department of Education and Michigan Rehabilitation Services Memorandum of Understanding clarifies Michigan Rehabilitation Services staff will attend student Individualized Education Program meetings when invited. Educational partners are encouraged to provide advance notice, communicate and coordinate IEP meetings to ensure Michigan Rehabilitation Services staff are available to attend. (Page 260) Title IV

Transition counselors are connected to transition coordinators in each intermediate school district in the state. The counselors work in collaboration with transition coordinators, as well as other education staff, to identify students interested in pursuing competitive integrated employment who require vocational rehabilitation services. Students with disabilities are referred to Michigan Rehabilitation Services through this process.
In addition, Section 504 students are provided information about Michigan Rehabilitation Services by education staff, Michigan Rehabilitation Services marketing publications, informational meetings, and one-on-one meetings. If students are determined eligible, Michigan Rehabilitation Services works with the student and the family/guardian as appropriate to move through the rehabilitation process with the goal of competitive integrated employment. (Page 262) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services works extensively to provide Pre-Employment Transition Services and transition services for students with disabilities. Every Michigan Rehabilitation Services district has at least two assigned Pre-Employment Transition Services counselors and a Business Relations Consultant. Staff work to identify opportunities of Pre-Employment Transition Services, focusing on work-based-learning experiences, at local businesses. (Page 265) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services values the achievement of competitive integrated employment so that people with disabilities can be independent. Postsecondary education and job training beyond secondary education is critical to the achievement of independence for many people with disabilities. Through the provision of pre-employment transition services which allows for a continuum of developmental experiences, Michigan Rehabilitation Services will be able to help students (and their guardians) be better informed and prepared to choose careers. (Page 307) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services transfers customers receiving Supported Employment to extended services once stabilization has occurred. The customer is considered to have achieved stabilization when the counselor, with input from the job coach/employment specialist, employer and individual, confirms that: (1) initial intensive services identified on the IPE have resulted in the individual demonstrating acceptable job performance and (2) a reasonable expectation satisfactory job performance will be maintained with the individual based on ongoing support services being provided. (Page 316) Title IV

A BSBP Transition Specialist has been hired to assist the Transition Services Manager, field counselors and the BSBP Training Center in developing and implementing new Pre-ETS programs as well as provide Pre-ETS services to students who are visually impaired. BSBP has VR counselors and Vision Rehabilitation Therapists assigned geographically to each ISD and Local Educational Authority (LEA). The VR counselor works closely with teacher consultants for the visually impaired to identify students who would benefit from Pre-ETS and/or Vocational Rehabilitation Services through outreach and the BSBP Youth Low Vision Program. (Page 331) Title IV

BSBP will provide Pre-ETS not only to students with disabilities who have applied for vocational rehabilitation services but also to those students with disabilities who have not applied for services. If a student needs a service that goes beyond the scope of Pre-ETS and such additional service is listed on the student's approved IPE, BSBP will pay for those costs with non-reserved VR funds. If a student applies for a VR case, the Counselor establishes eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services within 60 days of the VR application being signed. The VR Counselor works with the student and parents to develop an IPE outlining the VR services necessary to assist the student in obtaining competitive integrated employment. The eligibility criteria for services must be met before plan development. The IEP, along with the IPE, are instruments that identify education, transition, and employment goals and objectives. The services outlined in the IEP are cooperatively agreed upon by the schools or educational facilities, parent/student, other relevant agencies and the rehabilitation agency; thereby establishing the objectives of the transition plan. (Pages 331-332) Title IV

Not all eligible or potentially eligible students with disabilities will require all five required pre-employment transition services, however, all should receive all needed services, as determined through informed choice and consultation with each student based on their strengths and needs and consistent with their IEP, when applicable.  (Page 336) Title IV

Students who are blind or visually impaired benefit from services designed to enhance Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) outcomes by receiving work based learning, work based readiness, career exploration counseling, instruction in self advocacy and counseling on opportunities for enrollment in post-secondary education. BSBP’s assessment suggests that early intervention implementing the above services leads to stronger vocational direction and outcomes that are focused on demand driven occupations. BSBP is gathering data as the implementation of WIOA drives this early intervention in order to obtain evidence based practice to substantiate the benefit of providing these early services. BSBP aligns with IDEA by participating in the IEP process, participating and conducting person centered plans and post-secondary planning. (Page 345) Title IV

BSBP provides appropriate Pre-ETS services and/or VR services to potentially eligible students or students who are eligible as early as age 14. BSBP attends IEPs, person-centered planning meetings, consultations with school staff including transition coordinators for the purpose of providing education and training for students and families regarding the opportunities for services that can enhance CIE outcomes. The ability to provide the five Pre-Employment Transition services categories and the four coordination services along with the nine authorized categories when appropriate can create an opportunity for great success. Examples are provision of work-based learning experiences that allow students to engage with employers, including learning soft skills. Providing the opportunity to visit college, and vocational programs to understand the expectations and plan with their family and counselor how to incorporate those into their career plan. (Page 353) Title IV

BSBP transfers customers receiving Support Employment to extended services once stabilization has occurred. The customer is considered to have achieved stabilization when the counselor, with input from the job coach/employment specialist, employer and individual, confirms that: 1) initial intensive services identified on the IPE have resulted in the individual demonstrating acceptable job performance, and 2) a reasonable expectation of satisfactory job performance will be maintained with the individual based on ongoing support services being provided. (Page 359) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Both VR agencies have collaborated to provide disability sensitivity training to front-line Michigan Works! staff and ADAAG (ADA Architectural Guidelines) evaluations. The purpose for the training and evaluations support Section 188 of WIOA which prohibits the exclusion of an individual from participation in, denial of the benefits of, discrimination in, or denial of employment in the administration of or in connection with, any programs and activities funded or otherwise financially assisted in whole or in part under Title I of WIOA because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or political affiliation or belief, or for beneficiaries, applicants, and participants only, on the basis of citizenship status, or participation in a program or activity that receives financial assistance under Title I of WIOA. For example, the most effective implementation of a strategic approach to address Section 188 has occurred in the Michigan Works! Macomb/St. Clair where a subcommittee under the Workforce Development Board was established specific to serving individuals with disabilities, the VR agencies serve as members on this subcommittee. Intense technical assistance from Michigan Rehabilitation Services/BSBP was provided to all of the offices within this Michigan Works! Office. (Page 92) Title I

Michigan Works! Service Centers must be inclusive of all customers to be effective. Inclusion honors and accommodates diversity. A universally accessible system requires meeting the diverse customer needs that exist within the local delivery area, which includes the needs of individuals with disabilities, people of different cultures, and persons with barriers to employment. Where inclusion abounds, centers are welcoming, inviting, accommodating, and accessible to everyone. As recipients of federal funds, Michigan Works! Agencies are required to comply with various regulations relating to non— discrimination, equal opportunity, and inclusion. The most critical of these regulations are: 
Section 188 of the WIOA.
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1998, as amended.
Titles I and II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (Page 156) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides consultation and technical assistance to Michigan Department of Education and local educational agencies to assist in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, employment-related activities, Pre-Employment Transition Services and other vocational rehabilitation. Consultation and technical assistance may include, but is not limited to, the following topics:
•Disability awareness
•Accommodations and assistive technology
•MDHHS Michigan Rehabilitation Services application, eligibility, and services
•Community-based services
•Independent living
•Career Pathways
•Competitive integrated employment (Page 259) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The provision of VR services to assist businesses to obtain qualified talent includes: •Talent Development including no cost recruitment and paid internships and apprenticeships •Reasonable Accommodations/Ergonomic Intervention to develop strategies for Workers with Physical, Cognitive and/or Behavioral Disabilities •Connections to partner assets and services •Job Analysis for performance elements and requirements •Risk management/Staff Retention •Injury Prevention and Wellness Programming •ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Services (Page 70) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Cooperation with Social Security Administration and Michigan Rehabilitation Services regional and local district offices to assist dually eligible customers receiving disability benefits in the use of Social Security work incentives and return to work efforts. Each Michigan Rehabilitation Services office has a dedicated champion for addressing unique needs of Social Security Administration recipients. These include Michigan Rehabilitation Services’ internal (online) eLearn system which contains information regarding:
o Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program and work incentives,
o Resource and referral available through the Social Security Administration’s Work Incentive Planning and Assistance project in serving Michigan communities,
o Referral to Beneficiary Access and Support Services as contracted with the Social Security Administration,
o Social Security Administration Work Incentive Liaisons available through local Social Security Administration offices, and Michigan Rehabilitation Services fee-for-service vendors. (Page 251) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Data Collection

According to the Fiscal Year 2016 RSA-911 data, 89% of customers were determined eligible for services and exited Michigan Rehabilitation Services during Fiscal Year 2016 were significantly or most significantly disabled; 65% were most significantly disabled. Customers with the following characteristics were more likely to be determined to have a most significant disability: racial/ethnic minority, students or youth, attendance or completion in special education certificate program, and Social Security beneficiaries. In addition, a higher proportion of customers with cognitive or psychiatric impairments were determined to be most significantly disabled. (Page 279) Title IV

511

~~VR is developing a coordinated process with State and local educational agencies in assisting individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities who are considering subminimum wage employment or who are already employed, at a subminimum wage, to maximize opportunities to achieve competitive integrated employment through services provided by VR and the local educational agencies. (Pages 97-98) Title I

To comply with the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act, Michigan Rehabilitation Services is collaborating with the Michigan Department of Education to update the Memorandum of Understanding. This agreement lays out how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education partner to provide a coordinated set of activities to facilitate a seamless transition of students with disabilities from school to competitive integrated employment. 
The Memorandum of Understanding focuses on mandates for transition services described in the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004). This includes how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education will collaborate to fulfill mandates on behalf of students with disabilities. Key elements of the partnership are stated in the agreement and include: Authority; Purpose; Pre-Employment Transition Services Required Activities; Consultation and Technical Assistance; Transition Planning; Outreach and Identification of Students with Disabilities; Section 511 Subminimum Wage; Assurance; and Provision of Services and Reimbursement. (Page 255) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides career counseling and information and referral services for individual with disabilities employed at subminimum wages. Individuals with disabilities are provided information and resources on competitive integrated employment initiatives designed to transition employees from sub minimum to competitive integrated employment. (Page 265) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Michigan Works! Service Centers must be inclusive of all customers to be effective. Inclusion honors and accommodates diversity. A universally accessible system requires meeting the diverse customer needs that exist within the local delivery area, which includes the needs of individuals with disabilities, people of different cultures, and persons with barriers to employment. Where inclusion abounds, centers are welcoming, inviting, accommodating, and accessible to everyone. As recipients of federal funds, Michigan Works! Agencies are required to comply with various regulations relating to non— discrimination, equal opportunity, and inclusion. The most critical of these regulations are: Section 188 of the WIOA. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1998, as amended. Titles I and II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (Page 156) Title I

Each year, the Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity, in conjunction with the Michigan Works! Association, hosts a Multi—State Equal Opportunity Officers training seminar. Representatives from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the U.S. Department of Labor Civil Rights Center conduct the training. The training focused on social media and employment discrimination, discrimination complaint, investigative techniques, asking telling, using and storing disability related information, recognizing hidden disabilities and identifying strategies to assist individuals, assistive technologies, and web accessibility guidelines. (Page 157) Title IV

The Michigan Works! Service Center certification criteria policy provides guidance on accessibility of our One-Stop delivery system and our Wagner-Peyser Employment Services Manual provides information about the requirements of posters and other materials to be displayed at Michigan Works! Service Centers. The Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity staff monitor Service Centers for compliance with certification criteria as part of WIOA programmatic reviews. The goal of programmatic reviews is to provide technical assistance, as appropriate, and ensure that established policies, procedures, and systems of the Michigan Works! Agency achieve quality program outcomes that meet the requirements and objectives of the WIOA and federal and state regulations. This program review is in addition to the WIOA fiscal compliance monitoring, and thereby ensures the state will meet program design, as required by the WIOA. (Page 159) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services’ Assistive Technology Consultant sits on the Assistive Technology Advisory Council for Michigan’s Assistive Technology Act’s program. The AT consultant will be responsible for; but not limited to: o Establishing a baseline and provide reports to reflect; program accessibility and progress and effectiveness of AT program/project implementation. o Ensuring accessibility throughout the vocational process that align with ADAAG and assessing the means in which the services are delivered (i.e. -Online orientation, web base outreach, and physical office locations) o Identify and assist in training curriculums ensuring for consistent practices across the Agency and interactions with partners. o Develop a network of resources for the state to address: o Delivery, education and reinforcement of AT Training for participates. o Secure Demonstration Equipment for trial and training use. o Provides Businesses with a Subject Matter Expert to assist with AT implementation and Training for newly acquired employees and retention of current employees with disabilities. o Develop a web-based inventory and exchange protocol to be utilized by the Agency and participates. (Pages 305-306) Title IV

Vets

The State of Michigan continues using the Talent Acquisition Portal — an online tool providing access to a centralized pool of individuals with disabilities, including disabled veterans, at the local, state and national level. MRS has committed to funding TAP access for state agencies for 18 months. TAP has both a national talent pool of Vocational Rehabilitation candidates looking for employment and a job-posting system for businesses looking to hire individuals with disabilities. TAP is led by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation, the National Employment Team (NET) and disABLEDperson, Inc. TAP allows employers to post jobs, search candidate resumes based on skill sets and geographic availability, capture job metrics, generate compliance and application quick reports, interview candidates, have online job fairs, and have their jobs seen by individuals with disabilities across the country. Employers also benefit from VR counselors and qualified candidates searching available opportunities. (Page 91) Title I

Assure that veteran’s preference and priority are strictly observed by giving covered persons (eligible veterans and eligible spouses) employment and training opportunities ahead or instead of non—covered persons in accordance with the requirements of Priority of Service. In addition, veterans, transitioning service members, and eligible spouses may be qualified for intensive services provided by Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists. Both DVOP Specialists and Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are integral, collocated partners in the Michigan Works! Service Centers. (Page 127) Title I

Priority of service is in effect at all times, not just when funds are limited. Priority is given in the following order: 78. First, to veterans and eligible spouses who are also funded in the groups are given statutory priority for WIOA adult formula funds. This means that veterans and eligible spouses who are also recipients of public assistance, other low-income individuals, or individuals who are basic skills deficient would receive first priority of services with the WIOA adult formula funds. 79. Second, to non-covered persons (that is, individuals who are not veterans or eligible spouses) who are included in the WIOA’s priority groups. 80. Third, to veterans and eligible spouses who are not included in the WIOA’s priority groups. 81. Last, to non-covered persons outside the groups given priority under the WIOA. (Page 154) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grant provides funding to support Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists and Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives. Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists provide intensive, one-on-one employment services exclusively to program-eligible veterans and spouses who possess a significant barrier to employment and/or are part of a population group identified as eligible. The purpose of the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists’ services is to assist the client in becoming job ready so they can secure employment utilizing the public workforce system. Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists do not interact with employers, nor engage in direct placement, and rely on their Michigan Works! Agency One-Stop partners to assist their job ready clients to secure appropriate employment. (Pages 154-155) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans State Grants is a fully integrated partner in our Michigan Works! Agency One-Stop Centers. All veterans and spouses of veterans seeking services at our One-Stop Centers will receive appropriate services from all One-Stop partners as would any other job seeker, but with priority of Service for veterans and eligible spouses applied. Prior to receiving services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants, a veteran or spouse of a veteran is first assessed by a non-Jobs for Veterans State Grants One-Stop worker prior to referral. (Page 155) Title I

The Veterans Services team also provides guidance to Service Center staff on how to identify and refer a veteran to a Disabled Veteran Outreach Worker for intensive case management services. (Page 198) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services continues Memorandum of Understanding with the Veterans Administration to provide coordinated services to returning veterans with disabilities. This agreement clarifies services not be duplicated, but are complimentary in assisting eligible veterans achieve meaningful employment, in accordance with the laws and regulations governing each entity. Bureau liaisons are identified to assist in coordinating cooperative employment plans. Cross training has been provided to ensure understanding of both federal programs. (Page 253) Title I

Additionally, facility improvements will allow MCTI to enhance occupational training programs to maximize opportunities for the following populations identified in the 2017 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. • Individuals with mental illness • Students and youth with disabilities (formerly Transition Youth) • Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders • Cultural minority residents with disabilities • Individuals with sensory disabilities • Veterans with disabilities• Other underserved groups (Page 301) Title IV

Mental Health

~~In 2017, Michigan Rehabilitation Services and Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration revised and improved a longstanding Memorandum of Understanding between the two agencies. This updated agreement details Michigan Rehabilitation Services’ increased focus on both Supported Employment and the provision of Extended Services as detailed within Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

The Memorandum of Understanding focuses on individuals with developmental and/or intellectual disabilities and is delivered locally. Specific local partnership agreements are developed between Community Mental Health service providers, Michigan Rehabilitation Services, and may also include community rehabilitation organizations and local school districts. The local partnership agreements include Community Mental Health funding that allows Michigan Rehabilitation Services to capture federal match funds. These funds are used to provide Supported Employment services throughout Community Mental Health service areas. These local agreements include goals, objectives, responsibilities, and expectations for delivering Supported Employment and Extended Services. (Page 263) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services established a Memorandum of Understanding with the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration to ensure individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness who are dually eligible for both agencies’ programs have collaborative supports and services toward competitive integrated employment outcomes. The Memorandum of Understanding outlines the coordination of services, including Extended Services, Supported Employment, and Customized Employment.
Michigan Rehabilitation Services collaborates with Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration in the development of the Individual Placement and Supports model. This model promotes early engagement in employment activities for individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness express an interest in competitive integrated employment. There are currently 22 Individual Placement and Support sites providing services statewide. (Page 267) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services builds on the person-centered planning process used by local community mental health providers to develop quality individualized plans for employment. This includes required services and supports, service providers, Supported Employment goal, and may include Extended Service providers. Individualized services provided include, but are not limited to: individual community-based placement; trial work experiences; psychosocial rehabilitation via clubhouse programs; job coaching; job referral; Customized Employment; job development; job placement; and long-term follow along (including natural supports). Supported Employment services are provided in integrated community settings to the maximum extent possible. Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides ongoing support services for adults until the customer has 90 days of stabilized employment. Following job stabilization, Michigan Rehabilitation Services transfers the customer from employment follow-along to extended services provided by community mental health or natural supports.  (Page 315) Title IV

Project SEARCH is a specific employment model for students with the most significant disabilities in secondary education. Project SEARCH is funded by Michigan Mental Health Wellness Commission and federal funds. Students receive follow-along services as part of the Project SEARCH model. Michigan Rehabilitation Services works with the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration to ensure extended services are provided for dually eligible students employed in competitive integrated settings.  (Page 315) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 72

Medicaid Provider Manual - 04/01/2020

“The following documents comprise the Michigan Medicaid Provider Manual, and address all health insurance programs administered by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS). MDHHS also issues periodic bulletins as changes are implemented to the policies and/or processes described in the manual. Bulletins are incorporated into the online version of the manual on a quarterly basis.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan Rehabilitation Services

The goal for all funds used for Supported Employment Services is to help individuals whose disabilities and functional limitations have traditionally meant that they would not be able to successfully enter the labor market through competitive integrated employment. Priorities include, but are not limited to: •Increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities who receive Supported Employment services;

Use Title I funds for Supported Employment services to achieve the maximum number of quality employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities and a focus on youth;Build subject matter expertise to facilitate Supported Employment, Customized Employment and other evidenced-based practices;Increase Supported Employment training opportunities for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors, community rehabilitation service staff, families and individuals”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • WIOA

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan is in a unique position to address the needs of individuals, employers and communities to address the educational and economic means to reach their full potential.  All four Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) core programs (Titles I, II, III, and IV) are newly positioned within the Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity (LEO). Under Executive Order 2019-13, Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) (Title IV) was positioned under LEO and provides all four WIOA Core programs under one State department to allow for greater transparency and partnership.  VR continues to closely partner with the State’s One-Stop system and partners on strategic planning, and ways to collaboratively service our mutual customers (businesses and individuals with disabilities).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals - 12/17/2019

“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approves Michigan’s MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals, authorized under sections 1915(c) and 1915(b)(1) of the Social Security Act (the Act) respectively. This letter replaced the approval letter issued on December 13, 2019…

These section 1915(c) and 1915(b) MI HealthLink waivers are effective for a five year period beginning January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2024 and operate concurrently…

Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Training Connect (MiTC) Policy Manual Requirements and Guidelines - 12/09/2019

“The workforce system established under the WIOA emphasizes informed consumer choice, job-driven training, provider performance, and continuous improvement. The quality and selection of providers and programs of training services is vital to achieving these core principles. As required by the WIOA, Section 122, states in partnership with Local Boards must identify eligible training providers and programs that are qualified to receive WIOA Title I-B funds to train adults and dislocated workers, including those with disabilities. The approved State list of eligible training providers and programs serves as an important tool for participants seeking training providers and programs, and relevant information, such as program cost and program outcomes.

 

Local boards must work with the state to ensure that:

There are sufficient numbers and types of providers of career services and training services (including eligible providers with expertise in assisting individuals with disabilities and eligible providers with expertise in assisting adults in need of adult education and literacy activities) serving the local area and providing services that maximize consumer choice and lead to competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities; and

Public dissemination of the MiTC through the local One-Stop system and its partner programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

MI Choice Waiver Program - 12/01/2019

“Revisions to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual

Effective December 1, 2019, revisions were made to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter which result in policy and program changes. Many changes are the result of policy changes approved by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) during the MI Choice Waiver renewal process. Additional changes were made to provide clarification on certain topics. Please see the Medical Services Administration Bulletin, MSA 19-17 for a list of updates and the updated MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment First in Michigan - 11/15/2019

“This report builds on the 2014 Michigan Developmental Disabilities Network report, “Employment First in Michigan,” which examined the employment status of Michigan adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and/or dual diagnosis (co-occurring DD and mental illness) and state policies that align with employment First goals. The 2019 report on Employment First highlights where employment conditions have improved, what challenges remain, and what policy and practice changes are required to continue Michigan’s improvement in providing access to competitive, integrated employment for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) - 09/03/2019

~~“Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, as well as Arab and non-Arab, Chaldean, and South Asian communities in the greater Detroit area.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Islamic Organization of North America Mosque, Islamic Center of America, Macomb County Health Department, Congressional offices, Chaldean and Coptic churches, Jewish Family Service, HUDA Clinic, Luke Project 52 Clinic, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Regional Social Security offices, and Local businesses.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mr. Hassan JaberPhone: (313) 842-7010Email: hjaber@accesscommunity.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Genesee Health Plan Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Genesee Health Plan Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left-behind” populations; immigrant population; deaf and hard of hearing population, veterans; employees of small businesses and small business owners; federally recognized tribes; reentering incarcerated citizens.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Disability Network, Enroll America, First Presbyterian Church of Flint, Genesee Community Health Center, Genesee County Health Department, Ascension Genesys, Hamilton Community Health Network, Hurley Medical Center, McLaren Flint Hospital, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Michigan Medicaid/Medicare Assistance Program, Michigan State University Extension Valley Area Agency on Aging, The CRIM Fitness Foundation, and The Flint Registry.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:James Milanowski Phone: (810) 232-7740Email: jmilanowski@countyhealthplans.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veteran Navigators - 07/01/2019

~~“Veteran Navigators was created to assist Veterans and military families of ALL eras and discharge types. They work to connect Veterans and their families to federal, state and local resources to ease issues regarding mental health, substance abuse, housing and other common issues that impact veterans in order to support healthier lifestyles and provide support.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

House Resolution No. 170 - 01/01/2018

“A resolution to declare October 2017 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in the state of Michigan

Whereas, It has been more than 70 years since Congress designated a week in October, which has culminated into National Disability Employment Awareness Month with the 2017 theme being ‘Employment First for Michigan’; and

Whereas, Every person should be seen for their ability and not disability with valuable strengths and the potential to make important contributions to their local communities; and

Whereas, By promoting opportunities for all citizens with disabilities in Michigan, gaining individual integrated employment, and engaging businesses to value the contributions that employees with disabilities bring to their organization, we will enhance the employment landscape and enable Michigan to compete with other states to bring in high-demand businesses and jobs; and

Whereas, Disability Employment Awareness Month is an appropriate time to recognize Michigan’s employment accomplishments concerning persons with disabilities in integrated environments and to make sure all of Michigan’s citizens with intellectual and developmental disabilities are included;

 

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare October 2017 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in the state of Michigan.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan ABLE Legislation (HB 4542) - 10/28/2015

An act to create the Michigan achieving a better life experience (ABLE) program; to provide for ABLE accounts; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state agencies, boards, and departments; to allow certain tax credits or deductions; and to provide for penalties and remedies.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Michigan Business Opportunity Act for Persons with Disabilities - 05/04/1998

An act to provide competitive opportunity in state procurements of goods, services, and construction for businesses owned by persons with disabilities; to provide powers and duties of the governor; to prescribe powers and duties of certain state departments and agencies; and to provide penalties.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Michigan SB 360 - Education Savings Program

An act to amend 2000 PA 161, entitled “An act to create the Michigan education savings program; to provide for education savings accounts; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state agencies, boards, and departments; to allow certain tax credits or deductions; and to provide for penalties and remedies,” by amending section 10 (MCL 390.1480), as amended by 2001 PA 215.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

“MiABLE Disability Savings Program Now Available in Michigan” - 11/01/2016

“Today, Michigan became the fifth state in the country to launch a disability savings program, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley announced. The Mi-ABLE (Michigan Achieving a Better Life Experience) program is a 529 (A) savings account, offering investment and tax incentives for families and others who wish to save for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Michigan Executive Order 2015-15: Employment First in Michigan - 11/18/2015

All state departments and agencies that provide services and support to persons with disabilities, and all state departments and agencies that provide employment, economic development, or other related services, shall implement Employment First in Michigan by coordinating efforts and collaborating to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures, and funding support competitive employment within an integrated setting as the first priority and optimal outcome for persons with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Michigan Executive Directive 2014-1: Employment Opportunities - 10/27/2014

“It is important that the State of Michigan provide a welcoming environment to those with disabilities and encourage their employment in state government in a competitive integrated setting. While many individuals desire that their disability be kept confidential, raising awareness and providing adequate training to all state employees can help bridge the gap to ensure every employee is treated with dignity and respect at all times.”   “In coordination with the Department of Civil Rights, the Civil Rights Commission and the Civil Service Commission, the SEODC shall recommend a program for attracting and retaining individuals with mental illness, intellectual or developmental disabilities and physical disabilities that includes competitive integrated employment opportunities. The program shall require the participation and engagement of all Executive Branch departments and agencies.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order No. 2004 State Americans with Disabilities Act Coordinator - 06/03/2004

“Whereas, in Michigan there are approximately 1.9 million persons with disabilities;

Whereas it has long been the policy of the State of Michigan and this Governor to ensure that all persons, including those persons with disabilities, are given equal participation opportunities in all aspects of public life;

Now, therefore, I, Jennifer M. Granholm, Governor of State of Michigan, by virtue of the power and authority vested in the Governor under the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and Michigan law, order the following:

Establishment of State ADA Coordinator; Designation of Departmental ADA Coordinators; Assistance of Departments of Agencies”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 30

Training Connect (MiTC) Policy Manual Requirements and Guidelines - 12/09/2019

“The workforce system established under the WIOA emphasizes informed consumer choice, job-driven training, provider performance, and continuous improvement. The quality and selection of providers and programs of training services is vital to achieving these core principles. As required by the WIOA, Section 122, states in partnership with Local Boards must identify eligible training providers and programs that are qualified to receive WIOA Title I-B funds to train adults and dislocated workers, including those with disabilities. The approved State list of eligible training providers and programs serves as an important tool for participants seeking training providers and programs, and relevant information, such as program cost and program outcomes.

 

Local boards must work with the state to ensure that:

There are sufficient numbers and types of providers of career services and training services (including eligible providers with expertise in assisting individuals with disabilities and eligible providers with expertise in assisting adults in need of adult education and literacy activities) serving the local area and providing services that maximize consumer choice and lead to competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities; and

Public dissemination of the MiTC through the local One-Stop system and its partner programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Employment First in Michigan - 11/15/2019

“This report builds on the 2014 Michigan Developmental Disabilities Network report, “Employment First in Michigan,” which examined the employment status of Michigan adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and/or dual diagnosis (co-occurring DD and mental illness) and state policies that align with employment First goals. The 2019 report on Employment First highlights where employment conditions have improved, what challenges remain, and what policy and practice changes are required to continue Michigan’s improvement in providing access to competitive, integrated employment for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Veteran Navigators - 07/01/2019

~~“Veteran Navigators was created to assist Veterans and military families of ALL eras and discharge types. They work to connect Veterans and their families to federal, state and local resources to ease issues regarding mental health, substance abuse, housing and other common issues that impact veterans in order to support healthier lifestyles and provide support.”

Systems
  • Other

Michigan Disability Resources - 06/07/2019

~~“Welcome to Michigan's first website devoted specially to the interests, concerns, and needs of Michiganians with disabilities. Of Michigan's nearly 10 million residents, about 1.9 million have a disability. That's one in every five residents.

On these pages you will find the services and programs for people with disabilities offered by the State of Michigan as well as other sites of interest. Whether you're looking for assistance in finding a job, want to learn about the latest assistive technology, or have a question about your rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act, you will find it here.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Educational Development Plan (EDP) Fact Sheet - 05/04/2019

“Educational Development Plans (EDPs) are plans created by all students about career goals and action plans for reaching their goals. EDPs help students think about long-term education and career plans before entering high school. By going through this process, students learn more about themselves, consider different options for their future, and develop a more specific path for preparing for their career choice.

 

Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and EDPs

Although both the IEP and EDP promote positive outcomes after high school, they are two different documents with different purposes. EDPs do not replace IEPs. IEPs are created for students meeting special education eligibility under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Per IDEA, during transition planning, educators gather information about a student’s interests and strengths through age-appropriate assessments and work with the student to develop measurable postsecondary (after high school) goals related to education, training, employment, and, when appropriate, independent living skills. EDPs help students identify career paths and the education needed to reach career goals. Sometimes in developing the IEP, information from the EDP may be used to assist in transition planning.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Special Education Reevaluation Process - 04/30/2019

~~“A student’s special education needs may change throughout the course of their educational career, and the reevaluation process is developed to assess these evolving needs. A district must ensure a reevaluation of each student with a disability is conducted when: The district determines the student’s special education and related services and the student’s educational needs, including improved academic achievement and functional performance, warrant a reevaluation; or The child’s parent or teacher requests a reevaluation.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS) - 04/09/2019

~~“MISSIONTo improve public Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services delivered by the Bureau of Services for Blind Persons (BSBP) and Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS).

VISIONBSBP and MRS will provide VR services in manners that are respectful, equitable and effective in achieving meaningful employment outcomes for people with disabilities.”

MCRS was created under Executive Order (EO) (2012-10) in 2012.And oversight of implementing Employment First in Michigan (click here for Executive Order 2015-15). More about the mission of MCRS can be found by accessing the web-link.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mental Health Services - 02/08/2019

~~“The VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System Mental Health Service is a Partner Affiliate of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School. Together the departments host an internationally recognized faculty known for their contributions to the study of mood disorders, stress and anxiety disorders, substance use disorders as well as other psychiatric disorders….Community Based Services• Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center/Veteran's Empowerment and Recovery (VEAR) Center• Mental Health Intensive Care Management (MHICM)• Compensated Work Therapy Program (CWT)”

Systems
  • Other

Supports for Students with Disabilities - 11/16/2018

~~“Many offices, agencies, and organizations outside of the Office of Special Education (OSE) work with families and schools to support students with disabilities.”This site has links to a variety of services including Assistive Technology and Transition to employment 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Services Offered by the Detroit Regional Office - 11/15/2018

~~“VA’s Detroit Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Michigan. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan is in a unique position to address the needs of individuals, employers and communities to address the educational and economic means to reach their full potential.  All four Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) core programs (Titles I, II, III, and IV) are newly positioned within the Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity (LEO). Under Executive Order 2019-13, Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) (Title IV) was positioned under LEO and provides all four WIOA Core programs under one State department to allow for greater transparency and partnership.  VR continues to closely partner with the State’s One-Stop system and partners on strategic planning, and ways to collaboratively service our mutual customers (businesses and individuals with disabilities).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Employment First - 04/20/2019

~~“A critical priority for the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), is to invest in systems change efforts that result in increased community-based, integrated employment opportunities for individuals with significant disabilities. This priority reflects growing support for a national movement called Employment First, a framework for systems change that is centered on the premise that all citizens, including individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life.

Under this approach, publicly-financed systems are urged to align policies, service delivery practices, and reimbursement structures to commit to integrated employment as the priority option with respect to the use of publicly-financed day and employment services for youth and adults with significant disabilities. ODEP defines integrated employment as work paid directly by employers at the greater of minimum or prevailing wages with commensurate benefits, occurring in a typical work setting where the employee with a disability interacts or has the opportunity to interact continuously with co-workers without disabilities, has an opportunity for advancement and job mobility, and is preferably engaged full-time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Michigan "Better Off Working" - Disability Reform Work Group Strategic Plan - 08/01/2014

This report, developed by the Michigan Department of Human Services, Michigan Rehabilitation Services, Disability Determination Service, the Disability Network, and Michigan Employers, details goals to further the inclusive employment of individuals with disabilities in the state of Michigan. “The goals of the strategic plan include: “Coordinating government and private agency resources in cross-program settings to assist individuals with disabilities enter or return to the workforce.  Improving the health and well-being of individuals with disabilities by promoting work participation. De-emphasizing disability as a de facto public assistance program by refocusing on the goal of returning to work.”   
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wayne State University Developmental Disabilities Institute

"~~The Michigan Developmental Disabilities Institute (MI-DDI) is a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD). MI-DDI is part of a network of 67 UCEDDs in the U.S. and its territories. The Institute's mission is to contribute to the development of inclusive communities and quality of life for people with disabilities and their families through a culturally-sensitive, statewide program of interdisciplinary education, community support and services, and research and dissemination of information."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan Developmental Disabilities Council Five Year State Plan 2012-2016

Interagency Efforts around Supportive Employment Peer Mentor Pilot- “This pilot has involved the training of 22 individuals with DD to help others with DD to reach their life goals and increase their community involvement and self advocacy. The pilot has involved numerous workshops and trainings culminating with internships at the peer mentors local Community Mental Health. The vision of the planning workgroup is to develop a ‘Train the Trainer’ model so that the curriculum and lessons learned may be shared with other CMHSPs across the state.” “MDCH and MRS have developed a partnership to improve the employment outcomes for individuals with DD. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) has assisted with training peer mentors as well as sponsoring their attendance at numerous workshops.” “The Michigan Commission for the Blind has assisted with the coordination of a peer mentor’s internship.”   Interagency Efforts around Rehabilitative Services “MRS currently has interagency agreements with the Michigan Departments of Community Health, Education, Health and Human Services, as well as with Michigan Works! and Adult Literacy to help better serve Michigan’s citizens with disabilities.”  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan DHHS Regional Inclusive Community Coalitions

“A RICC is a local grassroots group of people that is funded and supported by the Michigan Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council). Members include people with disabilities, family members, friends, local advocates, community leaders and service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

IDEA Grant Funded Initiatives - 01/01/2018

“The Michigan Department of Education (MDE), Office of Special Education (OSE) established various Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Grant Funded Initiatives to enhance its support for special education in Michigan. IDEA Grant Funded Initiatives are funded by IDEA Part B and are awarded through the OSE.

 

IDEA Grant Funded Initiatives provide statewide assistance in advancing evidence-based practices to support diverse learners. Each initiative addresses different needs identified through state or federal mandates and stakeholder-based concerns.

 

IDEA Grant Funded Initiatives support a variety of stakeholders, including school districts and families of students with disabilities. Some examples of support include:

 

-Providing professional development and training.-Implementing proven programs in schools.-Producing or loaning materials for students.

-Disseminating critical guidance and information.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Data Sharing

“Employment First moving forward in Michigan” - 11/09/2017

“LANSING, — Michigan has been chosen to receive federal assistance and training to help implement its Employment First strategy, working to improve competitive integrated employment opportunities for Michiganders with disabilities.

 

The assistance comes from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy as part of its Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. Michigan received two designations from ODEP, providing the state with 300 hours of onsite and virtual assistance.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Lt. Governor Calley's Overview of Michigan Budget priority items "Employment First in Michigan" - 07/21/2017

~~“Employment First in Michigan:Employment First in Michigan is an initiative to promote opportunities for people with disabilities to gain competitive employment within an integrated setting and to engage organizations about the value of hiring people with disabilities. The final version of the budget included $500,000 in support of this initiative, helping promote and increase competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Michigan Project SEARCH - 06/01/2008

Project SEARCH is a business-led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration.  More specifically, it’s a one year high school transition program which provides training and education…Project SEARCH serves as a workforce alternative for students in their last years of school.  

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan DHHS Pathways to Potential

In an effort to help everyone find a path to their fullest potential, we created Pathways to Potential as a way to break down barriers and deliver services where people need them.   The Pathways approach targets five outcome areas: attendance, education, health, safety and self-sufficiency. It also relies on a number of support networks and partnerships to wrap their arms around children and families to help them succeed.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Michigan Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 40,500 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2013.  The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply.”

 

Goals Give consumers and families a central role in defining and implementing the systems changes necessary to realize the principle that money follows the person. Develop and establish within pilot sites a model for an integrated long-term care (LTC) system that supports money follows the person. Develop strategies within the State Plan and the current MI Choice waiver that support the principle of money follows the person. Develop alternatives to traditional models for nursing home care.   Activities Establish a Community Consortium for Advocacy and Technical Assistance to provide advocacy for LTC system change. Establish an LTC Community Roundtable to facilitate stakeholder involvement in planning. Analyze barriers to "money follows the person" and devise solutions, including waivers and State policy changes. Develop alternative uses for nursing facilities. Provide and support alternatives to traditional nursing care. Develop a model for nursing home transition and development of community support. Establish and implement the model at three pilot sites.
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan Rehabilitation Services

The goal for all funds used for Supported Employment Services is to help individuals whose disabilities and functional limitations have traditionally meant that they would not be able to successfully enter the labor market through competitive integrated employment. Priorities include, but are not limited to: •Increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities who receive Supported Employment services;

Use Title I funds for Supported Employment services to achieve the maximum number of quality employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities and a focus on youth;Build subject matter expertise to facilitate Supported Employment, Customized Employment and other evidenced-based practices;Increase Supported Employment training opportunities for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors, community rehabilitation service staff, families and individuals”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • WIOA

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) - 09/03/2019

~~“Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, as well as Arab and non-Arab, Chaldean, and South Asian communities in the greater Detroit area.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Islamic Organization of North America Mosque, Islamic Center of America, Macomb County Health Department, Congressional offices, Chaldean and Coptic churches, Jewish Family Service, HUDA Clinic, Luke Project 52 Clinic, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Regional Social Security offices, and Local businesses.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mr. Hassan JaberPhone: (313) 842-7010Email: hjaber@accesscommunity.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Genesee Health Plan Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Genesee Health Plan Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left-behind” populations; immigrant population; deaf and hard of hearing population, veterans; employees of small businesses and small business owners; federally recognized tribes; reentering incarcerated citizens.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Disability Network, Enroll America, First Presbyterian Church of Flint, Genesee Community Health Center, Genesee County Health Department, Ascension Genesys, Hamilton Community Health Network, Hurley Medical Center, McLaren Flint Hospital, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Michigan Medicaid/Medicare Assistance Program, Michigan State University Extension Valley Area Agency on Aging, The CRIM Fitness Foundation, and The Flint Registry.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:James Milanowski Phone: (810) 232-7740Email: jmilanowski@countyhealthplans.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan Works! Annual Conference Michigan Works! Association. (n.d.). Michigan Works! annual conference. - 01/01/2019

~~“2019 Michigan Works! Annual ConferenceSunday, September 8 - Tuesday, September 10Radisson Plaza Hotel & Suites // Kalamazoo Michigan’s signature workforce development conference offers dynamic keynote presentations, a wide array of professional development opportunities and plenty of time for networking.” 

Systems
  • Other

Michigan to get federal help in improving job opportunities for people with disabilities - 10/31/2017

“LANSING Michigan will receive federal help to put into practice a statewide strategy helping people with disabilities find jobs.

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley's office said Tuesday that Michigan will receive 300 hours of training, both in person and online, from the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy as part of a national effort called Employment First targeted at helping people with disabilities find employment. Michigan signed on to the effort in 2015 via an executive order that Calley signed. 

The program is intended to help create competitive and integrated job opportunities for disabled residents by encouraging employers to create such opportunities, as well as help state agencies that serve people with disabilities and workforce development purposes to coordinate policy goals.

The federal assistance is in the form of training and technical help, not funding, Calley spokeswoman Laura Biehl said. A news release from the Office of Disability Employment Policy indicates Michigan will receive training in capacity building and transitioning from school to work.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Resources: Notes from the APSE Executive Director - 03/22/2017

~~“This month, we're formally introducing two new tools developed to help your organization navigate the shifting political and policy landscape and strengthen your organization. Change can be managed for positive outcomes if you've got a solid plan and the right tools:From Workshops to Workplaces: Achieving the Goals of Employment First is a comprehensive eLearning course developed by APSE in response to a need expressed by agencies across the country. As the Employment First movement accelerates, federal regulations have asked agencies to change how they serve individuals with disabilities. Many organizations want to make the transition from a segregated service delivery model to integrated and community-based employment services. That's a major transformation. We couldn't find an in-person or online resource that lays out helpful tips and strategies in enough depth or detail. So we created one.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

MI DoE: Bridging the Special Education Career and Technical Education Divide - 05/01/2009

“The purpose of this white paper is to help secondary school administrators, teachers, and parents coordinate the programmatic requirements of Career and Technical Education (CTE) with those that govern the rights of students in Special Education programs and those with a 504 plan. This paper discusses the relevant laws governing both areas and potential for conflict, explores the positive impact that proper placement in a CTE program may have on a student with a disability, and proposes a solution that best supports the success of a student with a disability in secondary and postsecondary CTE programs. This success requires the collaboration of CTE and Special Education personnel, the understanding of the student’s disability and abilities, and the appropriate recommendation for proper placement in a CTE program.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Wayne State University Developmental Disabilities Institute - Training and Events Calendar

"The DDI Training and Events Calendar shows the training events, conferences, talks and other opportunities being hosted or sponsored by DDI.”

Systems
  • Other
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Muskegon Family Care to Pay $21,500 to Settle EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 02/23/2017

“According to the EEOC’s lawsuit, Avis Lane worked for Muskegon Family Care as an outreach-enrollment coordinator. Before she began work, the company required that she submit to a post-offer, pre-employment physical. The medical specialist who conducted that physical recommended that Lane be put on a medical hold due to medications she was taking. Notwithstanding the recommended medical hold, the company allowed Lane to work for over a month. Eventually, Muskegon Family Care fired her based on the recommended medical hold, the EEOC said.

 

Firing an employee on the basis of disability violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). And an employer is liable for the actions of its agent, such as a medical specialist who conducts pre-employment physicals. EEOC filed its lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Michigan (EEOC v. M.G.H. Family Health Center d/b/a Muskegon Family Care, Civil Case No.: 15-952) after first attempting to reach a pre-litigation settlement through its conciliation process.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Medicaid Provider Manual - 04/01/2020

“The following documents comprise the Michigan Medicaid Provider Manual, and address all health insurance programs administered by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS). MDHHS also issues periodic bulletins as changes are implemented to the policies and/or processes described in the manual. Bulletins are incorporated into the online version of the manual on a quarterly basis.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals - 12/17/2019

“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approves Michigan’s MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals, authorized under sections 1915(c) and 1915(b)(1) of the Social Security Act (the Act) respectively. This letter replaced the approval letter issued on December 13, 2019…

These section 1915(c) and 1915(b) MI HealthLink waivers are effective for a five year period beginning January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2024 and operate concurrently…

Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MI Choice Waiver Program - 12/01/2019

“Revisions to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual

Effective December 1, 2019, revisions were made to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter which result in policy and program changes. Many changes are the result of policy changes approved by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) during the MI Choice Waiver renewal process. Additional changes were made to provide clarification on certain topics. Please see the Medical Services Administration Bulletin, MSA 19-17 for a list of updates and the updated MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The following documents comprise the Michigan Medicaid Provider Manual, and address all health insurance programs administered by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS).MDHHS also issues periodic bulletins as changes are implemented to the policies and/or processes described in the manual. Bulletins are incorporated into the online version of the manual on a quarterly basis. ” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Revised Statewide Transition Plan for Home and Community-Based Services; released for additional public comment” - 12/01/2016

“In 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released a new rule for Home and Community-Based Services waivers to promote enhanced quality of services and personal protections for residents with disabilities or other health issues. Today, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) released its Statewide Transition Plan for additional public comment. MDHHS provides home and Community-Based Services to individuals in the Medicaid program to help Michigan residents with disabilities or other health issues live at home or in the community. Michigan offers many of these services through waivers, which were approved by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Michigan’s Statewide Transition Plan for Home and Community-Based Services - 12/01/2016

“The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) offers a wide range of home and community-based services and supports to improve the health and well-being of Michigan residents. Many of these home and community-based services are offered through Medicaid waiver programs. MDHHS has created several waiver programs to provide services to Michigan residents who have aging -related needs, disabilities, or other health issues. Individuals in these programs receive services in their own homes and/or communities rather than being served in an institutional setting.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Reports in WSA for the Habilitation Support Waiver (HSW) - 10/05/2016

“HCBS Rule: Intent a) to ensure that individuals receiving long-term services and supports through home and community based service (HCBS) programs under the 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915 (k) b) and to enhance the quality of HCBS and provide protections to participants.(CMS, 2014)”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1915(i) State plan Home and Community Based Services Administration and Operation - 09/30/2016

“The §1915(i) State Plan Amendment ABA service will operate within the §1915(b) Managed Specialty Services & Supports Program (MSS&SP), which also includes the concurrent §1915(c) Habilitation Supports Waiver. For more than a decade, the PIHPs have been responsible per the approved §1915(b)/(c) waivers and the MDCH/PIHP contract for 1) determining eligibility for mental health State Plan, additional [(b)(3)] and §1915(c) home and community based services (HCBS); 2) maintaining a provider network of qualified providers; 3) assuring the delivery of all medically necessary mental health State Plan, additional and 1915(c) HCBS to Medicaid beneficiaries; 4) maintaining the mandated organization structure and administrative services for managed care plan, including Customer Service, Grievance & Appeals, Quality Assessment & Performance Improvement Program (QAPIP) and Service & Utilization Management.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Michigan Medicaid State Plan - 07/01/2016

The Michigan Medicaid State Plan is an agreement between the state and federal government that identifies the general health care services, reimbursement, and eligibility policies in effect under Michigan Medicaid. It is the basis for the federal government (CMS/HHS) to pay its federal financial participation (FFP) for the program's operation. The plan is written on a more general level than contained in program policy.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Michigan State HCBS Transition Plan - 03/15/2016

In 2014, the Federal Government issued a new rule for Medicaid waiver programs that pay for home and community-based services. The goal of the new rule is to ensure that individuals who receive home and community-based services are an equal part of the community and have the same access to the community as people who do not receive Medicaid waiver services. The MDHHS must assess Michigan waiver programs and transition each program into compliance with new rule.    MDHHS developed a Statewide Transition Plan (STP) to outline the transition process for Michigan Medicaid waiver programs.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Employers in the Great Lakes State know you can "Give Your Business the Upper Hand" in Michigan by creating job opportunities for workers with disabilities to reach their full potential and live the lives they choose.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Michigan’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2017 to 2018
9,995,915
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.46%
Change from
2017 to 2018
730,791
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.08%
Change from
2017 to 2018
259,363
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.65%
Change from
2017 to 2018
35.49%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.72%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.65%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 9,928,300 9,962,311 9,995,915
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 764,334 727,451 730,791
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 254,334 246,196 259,363
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,042,733 4,106,166 4,128,006
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.28% 33.84% 35.49%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.35% 77.09% 77.65%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90% 4.60% 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.70% 21.80% 21.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.80% 12.90% 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 693,065 670,112 678,980
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 730,326 720,198 728,739
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,099,891 1,078,912 1,098,144
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 238,754 235,280 233,479
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 52,499 51,272 50,537
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 10,757 11,410 10,253
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 16,032 13,560 17,919
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 333 299 575
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 43,925 40,081 35,067
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 13,699 10,768 12,282

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 13,620 14,154 14,401
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.30% 5.50% 5.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 346,000 341,200 334,642

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 21,634 18,521 19,479
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 62,706 70,782 75,923
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 169,872 142,442 145,811
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 12.70% 13.00% 13.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.20% 3.90% 3.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.30% 2.10% 1.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.30% 4.80% 4.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,303 2,824 3,648
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,305 1,518 1,279
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 4,469 3,422 3,914
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 13,105 12,064 11,432
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 156 132 109
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 117 116 86
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 75.00% 88.00% 79.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.18 1.17 0.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
11,440
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 64 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 2,473 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,063 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 3,443 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,767 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,630 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 38.80% 36.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,033 7,444 7,474
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 538,310 534,332 529,956
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 201 174 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 497 383 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $25,299,000 $27,242,000 $29,223,562
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $38,584,000 $46,790,000 $37,185,858
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $36,195,000 $47,081,000 $37,398,586
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $57,051,000 $36,344,000 $55,648,528
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00% 26.00% 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 6,465 13,634 12,880
Number of people served in facility based work. 4,920 4,458 3,290
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,824 4,880 3,553
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 42.80 44.80 43.89

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.39% 66.89% 67.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.86% 10.90% 11.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 5.16% 4.96% 4.83%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 78.34% 81.23% 81.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 32.36% 32.56% 29.18%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 63.31% 62.96% 64.85%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 76.82% 76.93% 77.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.95% 30.40% 35.67%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 4,169,358
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 6,288
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 631,296
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,489,918
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 2,121,213
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 964
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,300
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,264
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,129,959
AbilityOne wages (services). $21,448,161

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 2 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 28 34 25
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 30 37 27
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 39 19
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 30 26 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 4,329 5,184 3,103
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,360 5,249 3,122

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Employment First. Executive Order 2015-15 established Employment First in Michigan. It sets forth a mission to establish the expectation and promote opportunities for all working-age individuals with disabilities in Michigan to gain competitive employment within an integrated setting, with or without supports, and to engage businesses and organizations that value the contributions of employees with disabilities. All state departments and agencies that provide services and support to persons with disabilities, and all state departments and agencies that provide employment, economic development, or other related services, shall implement Employment First in Michigan by coordinating efforts and collaborating to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures, and funding support competitive employment within an integrated setting as the first priority and optimal outcome for persons with disabilities. (Pages 83-84) Title I

Michigan is an Employment First state and Michigan Rehabilitation Services is working closely with multiple stakeholders to improve employment outcomes for customers with disabilities. Several workgroups have formed, one of which focuses on school-to work improvement outcomes for students with disabilities. Technical assistance is being provided by TransCen, Inc. Career and Workforce Development, to implement the seamless transition model. (Page 256) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services is aligned with agency and community partners as part of the Employment First initiative in Michigan. This initiative’s purpose is to promote diversity and inclusive employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This is achieved by engaging businesses regarding the value employees with disabilities bring to their organizations. (Page 265) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services, Michigan Department of Education, the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration and other stakeholders are participating in Employment First efforts to improve competitive integrated employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities. These efforts, along with the newly signed Memorandum of Understanding, are designed to improve Supported Employment programming and outcomes. (Page 315) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~Vocational Rehabilitation is exploring ways to develop staff/vendor skills in customized employment and to export appropriate training across the state. (Page 113) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services has updated its policy manual to align with Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act mandates. This includes guidance for the provision of Extended Services for youth populations with the most significant disabilities. Extended Services may be provided for up to 4 years. In addition, Customized Employment is clarified within the policy as a Vocational Rehabilitation service option. (Page 264) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services established a Memorandum of Understanding with the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration to ensure individuals with developmental disabilities who are dually eligible for both agencies’ programs have
collaborative supports and services toward competitive integrated employment outcomes. The Memorandum of Understanding outlines the coordination of services, including Extended Services, Supported Employment, and Customized Employment. (Pages 266-267) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services offers statewide Supported Employment services, including Customized Employment, for individuals and youth with the most significant disabilities reach competitive integrated employment outcomes. Michigan Rehabilitation Services updated its policy manual to align with WIOA mandates. (Page 314) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services builds on the person-centered planning process used by local community mental health providers to develop quality individualized plans for employment. This includes required services and supports, service providers, Supported Employment goal, and may include Extended Service providers. Individualized services provided include, but are not limited to: individual community-based placement; trial work experiences; psychosocial rehabilitation via clubhouse programs; job coaching; job referral; Customized Employment; job development; job placement; and long-term follow along (including natural supports). (Page 315) Title IV

Customized employment of persons who are blind or visually impaired is paramount to every placement. The unique needs and accommodations that BSBP consumers may require lends itself heavily to customization. BSBP works closely with Community Rehabilitation Programs or fee for service vendors where we purchase service in order to assist them in understanding the complex needs of BSBP’s consumer base. BSBP’s Training Center provides blindness specific training to community partners to assist in the education and training of service providers. This practice speaks to the customization of the employment process. (Page 338) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Jobs Strategy: Our jobs strategy is integrated into the Governor’s overall strategic plan for Michigan’s reinvention. Michigan’s primary workforce development strategy is a demand-driven system that focuses on aligning all efforts, initiatives, programs, and funding around key industry clusters. This strategy includes the alignment of policies, operations, and administrative systems to avoid duplication of workforce programs and activities, as well as providing a way to leverage discretionary funding and formula-based investment across all programs. Our collaboration with workforce agencies, employers, economic developers, post-secondary education providers, and other partners with shared interests provides us with opportunities to leverage partner funds for services not funded under the WIOA. Our workforce programs are being implemented with innovation and efficiency in mind to deliver results-driven training and services in order to provide more and better jobs, assist employers with their workforce training needs, and revitalize our education system to better prepare youth. (Page 7) Title I

Our vision encompasses key actions related to workforce employment, training and educational programs as identified in the Governor’s strategy for Michigan’s reinvention. Key actions included:
• Creating WIOA planning regions across the State, thereby allowing local areas to devote their resources to leverage State resources that help create more and better jobs and training, (Page 74) Title I

Collaboration with other State of Michigan departments and agencies includes Michigan Rehabilitation Services, the Bureau of Services for Blind Persons, the Michigan Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Civil Rights among other state agencies, the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, and the Advisory Council on Deaf and Hard of Hearing align disability related programs by linking the state’s workforce and economic development agendas. To achieve necessary collaboration, the workgroup is moving forward with the formation of an ad hoc committee to identify and address the needs of individuals with disabilities and those agencies and respective services that can be leveraged for the purpose of putting qualified individuals back to work.  (Page 107) Title I

How the State will leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Michigan Rehabilitation Services is working to leverage other public and private funds by working strategically with Michigan businesses to expand the array of services to business through innovative approaches. Proposed strategies include:
o Assigning staff to specific businesses, providing customized services including Supported Employment. 
o Expanding community work experience options for transition youth with significant disabilities to create Supported Employment opportunities. 
o Aligning the business community with educational partners to provide additional resources, funding, and innovative programming through cooperative agreements and Memorandums of Understanding.
These strategies will assist Michigan Rehabilitation Services in leveraging resources for Extended Services and expanding Supported Employment. (Page 299) Title IV

How the State will leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities.
When BSBP consumers who are receiving Medicaid funding and who are receiving services from Community Mental Health agencies can leverage those resources to receive extended services. (Page 350) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Bureau’s Staff Developmental Unit subscribes and shares, as appropriate, information, facts, materials, news and reports from resources such as the Institute on Rehabilitation Issues (IRI), the National Center for Rehabilitation Training Materials (NCRTM) and The LEAD which is a collaborative of disability, workforce and economic empowerment organizations dedicated to improving employment and economic advancement outcomes for all people with disabilities. In addition, information is posted using the Bureau’s Knowledge Management System and Online Learning Center known as eLearn. (Page 272) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~The Project SEARCH program is one initiative launched by the State of Michigan to promote Executive Directive 2014-1. Project SEARCH is a one-year internship for students with disabilities, ages 18-26, ready for their last year of high school and with a goal of competitive employment. The purpose is to provide both classroom training and real-life work experience to prepare students for employment following completion of the program. Nine state departments have identified internships and two additional departments have expressed an interest in hosting an intern during the 2018-2019 school year. Options, including the establishment of a Project SEARCH Worker classification, are being considered to allow for permanent placement of interns upon successful completion of the program. (Page 91) Title I

Bureau of Services for Blind Persons is working with the One Stop centers to provide services to Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) students and youth in order to allow for summer work experiences and the development of work based learning. We know that that this is an ongoing area where partnership is needed as the relationships vary in intensity across the state. (Page 92) Title IV

VR is also participating in an Office of Disability Employment Policy grant that is supporting four pilot sites in Michigan with the goal of Students with Disabilities achieving competitive integrated employment prior to exiting secondary education. The four pilot sites are utilizing a collaborative approach involving core partners where education and adult agencies (for example: Vocational Rehabilitation and Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration) provide early intervention and work experiences while the student is still in secondary education. (Page 93) Title IV

Pathways to Potential -- This human services program focuses on three critical elements: going into the community to where the individual is located, working one-on-one with families to identify and remove barriers and serve as connectors to a network of services, and engaging community partners and school personnel in efforts to help families find their pathway to success. Michigan Rehabilitation Services partners with Pathways to Potential to connect students with disabilities and their family members with disabilities to vocational rehabilitation services leading to competitive integrated employment. (Page 254) Title IV

To comply with the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act, Michigan Rehabilitation Services is collaborating with the Michigan Department of Education to update the Memorandum of Understanding. This agreement lays out how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education partner to provide a coordinated set of activities to facilitate a seamless transition of students with disabilities from school to competitive integrated employment.
The Memorandum of Understanding focuses on mandates for transition services described in the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004). This includes how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education will collaborate to fulfill mandates on behalf of students with disabilities. Key elements of the partnership are stated in the agreement and include: Authority; Purpose; Pre-Employment Transition Services Required Activities; Consultation and Technical Assistance; Transition Planning; Outreach and Identification of Students with Disabilities; Section 511 Subminimum Wage; Assurance; and Provision of Services and Reimbursement. (Page 255) Title IV

Michigan is an Employment First state and Michigan Rehabilitation Services is working closely with multiple stakeholders to improve employment outcomes for customers with disabilities. Several workgroups have formed, one of which focuses on school-to work improvement outcomes for students with disabilities. Technical assistance is being provided by TransCen, Inc. Career and Workforce Development, to implement the seamless transition model. (Page 256) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides Pre-Employment Transition Services to students with disabilities prior to, and after application. Approximately 30 counselors have been hired to provide Pre-Employment Transition Services prior to application.
Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided by Michigan Rehabilitation Services counselors for students who are interested in and need the program. Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided prior to application and during the stages of the vocational rehabilitation process which include: application, eligibility determination, and Individualized Plan for Employment. Transition and general counselors may serve customers meeting the definition of a student with a disability.
Michigan Rehabilitation Services coordinated with educational partners to deliver contracted Pre-Employment Transition Services through Michigan’s Centers for Independent Living. In addition, local district offices are coordinating with educational partners to develop Pre-Employment Transition Services programs to be provided by community rehabilitation organizations and other qualified vendors. (Page 256) Title IV

• Project SEARCH -Michigan currently has 16 Project Search sites impacting approximately 100 students with disabilities per year. Project SEARCH is a business-led model allowing students with disabilities in their last year of secondary education to participate in three unpaid internships at a business in their community for school credit. The goal of the program is for students to become employed at the host business or another business in the community after completion. Project SEARCH funding was an outcome of the 2013 Mental Health and Wellness Commission report recommending expansion of a minimum of 3 additional Project SEARCH sites per year. Michigan Rehabilitation Services has received dedicated Project SEARCH funds to support the expansion of new sites. The funding is used to provide technical assistance from Project SEARCH to Michigan and to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
• Post-secondary Education Rehabilitation Transition (PERT) Program -The PERT program is a one week comprehensive vocational and independent living assessment offered in a semi-structured residential environment at Michigan Career and Technical Institute for students enrolled in secondary education. In summer of 2017, 144 students with disabilities participated in the program. Students reside in dormitories, giving them the experience of independent living. After completion, students return to their local school districts where information they have learned is document in their Individualized Education Program.

This past year, the PERT program has been offered in local communities as a pilot. One benefit of making the program portable is more students can participate in the assessment process as they are not required to travel and stay on campus of Michigan Career and Technical Institute to participate.

• Pathways to Potential -This human services program focuses on three critical elements: going into the community to where the individual is located, working one-on-one with families to identify and remove barriers and serve as connectors to a network of services, and engaging community partners and school personnel in efforts to help families find their pathway to success. Michigan Rehabilitation Services partners with Pathways to Potential to connect students with disabilities and their family members with disabilities to vocational rehabilitation services leading to competitive integrated employment.
• Seamless Transition -The seamless transition model targets students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. A collaborative approach is used to prepare and support students with the outcome of competitive integrated employment prior to exit from secondary education. (Page 257-258) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides consultation and technical assistance to Michigan Department of Education and local educational agencies to assist in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, employment-related activities, Pre-Employment Transition Services and other vocational rehabilitation. Consultation and technical assistance may include, but is not limited to, the following topics:
•Disability awareness
•Accommodations and assistive technology
•MDHHS Michigan Rehabilitation Services application, eligibility, and services
•Community-based services
•Independent living
•Career Pathways
•Competitive integrated employment (Page 259) Title I

Transition planning occurs between the student/family/guardian, education staff and Michigan Rehabilitation Services staff to enhance the development of Individualized Education Programs. The Michigan Department of Education and Michigan Rehabilitation Services Memorandum of Understanding clarifies Michigan Rehabilitation Services staff will attend student Individualized Education Program meetings when invited. Educational partners are encouraged to provide advance notice, communicate and coordinate IEP meetings to ensure Michigan Rehabilitation Services staff are available to attend. (Page 260) Title IV

Transition counselors are connected to transition coordinators in each intermediate school district in the state. The counselors work in collaboration with transition coordinators, as well as other education staff, to identify students interested in pursuing competitive integrated employment who require vocational rehabilitation services. Students with disabilities are referred to Michigan Rehabilitation Services through this process.
In addition, Section 504 students are provided information about Michigan Rehabilitation Services by education staff, Michigan Rehabilitation Services marketing publications, informational meetings, and one-on-one meetings. If students are determined eligible, Michigan Rehabilitation Services works with the student and the family/guardian as appropriate to move through the rehabilitation process with the goal of competitive integrated employment. (Page 262) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services works extensively to provide Pre-Employment Transition Services and transition services for students with disabilities. Every Michigan Rehabilitation Services district has at least two assigned Pre-Employment Transition Services counselors and a Business Relations Consultant. Staff work to identify opportunities of Pre-Employment Transition Services, focusing on work-based-learning experiences, at local businesses. (Page 265) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services values the achievement of competitive integrated employment so that people with disabilities can be independent. Postsecondary education and job training beyond secondary education is critical to the achievement of independence for many people with disabilities. Through the provision of pre-employment transition services which allows for a continuum of developmental experiences, Michigan Rehabilitation Services will be able to help students (and their guardians) be better informed and prepared to choose careers. (Page 307) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services transfers customers receiving Supported Employment to extended services once stabilization has occurred. The customer is considered to have achieved stabilization when the counselor, with input from the job coach/employment specialist, employer and individual, confirms that: (1) initial intensive services identified on the IPE have resulted in the individual demonstrating acceptable job performance and (2) a reasonable expectation satisfactory job performance will be maintained with the individual based on ongoing support services being provided. (Page 316) Title IV

A BSBP Transition Specialist has been hired to assist the Transition Services Manager, field counselors and the BSBP Training Center in developing and implementing new Pre-ETS programs as well as provide Pre-ETS services to students who are visually impaired. BSBP has VR counselors and Vision Rehabilitation Therapists assigned geographically to each ISD and Local Educational Authority (LEA). The VR counselor works closely with teacher consultants for the visually impaired to identify students who would benefit from Pre-ETS and/or Vocational Rehabilitation Services through outreach and the BSBP Youth Low Vision Program. (Page 331) Title IV

BSBP will provide Pre-ETS not only to students with disabilities who have applied for vocational rehabilitation services but also to those students with disabilities who have not applied for services. If a student needs a service that goes beyond the scope of Pre-ETS and such additional service is listed on the student's approved IPE, BSBP will pay for those costs with non-reserved VR funds. If a student applies for a VR case, the Counselor establishes eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services within 60 days of the VR application being signed. The VR Counselor works with the student and parents to develop an IPE outlining the VR services necessary to assist the student in obtaining competitive integrated employment. The eligibility criteria for services must be met before plan development. The IEP, along with the IPE, are instruments that identify education, transition, and employment goals and objectives. The services outlined in the IEP are cooperatively agreed upon by the schools or educational facilities, parent/student, other relevant agencies and the rehabilitation agency; thereby establishing the objectives of the transition plan. (Pages 331-332) Title IV

Not all eligible or potentially eligible students with disabilities will require all five required pre-employment transition services, however, all should receive all needed services, as determined through informed choice and consultation with each student based on their strengths and needs and consistent with their IEP, when applicable.  (Page 336) Title IV

Students who are blind or visually impaired benefit from services designed to enhance Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) outcomes by receiving work based learning, work based readiness, career exploration counseling, instruction in self advocacy and counseling on opportunities for enrollment in post-secondary education. BSBP’s assessment suggests that early intervention implementing the above services leads to stronger vocational direction and outcomes that are focused on demand driven occupations. BSBP is gathering data as the implementation of WIOA drives this early intervention in order to obtain evidence based practice to substantiate the benefit of providing these early services. BSBP aligns with IDEA by participating in the IEP process, participating and conducting person centered plans and post-secondary planning. (Page 345) Title IV

BSBP provides appropriate Pre-ETS services and/or VR services to potentially eligible students or students who are eligible as early as age 14. BSBP attends IEPs, person-centered planning meetings, consultations with school staff including transition coordinators for the purpose of providing education and training for students and families regarding the opportunities for services that can enhance CIE outcomes. The ability to provide the five Pre-Employment Transition services categories and the four coordination services along with the nine authorized categories when appropriate can create an opportunity for great success. Examples are provision of work-based learning experiences that allow students to engage with employers, including learning soft skills. Providing the opportunity to visit college, and vocational programs to understand the expectations and plan with their family and counselor how to incorporate those into their career plan. (Page 353) Title IV

BSBP transfers customers receiving Support Employment to extended services once stabilization has occurred. The customer is considered to have achieved stabilization when the counselor, with input from the job coach/employment specialist, employer and individual, confirms that: 1) initial intensive services identified on the IPE have resulted in the individual demonstrating acceptable job performance, and 2) a reasonable expectation of satisfactory job performance will be maintained with the individual based on ongoing support services being provided. (Page 359) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Both VR agencies have collaborated to provide disability sensitivity training to front-line Michigan Works! staff and ADAAG (ADA Architectural Guidelines) evaluations. The purpose for the training and evaluations support Section 188 of WIOA which prohibits the exclusion of an individual from participation in, denial of the benefits of, discrimination in, or denial of employment in the administration of or in connection with, any programs and activities funded or otherwise financially assisted in whole or in part under Title I of WIOA because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or political affiliation or belief, or for beneficiaries, applicants, and participants only, on the basis of citizenship status, or participation in a program or activity that receives financial assistance under Title I of WIOA. For example, the most effective implementation of a strategic approach to address Section 188 has occurred in the Michigan Works! Macomb/St. Clair where a subcommittee under the Workforce Development Board was established specific to serving individuals with disabilities, the VR agencies serve as members on this subcommittee. Intense technical assistance from Michigan Rehabilitation Services/BSBP was provided to all of the offices within this Michigan Works! Office. (Page 92) Title I

Michigan Works! Service Centers must be inclusive of all customers to be effective. Inclusion honors and accommodates diversity. A universally accessible system requires meeting the diverse customer needs that exist within the local delivery area, which includes the needs of individuals with disabilities, people of different cultures, and persons with barriers to employment. Where inclusion abounds, centers are welcoming, inviting, accommodating, and accessible to everyone. As recipients of federal funds, Michigan Works! Agencies are required to comply with various regulations relating to non— discrimination, equal opportunity, and inclusion. The most critical of these regulations are: 
Section 188 of the WIOA.
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1998, as amended.
Titles I and II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (Page 156) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides consultation and technical assistance to Michigan Department of Education and local educational agencies to assist in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, employment-related activities, Pre-Employment Transition Services and other vocational rehabilitation. Consultation and technical assistance may include, but is not limited to, the following topics:
•Disability awareness
•Accommodations and assistive technology
•MDHHS Michigan Rehabilitation Services application, eligibility, and services
•Community-based services
•Independent living
•Career Pathways
•Competitive integrated employment (Page 259) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The provision of VR services to assist businesses to obtain qualified talent includes: •Talent Development including no cost recruitment and paid internships and apprenticeships •Reasonable Accommodations/Ergonomic Intervention to develop strategies for Workers with Physical, Cognitive and/or Behavioral Disabilities •Connections to partner assets and services •Job Analysis for performance elements and requirements •Risk management/Staff Retention •Injury Prevention and Wellness Programming •ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Services (Page 70) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Cooperation with Social Security Administration and Michigan Rehabilitation Services regional and local district offices to assist dually eligible customers receiving disability benefits in the use of Social Security work incentives and return to work efforts. Each Michigan Rehabilitation Services office has a dedicated champion for addressing unique needs of Social Security Administration recipients. These include Michigan Rehabilitation Services’ internal (online) eLearn system which contains information regarding:
o Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program and work incentives,
o Resource and referral available through the Social Security Administration’s Work Incentive Planning and Assistance project in serving Michigan communities,
o Referral to Beneficiary Access and Support Services as contracted with the Social Security Administration,
o Social Security Administration Work Incentive Liaisons available through local Social Security Administration offices, and Michigan Rehabilitation Services fee-for-service vendors. (Page 251) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Data Collection

According to the Fiscal Year 2016 RSA-911 data, 89% of customers were determined eligible for services and exited Michigan Rehabilitation Services during Fiscal Year 2016 were significantly or most significantly disabled; 65% were most significantly disabled. Customers with the following characteristics were more likely to be determined to have a most significant disability: racial/ethnic minority, students or youth, attendance or completion in special education certificate program, and Social Security beneficiaries. In addition, a higher proportion of customers with cognitive or psychiatric impairments were determined to be most significantly disabled. (Page 279) Title IV

511

~~VR is developing a coordinated process with State and local educational agencies in assisting individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities who are considering subminimum wage employment or who are already employed, at a subminimum wage, to maximize opportunities to achieve competitive integrated employment through services provided by VR and the local educational agencies. (Pages 97-98) Title I

To comply with the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act, Michigan Rehabilitation Services is collaborating with the Michigan Department of Education to update the Memorandum of Understanding. This agreement lays out how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education partner to provide a coordinated set of activities to facilitate a seamless transition of students with disabilities from school to competitive integrated employment. 
The Memorandum of Understanding focuses on mandates for transition services described in the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004). This includes how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education will collaborate to fulfill mandates on behalf of students with disabilities. Key elements of the partnership are stated in the agreement and include: Authority; Purpose; Pre-Employment Transition Services Required Activities; Consultation and Technical Assistance; Transition Planning; Outreach and Identification of Students with Disabilities; Section 511 Subminimum Wage; Assurance; and Provision of Services and Reimbursement. (Page 255) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides career counseling and information and referral services for individual with disabilities employed at subminimum wages. Individuals with disabilities are provided information and resources on competitive integrated employment initiatives designed to transition employees from sub minimum to competitive integrated employment. (Page 265) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Michigan Works! Service Centers must be inclusive of all customers to be effective. Inclusion honors and accommodates diversity. A universally accessible system requires meeting the diverse customer needs that exist within the local delivery area, which includes the needs of individuals with disabilities, people of different cultures, and persons with barriers to employment. Where inclusion abounds, centers are welcoming, inviting, accommodating, and accessible to everyone. As recipients of federal funds, Michigan Works! Agencies are required to comply with various regulations relating to non— discrimination, equal opportunity, and inclusion. The most critical of these regulations are: Section 188 of the WIOA. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1998, as amended. Titles I and II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (Page 156) Title I

Each year, the Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity, in conjunction with the Michigan Works! Association, hosts a Multi—State Equal Opportunity Officers training seminar. Representatives from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the U.S. Department of Labor Civil Rights Center conduct the training. The training focused on social media and employment discrimination, discrimination complaint, investigative techniques, asking telling, using and storing disability related information, recognizing hidden disabilities and identifying strategies to assist individuals, assistive technologies, and web accessibility guidelines. (Page 157) Title IV

The Michigan Works! Service Center certification criteria policy provides guidance on accessibility of our One-Stop delivery system and our Wagner-Peyser Employment Services Manual provides information about the requirements of posters and other materials to be displayed at Michigan Works! Service Centers. The Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity staff monitor Service Centers for compliance with certification criteria as part of WIOA programmatic reviews. The goal of programmatic reviews is to provide technical assistance, as appropriate, and ensure that established policies, procedures, and systems of the Michigan Works! Agency achieve quality program outcomes that meet the requirements and objectives of the WIOA and federal and state regulations. This program review is in addition to the WIOA fiscal compliance monitoring, and thereby ensures the state will meet program design, as required by the WIOA. (Page 159) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services’ Assistive Technology Consultant sits on the Assistive Technology Advisory Council for Michigan’s Assistive Technology Act’s program. The AT consultant will be responsible for; but not limited to: o Establishing a baseline and provide reports to reflect; program accessibility and progress and effectiveness of AT program/project implementation. o Ensuring accessibility throughout the vocational process that align with ADAAG and assessing the means in which the services are delivered (i.e. -Online orientation, web base outreach, and physical office locations) o Identify and assist in training curriculums ensuring for consistent practices across the Agency and interactions with partners. o Develop a network of resources for the state to address: o Delivery, education and reinforcement of AT Training for participates. o Secure Demonstration Equipment for trial and training use. o Provides Businesses with a Subject Matter Expert to assist with AT implementation and Training for newly acquired employees and retention of current employees with disabilities. o Develop a web-based inventory and exchange protocol to be utilized by the Agency and participates. (Pages 305-306) Title IV

Vets

The State of Michigan continues using the Talent Acquisition Portal — an online tool providing access to a centralized pool of individuals with disabilities, including disabled veterans, at the local, state and national level. MRS has committed to funding TAP access for state agencies for 18 months. TAP has both a national talent pool of Vocational Rehabilitation candidates looking for employment and a job-posting system for businesses looking to hire individuals with disabilities. TAP is led by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation, the National Employment Team (NET) and disABLEDperson, Inc. TAP allows employers to post jobs, search candidate resumes based on skill sets and geographic availability, capture job metrics, generate compliance and application quick reports, interview candidates, have online job fairs, and have their jobs seen by individuals with disabilities across the country. Employers also benefit from VR counselors and qualified candidates searching available opportunities. (Page 91) Title I

Assure that veteran’s preference and priority are strictly observed by giving covered persons (eligible veterans and eligible spouses) employment and training opportunities ahead or instead of non—covered persons in accordance with the requirements of Priority of Service. In addition, veterans, transitioning service members, and eligible spouses may be qualified for intensive services provided by Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists. Both DVOP Specialists and Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are integral, collocated partners in the Michigan Works! Service Centers. (Page 127) Title I

Priority of service is in effect at all times, not just when funds are limited. Priority is given in the following order: 78. First, to veterans and eligible spouses who are also funded in the groups are given statutory priority for WIOA adult formula funds. This means that veterans and eligible spouses who are also recipients of public assistance, other low-income individuals, or individuals who are basic skills deficient would receive first priority of services with the WIOA adult formula funds. 79. Second, to non-covered persons (that is, individuals who are not veterans or eligible spouses) who are included in the WIOA’s priority groups. 80. Third, to veterans and eligible spouses who are not included in the WIOA’s priority groups. 81. Last, to non-covered persons outside the groups given priority under the WIOA. (Page 154) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grant provides funding to support Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists and Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives. Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists provide intensive, one-on-one employment services exclusively to program-eligible veterans and spouses who possess a significant barrier to employment and/or are part of a population group identified as eligible. The purpose of the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists’ services is to assist the client in becoming job ready so they can secure employment utilizing the public workforce system. Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists do not interact with employers, nor engage in direct placement, and rely on their Michigan Works! Agency One-Stop partners to assist their job ready clients to secure appropriate employment. (Pages 154-155) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans State Grants is a fully integrated partner in our Michigan Works! Agency One-Stop Centers. All veterans and spouses of veterans seeking services at our One-Stop Centers will receive appropriate services from all One-Stop partners as would any other job seeker, but with priority of Service for veterans and eligible spouses applied. Prior to receiving services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants, a veteran or spouse of a veteran is first assessed by a non-Jobs for Veterans State Grants One-Stop worker prior to referral. (Page 155) Title I

The Veterans Services team also provides guidance to Service Center staff on how to identify and refer a veteran to a Disabled Veteran Outreach Worker for intensive case management services. (Page 198) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services continues Memorandum of Understanding with the Veterans Administration to provide coordinated services to returning veterans with disabilities. This agreement clarifies services not be duplicated, but are complimentary in assisting eligible veterans achieve meaningful employment, in accordance with the laws and regulations governing each entity. Bureau liaisons are identified to assist in coordinating cooperative employment plans. Cross training has been provided to ensure understanding of both federal programs. (Page 253) Title I

Additionally, facility improvements will allow MCTI to enhance occupational training programs to maximize opportunities for the following populations identified in the 2017 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. • Individuals with mental illness • Students and youth with disabilities (formerly Transition Youth) • Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders • Cultural minority residents with disabilities • Individuals with sensory disabilities • Veterans with disabilities• Other underserved groups (Page 301) Title IV

Mental Health

~~In 2017, Michigan Rehabilitation Services and Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration revised and improved a longstanding Memorandum of Understanding between the two agencies. This updated agreement details Michigan Rehabilitation Services’ increased focus on both Supported Employment and the provision of Extended Services as detailed within Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

The Memorandum of Understanding focuses on individuals with developmental and/or intellectual disabilities and is delivered locally. Specific local partnership agreements are developed between Community Mental Health service providers, Michigan Rehabilitation Services, and may also include community rehabilitation organizations and local school districts. The local partnership agreements include Community Mental Health funding that allows Michigan Rehabilitation Services to capture federal match funds. These funds are used to provide Supported Employment services throughout Community Mental Health service areas. These local agreements include goals, objectives, responsibilities, and expectations for delivering Supported Employment and Extended Services. (Page 263) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services established a Memorandum of Understanding with the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration to ensure individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness who are dually eligible for both agencies’ programs have collaborative supports and services toward competitive integrated employment outcomes. The Memorandum of Understanding outlines the coordination of services, including Extended Services, Supported Employment, and Customized Employment.
Michigan Rehabilitation Services collaborates with Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration in the development of the Individual Placement and Supports model. This model promotes early engagement in employment activities for individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness express an interest in competitive integrated employment. There are currently 22 Individual Placement and Support sites providing services statewide. (Page 267) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services builds on the person-centered planning process used by local community mental health providers to develop quality individualized plans for employment. This includes required services and supports, service providers, Supported Employment goal, and may include Extended Service providers. Individualized services provided include, but are not limited to: individual community-based placement; trial work experiences; psychosocial rehabilitation via clubhouse programs; job coaching; job referral; Customized Employment; job development; job placement; and long-term follow along (including natural supports). Supported Employment services are provided in integrated community settings to the maximum extent possible. Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides ongoing support services for adults until the customer has 90 days of stabilized employment. Following job stabilization, Michigan Rehabilitation Services transfers the customer from employment follow-along to extended services provided by community mental health or natural supports.  (Page 315) Title IV

Project SEARCH is a specific employment model for students with the most significant disabilities in secondary education. Project SEARCH is funded by Michigan Mental Health Wellness Commission and federal funds. Students receive follow-along services as part of the Project SEARCH model. Michigan Rehabilitation Services works with the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration to ensure extended services are provided for dually eligible students employed in competitive integrated settings.  (Page 315) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 72

Medicaid Provider Manual - 04/01/2020

“The following documents comprise the Michigan Medicaid Provider Manual, and address all health insurance programs administered by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS). MDHHS also issues periodic bulletins as changes are implemented to the policies and/or processes described in the manual. Bulletins are incorporated into the online version of the manual on a quarterly basis.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan Rehabilitation Services

The goal for all funds used for Supported Employment Services is to help individuals whose disabilities and functional limitations have traditionally meant that they would not be able to successfully enter the labor market through competitive integrated employment. Priorities include, but are not limited to: •Increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities who receive Supported Employment services;

Use Title I funds for Supported Employment services to achieve the maximum number of quality employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities and a focus on youth;Build subject matter expertise to facilitate Supported Employment, Customized Employment and other evidenced-based practices;Increase Supported Employment training opportunities for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors, community rehabilitation service staff, families and individuals”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • WIOA

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan is in a unique position to address the needs of individuals, employers and communities to address the educational and economic means to reach their full potential.  All four Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) core programs (Titles I, II, III, and IV) are newly positioned within the Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity (LEO). Under Executive Order 2019-13, Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) (Title IV) was positioned under LEO and provides all four WIOA Core programs under one State department to allow for greater transparency and partnership.  VR continues to closely partner with the State’s One-Stop system and partners on strategic planning, and ways to collaboratively service our mutual customers (businesses and individuals with disabilities).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals - 12/17/2019

“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approves Michigan’s MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals, authorized under sections 1915(c) and 1915(b)(1) of the Social Security Act (the Act) respectively. This letter replaced the approval letter issued on December 13, 2019…

These section 1915(c) and 1915(b) MI HealthLink waivers are effective for a five year period beginning January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2024 and operate concurrently…

Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Training Connect (MiTC) Policy Manual Requirements and Guidelines - 12/09/2019

“The workforce system established under the WIOA emphasizes informed consumer choice, job-driven training, provider performance, and continuous improvement. The quality and selection of providers and programs of training services is vital to achieving these core principles. As required by the WIOA, Section 122, states in partnership with Local Boards must identify eligible training providers and programs that are qualified to receive WIOA Title I-B funds to train adults and dislocated workers, including those with disabilities. The approved State list of eligible training providers and programs serves as an important tool for participants seeking training providers and programs, and relevant information, such as program cost and program outcomes.

 

Local boards must work with the state to ensure that:

There are sufficient numbers and types of providers of career services and training services (including eligible providers with expertise in assisting individuals with disabilities and eligible providers with expertise in assisting adults in need of adult education and literacy activities) serving the local area and providing services that maximize consumer choice and lead to competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities; and

Public dissemination of the MiTC through the local One-Stop system and its partner programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

MI Choice Waiver Program - 12/01/2019

“Revisions to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual

Effective December 1, 2019, revisions were made to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter which result in policy and program changes. Many changes are the result of policy changes approved by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) during the MI Choice Waiver renewal process. Additional changes were made to provide clarification on certain topics. Please see the Medical Services Administration Bulletin, MSA 19-17 for a list of updates and the updated MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment First in Michigan - 11/15/2019

“This report builds on the 2014 Michigan Developmental Disabilities Network report, “Employment First in Michigan,” which examined the employment status of Michigan adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and/or dual diagnosis (co-occurring DD and mental illness) and state policies that align with employment First goals. The 2019 report on Employment First highlights where employment conditions have improved, what challenges remain, and what policy and practice changes are required to continue Michigan’s improvement in providing access to competitive, integrated employment for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) - 09/03/2019

~~“Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, as well as Arab and non-Arab, Chaldean, and South Asian communities in the greater Detroit area.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Islamic Organization of North America Mosque, Islamic Center of America, Macomb County Health Department, Congressional offices, Chaldean and Coptic churches, Jewish Family Service, HUDA Clinic, Luke Project 52 Clinic, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Regional Social Security offices, and Local businesses.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mr. Hassan JaberPhone: (313) 842-7010Email: hjaber@accesscommunity.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Genesee Health Plan Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Genesee Health Plan Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left-behind” populations; immigrant population; deaf and hard of hearing population, veterans; employees of small businesses and small business owners; federally recognized tribes; reentering incarcerated citizens.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Disability Network, Enroll America, First Presbyterian Church of Flint, Genesee Community Health Center, Genesee County Health Department, Ascension Genesys, Hamilton Community Health Network, Hurley Medical Center, McLaren Flint Hospital, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Michigan Medicaid/Medicare Assistance Program, Michigan State University Extension Valley Area Agency on Aging, The CRIM Fitness Foundation, and The Flint Registry.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:James Milanowski Phone: (810) 232-7740Email: jmilanowski@countyhealthplans.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veteran Navigators - 07/01/2019

~~“Veteran Navigators was created to assist Veterans and military families of ALL eras and discharge types. They work to connect Veterans and their families to federal, state and local resources to ease issues regarding mental health, substance abuse, housing and other common issues that impact veterans in order to support healthier lifestyles and provide support.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

House Resolution No. 170 - 01/01/2018

“A resolution to declare October 2017 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in the state of Michigan

Whereas, It has been more than 70 years since Congress designated a week in October, which has culminated into National Disability Employment Awareness Month with the 2017 theme being ‘Employment First for Michigan’; and

Whereas, Every person should be seen for their ability and not disability with valuable strengths and the potential to make important contributions to their local communities; and

Whereas, By promoting opportunities for all citizens with disabilities in Michigan, gaining individual integrated employment, and engaging businesses to value the contributions that employees with disabilities bring to their organization, we will enhance the employment landscape and enable Michigan to compete with other states to bring in high-demand businesses and jobs; and

Whereas, Disability Employment Awareness Month is an appropriate time to recognize Michigan’s employment accomplishments concerning persons with disabilities in integrated environments and to make sure all of Michigan’s citizens with intellectual and developmental disabilities are included;

 

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare October 2017 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in the state of Michigan.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan ABLE Legislation (HB 4542) - 10/28/2015

An act to create the Michigan achieving a better life experience (ABLE) program; to provide for ABLE accounts; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state agencies, boards, and departments; to allow certain tax credits or deductions; and to provide for penalties and remedies.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Michigan Business Opportunity Act for Persons with Disabilities - 05/04/1998

An act to provide competitive opportunity in state procurements of goods, services, and construction for businesses owned by persons with disabilities; to provide powers and duties of the governor; to prescribe powers and duties of certain state departments and agencies; and to provide penalties.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Michigan SB 360 - Education Savings Program

An act to amend 2000 PA 161, entitled “An act to create the Michigan education savings program; to provide for education savings accounts; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state agencies, boards, and departments; to allow certain tax credits or deductions; and to provide for penalties and remedies,” by amending section 10 (MCL 390.1480), as amended by 2001 PA 215.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

“MiABLE Disability Savings Program Now Available in Michigan” - 11/01/2016

“Today, Michigan became the fifth state in the country to launch a disability savings program, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley announced. The Mi-ABLE (Michigan Achieving a Better Life Experience) program is a 529 (A) savings account, offering investment and tax incentives for families and others who wish to save for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Michigan Executive Order 2015-15: Employment First in Michigan - 11/18/2015

All state departments and agencies that provide services and support to persons with disabilities, and all state departments and agencies that provide employment, economic development, or other related services, shall implement Employment First in Michigan by coordinating efforts and collaborating to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures, and funding support competitive employment within an integrated setting as the first priority and optimal outcome for persons with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Michigan Executive Directive 2014-1: Employment Opportunities - 10/27/2014

“It is important that the State of Michigan provide a welcoming environment to those with disabilities and encourage their employment in state government in a competitive integrated setting. While many individuals desire that their disability be kept confidential, raising awareness and providing adequate training to all state employees can help bridge the gap to ensure every employee is treated with dignity and respect at all times.”   “In coordination with the Department of Civil Rights, the Civil Rights Commission and the Civil Service Commission, the SEODC shall recommend a program for attracting and retaining individuals with mental illness, intellectual or developmental disabilities and physical disabilities that includes competitive integrated employment opportunities. The program shall require the participation and engagement of all Executive Branch departments and agencies.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order No. 2004 State Americans with Disabilities Act Coordinator - 06/03/2004

“Whereas, in Michigan there are approximately 1.9 million persons with disabilities;

Whereas it has long been the policy of the State of Michigan and this Governor to ensure that all persons, including those persons with disabilities, are given equal participation opportunities in all aspects of public life;

Now, therefore, I, Jennifer M. Granholm, Governor of State of Michigan, by virtue of the power and authority vested in the Governor under the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and Michigan law, order the following:

Establishment of State ADA Coordinator; Designation of Departmental ADA Coordinators; Assistance of Departments of Agencies”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 30

Training Connect (MiTC) Policy Manual Requirements and Guidelines - 12/09/2019

“The workforce system established under the WIOA emphasizes informed consumer choice, job-driven training, provider performance, and continuous improvement. The quality and selection of providers and programs of training services is vital to achieving these core principles. As required by the WIOA, Section 122, states in partnership with Local Boards must identify eligible training providers and programs that are qualified to receive WIOA Title I-B funds to train adults and dislocated workers, including those with disabilities. The approved State list of eligible training providers and programs serves as an important tool for participants seeking training providers and programs, and relevant information, such as program cost and program outcomes.

 

Local boards must work with the state to ensure that:

There are sufficient numbers and types of providers of career services and training services (including eligible providers with expertise in assisting individuals with disabilities and eligible providers with expertise in assisting adults in need of adult education and literacy activities) serving the local area and providing services that maximize consumer choice and lead to competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities; and

Public dissemination of the MiTC through the local One-Stop system and its partner programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Employment First in Michigan - 11/15/2019

“This report builds on the 2014 Michigan Developmental Disabilities Network report, “Employment First in Michigan,” which examined the employment status of Michigan adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and/or dual diagnosis (co-occurring DD and mental illness) and state policies that align with employment First goals. The 2019 report on Employment First highlights where employment conditions have improved, what challenges remain, and what policy and practice changes are required to continue Michigan’s improvement in providing access to competitive, integrated employment for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Veteran Navigators - 07/01/2019

~~“Veteran Navigators was created to assist Veterans and military families of ALL eras and discharge types. They work to connect Veterans and their families to federal, state and local resources to ease issues regarding mental health, substance abuse, housing and other common issues that impact veterans in order to support healthier lifestyles and provide support.”

Systems
  • Other

Michigan Disability Resources - 06/07/2019

~~“Welcome to Michigan's first website devoted specially to the interests, concerns, and needs of Michiganians with disabilities. Of Michigan's nearly 10 million residents, about 1.9 million have a disability. That's one in every five residents.

On these pages you will find the services and programs for people with disabilities offered by the State of Michigan as well as other sites of interest. Whether you're looking for assistance in finding a job, want to learn about the latest assistive technology, or have a question about your rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act, you will find it here.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Educational Development Plan (EDP) Fact Sheet - 05/04/2019

“Educational Development Plans (EDPs) are plans created by all students about career goals and action plans for reaching their goals. EDPs help students think about long-term education and career plans before entering high school. By going through this process, students learn more about themselves, consider different options for their future, and develop a more specific path for preparing for their career choice.

 

Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and EDPs

Although both the IEP and EDP promote positive outcomes after high school, they are two different documents with different purposes. EDPs do not replace IEPs. IEPs are created for students meeting special education eligibility under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Per IDEA, during transition planning, educators gather information about a student’s interests and strengths through age-appropriate assessments and work with the student to develop measurable postsecondary (after high school) goals related to education, training, employment, and, when appropriate, independent living skills. EDPs help students identify career paths and the education needed to reach career goals. Sometimes in developing the IEP, information from the EDP may be used to assist in transition planning.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Special Education Reevaluation Process - 04/30/2019

~~“A student’s special education needs may change throughout the course of their educational career, and the reevaluation process is developed to assess these evolving needs. A district must ensure a reevaluation of each student with a disability is conducted when: The district determines the student’s special education and related services and the student’s educational needs, including improved academic achievement and functional performance, warrant a reevaluation; or The child’s parent or teacher requests a reevaluation.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS) - 04/09/2019

~~“MISSIONTo improve public Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services delivered by the Bureau of Services for Blind Persons (BSBP) and Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS).

VISIONBSBP and MRS will provide VR services in manners that are respectful, equitable and effective in achieving meaningful employment outcomes for people with disabilities.”

MCRS was created under Executive Order (EO) (2012-10) in 2012.And oversight of implementing Employment First in Michigan (click here for Executive Order 2015-15). More about the mission of MCRS can be found by accessing the web-link.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mental Health Services - 02/08/2019

~~“The VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System Mental Health Service is a Partner Affiliate of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School. Together the departments host an internationally recognized faculty known for their contributions to the study of mood disorders, stress and anxiety disorders, substance use disorders as well as other psychiatric disorders….Community Based Services• Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center/Veteran's Empowerment and Recovery (VEAR) Center• Mental Health Intensive Care Management (MHICM)• Compensated Work Therapy Program (CWT)”

Systems
  • Other

Supports for Students with Disabilities - 11/16/2018

~~“Many offices, agencies, and organizations outside of the Office of Special Education (OSE) work with families and schools to support students with disabilities.”This site has links to a variety of services including Assistive Technology and Transition to employment 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Services Offered by the Detroit Regional Office - 11/15/2018

~~“VA’s Detroit Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Michigan. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan is in a unique position to address the needs of individuals, employers and communities to address the educational and economic means to reach their full potential.  All four Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) core programs (Titles I, II, III, and IV) are newly positioned within the Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity (LEO). Under Executive Order 2019-13, Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) (Title IV) was positioned under LEO and provides all four WIOA Core programs under one State department to allow for greater transparency and partnership.  VR continues to closely partner with the State’s One-Stop system and partners on strategic planning, and ways to collaboratively service our mutual customers (businesses and individuals with disabilities).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Employment First - 04/20/2019

~~“A critical priority for the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), is to invest in systems change efforts that result in increased community-based, integrated employment opportunities for individuals with significant disabilities. This priority reflects growing support for a national movement called Employment First, a framework for systems change that is centered on the premise that all citizens, including individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life.

Under this approach, publicly-financed systems are urged to align policies, service delivery practices, and reimbursement structures to commit to integrated employment as the priority option with respect to the use of publicly-financed day and employment services for youth and adults with significant disabilities. ODEP defines integrated employment as work paid directly by employers at the greater of minimum or prevailing wages with commensurate benefits, occurring in a typical work setting where the employee with a disability interacts or has the opportunity to interact continuously with co-workers without disabilities, has an opportunity for advancement and job mobility, and is preferably engaged full-time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Michigan "Better Off Working" - Disability Reform Work Group Strategic Plan - 08/01/2014

This report, developed by the Michigan Department of Human Services, Michigan Rehabilitation Services, Disability Determination Service, the Disability Network, and Michigan Employers, details goals to further the inclusive employment of individuals with disabilities in the state of Michigan. “The goals of the strategic plan include: “Coordinating government and private agency resources in cross-program settings to assist individuals with disabilities enter or return to the workforce.  Improving the health and well-being of individuals with disabilities by promoting work participation. De-emphasizing disability as a de facto public assistance program by refocusing on the goal of returning to work.”   
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wayne State University Developmental Disabilities Institute

"~~The Michigan Developmental Disabilities Institute (MI-DDI) is a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD). MI-DDI is part of a network of 67 UCEDDs in the U.S. and its territories. The Institute's mission is to contribute to the development of inclusive communities and quality of life for people with disabilities and their families through a culturally-sensitive, statewide program of interdisciplinary education, community support and services, and research and dissemination of information."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan Developmental Disabilities Council Five Year State Plan 2012-2016

Interagency Efforts around Supportive Employment Peer Mentor Pilot- “This pilot has involved the training of 22 individuals with DD to help others with DD to reach their life goals and increase their community involvement and self advocacy. The pilot has involved numerous workshops and trainings culminating with internships at the peer mentors local Community Mental Health. The vision of the planning workgroup is to develop a ‘Train the Trainer’ model so that the curriculum and lessons learned may be shared with other CMHSPs across the state.” “MDCH and MRS have developed a partnership to improve the employment outcomes for individuals with DD. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) has assisted with training peer mentors as well as sponsoring their attendance at numerous workshops.” “The Michigan Commission for the Blind has assisted with the coordination of a peer mentor’s internship.”   Interagency Efforts around Rehabilitative Services “MRS currently has interagency agreements with the Michigan Departments of Community Health, Education, Health and Human Services, as well as with Michigan Works! and Adult Literacy to help better serve Michigan’s citizens with disabilities.”  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan DHHS Regional Inclusive Community Coalitions

“A RICC is a local grassroots group of people that is funded and supported by the Michigan Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council). Members include people with disabilities, family members, friends, local advocates, community leaders and service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

IDEA Grant Funded Initiatives - 01/01/2018

“The Michigan Department of Education (MDE), Office of Special Education (OSE) established various Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Grant Funded Initiatives to enhance its support for special education in Michigan. IDEA Grant Funded Initiatives are funded by IDEA Part B and are awarded through the OSE.

 

IDEA Grant Funded Initiatives provide statewide assistance in advancing evidence-based practices to support diverse learners. Each initiative addresses different needs identified through state or federal mandates and stakeholder-based concerns.

 

IDEA Grant Funded Initiatives support a variety of stakeholders, including school districts and families of students with disabilities. Some examples of support include:

 

-Providing professional development and training.-Implementing proven programs in schools.-Producing or loaning materials for students.

-Disseminating critical guidance and information.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Data Sharing

“Employment First moving forward in Michigan” - 11/09/2017

“LANSING, — Michigan has been chosen to receive federal assistance and training to help implement its Employment First strategy, working to improve competitive integrated employment opportunities for Michiganders with disabilities.

 

The assistance comes from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy as part of its Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. Michigan received two designations from ODEP, providing the state with 300 hours of onsite and virtual assistance.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Lt. Governor Calley's Overview of Michigan Budget priority items "Employment First in Michigan" - 07/21/2017

~~“Employment First in Michigan:Employment First in Michigan is an initiative to promote opportunities for people with disabilities to gain competitive employment within an integrated setting and to engage organizations about the value of hiring people with disabilities. The final version of the budget included $500,000 in support of this initiative, helping promote and increase competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Michigan Project SEARCH - 06/01/2008

Project SEARCH is a business-led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration.  More specifically, it’s a one year high school transition program which provides training and education…Project SEARCH serves as a workforce alternative for students in their last years of school.  

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan DHHS Pathways to Potential

In an effort to help everyone find a path to their fullest potential, we created Pathways to Potential as a way to break down barriers and deliver services where people need them.   The Pathways approach targets five outcome areas: attendance, education, health, safety and self-sufficiency. It also relies on a number of support networks and partnerships to wrap their arms around children and families to help them succeed.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Michigan Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 40,500 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2013.  The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply.”

 

Goals Give consumers and families a central role in defining and implementing the systems changes necessary to realize the principle that money follows the person. Develop and establish within pilot sites a model for an integrated long-term care (LTC) system that supports money follows the person. Develop strategies within the State Plan and the current MI Choice waiver that support the principle of money follows the person. Develop alternatives to traditional models for nursing home care.   Activities Establish a Community Consortium for Advocacy and Technical Assistance to provide advocacy for LTC system change. Establish an LTC Community Roundtable to facilitate stakeholder involvement in planning. Analyze barriers to "money follows the person" and devise solutions, including waivers and State policy changes. Develop alternative uses for nursing facilities. Provide and support alternatives to traditional nursing care. Develop a model for nursing home transition and development of community support. Establish and implement the model at three pilot sites.
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan Rehabilitation Services

The goal for all funds used for Supported Employment Services is to help individuals whose disabilities and functional limitations have traditionally meant that they would not be able to successfully enter the labor market through competitive integrated employment. Priorities include, but are not limited to: •Increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities who receive Supported Employment services;

Use Title I funds for Supported Employment services to achieve the maximum number of quality employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities and a focus on youth;Build subject matter expertise to facilitate Supported Employment, Customized Employment and other evidenced-based practices;Increase Supported Employment training opportunities for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors, community rehabilitation service staff, families and individuals”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • WIOA

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) - 09/03/2019

~~“Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, as well as Arab and non-Arab, Chaldean, and South Asian communities in the greater Detroit area.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Islamic Organization of North America Mosque, Islamic Center of America, Macomb County Health Department, Congressional offices, Chaldean and Coptic churches, Jewish Family Service, HUDA Clinic, Luke Project 52 Clinic, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Regional Social Security offices, and Local businesses.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mr. Hassan JaberPhone: (313) 842-7010Email: hjaber@accesscommunity.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Genesee Health Plan Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Genesee Health Plan Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left-behind” populations; immigrant population; deaf and hard of hearing population, veterans; employees of small businesses and small business owners; federally recognized tribes; reentering incarcerated citizens.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Disability Network, Enroll America, First Presbyterian Church of Flint, Genesee Community Health Center, Genesee County Health Department, Ascension Genesys, Hamilton Community Health Network, Hurley Medical Center, McLaren Flint Hospital, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Michigan Medicaid/Medicare Assistance Program, Michigan State University Extension Valley Area Agency on Aging, The CRIM Fitness Foundation, and The Flint Registry.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:James Milanowski Phone: (810) 232-7740Email: jmilanowski@countyhealthplans.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan Works! Annual Conference Michigan Works! Association. (n.d.). Michigan Works! annual conference. - 01/01/2019

~~“2019 Michigan Works! Annual ConferenceSunday, September 8 - Tuesday, September 10Radisson Plaza Hotel & Suites // Kalamazoo Michigan’s signature workforce development conference offers dynamic keynote presentations, a wide array of professional development opportunities and plenty of time for networking.” 

Systems
  • Other

Michigan to get federal help in improving job opportunities for people with disabilities - 10/31/2017

“LANSING Michigan will receive federal help to put into practice a statewide strategy helping people with disabilities find jobs.

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley's office said Tuesday that Michigan will receive 300 hours of training, both in person and online, from the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy as part of a national effort called Employment First targeted at helping people with disabilities find employment. Michigan signed on to the effort in 2015 via an executive order that Calley signed. 

The program is intended to help create competitive and integrated job opportunities for disabled residents by encouraging employers to create such opportunities, as well as help state agencies that serve people with disabilities and workforce development purposes to coordinate policy goals.

The federal assistance is in the form of training and technical help, not funding, Calley spokeswoman Laura Biehl said. A news release from the Office of Disability Employment Policy indicates Michigan will receive training in capacity building and transitioning from school to work.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Resources: Notes from the APSE Executive Director - 03/22/2017

~~“This month, we're formally introducing two new tools developed to help your organization navigate the shifting political and policy landscape and strengthen your organization. Change can be managed for positive outcomes if you've got a solid plan and the right tools:From Workshops to Workplaces: Achieving the Goals of Employment First is a comprehensive eLearning course developed by APSE in response to a need expressed by agencies across the country. As the Employment First movement accelerates, federal regulations have asked agencies to change how they serve individuals with disabilities. Many organizations want to make the transition from a segregated service delivery model to integrated and community-based employment services. That's a major transformation. We couldn't find an in-person or online resource that lays out helpful tips and strategies in enough depth or detail. So we created one.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

MI DoE: Bridging the Special Education Career and Technical Education Divide - 05/01/2009

“The purpose of this white paper is to help secondary school administrators, teachers, and parents coordinate the programmatic requirements of Career and Technical Education (CTE) with those that govern the rights of students in Special Education programs and those with a 504 plan. This paper discusses the relevant laws governing both areas and potential for conflict, explores the positive impact that proper placement in a CTE program may have on a student with a disability, and proposes a solution that best supports the success of a student with a disability in secondary and postsecondary CTE programs. This success requires the collaboration of CTE and Special Education personnel, the understanding of the student’s disability and abilities, and the appropriate recommendation for proper placement in a CTE program.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Wayne State University Developmental Disabilities Institute - Training and Events Calendar

"The DDI Training and Events Calendar shows the training events, conferences, talks and other opportunities being hosted or sponsored by DDI.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Muskegon Family Care to Pay $21,500 to Settle EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 02/23/2017

“According to the EEOC’s lawsuit, Avis Lane worked for Muskegon Family Care as an outreach-enrollment coordinator. Before she began work, the company required that she submit to a post-offer, pre-employment physical. The medical specialist who conducted that physical recommended that Lane be put on a medical hold due to medications she was taking. Notwithstanding the recommended medical hold, the company allowed Lane to work for over a month. Eventually, Muskegon Family Care fired her based on the recommended medical hold, the EEOC said.

 

Firing an employee on the basis of disability violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). And an employer is liable for the actions of its agent, such as a medical specialist who conducts pre-employment physicals. EEOC filed its lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Michigan (EEOC v. M.G.H. Family Health Center d/b/a Muskegon Family Care, Civil Case No.: 15-952) after first attempting to reach a pre-litigation settlement through its conciliation process.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Medicaid Provider Manual - 04/01/2020

“The following documents comprise the Michigan Medicaid Provider Manual, and address all health insurance programs administered by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS). MDHHS also issues periodic bulletins as changes are implemented to the policies and/or processes described in the manual. Bulletins are incorporated into the online version of the manual on a quarterly basis.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals - 12/17/2019

“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approves Michigan’s MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals, authorized under sections 1915(c) and 1915(b)(1) of the Social Security Act (the Act) respectively. This letter replaced the approval letter issued on December 13, 2019…

These section 1915(c) and 1915(b) MI HealthLink waivers are effective for a five year period beginning January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2024 and operate concurrently…

Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MI Choice Waiver Program - 12/01/2019

“Revisions to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual

Effective December 1, 2019, revisions were made to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter which result in policy and program changes. Many changes are the result of policy changes approved by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) during the MI Choice Waiver renewal process. Additional changes were made to provide clarification on certain topics. Please see the Medical Services Administration Bulletin, MSA 19-17 for a list of updates and the updated MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The following documents comprise the Michigan Medicaid Provider Manual, and address all health insurance programs administered by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS).MDHHS also issues periodic bulletins as changes are implemented to the policies and/or processes described in the manual. Bulletins are incorporated into the online version of the manual on a quarterly basis. ” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Revised Statewide Transition Plan for Home and Community-Based Services; released for additional public comment” - 12/01/2016

“In 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released a new rule for Home and Community-Based Services waivers to promote enhanced quality of services and personal protections for residents with disabilities or other health issues. Today, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) released its Statewide Transition Plan for additional public comment. MDHHS provides home and Community-Based Services to individuals in the Medicaid program to help Michigan residents with disabilities or other health issues live at home or in the community. Michigan offers many of these services through waivers, which were approved by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Michigan’s Statewide Transition Plan for Home and Community-Based Services - 12/01/2016

“The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) offers a wide range of home and community-based services and supports to improve the health and well-being of Michigan residents. Many of these home and community-based services are offered through Medicaid waiver programs. MDHHS has created several waiver programs to provide services to Michigan residents who have aging -related needs, disabilities, or other health issues. Individuals in these programs receive services in their own homes and/or communities rather than being served in an institutional setting.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Reports in WSA for the Habilitation Support Waiver (HSW) - 10/05/2016

“HCBS Rule: Intent a) to ensure that individuals receiving long-term services and supports through home and community based service (HCBS) programs under the 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915 (k) b) and to enhance the quality of HCBS and provide protections to participants.(CMS, 2014)”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1915(i) State plan Home and Community Based Services Administration and Operation - 09/30/2016

“The §1915(i) State Plan Amendment ABA service will operate within the §1915(b) Managed Specialty Services & Supports Program (MSS&SP), which also includes the concurrent §1915(c) Habilitation Supports Waiver. For more than a decade, the PIHPs have been responsible per the approved §1915(b)/(c) waivers and the MDCH/PIHP contract for 1) determining eligibility for mental health State Plan, additional [(b)(3)] and §1915(c) home and community based services (HCBS); 2) maintaining a provider network of qualified providers; 3) assuring the delivery of all medically necessary mental health State Plan, additional and 1915(c) HCBS to Medicaid beneficiaries; 4) maintaining the mandated organization structure and administrative services for managed care plan, including Customer Service, Grievance & Appeals, Quality Assessment & Performance Improvement Program (QAPIP) and Service & Utilization Management.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Michigan Medicaid State Plan - 07/01/2016

The Michigan Medicaid State Plan is an agreement between the state and federal government that identifies the general health care services, reimbursement, and eligibility policies in effect under Michigan Medicaid. It is the basis for the federal government (CMS/HHS) to pay its federal financial participation (FFP) for the program's operation. The plan is written on a more general level than contained in program policy.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Michigan State HCBS Transition Plan - 03/15/2016

In 2014, the Federal Government issued a new rule for Medicaid waiver programs that pay for home and community-based services. The goal of the new rule is to ensure that individuals who receive home and community-based services are an equal part of the community and have the same access to the community as people who do not receive Medicaid waiver services. The MDHHS must assess Michigan waiver programs and transition each program into compliance with new rule.    MDHHS developed a Statewide Transition Plan (STP) to outline the transition process for Michigan Medicaid waiver programs.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Employers in the Great Lakes State know you can "Give Your Business the Upper Hand" in Michigan by creating job opportunities for workers with disabilities to reach their full potential and live the lives they choose.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Michigan’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2017 to 2018
9,995,915
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.46%
Change from
2017 to 2018
730,791
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.08%
Change from
2017 to 2018
259,363
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.65%
Change from
2017 to 2018
35.49%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.72%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.65%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 9,928,300 9,962,311 9,995,915
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 764,334 727,451 730,791
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 254,334 246,196 259,363
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,042,733 4,106,166 4,128,006
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.28% 33.84% 35.49%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.35% 77.09% 77.65%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90% 4.60% 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.70% 21.80% 21.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.80% 12.90% 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 693,065 670,112 678,980
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 730,326 720,198 728,739
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,099,891 1,078,912 1,098,144
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 238,754 235,280 233,479
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 52,499 51,272 50,537
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 10,757 11,410 10,253
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 16,032 13,560 17,919
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 333 299 575
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 43,925 40,081 35,067
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 13,699 10,768 12,282

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 13,620 14,154 14,401
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.30% 5.50% 5.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 346,000 341,200 334,642

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 21,634 18,521 19,479
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 62,706 70,782 75,923
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 169,872 142,442 145,811
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 12.70% 13.00% 13.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.20% 3.90% 3.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.30% 2.10% 1.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.30% 4.80% 4.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,303 2,824 3,648
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,305 1,518 1,279
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 4,469 3,422 3,914
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 13,105 12,064 11,432
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 156 132 109
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 117 116 86
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 75.00% 88.00% 79.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.18 1.17 0.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
11,440
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 64 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 2,473 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,063 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 3,443 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,767 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,630 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 38.80% 36.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,033 7,444 7,474
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 538,310 534,332 529,956
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 201 174 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 497 383 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $25,299,000 $27,242,000 $29,223,562
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $38,584,000 $46,790,000 $37,185,858
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $36,195,000 $47,081,000 $37,398,586
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $57,051,000 $36,344,000 $55,648,528
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00% 26.00% 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 6,465 13,634 12,880
Number of people served in facility based work. 4,920 4,458 3,290
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,824 4,880 3,553
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 42.80 44.80 43.89

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.39% 66.89% 67.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.86% 10.90% 11.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 5.16% 4.96% 4.83%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 78.34% 81.23% 81.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 32.36% 32.56% 29.18%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 63.31% 62.96% 64.85%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 76.82% 76.93% 77.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.95% 30.40% 35.67%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 4,169,358
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 6,288
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 631,296
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,489,918
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 2,121,213
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 964
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,300
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,264
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,129,959
AbilityOne wages (services). $21,448,161

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 2 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 28 34 25
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 30 37 27
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 39 19
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 30 26 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 4,329 5,184 3,103
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,360 5,249 3,122

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Employment First. Executive Order 2015-15 established Employment First in Michigan. It sets forth a mission to establish the expectation and promote opportunities for all working-age individuals with disabilities in Michigan to gain competitive employment within an integrated setting, with or without supports, and to engage businesses and organizations that value the contributions of employees with disabilities. All state departments and agencies that provide services and support to persons with disabilities, and all state departments and agencies that provide employment, economic development, or other related services, shall implement Employment First in Michigan by coordinating efforts and collaborating to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures, and funding support competitive employment within an integrated setting as the first priority and optimal outcome for persons with disabilities. (Pages 83-84) Title I

Michigan is an Employment First state and Michigan Rehabilitation Services is working closely with multiple stakeholders to improve employment outcomes for customers with disabilities. Several workgroups have formed, one of which focuses on school-to work improvement outcomes for students with disabilities. Technical assistance is being provided by TransCen, Inc. Career and Workforce Development, to implement the seamless transition model. (Page 256) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services is aligned with agency and community partners as part of the Employment First initiative in Michigan. This initiative’s purpose is to promote diversity and inclusive employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This is achieved by engaging businesses regarding the value employees with disabilities bring to their organizations. (Page 265) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services, Michigan Department of Education, the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration and other stakeholders are participating in Employment First efforts to improve competitive integrated employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities. These efforts, along with the newly signed Memorandum of Understanding, are designed to improve Supported Employment programming and outcomes. (Page 315) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~Vocational Rehabilitation is exploring ways to develop staff/vendor skills in customized employment and to export appropriate training across the state. (Page 113) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services has updated its policy manual to align with Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act mandates. This includes guidance for the provision of Extended Services for youth populations with the most significant disabilities. Extended Services may be provided for up to 4 years. In addition, Customized Employment is clarified within the policy as a Vocational Rehabilitation service option. (Page 264) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services established a Memorandum of Understanding with the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration to ensure individuals with developmental disabilities who are dually eligible for both agencies’ programs have
collaborative supports and services toward competitive integrated employment outcomes. The Memorandum of Understanding outlines the coordination of services, including Extended Services, Supported Employment, and Customized Employment. (Pages 266-267) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services offers statewide Supported Employment services, including Customized Employment, for individuals and youth with the most significant disabilities reach competitive integrated employment outcomes. Michigan Rehabilitation Services updated its policy manual to align with WIOA mandates. (Page 314) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services builds on the person-centered planning process used by local community mental health providers to develop quality individualized plans for employment. This includes required services and supports, service providers, Supported Employment goal, and may include Extended Service providers. Individualized services provided include, but are not limited to: individual community-based placement; trial work experiences; psychosocial rehabilitation via clubhouse programs; job coaching; job referral; Customized Employment; job development; job placement; and long-term follow along (including natural supports). (Page 315) Title IV

Customized employment of persons who are blind or visually impaired is paramount to every placement. The unique needs and accommodations that BSBP consumers may require lends itself heavily to customization. BSBP works closely with Community Rehabilitation Programs or fee for service vendors where we purchase service in order to assist them in understanding the complex needs of BSBP’s consumer base. BSBP’s Training Center provides blindness specific training to community partners to assist in the education and training of service providers. This practice speaks to the customization of the employment process. (Page 338) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Jobs Strategy: Our jobs strategy is integrated into the Governor’s overall strategic plan for Michigan’s reinvention. Michigan’s primary workforce development strategy is a demand-driven system that focuses on aligning all efforts, initiatives, programs, and funding around key industry clusters. This strategy includes the alignment of policies, operations, and administrative systems to avoid duplication of workforce programs and activities, as well as providing a way to leverage discretionary funding and formula-based investment across all programs. Our collaboration with workforce agencies, employers, economic developers, post-secondary education providers, and other partners with shared interests provides us with opportunities to leverage partner funds for services not funded under the WIOA. Our workforce programs are being implemented with innovation and efficiency in mind to deliver results-driven training and services in order to provide more and better jobs, assist employers with their workforce training needs, and revitalize our education system to better prepare youth. (Page 7) Title I

Our vision encompasses key actions related to workforce employment, training and educational programs as identified in the Governor’s strategy for Michigan’s reinvention. Key actions included:
• Creating WIOA planning regions across the State, thereby allowing local areas to devote their resources to leverage State resources that help create more and better jobs and training, (Page 74) Title I

Collaboration with other State of Michigan departments and agencies includes Michigan Rehabilitation Services, the Bureau of Services for Blind Persons, the Michigan Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Civil Rights among other state agencies, the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, and the Advisory Council on Deaf and Hard of Hearing align disability related programs by linking the state’s workforce and economic development agendas. To achieve necessary collaboration, the workgroup is moving forward with the formation of an ad hoc committee to identify and address the needs of individuals with disabilities and those agencies and respective services that can be leveraged for the purpose of putting qualified individuals back to work.  (Page 107) Title I

How the State will leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Michigan Rehabilitation Services is working to leverage other public and private funds by working strategically with Michigan businesses to expand the array of services to business through innovative approaches. Proposed strategies include:
o Assigning staff to specific businesses, providing customized services including Supported Employment. 
o Expanding community work experience options for transition youth with significant disabilities to create Supported Employment opportunities. 
o Aligning the business community with educational partners to provide additional resources, funding, and innovative programming through cooperative agreements and Memorandums of Understanding.
These strategies will assist Michigan Rehabilitation Services in leveraging resources for Extended Services and expanding Supported Employment. (Page 299) Title IV

How the State will leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities.
When BSBP consumers who are receiving Medicaid funding and who are receiving services from Community Mental Health agencies can leverage those resources to receive extended services. (Page 350) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Bureau’s Staff Developmental Unit subscribes and shares, as appropriate, information, facts, materials, news and reports from resources such as the Institute on Rehabilitation Issues (IRI), the National Center for Rehabilitation Training Materials (NCRTM) and The LEAD which is a collaborative of disability, workforce and economic empowerment organizations dedicated to improving employment and economic advancement outcomes for all people with disabilities. In addition, information is posted using the Bureau’s Knowledge Management System and Online Learning Center known as eLearn. (Page 272) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~The Project SEARCH program is one initiative launched by the State of Michigan to promote Executive Directive 2014-1. Project SEARCH is a one-year internship for students with disabilities, ages 18-26, ready for their last year of high school and with a goal of competitive employment. The purpose is to provide both classroom training and real-life work experience to prepare students for employment following completion of the program. Nine state departments have identified internships and two additional departments have expressed an interest in hosting an intern during the 2018-2019 school year. Options, including the establishment of a Project SEARCH Worker classification, are being considered to allow for permanent placement of interns upon successful completion of the program. (Page 91) Title I

Bureau of Services for Blind Persons is working with the One Stop centers to provide services to Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) students and youth in order to allow for summer work experiences and the development of work based learning. We know that that this is an ongoing area where partnership is needed as the relationships vary in intensity across the state. (Page 92) Title IV

VR is also participating in an Office of Disability Employment Policy grant that is supporting four pilot sites in Michigan with the goal of Students with Disabilities achieving competitive integrated employment prior to exiting secondary education. The four pilot sites are utilizing a collaborative approach involving core partners where education and adult agencies (for example: Vocational Rehabilitation and Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration) provide early intervention and work experiences while the student is still in secondary education. (Page 93) Title IV

Pathways to Potential -- This human services program focuses on three critical elements: going into the community to where the individual is located, working one-on-one with families to identify and remove barriers and serve as connectors to a network of services, and engaging community partners and school personnel in efforts to help families find their pathway to success. Michigan Rehabilitation Services partners with Pathways to Potential to connect students with disabilities and their family members with disabilities to vocational rehabilitation services leading to competitive integrated employment. (Page 254) Title IV

To comply with the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act, Michigan Rehabilitation Services is collaborating with the Michigan Department of Education to update the Memorandum of Understanding. This agreement lays out how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education partner to provide a coordinated set of activities to facilitate a seamless transition of students with disabilities from school to competitive integrated employment.
The Memorandum of Understanding focuses on mandates for transition services described in the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004). This includes how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education will collaborate to fulfill mandates on behalf of students with disabilities. Key elements of the partnership are stated in the agreement and include: Authority; Purpose; Pre-Employment Transition Services Required Activities; Consultation and Technical Assistance; Transition Planning; Outreach and Identification of Students with Disabilities; Section 511 Subminimum Wage; Assurance; and Provision of Services and Reimbursement. (Page 255) Title IV

Michigan is an Employment First state and Michigan Rehabilitation Services is working closely with multiple stakeholders to improve employment outcomes for customers with disabilities. Several workgroups have formed, one of which focuses on school-to work improvement outcomes for students with disabilities. Technical assistance is being provided by TransCen, Inc. Career and Workforce Development, to implement the seamless transition model. (Page 256) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides Pre-Employment Transition Services to students with disabilities prior to, and after application. Approximately 30 counselors have been hired to provide Pre-Employment Transition Services prior to application.
Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided by Michigan Rehabilitation Services counselors for students who are interested in and need the program. Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided prior to application and during the stages of the vocational rehabilitation process which include: application, eligibility determination, and Individualized Plan for Employment. Transition and general counselors may serve customers meeting the definition of a student with a disability.
Michigan Rehabilitation Services coordinated with educational partners to deliver contracted Pre-Employment Transition Services through Michigan’s Centers for Independent Living. In addition, local district offices are coordinating with educational partners to develop Pre-Employment Transition Services programs to be provided by community rehabilitation organizations and other qualified vendors. (Page 256) Title IV

• Project SEARCH -Michigan currently has 16 Project Search sites impacting approximately 100 students with disabilities per year. Project SEARCH is a business-led model allowing students with disabilities in their last year of secondary education to participate in three unpaid internships at a business in their community for school credit. The goal of the program is for students to become employed at the host business or another business in the community after completion. Project SEARCH funding was an outcome of the 2013 Mental Health and Wellness Commission report recommending expansion of a minimum of 3 additional Project SEARCH sites per year. Michigan Rehabilitation Services has received dedicated Project SEARCH funds to support the expansion of new sites. The funding is used to provide technical assistance from Project SEARCH to Michigan and to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
• Post-secondary Education Rehabilitation Transition (PERT) Program -The PERT program is a one week comprehensive vocational and independent living assessment offered in a semi-structured residential environment at Michigan Career and Technical Institute for students enrolled in secondary education. In summer of 2017, 144 students with disabilities participated in the program. Students reside in dormitories, giving them the experience of independent living. After completion, students return to their local school districts where information they have learned is document in their Individualized Education Program.

This past year, the PERT program has been offered in local communities as a pilot. One benefit of making the program portable is more students can participate in the assessment process as they are not required to travel and stay on campus of Michigan Career and Technical Institute to participate.

• Pathways to Potential -This human services program focuses on three critical elements: going into the community to where the individual is located, working one-on-one with families to identify and remove barriers and serve as connectors to a network of services, and engaging community partners and school personnel in efforts to help families find their pathway to success. Michigan Rehabilitation Services partners with Pathways to Potential to connect students with disabilities and their family members with disabilities to vocational rehabilitation services leading to competitive integrated employment.
• Seamless Transition -The seamless transition model targets students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. A collaborative approach is used to prepare and support students with the outcome of competitive integrated employment prior to exit from secondary education. (Page 257-258) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides consultation and technical assistance to Michigan Department of Education and local educational agencies to assist in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, employment-related activities, Pre-Employment Transition Services and other vocational rehabilitation. Consultation and technical assistance may include, but is not limited to, the following topics:
•Disability awareness
•Accommodations and assistive technology
•MDHHS Michigan Rehabilitation Services application, eligibility, and services
•Community-based services
•Independent living
•Career Pathways
•Competitive integrated employment (Page 259) Title I

Transition planning occurs between the student/family/guardian, education staff and Michigan Rehabilitation Services staff to enhance the development of Individualized Education Programs. The Michigan Department of Education and Michigan Rehabilitation Services Memorandum of Understanding clarifies Michigan Rehabilitation Services staff will attend student Individualized Education Program meetings when invited. Educational partners are encouraged to provide advance notice, communicate and coordinate IEP meetings to ensure Michigan Rehabilitation Services staff are available to attend. (Page 260) Title IV

Transition counselors are connected to transition coordinators in each intermediate school district in the state. The counselors work in collaboration with transition coordinators, as well as other education staff, to identify students interested in pursuing competitive integrated employment who require vocational rehabilitation services. Students with disabilities are referred to Michigan Rehabilitation Services through this process.
In addition, Section 504 students are provided information about Michigan Rehabilitation Services by education staff, Michigan Rehabilitation Services marketing publications, informational meetings, and one-on-one meetings. If students are determined eligible, Michigan Rehabilitation Services works with the student and the family/guardian as appropriate to move through the rehabilitation process with the goal of competitive integrated employment. (Page 262) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services works extensively to provide Pre-Employment Transition Services and transition services for students with disabilities. Every Michigan Rehabilitation Services district has at least two assigned Pre-Employment Transition Services counselors and a Business Relations Consultant. Staff work to identify opportunities of Pre-Employment Transition Services, focusing on work-based-learning experiences, at local businesses. (Page 265) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services values the achievement of competitive integrated employment so that people with disabilities can be independent. Postsecondary education and job training beyond secondary education is critical to the achievement of independence for many people with disabilities. Through the provision of pre-employment transition services which allows for a continuum of developmental experiences, Michigan Rehabilitation Services will be able to help students (and their guardians) be better informed and prepared to choose careers. (Page 307) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services transfers customers receiving Supported Employment to extended services once stabilization has occurred. The customer is considered to have achieved stabilization when the counselor, with input from the job coach/employment specialist, employer and individual, confirms that: (1) initial intensive services identified on the IPE have resulted in the individual demonstrating acceptable job performance and (2) a reasonable expectation satisfactory job performance will be maintained with the individual based on ongoing support services being provided. (Page 316) Title IV

A BSBP Transition Specialist has been hired to assist the Transition Services Manager, field counselors and the BSBP Training Center in developing and implementing new Pre-ETS programs as well as provide Pre-ETS services to students who are visually impaired. BSBP has VR counselors and Vision Rehabilitation Therapists assigned geographically to each ISD and Local Educational Authority (LEA). The VR counselor works closely with teacher consultants for the visually impaired to identify students who would benefit from Pre-ETS and/or Vocational Rehabilitation Services through outreach and the BSBP Youth Low Vision Program. (Page 331) Title IV

BSBP will provide Pre-ETS not only to students with disabilities who have applied for vocational rehabilitation services but also to those students with disabilities who have not applied for services. If a student needs a service that goes beyond the scope of Pre-ETS and such additional service is listed on the student's approved IPE, BSBP will pay for those costs with non-reserved VR funds. If a student applies for a VR case, the Counselor establishes eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services within 60 days of the VR application being signed. The VR Counselor works with the student and parents to develop an IPE outlining the VR services necessary to assist the student in obtaining competitive integrated employment. The eligibility criteria for services must be met before plan development. The IEP, along with the IPE, are instruments that identify education, transition, and employment goals and objectives. The services outlined in the IEP are cooperatively agreed upon by the schools or educational facilities, parent/student, other relevant agencies and the rehabilitation agency; thereby establishing the objectives of the transition plan. (Pages 331-332) Title IV

Not all eligible or potentially eligible students with disabilities will require all five required pre-employment transition services, however, all should receive all needed services, as determined through informed choice and consultation with each student based on their strengths and needs and consistent with their IEP, when applicable.  (Page 336) Title IV

Students who are blind or visually impaired benefit from services designed to enhance Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) outcomes by receiving work based learning, work based readiness, career exploration counseling, instruction in self advocacy and counseling on opportunities for enrollment in post-secondary education. BSBP’s assessment suggests that early intervention implementing the above services leads to stronger vocational direction and outcomes that are focused on demand driven occupations. BSBP is gathering data as the implementation of WIOA drives this early intervention in order to obtain evidence based practice to substantiate the benefit of providing these early services. BSBP aligns with IDEA by participating in the IEP process, participating and conducting person centered plans and post-secondary planning. (Page 345) Title IV

BSBP provides appropriate Pre-ETS services and/or VR services to potentially eligible students or students who are eligible as early as age 14. BSBP attends IEPs, person-centered planning meetings, consultations with school staff including transition coordinators for the purpose of providing education and training for students and families regarding the opportunities for services that can enhance CIE outcomes. The ability to provide the five Pre-Employment Transition services categories and the four coordination services along with the nine authorized categories when appropriate can create an opportunity for great success. Examples are provision of work-based learning experiences that allow students to engage with employers, including learning soft skills. Providing the opportunity to visit college, and vocational programs to understand the expectations and plan with their family and counselor how to incorporate those into their career plan. (Page 353) Title IV

BSBP transfers customers receiving Support Employment to extended services once stabilization has occurred. The customer is considered to have achieved stabilization when the counselor, with input from the job coach/employment specialist, employer and individual, confirms that: 1) initial intensive services identified on the IPE have resulted in the individual demonstrating acceptable job performance, and 2) a reasonable expectation of satisfactory job performance will be maintained with the individual based on ongoing support services being provided. (Page 359) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Both VR agencies have collaborated to provide disability sensitivity training to front-line Michigan Works! staff and ADAAG (ADA Architectural Guidelines) evaluations. The purpose for the training and evaluations support Section 188 of WIOA which prohibits the exclusion of an individual from participation in, denial of the benefits of, discrimination in, or denial of employment in the administration of or in connection with, any programs and activities funded or otherwise financially assisted in whole or in part under Title I of WIOA because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or political affiliation or belief, or for beneficiaries, applicants, and participants only, on the basis of citizenship status, or participation in a program or activity that receives financial assistance under Title I of WIOA. For example, the most effective implementation of a strategic approach to address Section 188 has occurred in the Michigan Works! Macomb/St. Clair where a subcommittee under the Workforce Development Board was established specific to serving individuals with disabilities, the VR agencies serve as members on this subcommittee. Intense technical assistance from Michigan Rehabilitation Services/BSBP was provided to all of the offices within this Michigan Works! Office. (Page 92) Title I

Michigan Works! Service Centers must be inclusive of all customers to be effective. Inclusion honors and accommodates diversity. A universally accessible system requires meeting the diverse customer needs that exist within the local delivery area, which includes the needs of individuals with disabilities, people of different cultures, and persons with barriers to employment. Where inclusion abounds, centers are welcoming, inviting, accommodating, and accessible to everyone. As recipients of federal funds, Michigan Works! Agencies are required to comply with various regulations relating to non— discrimination, equal opportunity, and inclusion. The most critical of these regulations are: 
Section 188 of the WIOA.
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1998, as amended.
Titles I and II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (Page 156) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides consultation and technical assistance to Michigan Department of Education and local educational agencies to assist in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, employment-related activities, Pre-Employment Transition Services and other vocational rehabilitation. Consultation and technical assistance may include, but is not limited to, the following topics:
•Disability awareness
•Accommodations and assistive technology
•MDHHS Michigan Rehabilitation Services application, eligibility, and services
•Community-based services
•Independent living
•Career Pathways
•Competitive integrated employment (Page 259) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The provision of VR services to assist businesses to obtain qualified talent includes: •Talent Development including no cost recruitment and paid internships and apprenticeships •Reasonable Accommodations/Ergonomic Intervention to develop strategies for Workers with Physical, Cognitive and/or Behavioral Disabilities •Connections to partner assets and services •Job Analysis for performance elements and requirements •Risk management/Staff Retention •Injury Prevention and Wellness Programming •ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Services (Page 70) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Cooperation with Social Security Administration and Michigan Rehabilitation Services regional and local district offices to assist dually eligible customers receiving disability benefits in the use of Social Security work incentives and return to work efforts. Each Michigan Rehabilitation Services office has a dedicated champion for addressing unique needs of Social Security Administration recipients. These include Michigan Rehabilitation Services’ internal (online) eLearn system which contains information regarding:
o Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program and work incentives,
o Resource and referral available through the Social Security Administration’s Work Incentive Planning and Assistance project in serving Michigan communities,
o Referral to Beneficiary Access and Support Services as contracted with the Social Security Administration,
o Social Security Administration Work Incentive Liaisons available through local Social Security Administration offices, and Michigan Rehabilitation Services fee-for-service vendors. (Page 251) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Data Collection

According to the Fiscal Year 2016 RSA-911 data, 89% of customers were determined eligible for services and exited Michigan Rehabilitation Services during Fiscal Year 2016 were significantly or most significantly disabled; 65% were most significantly disabled. Customers with the following characteristics were more likely to be determined to have a most significant disability: racial/ethnic minority, students or youth, attendance or completion in special education certificate program, and Social Security beneficiaries. In addition, a higher proportion of customers with cognitive or psychiatric impairments were determined to be most significantly disabled. (Page 279) Title IV

511

~~VR is developing a coordinated process with State and local educational agencies in assisting individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities who are considering subminimum wage employment or who are already employed, at a subminimum wage, to maximize opportunities to achieve competitive integrated employment through services provided by VR and the local educational agencies. (Pages 97-98) Title I

To comply with the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act, Michigan Rehabilitation Services is collaborating with the Michigan Department of Education to update the Memorandum of Understanding. This agreement lays out how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education partner to provide a coordinated set of activities to facilitate a seamless transition of students with disabilities from school to competitive integrated employment. 
The Memorandum of Understanding focuses on mandates for transition services described in the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004). This includes how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education will collaborate to fulfill mandates on behalf of students with disabilities. Key elements of the partnership are stated in the agreement and include: Authority; Purpose; Pre-Employment Transition Services Required Activities; Consultation and Technical Assistance; Transition Planning; Outreach and Identification of Students with Disabilities; Section 511 Subminimum Wage; Assurance; and Provision of Services and Reimbursement. (Page 255) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides career counseling and information and referral services for individual with disabilities employed at subminimum wages. Individuals with disabilities are provided information and resources on competitive integrated employment initiatives designed to transition employees from sub minimum to competitive integrated employment. (Page 265) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Michigan Works! Service Centers must be inclusive of all customers to be effective. Inclusion honors and accommodates diversity. A universally accessible system requires meeting the diverse customer needs that exist within the local delivery area, which includes the needs of individuals with disabilities, people of different cultures, and persons with barriers to employment. Where inclusion abounds, centers are welcoming, inviting, accommodating, and accessible to everyone. As recipients of federal funds, Michigan Works! Agencies are required to comply with various regulations relating to non— discrimination, equal opportunity, and inclusion. The most critical of these regulations are: Section 188 of the WIOA. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1998, as amended. Titles I and II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (Page 156) Title I

Each year, the Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity, in conjunction with the Michigan Works! Association, hosts a Multi—State Equal Opportunity Officers training seminar. Representatives from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the U.S. Department of Labor Civil Rights Center conduct the training. The training focused on social media and employment discrimination, discrimination complaint, investigative techniques, asking telling, using and storing disability related information, recognizing hidden disabilities and identifying strategies to assist individuals, assistive technologies, and web accessibility guidelines. (Page 157) Title IV

The Michigan Works! Service Center certification criteria policy provides guidance on accessibility of our One-Stop delivery system and our Wagner-Peyser Employment Services Manual provides information about the requirements of posters and other materials to be displayed at Michigan Works! Service Centers. The Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity staff monitor Service Centers for compliance with certification criteria as part of WIOA programmatic reviews. The goal of programmatic reviews is to provide technical assistance, as appropriate, and ensure that established policies, procedures, and systems of the Michigan Works! Agency achieve quality program outcomes that meet the requirements and objectives of the WIOA and federal and state regulations. This program review is in addition to the WIOA fiscal compliance monitoring, and thereby ensures the state will meet program design, as required by the WIOA. (Page 159) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services’ Assistive Technology Consultant sits on the Assistive Technology Advisory Council for Michigan’s Assistive Technology Act’s program. The AT consultant will be responsible for; but not limited to: o Establishing a baseline and provide reports to reflect; program accessibility and progress and effectiveness of AT program/project implementation. o Ensuring accessibility throughout the vocational process that align with ADAAG and assessing the means in which the services are delivered (i.e. -Online orientation, web base outreach, and physical office locations) o Identify and assist in training curriculums ensuring for consistent practices across the Agency and interactions with partners. o Develop a network of resources for the state to address: o Delivery, education and reinforcement of AT Training for participates. o Secure Demonstration Equipment for trial and training use. o Provides Businesses with a Subject Matter Expert to assist with AT implementation and Training for newly acquired employees and retention of current employees with disabilities. o Develop a web-based inventory and exchange protocol to be utilized by the Agency and participates. (Pages 305-306) Title IV

Vets

The State of Michigan continues using the Talent Acquisition Portal — an online tool providing access to a centralized pool of individuals with disabilities, including disabled veterans, at the local, state and national level. MRS has committed to funding TAP access for state agencies for 18 months. TAP has both a national talent pool of Vocational Rehabilitation candidates looking for employment and a job-posting system for businesses looking to hire individuals with disabilities. TAP is led by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation, the National Employment Team (NET) and disABLEDperson, Inc. TAP allows employers to post jobs, search candidate resumes based on skill sets and geographic availability, capture job metrics, generate compliance and application quick reports, interview candidates, have online job fairs, and have their jobs seen by individuals with disabilities across the country. Employers also benefit from VR counselors and qualified candidates searching available opportunities. (Page 91) Title I

Assure that veteran’s preference and priority are strictly observed by giving covered persons (eligible veterans and eligible spouses) employment and training opportunities ahead or instead of non—covered persons in accordance with the requirements of Priority of Service. In addition, veterans, transitioning service members, and eligible spouses may be qualified for intensive services provided by Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists. Both DVOP Specialists and Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are integral, collocated partners in the Michigan Works! Service Centers. (Page 127) Title I

Priority of service is in effect at all times, not just when funds are limited. Priority is given in the following order: 78. First, to veterans and eligible spouses who are also funded in the groups are given statutory priority for WIOA adult formula funds. This means that veterans and eligible spouses who are also recipients of public assistance, other low-income individuals, or individuals who are basic skills deficient would receive first priority of services with the WIOA adult formula funds. 79. Second, to non-covered persons (that is, individuals who are not veterans or eligible spouses) who are included in the WIOA’s priority groups. 80. Third, to veterans and eligible spouses who are not included in the WIOA’s priority groups. 81. Last, to non-covered persons outside the groups given priority under the WIOA. (Page 154) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grant provides funding to support Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists and Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives. Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists provide intensive, one-on-one employment services exclusively to program-eligible veterans and spouses who possess a significant barrier to employment and/or are part of a population group identified as eligible. The purpose of the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists’ services is to assist the client in becoming job ready so they can secure employment utilizing the public workforce system. Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists do not interact with employers, nor engage in direct placement, and rely on their Michigan Works! Agency One-Stop partners to assist their job ready clients to secure appropriate employment. (Pages 154-155) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans State Grants is a fully integrated partner in our Michigan Works! Agency One-Stop Centers. All veterans and spouses of veterans seeking services at our One-Stop Centers will receive appropriate services from all One-Stop partners as would any other job seeker, but with priority of Service for veterans and eligible spouses applied. Prior to receiving services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants, a veteran or spouse of a veteran is first assessed by a non-Jobs for Veterans State Grants One-Stop worker prior to referral. (Page 155) Title I

The Veterans Services team also provides guidance to Service Center staff on how to identify and refer a veteran to a Disabled Veteran Outreach Worker for intensive case management services. (Page 198) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services continues Memorandum of Understanding with the Veterans Administration to provide coordinated services to returning veterans with disabilities. This agreement clarifies services not be duplicated, but are complimentary in assisting eligible veterans achieve meaningful employment, in accordance with the laws and regulations governing each entity. Bureau liaisons are identified to assist in coordinating cooperative employment plans. Cross training has been provided to ensure understanding of both federal programs. (Page 253) Title I

Additionally, facility improvements will allow MCTI to enhance occupational training programs to maximize opportunities for the following populations identified in the 2017 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. • Individuals with mental illness • Students and youth with disabilities (formerly Transition Youth) • Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders • Cultural minority residents with disabilities • Individuals with sensory disabilities • Veterans with disabilities• Other underserved groups (Page 301) Title IV

Mental Health

~~In 2017, Michigan Rehabilitation Services and Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration revised and improved a longstanding Memorandum of Understanding between the two agencies. This updated agreement details Michigan Rehabilitation Services’ increased focus on both Supported Employment and the provision of Extended Services as detailed within Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

The Memorandum of Understanding focuses on individuals with developmental and/or intellectual disabilities and is delivered locally. Specific local partnership agreements are developed between Community Mental Health service providers, Michigan Rehabilitation Services, and may also include community rehabilitation organizations and local school districts. The local partnership agreements include Community Mental Health funding that allows Michigan Rehabilitation Services to capture federal match funds. These funds are used to provide Supported Employment services throughout Community Mental Health service areas. These local agreements include goals, objectives, responsibilities, and expectations for delivering Supported Employment and Extended Services. (Page 263) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services established a Memorandum of Understanding with the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration to ensure individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness who are dually eligible for both agencies’ programs have collaborative supports and services toward competitive integrated employment outcomes. The Memorandum of Understanding outlines the coordination of services, including Extended Services, Supported Employment, and Customized Employment.
Michigan Rehabilitation Services collaborates with Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration in the development of the Individual Placement and Supports model. This model promotes early engagement in employment activities for individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness express an interest in competitive integrated employment. There are currently 22 Individual Placement and Support sites providing services statewide. (Page 267) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services builds on the person-centered planning process used by local community mental health providers to develop quality individualized plans for employment. This includes required services and supports, service providers, Supported Employment goal, and may include Extended Service providers. Individualized services provided include, but are not limited to: individual community-based placement; trial work experiences; psychosocial rehabilitation via clubhouse programs; job coaching; job referral; Customized Employment; job development; job placement; and long-term follow along (including natural supports). Supported Employment services are provided in integrated community settings to the maximum extent possible. Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides ongoing support services for adults until the customer has 90 days of stabilized employment. Following job stabilization, Michigan Rehabilitation Services transfers the customer from employment follow-along to extended services provided by community mental health or natural supports.  (Page 315) Title IV

Project SEARCH is a specific employment model for students with the most significant disabilities in secondary education. Project SEARCH is funded by Michigan Mental Health Wellness Commission and federal funds. Students receive follow-along services as part of the Project SEARCH model. Michigan Rehabilitation Services works with the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration to ensure extended services are provided for dually eligible students employed in competitive integrated settings.  (Page 315) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 72

Medicaid Provider Manual - 04/01/2020

“The following documents comprise the Michigan Medicaid Provider Manual, and address all health insurance programs administered by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS). MDHHS also issues periodic bulletins as changes are implemented to the policies and/or processes described in the manual. Bulletins are incorporated into the online version of the manual on a quarterly basis.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan Rehabilitation Services

The goal for all funds used for Supported Employment Services is to help individuals whose disabilities and functional limitations have traditionally meant that they would not be able to successfully enter the labor market through competitive integrated employment. Priorities include, but are not limited to: •Increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities who receive Supported Employment services;

Use Title I funds for Supported Employment services to achieve the maximum number of quality employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities and a focus on youth;Build subject matter expertise to facilitate Supported Employment, Customized Employment and other evidenced-based practices;Increase Supported Employment training opportunities for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors, community rehabilitation service staff, families and individuals”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • WIOA

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan is in a unique position to address the needs of individuals, employers and communities to address the educational and economic means to reach their full potential.  All four Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) core programs (Titles I, II, III, and IV) are newly positioned within the Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity (LEO). Under Executive Order 2019-13, Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) (Title IV) was positioned under LEO and provides all four WIOA Core programs under one State department to allow for greater transparency and partnership.  VR continues to closely partner with the State’s One-Stop system and partners on strategic planning, and ways to collaboratively service our mutual customers (businesses and individuals with disabilities).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals - 12/17/2019

“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approves Michigan’s MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals, authorized under sections 1915(c) and 1915(b)(1) of the Social Security Act (the Act) respectively. This letter replaced the approval letter issued on December 13, 2019…

These section 1915(c) and 1915(b) MI HealthLink waivers are effective for a five year period beginning January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2024 and operate concurrently…

Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Training Connect (MiTC) Policy Manual Requirements and Guidelines - 12/09/2019

“The workforce system established under the WIOA emphasizes informed consumer choice, job-driven training, provider performance, and continuous improvement. The quality and selection of providers and programs of training services is vital to achieving these core principles. As required by the WIOA, Section 122, states in partnership with Local Boards must identify eligible training providers and programs that are qualified to receive WIOA Title I-B funds to train adults and dislocated workers, including those with disabilities. The approved State list of eligible training providers and programs serves as an important tool for participants seeking training providers and programs, and relevant information, such as program cost and program outcomes.

 

Local boards must work with the state to ensure that:

There are sufficient numbers and types of providers of career services and training services (including eligible providers with expertise in assisting individuals with disabilities and eligible providers with expertise in assisting adults in need of adult education and literacy activities) serving the local area and providing services that maximize consumer choice and lead to competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities; and

Public dissemination of the MiTC through the local One-Stop system and its partner programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

MI Choice Waiver Program - 12/01/2019

“Revisions to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual

Effective December 1, 2019, revisions were made to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter which result in policy and program changes. Many changes are the result of policy changes approved by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) during the MI Choice Waiver renewal process. Additional changes were made to provide clarification on certain topics. Please see the Medical Services Administration Bulletin, MSA 19-17 for a list of updates and the updated MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment First in Michigan - 11/15/2019

“This report builds on the 2014 Michigan Developmental Disabilities Network report, “Employment First in Michigan,” which examined the employment status of Michigan adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and/or dual diagnosis (co-occurring DD and mental illness) and state policies that align with employment First goals. The 2019 report on Employment First highlights where employment conditions have improved, what challenges remain, and what policy and practice changes are required to continue Michigan’s improvement in providing access to competitive, integrated employment for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) - 09/03/2019

~~“Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, as well as Arab and non-Arab, Chaldean, and South Asian communities in the greater Detroit area.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Islamic Organization of North America Mosque, Islamic Center of America, Macomb County Health Department, Congressional offices, Chaldean and Coptic churches, Jewish Family Service, HUDA Clinic, Luke Project 52 Clinic, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Regional Social Security offices, and Local businesses.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mr. Hassan JaberPhone: (313) 842-7010Email: hjaber@accesscommunity.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Genesee Health Plan Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Genesee Health Plan Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left-behind” populations; immigrant population; deaf and hard of hearing population, veterans; employees of small businesses and small business owners; federally recognized tribes; reentering incarcerated citizens.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Disability Network, Enroll America, First Presbyterian Church of Flint, Genesee Community Health Center, Genesee County Health Department, Ascension Genesys, Hamilton Community Health Network, Hurley Medical Center, McLaren Flint Hospital, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Michigan Medicaid/Medicare Assistance Program, Michigan State University Extension Valley Area Agency on Aging, The CRIM Fitness Foundation, and The Flint Registry.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:James Milanowski Phone: (810) 232-7740Email: jmilanowski@countyhealthplans.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veteran Navigators - 07/01/2019

~~“Veteran Navigators was created to assist Veterans and military families of ALL eras and discharge types. They work to connect Veterans and their families to federal, state and local resources to ease issues regarding mental health, substance abuse, housing and other common issues that impact veterans in order to support healthier lifestyles and provide support.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

House Resolution No. 170 - 01/01/2018

“A resolution to declare October 2017 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in the state of Michigan

Whereas, It has been more than 70 years since Congress designated a week in October, which has culminated into National Disability Employment Awareness Month with the 2017 theme being ‘Employment First for Michigan’; and

Whereas, Every person should be seen for their ability and not disability with valuable strengths and the potential to make important contributions to their local communities; and

Whereas, By promoting opportunities for all citizens with disabilities in Michigan, gaining individual integrated employment, and engaging businesses to value the contributions that employees with disabilities bring to their organization, we will enhance the employment landscape and enable Michigan to compete with other states to bring in high-demand businesses and jobs; and

Whereas, Disability Employment Awareness Month is an appropriate time to recognize Michigan’s employment accomplishments concerning persons with disabilities in integrated environments and to make sure all of Michigan’s citizens with intellectual and developmental disabilities are included;

 

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare October 2017 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in the state of Michigan.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan ABLE Legislation (HB 4542) - 10/28/2015

An act to create the Michigan achieving a better life experience (ABLE) program; to provide for ABLE accounts; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state agencies, boards, and departments; to allow certain tax credits or deductions; and to provide for penalties and remedies.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Michigan Business Opportunity Act for Persons with Disabilities - 05/04/1998

An act to provide competitive opportunity in state procurements of goods, services, and construction for businesses owned by persons with disabilities; to provide powers and duties of the governor; to prescribe powers and duties of certain state departments and agencies; and to provide penalties.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Michigan SB 360 - Education Savings Program

An act to amend 2000 PA 161, entitled “An act to create the Michigan education savings program; to provide for education savings accounts; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state agencies, boards, and departments; to allow certain tax credits or deductions; and to provide for penalties and remedies,” by amending section 10 (MCL 390.1480), as amended by 2001 PA 215.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

“MiABLE Disability Savings Program Now Available in Michigan” - 11/01/2016

“Today, Michigan became the fifth state in the country to launch a disability savings program, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley announced. The Mi-ABLE (Michigan Achieving a Better Life Experience) program is a 529 (A) savings account, offering investment and tax incentives for families and others who wish to save for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Michigan Executive Order 2015-15: Employment First in Michigan - 11/18/2015

All state departments and agencies that provide services and support to persons with disabilities, and all state departments and agencies that provide employment, economic development, or other related services, shall implement Employment First in Michigan by coordinating efforts and collaborating to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures, and funding support competitive employment within an integrated setting as the first priority and optimal outcome for persons with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Michigan Executive Directive 2014-1: Employment Opportunities - 10/27/2014

“It is important that the State of Michigan provide a welcoming environment to those with disabilities and encourage their employment in state government in a competitive integrated setting. While many individuals desire that their disability be kept confidential, raising awareness and providing adequate training to all state employees can help bridge the gap to ensure every employee is treated with dignity and respect at all times.”   “In coordination with the Department of Civil Rights, the Civil Rights Commission and the Civil Service Commission, the SEODC shall recommend a program for attracting and retaining individuals with mental illness, intellectual or developmental disabilities and physical disabilities that includes competitive integrated employment opportunities. The program shall require the participation and engagement of all Executive Branch departments and agencies.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order No. 2004 State Americans with Disabilities Act Coordinator - 06/03/2004

“Whereas, in Michigan there are approximately 1.9 million persons with disabilities;

Whereas it has long been the policy of the State of Michigan and this Governor to ensure that all persons, including those persons with disabilities, are given equal participation opportunities in all aspects of public life;

Now, therefore, I, Jennifer M. Granholm, Governor of State of Michigan, by virtue of the power and authority vested in the Governor under the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and Michigan law, order the following:

Establishment of State ADA Coordinator; Designation of Departmental ADA Coordinators; Assistance of Departments of Agencies”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 30

Training Connect (MiTC) Policy Manual Requirements and Guidelines - 12/09/2019

“The workforce system established under the WIOA emphasizes informed consumer choice, job-driven training, provider performance, and continuous improvement. The quality and selection of providers and programs of training services is vital to achieving these core principles. As required by the WIOA, Section 122, states in partnership with Local Boards must identify eligible training providers and programs that are qualified to receive WIOA Title I-B funds to train adults and dislocated workers, including those with disabilities. The approved State list of eligible training providers and programs serves as an important tool for participants seeking training providers and programs, and relevant information, such as program cost and program outcomes.

 

Local boards must work with the state to ensure that:

There are sufficient numbers and types of providers of career services and training services (including eligible providers with expertise in assisting individuals with disabilities and eligible providers with expertise in assisting adults in need of adult education and literacy activities) serving the local area and providing services that maximize consumer choice and lead to competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities; and

Public dissemination of the MiTC through the local One-Stop system and its partner programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Employment First in Michigan - 11/15/2019

“This report builds on the 2014 Michigan Developmental Disabilities Network report, “Employment First in Michigan,” which examined the employment status of Michigan adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and/or dual diagnosis (co-occurring DD and mental illness) and state policies that align with employment First goals. The 2019 report on Employment First highlights where employment conditions have improved, what challenges remain, and what policy and practice changes are required to continue Michigan’s improvement in providing access to competitive, integrated employment for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Veteran Navigators - 07/01/2019

~~“Veteran Navigators was created to assist Veterans and military families of ALL eras and discharge types. They work to connect Veterans and their families to federal, state and local resources to ease issues regarding mental health, substance abuse, housing and other common issues that impact veterans in order to support healthier lifestyles and provide support.”

Systems
  • Other

Michigan Disability Resources - 06/07/2019

~~“Welcome to Michigan's first website devoted specially to the interests, concerns, and needs of Michiganians with disabilities. Of Michigan's nearly 10 million residents, about 1.9 million have a disability. That's one in every five residents.

On these pages you will find the services and programs for people with disabilities offered by the State of Michigan as well as other sites of interest. Whether you're looking for assistance in finding a job, want to learn about the latest assistive technology, or have a question about your rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act, you will find it here.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Educational Development Plan (EDP) Fact Sheet - 05/04/2019

“Educational Development Plans (EDPs) are plans created by all students about career goals and action plans for reaching their goals. EDPs help students think about long-term education and career plans before entering high school. By going through this process, students learn more about themselves, consider different options for their future, and develop a more specific path for preparing for their career choice.

 

Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and EDPs

Although both the IEP and EDP promote positive outcomes after high school, they are two different documents with different purposes. EDPs do not replace IEPs. IEPs are created for students meeting special education eligibility under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Per IDEA, during transition planning, educators gather information about a student’s interests and strengths through age-appropriate assessments and work with the student to develop measurable postsecondary (after high school) goals related to education, training, employment, and, when appropriate, independent living skills. EDPs help students identify career paths and the education needed to reach career goals. Sometimes in developing the IEP, information from the EDP may be used to assist in transition planning.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Special Education Reevaluation Process - 04/30/2019

~~“A student’s special education needs may change throughout the course of their educational career, and the reevaluation process is developed to assess these evolving needs. A district must ensure a reevaluation of each student with a disability is conducted when: The district determines the student’s special education and related services and the student’s educational needs, including improved academic achievement and functional performance, warrant a reevaluation; or The child’s parent or teacher requests a reevaluation.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS) - 04/09/2019

~~“MISSIONTo improve public Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services delivered by the Bureau of Services for Blind Persons (BSBP) and Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS).

VISIONBSBP and MRS will provide VR services in manners that are respectful, equitable and effective in achieving meaningful employment outcomes for people with disabilities.”

MCRS was created under Executive Order (EO) (2012-10) in 2012.And oversight of implementing Employment First in Michigan (click here for Executive Order 2015-15). More about the mission of MCRS can be found by accessing the web-link.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mental Health Services - 02/08/2019

~~“The VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System Mental Health Service is a Partner Affiliate of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School. Together the departments host an internationally recognized faculty known for their contributions to the study of mood disorders, stress and anxiety disorders, substance use disorders as well as other psychiatric disorders….Community Based Services• Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center/Veteran's Empowerment and Recovery (VEAR) Center• Mental Health Intensive Care Management (MHICM)• Compensated Work Therapy Program (CWT)”

Systems
  • Other

Supports for Students with Disabilities - 11/16/2018

~~“Many offices, agencies, and organizations outside of the Office of Special Education (OSE) work with families and schools to support students with disabilities.”This site has links to a variety of services including Assistive Technology and Transition to employment 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Services Offered by the Detroit Regional Office - 11/15/2018

~~“VA’s Detroit Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Michigan. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan is in a unique position to address the needs of individuals, employers and communities to address the educational and economic means to reach their full potential.  All four Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) core programs (Titles I, II, III, and IV) are newly positioned within the Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity (LEO). Under Executive Order 2019-13, Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) (Title IV) was positioned under LEO and provides all four WIOA Core programs under one State department to allow for greater transparency and partnership.  VR continues to closely partner with the State’s One-Stop system and partners on strategic planning, and ways to collaboratively service our mutual customers (businesses and individuals with disabilities).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Employment First - 04/20/2019

~~“A critical priority for the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), is to invest in systems change efforts that result in increased community-based, integrated employment opportunities for individuals with significant disabilities. This priority reflects growing support for a national movement called Employment First, a framework for systems change that is centered on the premise that all citizens, including individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life.

Under this approach, publicly-financed systems are urged to align policies, service delivery practices, and reimbursement structures to commit to integrated employment as the priority option with respect to the use of publicly-financed day and employment services for youth and adults with significant disabilities. ODEP defines integrated employment as work paid directly by employers at the greater of minimum or prevailing wages with commensurate benefits, occurring in a typical work setting where the employee with a disability interacts or has the opportunity to interact continuously with co-workers without disabilities, has an opportunity for advancement and job mobility, and is preferably engaged full-time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Michigan "Better Off Working" - Disability Reform Work Group Strategic Plan - 08/01/2014

This report, developed by the Michigan Department of Human Services, Michigan Rehabilitation Services, Disability Determination Service, the Disability Network, and Michigan Employers, details goals to further the inclusive employment of individuals with disabilities in the state of Michigan. “The goals of the strategic plan include: “Coordinating government and private agency resources in cross-program settings to assist individuals with disabilities enter or return to the workforce.  Improving the health and well-being of individuals with disabilities by promoting work participation. De-emphasizing disability as a de facto public assistance program by refocusing on the goal of returning to work.”   
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wayne State University Developmental Disabilities Institute

"~~The Michigan Developmental Disabilities Institute (MI-DDI) is a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD). MI-DDI is part of a network of 67 UCEDDs in the U.S. and its territories. The Institute's mission is to contribute to the development of inclusive communities and quality of life for people with disabilities and their families through a culturally-sensitive, statewide program of interdisciplinary education, community support and services, and research and dissemination of information."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan Developmental Disabilities Council Five Year State Plan 2012-2016

Interagency Efforts around Supportive Employment Peer Mentor Pilot- “This pilot has involved the training of 22 individuals with DD to help others with DD to reach their life goals and increase their community involvement and self advocacy. The pilot has involved numerous workshops and trainings culminating with internships at the peer mentors local Community Mental Health. The vision of the planning workgroup is to develop a ‘Train the Trainer’ model so that the curriculum and lessons learned may be shared with other CMHSPs across the state.” “MDCH and MRS have developed a partnership to improve the employment outcomes for individuals with DD. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) has assisted with training peer mentors as well as sponsoring their attendance at numerous workshops.” “The Michigan Commission for the Blind has assisted with the coordination of a peer mentor’s internship.”   Interagency Efforts around Rehabilitative Services “MRS currently has interagency agreements with the Michigan Departments of Community Health, Education, Health and Human Services, as well as with Michigan Works! and Adult Literacy to help better serve Michigan’s citizens with disabilities.”  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan DHHS Regional Inclusive Community Coalitions

“A RICC is a local grassroots group of people that is funded and supported by the Michigan Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council). Members include people with disabilities, family members, friends, local advocates, community leaders and service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

IDEA Grant Funded Initiatives - 01/01/2018

“The Michigan Department of Education (MDE), Office of Special Education (OSE) established various Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Grant Funded Initiatives to enhance its support for special education in Michigan. IDEA Grant Funded Initiatives are funded by IDEA Part B and are awarded through the OSE.

 

IDEA Grant Funded Initiatives provide statewide assistance in advancing evidence-based practices to support diverse learners. Each initiative addresses different needs identified through state or federal mandates and stakeholder-based concerns.

 

IDEA Grant Funded Initiatives support a variety of stakeholders, including school districts and families of students with disabilities. Some examples of support include:

 

-Providing professional development and training.-Implementing proven programs in schools.-Producing or loaning materials for students.

-Disseminating critical guidance and information.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Data Sharing

“Employment First moving forward in Michigan” - 11/09/2017

“LANSING, — Michigan has been chosen to receive federal assistance and training to help implement its Employment First strategy, working to improve competitive integrated employment opportunities for Michiganders with disabilities.

 

The assistance comes from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy as part of its Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. Michigan received two designations from ODEP, providing the state with 300 hours of onsite and virtual assistance.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Lt. Governor Calley's Overview of Michigan Budget priority items "Employment First in Michigan" - 07/21/2017

~~“Employment First in Michigan:Employment First in Michigan is an initiative to promote opportunities for people with disabilities to gain competitive employment within an integrated setting and to engage organizations about the value of hiring people with disabilities. The final version of the budget included $500,000 in support of this initiative, helping promote and increase competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Michigan Project SEARCH - 06/01/2008

Project SEARCH is a business-led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration.  More specifically, it’s a one year high school transition program which provides training and education…Project SEARCH serves as a workforce alternative for students in their last years of school.  

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan DHHS Pathways to Potential

In an effort to help everyone find a path to their fullest potential, we created Pathways to Potential as a way to break down barriers and deliver services where people need them.   The Pathways approach targets five outcome areas: attendance, education, health, safety and self-sufficiency. It also relies on a number of support networks and partnerships to wrap their arms around children and families to help them succeed.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Michigan Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 40,500 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2013.  The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply.”

 

Goals Give consumers and families a central role in defining and implementing the systems changes necessary to realize the principle that money follows the person. Develop and establish within pilot sites a model for an integrated long-term care (LTC) system that supports money follows the person. Develop strategies within the State Plan and the current MI Choice waiver that support the principle of money follows the person. Develop alternatives to traditional models for nursing home care.   Activities Establish a Community Consortium for Advocacy and Technical Assistance to provide advocacy for LTC system change. Establish an LTC Community Roundtable to facilitate stakeholder involvement in planning. Analyze barriers to "money follows the person" and devise solutions, including waivers and State policy changes. Develop alternative uses for nursing facilities. Provide and support alternatives to traditional nursing care. Develop a model for nursing home transition and development of community support. Establish and implement the model at three pilot sites.
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan Rehabilitation Services

The goal for all funds used for Supported Employment Services is to help individuals whose disabilities and functional limitations have traditionally meant that they would not be able to successfully enter the labor market through competitive integrated employment. Priorities include, but are not limited to: •Increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities who receive Supported Employment services;

Use Title I funds for Supported Employment services to achieve the maximum number of quality employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities and a focus on youth;Build subject matter expertise to facilitate Supported Employment, Customized Employment and other evidenced-based practices;Increase Supported Employment training opportunities for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors, community rehabilitation service staff, families and individuals”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • WIOA

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) - 09/03/2019

~~“Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, as well as Arab and non-Arab, Chaldean, and South Asian communities in the greater Detroit area.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Islamic Organization of North America Mosque, Islamic Center of America, Macomb County Health Department, Congressional offices, Chaldean and Coptic churches, Jewish Family Service, HUDA Clinic, Luke Project 52 Clinic, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Regional Social Security offices, and Local businesses.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mr. Hassan JaberPhone: (313) 842-7010Email: hjaber@accesscommunity.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Genesee Health Plan Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Genesee Health Plan Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left-behind” populations; immigrant population; deaf and hard of hearing population, veterans; employees of small businesses and small business owners; federally recognized tribes; reentering incarcerated citizens.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Disability Network, Enroll America, First Presbyterian Church of Flint, Genesee Community Health Center, Genesee County Health Department, Ascension Genesys, Hamilton Community Health Network, Hurley Medical Center, McLaren Flint Hospital, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Michigan Medicaid/Medicare Assistance Program, Michigan State University Extension Valley Area Agency on Aging, The CRIM Fitness Foundation, and The Flint Registry.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:James Milanowski Phone: (810) 232-7740Email: jmilanowski@countyhealthplans.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan Works! Annual Conference Michigan Works! Association. (n.d.). Michigan Works! annual conference. - 01/01/2019

~~“2019 Michigan Works! Annual ConferenceSunday, September 8 - Tuesday, September 10Radisson Plaza Hotel & Suites // Kalamazoo Michigan’s signature workforce development conference offers dynamic keynote presentations, a wide array of professional development opportunities and plenty of time for networking.” 

Systems
  • Other

Michigan to get federal help in improving job opportunities for people with disabilities - 10/31/2017

“LANSING Michigan will receive federal help to put into practice a statewide strategy helping people with disabilities find jobs.

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley's office said Tuesday that Michigan will receive 300 hours of training, both in person and online, from the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy as part of a national effort called Employment First targeted at helping people with disabilities find employment. Michigan signed on to the effort in 2015 via an executive order that Calley signed. 

The program is intended to help create competitive and integrated job opportunities for disabled residents by encouraging employers to create such opportunities, as well as help state agencies that serve people with disabilities and workforce development purposes to coordinate policy goals.

The federal assistance is in the form of training and technical help, not funding, Calley spokeswoman Laura Biehl said. A news release from the Office of Disability Employment Policy indicates Michigan will receive training in capacity building and transitioning from school to work.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Resources: Notes from the APSE Executive Director - 03/22/2017

~~“This month, we're formally introducing two new tools developed to help your organization navigate the shifting political and policy landscape and strengthen your organization. Change can be managed for positive outcomes if you've got a solid plan and the right tools:From Workshops to Workplaces: Achieving the Goals of Employment First is a comprehensive eLearning course developed by APSE in response to a need expressed by agencies across the country. As the Employment First movement accelerates, federal regulations have asked agencies to change how they serve individuals with disabilities. Many organizations want to make the transition from a segregated service delivery model to integrated and community-based employment services. That's a major transformation. We couldn't find an in-person or online resource that lays out helpful tips and strategies in enough depth or detail. So we created one.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

MI DoE: Bridging the Special Education Career and Technical Education Divide - 05/01/2009

“The purpose of this white paper is to help secondary school administrators, teachers, and parents coordinate the programmatic requirements of Career and Technical Education (CTE) with those that govern the rights of students in Special Education programs and those with a 504 plan. This paper discusses the relevant laws governing both areas and potential for conflict, explores the positive impact that proper placement in a CTE program may have on a student with a disability, and proposes a solution that best supports the success of a student with a disability in secondary and postsecondary CTE programs. This success requires the collaboration of CTE and Special Education personnel, the understanding of the student’s disability and abilities, and the appropriate recommendation for proper placement in a CTE program.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Wayne State University Developmental Disabilities Institute - Training and Events Calendar

"The DDI Training and Events Calendar shows the training events, conferences, talks and other opportunities being hosted or sponsored by DDI.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Muskegon Family Care to Pay $21,500 to Settle EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 02/23/2017

“According to the EEOC’s lawsuit, Avis Lane worked for Muskegon Family Care as an outreach-enrollment coordinator. Before she began work, the company required that she submit to a post-offer, pre-employment physical. The medical specialist who conducted that physical recommended that Lane be put on a medical hold due to medications she was taking. Notwithstanding the recommended medical hold, the company allowed Lane to work for over a month. Eventually, Muskegon Family Care fired her based on the recommended medical hold, the EEOC said.

 

Firing an employee on the basis of disability violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). And an employer is liable for the actions of its agent, such as a medical specialist who conducts pre-employment physicals. EEOC filed its lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Michigan (EEOC v. M.G.H. Family Health Center d/b/a Muskegon Family Care, Civil Case No.: 15-952) after first attempting to reach a pre-litigation settlement through its conciliation process.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Medicaid Provider Manual - 04/01/2020

“The following documents comprise the Michigan Medicaid Provider Manual, and address all health insurance programs administered by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS). MDHHS also issues periodic bulletins as changes are implemented to the policies and/or processes described in the manual. Bulletins are incorporated into the online version of the manual on a quarterly basis.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals - 12/17/2019

“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approves Michigan’s MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals, authorized under sections 1915(c) and 1915(b)(1) of the Social Security Act (the Act) respectively. This letter replaced the approval letter issued on December 13, 2019…

These section 1915(c) and 1915(b) MI HealthLink waivers are effective for a five year period beginning January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2024 and operate concurrently…

Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MI Choice Waiver Program - 12/01/2019

“Revisions to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual

Effective December 1, 2019, revisions were made to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter which result in policy and program changes. Many changes are the result of policy changes approved by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) during the MI Choice Waiver renewal process. Additional changes were made to provide clarification on certain topics. Please see the Medical Services Administration Bulletin, MSA 19-17 for a list of updates and the updated MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The following documents comprise the Michigan Medicaid Provider Manual, and address all health insurance programs administered by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS).MDHHS also issues periodic bulletins as changes are implemented to the policies and/or processes described in the manual. Bulletins are incorporated into the online version of the manual on a quarterly basis. ” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Revised Statewide Transition Plan for Home and Community-Based Services; released for additional public comment” - 12/01/2016

“In 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released a new rule for Home and Community-Based Services waivers to promote enhanced quality of services and personal protections for residents with disabilities or other health issues. Today, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) released its Statewide Transition Plan for additional public comment. MDHHS provides home and Community-Based Services to individuals in the Medicaid program to help Michigan residents with disabilities or other health issues live at home or in the community. Michigan offers many of these services through waivers, which were approved by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Michigan’s Statewide Transition Plan for Home and Community-Based Services - 12/01/2016

“The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) offers a wide range of home and community-based services and supports to improve the health and well-being of Michigan residents. Many of these home and community-based services are offered through Medicaid waiver programs. MDHHS has created several waiver programs to provide services to Michigan residents who have aging -related needs, disabilities, or other health issues. Individuals in these programs receive services in their own homes and/or communities rather than being served in an institutional setting.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Reports in WSA for the Habilitation Support Waiver (HSW) - 10/05/2016

“HCBS Rule: Intent a) to ensure that individuals receiving long-term services and supports through home and community based service (HCBS) programs under the 1915(c), 1915(i), and 1915 (k) b) and to enhance the quality of HCBS and provide protections to participants.(CMS, 2014)”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1915(i) State plan Home and Community Based Services Administration and Operation - 09/30/2016

“The §1915(i) State Plan Amendment ABA service will operate within the §1915(b) Managed Specialty Services & Supports Program (MSS&SP), which also includes the concurrent §1915(c) Habilitation Supports Waiver. For more than a decade, the PIHPs have been responsible per the approved §1915(b)/(c) waivers and the MDCH/PIHP contract for 1) determining eligibility for mental health State Plan, additional [(b)(3)] and §1915(c) home and community based services (HCBS); 2) maintaining a provider network of qualified providers; 3) assuring the delivery of all medically necessary mental health State Plan, additional and 1915(c) HCBS to Medicaid beneficiaries; 4) maintaining the mandated organization structure and administrative services for managed care plan, including Customer Service, Grievance & Appeals, Quality Assessment & Performance Improvement Program (QAPIP) and Service & Utilization Management.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Michigan Medicaid State Plan - 07/01/2016

The Michigan Medicaid State Plan is an agreement between the state and federal government that identifies the general health care services, reimbursement, and eligibility policies in effect under Michigan Medicaid. It is the basis for the federal government (CMS/HHS) to pay its federal financial participation (FFP) for the program's operation. The plan is written on a more general level than contained in program policy.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Michigan State HCBS Transition Plan - 03/15/2016

In 2014, the Federal Government issued a new rule for Medicaid waiver programs that pay for home and community-based services. The goal of the new rule is to ensure that individuals who receive home and community-based services are an equal part of the community and have the same access to the community as people who do not receive Medicaid waiver services. The MDHHS must assess Michigan waiver programs and transition each program into compliance with new rule.    MDHHS developed a Statewide Transition Plan (STP) to outline the transition process for Michigan Medicaid waiver programs.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

Employers in the Great Lakes State know you can "Give Your Business the Upper Hand" in Michigan by creating job opportunities for workers with disabilities to reach their full potential and live the lives they choose.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Michigan’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2017 to 2018
9,995,915
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.46%
Change from
2017 to 2018
730,791
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.08%
Change from
2017 to 2018
259,363
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.65%
Change from
2017 to 2018
35.49%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.72%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.65%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 9,995,915
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 730,791
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 259,363
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,128,006
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.49%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.65%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 678,980
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 728,739
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,098,144
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 233,479
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 50,537
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 10,253
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 17,919
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 575
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 35,067
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 12,282

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 14,401
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 334,642

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 19,479
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 75,923
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 145,811
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,648
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,279
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,914
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 11,432
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 109
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 86
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 79.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,474
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 529,956
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $29,223,562
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $37,185,858
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $37,398,586
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $55,648,528
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 12,880
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,290
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,553
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 43.89

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 67.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.83%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 81.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 29.18%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 64.85%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 77.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.67%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 4,169,358
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 6,288
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 631,296
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,489,918
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 2,121,213
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 964
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,300
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,264
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,129,959
AbilityOne wages (services). $21,448,161

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 25
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 27
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 19
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,103
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3,122

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Employment First. Executive Order 2015-15 established Employment First in Michigan. It sets forth a mission to establish the expectation and promote opportunities for all working-age individuals with disabilities in Michigan to gain competitive employment within an integrated setting, with or without supports, and to engage businesses and organizations that value the contributions of employees with disabilities. All state departments and agencies that provide services and support to persons with disabilities, and all state departments and agencies that provide employment, economic development, or other related services, shall implement Employment First in Michigan by coordinating efforts and collaborating to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures, and funding support competitive employment within an integrated setting as the first priority and optimal outcome for persons with disabilities. (Pages 83-84) Title I

Michigan is an Employment First state and Michigan Rehabilitation Services is working closely with multiple stakeholders to improve employment outcomes for customers with disabilities. Several workgroups have formed, one of which focuses on school-to work improvement outcomes for students with disabilities. Technical assistance is being provided by TransCen, Inc. Career and Workforce Development, to implement the seamless transition model. (Page 256) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services is aligned with agency and community partners as part of the Employment First initiative in Michigan. This initiative’s purpose is to promote diversity and inclusive employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This is achieved by engaging businesses regarding the value employees with disabilities bring to their organizations. (Page 265) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services, Michigan Department of Education, the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration and other stakeholders are participating in Employment First efforts to improve competitive integrated employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities. These efforts, along with the newly signed Memorandum of Understanding, are designed to improve Supported Employment programming and outcomes. (Page 315) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~Vocational Rehabilitation is exploring ways to develop staff/vendor skills in customized employment and to export appropriate training across the state. (Page 113) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services has updated its policy manual to align with Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act mandates. This includes guidance for the provision of Extended Services for youth populations with the most significant disabilities. Extended Services may be provided for up to 4 years. In addition, Customized Employment is clarified within the policy as a Vocational Rehabilitation service option. (Page 264) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services established a Memorandum of Understanding with the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration to ensure individuals with developmental disabilities who are dually eligible for both agencies’ programs have
collaborative supports and services toward competitive integrated employment outcomes. The Memorandum of Understanding outlines the coordination of services, including Extended Services, Supported Employment, and Customized Employment. (Pages 266-267) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services offers statewide Supported Employment services, including Customized Employment, for individuals and youth with the most significant disabilities reach competitive integrated employment outcomes. Michigan Rehabilitation Services updated its policy manual to align with WIOA mandates. (Page 314) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services builds on the person-centered planning process used by local community mental health providers to develop quality individualized plans for employment. This includes required services and supports, service providers, Supported Employment goal, and may include Extended Service providers. Individualized services provided include, but are not limited to: individual community-based placement; trial work experiences; psychosocial rehabilitation via clubhouse programs; job coaching; job referral; Customized Employment; job development; job placement; and long-term follow along (including natural supports). (Page 315) Title IV

Customized employment of persons who are blind or visually impaired is paramount to every placement. The unique needs and accommodations that BSBP consumers may require lends itself heavily to customization. BSBP works closely with Community Rehabilitation Programs or fee for service vendors where we purchase service in order to assist them in understanding the complex needs of BSBP’s consumer base. BSBP’s Training Center provides blindness specific training to community partners to assist in the education and training of service providers. This practice speaks to the customization of the employment process. (Page 338) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Jobs Strategy: Our jobs strategy is integrated into the Governor’s overall strategic plan for Michigan’s reinvention. Michigan’s primary workforce development strategy is a demand-driven system that focuses on aligning all efforts, initiatives, programs, and funding around key industry clusters. This strategy includes the alignment of policies, operations, and administrative systems to avoid duplication of workforce programs and activities, as well as providing a way to leverage discretionary funding and formula-based investment across all programs. Our collaboration with workforce agencies, employers, economic developers, post-secondary education providers, and other partners with shared interests provides us with opportunities to leverage partner funds for services not funded under the WIOA. Our workforce programs are being implemented with innovation and efficiency in mind to deliver results-driven training and services in order to provide more and better jobs, assist employers with their workforce training needs, and revitalize our education system to better prepare youth. (Page 7) Title I

Our vision encompasses key actions related to workforce employment, training and educational programs as identified in the Governor’s strategy for Michigan’s reinvention. Key actions included:
• Creating WIOA planning regions across the State, thereby allowing local areas to devote their resources to leverage State resources that help create more and better jobs and training, (Page 74) Title I

Collaboration with other State of Michigan departments and agencies includes Michigan Rehabilitation Services, the Bureau of Services for Blind Persons, the Michigan Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Civil Rights among other state agencies, the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, and the Advisory Council on Deaf and Hard of Hearing align disability related programs by linking the state’s workforce and economic development agendas. To achieve necessary collaboration, the workgroup is moving forward with the formation of an ad hoc committee to identify and address the needs of individuals with disabilities and those agencies and respective services that can be leveraged for the purpose of putting qualified individuals back to work.  (Page 107) Title I

How the State will leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Michigan Rehabilitation Services is working to leverage other public and private funds by working strategically with Michigan businesses to expand the array of services to business through innovative approaches. Proposed strategies include:
o Assigning staff to specific businesses, providing customized services including Supported Employment. 
o Expanding community work experience options for transition youth with significant disabilities to create Supported Employment opportunities. 
o Aligning the business community with educational partners to provide additional resources, funding, and innovative programming through cooperative agreements and Memorandums of Understanding.
These strategies will assist Michigan Rehabilitation Services in leveraging resources for Extended Services and expanding Supported Employment. (Page 299) Title IV

How the State will leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities.
When BSBP consumers who are receiving Medicaid funding and who are receiving services from Community Mental Health agencies can leverage those resources to receive extended services. (Page 350) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Bureau’s Staff Developmental Unit subscribes and shares, as appropriate, information, facts, materials, news and reports from resources such as the Institute on Rehabilitation Issues (IRI), the National Center for Rehabilitation Training Materials (NCRTM) and The LEAD which is a collaborative of disability, workforce and economic empowerment organizations dedicated to improving employment and economic advancement outcomes for all people with disabilities. In addition, information is posted using the Bureau’s Knowledge Management System and Online Learning Center known as eLearn. (Page 272) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~The Project SEARCH program is one initiative launched by the State of Michigan to promote Executive Directive 2014-1. Project SEARCH is a one-year internship for students with disabilities, ages 18-26, ready for their last year of high school and with a goal of competitive employment. The purpose is to provide both classroom training and real-life work experience to prepare students for employment following completion of the program. Nine state departments have identified internships and two additional departments have expressed an interest in hosting an intern during the 2018-2019 school year. Options, including the establishment of a Project SEARCH Worker classification, are being considered to allow for permanent placement of interns upon successful completion of the program. (Page 91) Title I

Bureau of Services for Blind Persons is working with the One Stop centers to provide services to Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) students and youth in order to allow for summer work experiences and the development of work based learning. We know that that this is an ongoing area where partnership is needed as the relationships vary in intensity across the state. (Page 92) Title IV

VR is also participating in an Office of Disability Employment Policy grant that is supporting four pilot sites in Michigan with the goal of Students with Disabilities achieving competitive integrated employment prior to exiting secondary education. The four pilot sites are utilizing a collaborative approach involving core partners where education and adult agencies (for example: Vocational Rehabilitation and Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration) provide early intervention and work experiences while the student is still in secondary education. (Page 93) Title IV

Pathways to Potential -- This human services program focuses on three critical elements: going into the community to where the individual is located, working one-on-one with families to identify and remove barriers and serve as connectors to a network of services, and engaging community partners and school personnel in efforts to help families find their pathway to success. Michigan Rehabilitation Services partners with Pathways to Potential to connect students with disabilities and their family members with disabilities to vocational rehabilitation services leading to competitive integrated employment. (Page 254) Title IV

To comply with the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act, Michigan Rehabilitation Services is collaborating with the Michigan Department of Education to update the Memorandum of Understanding. This agreement lays out how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education partner to provide a coordinated set of activities to facilitate a seamless transition of students with disabilities from school to competitive integrated employment.
The Memorandum of Understanding focuses on mandates for transition services described in the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004). This includes how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education will collaborate to fulfill mandates on behalf of students with disabilities. Key elements of the partnership are stated in the agreement and include: Authority; Purpose; Pre-Employment Transition Services Required Activities; Consultation and Technical Assistance; Transition Planning; Outreach and Identification of Students with Disabilities; Section 511 Subminimum Wage; Assurance; and Provision of Services and Reimbursement. (Page 255) Title IV

Michigan is an Employment First state and Michigan Rehabilitation Services is working closely with multiple stakeholders to improve employment outcomes for customers with disabilities. Several workgroups have formed, one of which focuses on school-to work improvement outcomes for students with disabilities. Technical assistance is being provided by TransCen, Inc. Career and Workforce Development, to implement the seamless transition model. (Page 256) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides Pre-Employment Transition Services to students with disabilities prior to, and after application. Approximately 30 counselors have been hired to provide Pre-Employment Transition Services prior to application.
Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided by Michigan Rehabilitation Services counselors for students who are interested in and need the program. Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided prior to application and during the stages of the vocational rehabilitation process which include: application, eligibility determination, and Individualized Plan for Employment. Transition and general counselors may serve customers meeting the definition of a student with a disability.
Michigan Rehabilitation Services coordinated with educational partners to deliver contracted Pre-Employment Transition Services through Michigan’s Centers for Independent Living. In addition, local district offices are coordinating with educational partners to develop Pre-Employment Transition Services programs to be provided by community rehabilitation organizations and other qualified vendors. (Page 256) Title IV

• Project SEARCH -Michigan currently has 16 Project Search sites impacting approximately 100 students with disabilities per year. Project SEARCH is a business-led model allowing students with disabilities in their last year of secondary education to participate in three unpaid internships at a business in their community for school credit. The goal of the program is for students to become employed at the host business or another business in the community after completion. Project SEARCH funding was an outcome of the 2013 Mental Health and Wellness Commission report recommending expansion of a minimum of 3 additional Project SEARCH sites per year. Michigan Rehabilitation Services has received dedicated Project SEARCH funds to support the expansion of new sites. The funding is used to provide technical assistance from Project SEARCH to Michigan and to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
• Post-secondary Education Rehabilitation Transition (PERT) Program -The PERT program is a one week comprehensive vocational and independent living assessment offered in a semi-structured residential environment at Michigan Career and Technical Institute for students enrolled in secondary education. In summer of 2017, 144 students with disabilities participated in the program. Students reside in dormitories, giving them the experience of independent living. After completion, students return to their local school districts where information they have learned is document in their Individualized Education Program.

This past year, the PERT program has been offered in local communities as a pilot. One benefit of making the program portable is more students can participate in the assessment process as they are not required to travel and stay on campus of Michigan Career and Technical Institute to participate.

• Pathways to Potential -This human services program focuses on three critical elements: going into the community to where the individual is located, working one-on-one with families to identify and remove barriers and serve as connectors to a network of services, and engaging community partners and school personnel in efforts to help families find their pathway to success. Michigan Rehabilitation Services partners with Pathways to Potential to connect students with disabilities and their family members with disabilities to vocational rehabilitation services leading to competitive integrated employment.
• Seamless Transition -The seamless transition model targets students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. A collaborative approach is used to prepare and support students with the outcome of competitive integrated employment prior to exit from secondary education. (Page 257-258) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides consultation and technical assistance to Michigan Department of Education and local educational agencies to assist in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, employment-related activities, Pre-Employment Transition Services and other vocational rehabilitation. Consultation and technical assistance may include, but is not limited to, the following topics:
•Disability awareness
•Accommodations and assistive technology
•MDHHS Michigan Rehabilitation Services application, eligibility, and services
•Community-based services
•Independent living
•Career Pathways
•Competitive integrated employment (Page 259) Title I

Transition planning occurs between the student/family/guardian, education staff and Michigan Rehabilitation Services staff to enhance the development of Individualized Education Programs. The Michigan Department of Education and Michigan Rehabilitation Services Memorandum of Understanding clarifies Michigan Rehabilitation Services staff will attend student Individualized Education Program meetings when invited. Educational partners are encouraged to provide advance notice, communicate and coordinate IEP meetings to ensure Michigan Rehabilitation Services staff are available to attend. (Page 260) Title IV

Transition counselors are connected to transition coordinators in each intermediate school district in the state. The counselors work in collaboration with transition coordinators, as well as other education staff, to identify students interested in pursuing competitive integrated employment who require vocational rehabilitation services. Students with disabilities are referred to Michigan Rehabilitation Services through this process.
In addition, Section 504 students are provided information about Michigan Rehabilitation Services by education staff, Michigan Rehabilitation Services marketing publications, informational meetings, and one-on-one meetings. If students are determined eligible, Michigan Rehabilitation Services works with the student and the family/guardian as appropriate to move through the rehabilitation process with the goal of competitive integrated employment. (Page 262) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services works extensively to provide Pre-Employment Transition Services and transition services for students with disabilities. Every Michigan Rehabilitation Services district has at least two assigned Pre-Employment Transition Services counselors and a Business Relations Consultant. Staff work to identify opportunities of Pre-Employment Transition Services, focusing on work-based-learning experiences, at local businesses. (Page 265) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services values the achievement of competitive integrated employment so that people with disabilities can be independent. Postsecondary education and job training beyond secondary education is critical to the achievement of independence for many people with disabilities. Through the provision of pre-employment transition services which allows for a continuum of developmental experiences, Michigan Rehabilitation Services will be able to help students (and their guardians) be better informed and prepared to choose careers. (Page 307) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services transfers customers receiving Supported Employment to extended services once stabilization has occurred. The customer is considered to have achieved stabilization when the counselor, with input from the job coach/employment specialist, employer and individual, confirms that: (1) initial intensive services identified on the IPE have resulted in the individual demonstrating acceptable job performance and (2) a reasonable expectation satisfactory job performance will be maintained with the individual based on ongoing support services being provided. (Page 316) Title IV

A BSBP Transition Specialist has been hired to assist the Transition Services Manager, field counselors and the BSBP Training Center in developing and implementing new Pre-ETS programs as well as provide Pre-ETS services to students who are visually impaired. BSBP has VR counselors and Vision Rehabilitation Therapists assigned geographically to each ISD and Local Educational Authority (LEA). The VR counselor works closely with teacher consultants for the visually impaired to identify students who would benefit from Pre-ETS and/or Vocational Rehabilitation Services through outreach and the BSBP Youth Low Vision Program. (Page 331) Title IV

BSBP will provide Pre-ETS not only to students with disabilities who have applied for vocational rehabilitation services but also to those students with disabilities who have not applied for services. If a student needs a service that goes beyond the scope of Pre-ETS and such additional service is listed on the student's approved IPE, BSBP will pay for those costs with non-reserved VR funds. If a student applies for a VR case, the Counselor establishes eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services within 60 days of the VR application being signed. The VR Counselor works with the student and parents to develop an IPE outlining the VR services necessary to assist the student in obtaining competitive integrated employment. The eligibility criteria for services must be met before plan development. The IEP, along with the IPE, are instruments that identify education, transition, and employment goals and objectives. The services outlined in the IEP are cooperatively agreed upon by the schools or educational facilities, parent/student, other relevant agencies and the rehabilitation agency; thereby establishing the objectives of the transition plan. (Pages 331-332) Title IV

Not all eligible or potentially eligible students with disabilities will require all five required pre-employment transition services, however, all should receive all needed services, as determined through informed choice and consultation with each student based on their strengths and needs and consistent with their IEP, when applicable.  (Page 336) Title IV

Students who are blind or visually impaired benefit from services designed to enhance Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) outcomes by receiving work based learning, work based readiness, career exploration counseling, instruction in self advocacy and counseling on opportunities for enrollment in post-secondary education. BSBP’s assessment suggests that early intervention implementing the above services leads to stronger vocational direction and outcomes that are focused on demand driven occupations. BSBP is gathering data as the implementation of WIOA drives this early intervention in order to obtain evidence based practice to substantiate the benefit of providing these early services. BSBP aligns with IDEA by participating in the IEP process, participating and conducting person centered plans and post-secondary planning. (Page 345) Title IV

BSBP provides appropriate Pre-ETS services and/or VR services to potentially eligible students or students who are eligible as early as age 14. BSBP attends IEPs, person-centered planning meetings, consultations with school staff including transition coordinators for the purpose of providing education and training for students and families regarding the opportunities for services that can enhance CIE outcomes. The ability to provide the five Pre-Employment Transition services categories and the four coordination services along with the nine authorized categories when appropriate can create an opportunity for great success. Examples are provision of work-based learning experiences that allow students to engage with employers, including learning soft skills. Providing the opportunity to visit college, and vocational programs to understand the expectations and plan with their family and counselor how to incorporate those into their career plan. (Page 353) Title IV

BSBP transfers customers receiving Support Employment to extended services once stabilization has occurred. The customer is considered to have achieved stabilization when the counselor, with input from the job coach/employment specialist, employer and individual, confirms that: 1) initial intensive services identified on the IPE have resulted in the individual demonstrating acceptable job performance, and 2) a reasonable expectation of satisfactory job performance will be maintained with the individual based on ongoing support services being provided. (Page 359) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Both VR agencies have collaborated to provide disability sensitivity training to front-line Michigan Works! staff and ADAAG (ADA Architectural Guidelines) evaluations. The purpose for the training and evaluations support Section 188 of WIOA which prohibits the exclusion of an individual from participation in, denial of the benefits of, discrimination in, or denial of employment in the administration of or in connection with, any programs and activities funded or otherwise financially assisted in whole or in part under Title I of WIOA because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or political affiliation or belief, or for beneficiaries, applicants, and participants only, on the basis of citizenship status, or participation in a program or activity that receives financial assistance under Title I of WIOA. For example, the most effective implementation of a strategic approach to address Section 188 has occurred in the Michigan Works! Macomb/St. Clair where a subcommittee under the Workforce Development Board was established specific to serving individuals with disabilities, the VR agencies serve as members on this subcommittee. Intense technical assistance from Michigan Rehabilitation Services/BSBP was provided to all of the offices within this Michigan Works! Office. (Page 92) Title I

Michigan Works! Service Centers must be inclusive of all customers to be effective. Inclusion honors and accommodates diversity. A universally accessible system requires meeting the diverse customer needs that exist within the local delivery area, which includes the needs of individuals with disabilities, people of different cultures, and persons with barriers to employment. Where inclusion abounds, centers are welcoming, inviting, accommodating, and accessible to everyone. As recipients of federal funds, Michigan Works! Agencies are required to comply with various regulations relating to non— discrimination, equal opportunity, and inclusion. The most critical of these regulations are: 
Section 188 of the WIOA.
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1998, as amended.
Titles I and II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (Page 156) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides consultation and technical assistance to Michigan Department of Education and local educational agencies to assist in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, employment-related activities, Pre-Employment Transition Services and other vocational rehabilitation. Consultation and technical assistance may include, but is not limited to, the following topics:
•Disability awareness
•Accommodations and assistive technology
•MDHHS Michigan Rehabilitation Services application, eligibility, and services
•Community-based services
•Independent living
•Career Pathways
•Competitive integrated employment (Page 259) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The provision of VR services to assist businesses to obtain qualified talent includes: •Talent Development including no cost recruitment and paid internships and apprenticeships •Reasonable Accommodations/Ergonomic Intervention to develop strategies for Workers with Physical, Cognitive and/or Behavioral Disabilities •Connections to partner assets and services •Job Analysis for performance elements and requirements •Risk management/Staff Retention •Injury Prevention and Wellness Programming •ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Services (Page 70) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Cooperation with Social Security Administration and Michigan Rehabilitation Services regional and local district offices to assist dually eligible customers receiving disability benefits in the use of Social Security work incentives and return to work efforts. Each Michigan Rehabilitation Services office has a dedicated champion for addressing unique needs of Social Security Administration recipients. These include Michigan Rehabilitation Services’ internal (online) eLearn system which contains information regarding:
o Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program and work incentives,
o Resource and referral available through the Social Security Administration’s Work Incentive Planning and Assistance project in serving Michigan communities,
o Referral to Beneficiary Access and Support Services as contracted with the Social Security Administration,
o Social Security Administration Work Incentive Liaisons available through local Social Security Administration offices, and Michigan Rehabilitation Services fee-for-service vendors. (Page 251) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Data Collection

According to the Fiscal Year 2016 RSA-911 data, 89% of customers were determined eligible for services and exited Michigan Rehabilitation Services during Fiscal Year 2016 were significantly or most significantly disabled; 65% were most significantly disabled. Customers with the following characteristics were more likely to be determined to have a most significant disability: racial/ethnic minority, students or youth, attendance or completion in special education certificate program, and Social Security beneficiaries. In addition, a higher proportion of customers with cognitive or psychiatric impairments were determined to be most significantly disabled. (Page 279) Title IV

511

~~VR is developing a coordinated process with State and local educational agencies in assisting individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities who are considering subminimum wage employment or who are already employed, at a subminimum wage, to maximize opportunities to achieve competitive integrated employment through services provided by VR and the local educational agencies. (Pages 97-98) Title I

To comply with the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act, Michigan Rehabilitation Services is collaborating with the Michigan Department of Education to update the Memorandum of Understanding. This agreement lays out how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education partner to provide a coordinated set of activities to facilitate a seamless transition of students with disabilities from school to competitive integrated employment. 
The Memorandum of Understanding focuses on mandates for transition services described in the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004). This includes how Michigan Rehabilitation Services and the Michigan Department of Education will collaborate to fulfill mandates on behalf of students with disabilities. Key elements of the partnership are stated in the agreement and include: Authority; Purpose; Pre-Employment Transition Services Required Activities; Consultation and Technical Assistance; Transition Planning; Outreach and Identification of Students with Disabilities; Section 511 Subminimum Wage; Assurance; and Provision of Services and Reimbursement. (Page 255) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides career counseling and information and referral services for individual with disabilities employed at subminimum wages. Individuals with disabilities are provided information and resources on competitive integrated employment initiatives designed to transition employees from sub minimum to competitive integrated employment. (Page 265) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Michigan Works! Service Centers must be inclusive of all customers to be effective. Inclusion honors and accommodates diversity. A universally accessible system requires meeting the diverse customer needs that exist within the local delivery area, which includes the needs of individuals with disabilities, people of different cultures, and persons with barriers to employment. Where inclusion abounds, centers are welcoming, inviting, accommodating, and accessible to everyone. As recipients of federal funds, Michigan Works! Agencies are required to comply with various regulations relating to non— discrimination, equal opportunity, and inclusion. The most critical of these regulations are: Section 188 of the WIOA. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1998, as amended. Titles I and II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (Page 156) Title I

Each year, the Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity, in conjunction with the Michigan Works! Association, hosts a Multi—State Equal Opportunity Officers training seminar. Representatives from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the U.S. Department of Labor Civil Rights Center conduct the training. The training focused on social media and employment discrimination, discrimination complaint, investigative techniques, asking telling, using and storing disability related information, recognizing hidden disabilities and identifying strategies to assist individuals, assistive technologies, and web accessibility guidelines. (Page 157) Title IV

The Michigan Works! Service Center certification criteria policy provides guidance on accessibility of our One-Stop delivery system and our Wagner-Peyser Employment Services Manual provides information about the requirements of posters and other materials to be displayed at Michigan Works! Service Centers. The Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity staff monitor Service Centers for compliance with certification criteria as part of WIOA programmatic reviews. The goal of programmatic reviews is to provide technical assistance, as appropriate, and ensure that established policies, procedures, and systems of the Michigan Works! Agency achieve quality program outcomes that meet the requirements and objectives of the WIOA and federal and state regulations. This program review is in addition to the WIOA fiscal compliance monitoring, and thereby ensures the state will meet program design, as required by the WIOA. (Page 159) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services’ Assistive Technology Consultant sits on the Assistive Technology Advisory Council for Michigan’s Assistive Technology Act’s program. The AT consultant will be responsible for; but not limited to: o Establishing a baseline and provide reports to reflect; program accessibility and progress and effectiveness of AT program/project implementation. o Ensuring accessibility throughout the vocational process that align with ADAAG and assessing the means in which the services are delivered (i.e. -Online orientation, web base outreach, and physical office locations) o Identify and assist in training curriculums ensuring for consistent practices across the Agency and interactions with partners. o Develop a network of resources for the state to address: o Delivery, education and reinforcement of AT Training for participates. o Secure Demonstration Equipment for trial and training use. o Provides Businesses with a Subject Matter Expert to assist with AT implementation and Training for newly acquired employees and retention of current employees with disabilities. o Develop a web-based inventory and exchange protocol to be utilized by the Agency and participates. (Pages 305-306) Title IV

Vets

The State of Michigan continues using the Talent Acquisition Portal — an online tool providing access to a centralized pool of individuals with disabilities, including disabled veterans, at the local, state and national level. MRS has committed to funding TAP access for state agencies for 18 months. TAP has both a national talent pool of Vocational Rehabilitation candidates looking for employment and a job-posting system for businesses looking to hire individuals with disabilities. TAP is led by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation, the National Employment Team (NET) and disABLEDperson, Inc. TAP allows employers to post jobs, search candidate resumes based on skill sets and geographic availability, capture job metrics, generate compliance and application quick reports, interview candidates, have online job fairs, and have their jobs seen by individuals with disabilities across the country. Employers also benefit from VR counselors and qualified candidates searching available opportunities. (Page 91) Title I

Assure that veteran’s preference and priority are strictly observed by giving covered persons (eligible veterans and eligible spouses) employment and training opportunities ahead or instead of non—covered persons in accordance with the requirements of Priority of Service. In addition, veterans, transitioning service members, and eligible spouses may be qualified for intensive services provided by Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists. Both DVOP Specialists and Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are integral, collocated partners in the Michigan Works! Service Centers. (Page 127) Title I

Priority of service is in effect at all times, not just when funds are limited. Priority is given in the following order: 78. First, to veterans and eligible spouses who are also funded in the groups are given statutory priority for WIOA adult formula funds. This means that veterans and eligible spouses who are also recipients of public assistance, other low-income individuals, or individuals who are basic skills deficient would receive first priority of services with the WIOA adult formula funds. 79. Second, to non-covered persons (that is, individuals who are not veterans or eligible spouses) who are included in the WIOA’s priority groups. 80. Third, to veterans and eligible spouses who are not included in the WIOA’s priority groups. 81. Last, to non-covered persons outside the groups given priority under the WIOA. (Page 154) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grant provides funding to support Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists and Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives. Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists provide intensive, one-on-one employment services exclusively to program-eligible veterans and spouses who possess a significant barrier to employment and/or are part of a population group identified as eligible. The purpose of the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists’ services is to assist the client in becoming job ready so they can secure employment utilizing the public workforce system. Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists do not interact with employers, nor engage in direct placement, and rely on their Michigan Works! Agency One-Stop partners to assist their job ready clients to secure appropriate employment. (Pages 154-155) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans State Grants is a fully integrated partner in our Michigan Works! Agency One-Stop Centers. All veterans and spouses of veterans seeking services at our One-Stop Centers will receive appropriate services from all One-Stop partners as would any other job seeker, but with priority of Service for veterans and eligible spouses applied. Prior to receiving services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants, a veteran or spouse of a veteran is first assessed by a non-Jobs for Veterans State Grants One-Stop worker prior to referral. (Page 155) Title I

The Veterans Services team also provides guidance to Service Center staff on how to identify and refer a veteran to a Disabled Veteran Outreach Worker for intensive case management services. (Page 198) Title I

Michigan Rehabilitation Services continues Memorandum of Understanding with the Veterans Administration to provide coordinated services to returning veterans with disabilities. This agreement clarifies services not be duplicated, but are complimentary in assisting eligible veterans achieve meaningful employment, in accordance with the laws and regulations governing each entity. Bureau liaisons are identified to assist in coordinating cooperative employment plans. Cross training has been provided to ensure understanding of both federal programs. (Page 253) Title I

Additionally, facility improvements will allow MCTI to enhance occupational training programs to maximize opportunities for the following populations identified in the 2017 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. • Individuals with mental illness • Students and youth with disabilities (formerly Transition Youth) • Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders • Cultural minority residents with disabilities • Individuals with sensory disabilities • Veterans with disabilities• Other underserved groups (Page 301) Title IV

Mental Health

~~In 2017, Michigan Rehabilitation Services and Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration revised and improved a longstanding Memorandum of Understanding between the two agencies. This updated agreement details Michigan Rehabilitation Services’ increased focus on both Supported Employment and the provision of Extended Services as detailed within Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

The Memorandum of Understanding focuses on individuals with developmental and/or intellectual disabilities and is delivered locally. Specific local partnership agreements are developed between Community Mental Health service providers, Michigan Rehabilitation Services, and may also include community rehabilitation organizations and local school districts. The local partnership agreements include Community Mental Health funding that allows Michigan Rehabilitation Services to capture federal match funds. These funds are used to provide Supported Employment services throughout Community Mental Health service areas. These local agreements include goals, objectives, responsibilities, and expectations for delivering Supported Employment and Extended Services. (Page 263) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services established a Memorandum of Understanding with the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration to ensure individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness who are dually eligible for both agencies’ programs have collaborative supports and services toward competitive integrated employment outcomes. The Memorandum of Understanding outlines the coordination of services, including Extended Services, Supported Employment, and Customized Employment.
Michigan Rehabilitation Services collaborates with Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration in the development of the Individual Placement and Supports model. This model promotes early engagement in employment activities for individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness express an interest in competitive integrated employment. There are currently 22 Individual Placement and Support sites providing services statewide. (Page 267) Title IV

Michigan Rehabilitation Services builds on the person-centered planning process used by local community mental health providers to develop quality individualized plans for employment. This includes required services and supports, service providers, Supported Employment goal, and may include Extended Service providers. Individualized services provided include, but are not limited to: individual community-based placement; trial work experiences; psychosocial rehabilitation via clubhouse programs; job coaching; job referral; Customized Employment; job development; job placement; and long-term follow along (including natural supports). Supported Employment services are provided in integrated community settings to the maximum extent possible. Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides ongoing support services for adults until the customer has 90 days of stabilized employment. Following job stabilization, Michigan Rehabilitation Services transfers the customer from employment follow-along to extended services provided by community mental health or natural supports.  (Page 315) Title IV

Project SEARCH is a specific employment model for students with the most significant disabilities in secondary education. Project SEARCH is funded by Michigan Mental Health Wellness Commission and federal funds. Students receive follow-along services as part of the Project SEARCH model. Michigan Rehabilitation Services works with the Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration to ensure extended services are provided for dually eligible students employed in competitive integrated settings.  (Page 315) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 72

Medicaid Provider Manual - 04/01/2020

“The following documents comprise the Michigan Medicaid Provider Manual, and address all health insurance programs administered by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS). MDHHS also issues periodic bulletins as changes are implemented to the policies and/or processes described in the manual. Bulletins are incorporated into the online version of the manual on a quarterly basis.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan Rehabilitation Services

The goal for all funds used for Supported Employment Services is to help individuals whose disabilities and functional limitations have traditionally meant that they would not be able to successfully enter the labor market through competitive integrated employment. Priorities include, but are not limited to: •Increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities who receive Supported Employment services;

Use Title I funds for Supported Employment services to achieve the maximum number of quality employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities and a focus on youth;Build subject matter expertise to facilitate Supported Employment, Customized Employment and other evidenced-based practices;Increase Supported Employment training opportunities for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors, community rehabilitation service staff, families and individuals”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • WIOA

State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan is in a unique position to address the needs of individuals, employers and communities to address the educational and economic means to reach their full potential.  All four Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) core programs (Titles I, II, III, and IV) are newly positioned within the Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity (LEO). Under Executive Order 2019-13, Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) (Title IV) was positioned under LEO and provides all four WIOA Core programs under one State department to allow for greater transparency and partnership.  VR continues to closely partner with the State’s One-Stop system and partners on strategic planning, and ways to collaboratively service our mutual customers (businesses and individuals with disabilities).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals - 12/17/2019

“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approves Michigan’s MI HealthLink Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver and concurrent MI HealthLink Waiver renewals, authorized under sections 1915(c) and 1915(b)(1) of the Social Security Act (the Act) respectively. This letter replaced the approval letter issued on December 13, 2019…

These section 1915(c) and 1915(b) MI HealthLink waivers are effective for a five year period beginning January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2024 and operate concurrently…

Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Training Connect (MiTC) Policy Manual Requirements and Guidelines - 12/09/2019

“The workforce system established under the WIOA emphasizes informed consumer choice, job-driven training, provider performance, and continuous improvement. The quality and selection of providers and programs of training services is vital to achieving these core principles. As required by the WIOA, Section 122, states in partnership with Local Boards must identify eligible training providers and programs that are qualified to receive WIOA Title I-B funds to train adults and dislocated workers, including those with disabilities. The approved State list of eligible training providers and programs serves as an important tool for participants seeking training providers and programs, and relevant information, such as program cost and program outcomes.

 

Local boards must work with the state to ensure that:

There are sufficient numbers and types of providers of career services and training services (including eligible providers with expertise in assisting individuals with disabilities and eligible providers with expertise in assisting adults in need of adult education and literacy activities) serving the local area and providing services that maximize consumer choice and lead to competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities; and

Public dissemination of the MiTC through the local One-Stop system and its partner programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

MI Choice Waiver Program - 12/01/2019

“Revisions to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual

Effective December 1, 2019, revisions were made to the MI Choice Waiver Chapter which result in policy and program changes. Many changes are the result of policy changes approved by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) during the MI Choice Waiver renewal process. Additional changes were made to provide clarification on certain topics. Please see the Medical Services Administration Bulletin, MSA 19-17 for a list of updates and the updated MI Choice Waiver Chapter of the Medicaid Provider Manual.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment First in Michigan - 11/15/2019

“This report builds on the 2014 Michigan Developmental Disabilities Network report, “Employment First in Michigan,” which examined the employment status of Michigan adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and/or dual diagnosis (co-occurring DD and mental illness) and state policies that align with employment First goals. The 2019 report on Employment First highlights where employment conditions have improved, what challenges remain, and what policy and practice changes are required to continue Michigan’s improvement in providing access to competitive, integrated employment for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) - 09/03/2019

~~“Arab Community Center for Economic & Social Services (ACCESS) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, as well as Arab and non-Arab, Chaldean, and South Asian communities in the greater Detroit area.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Islamic Organization of North America Mosque, Islamic Center of America, Macomb County Health Department, Congressional offices, Chaldean and Coptic churches, Jewish Family Service, HUDA Clinic, Luke Project 52 Clinic, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Regional Social Security offices, and Local businesses.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mr. Hassan JaberPhone: (313) 842-7010Email: hjaber@accesscommunity.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Genesee Health Plan Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Genesee Health Plan Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left-behind” populations; immigrant population; deaf and hard of hearing population, veterans; employees of small businesses and small business owners; federally recognized tribes; reentering incarcerated citizens.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with the Disability Network, Enroll America, First Presbyterian Church of Flint, Genesee Community Health Center, Genesee County Health Department, Ascension Genesys, Hamilton Community Health Network, Hurley Medical Center, McLaren Flint Hospital, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Michigan Medicaid/Medicare Assistance Program, Michigan State University Extension Valley Area Agency on Aging, The CRIM Fitness Foundation, and The Flint Registry.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:James Milanowski Phone: (810) 232-7740Email: jmilanowski@countyhealthplans.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veteran Navigators - 07/01/2019

~~“Veteran Navigators was created to assist Veterans and military families of ALL eras and discharge types. They work to connect Veterans and their families to federal, state and local resources to ease issues regarding mental health, substance abuse, housing and other common issues that impact veterans in order to support healthier lifestyles and provide support.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

House Resolution No. 170 - 01/01/2018

“A resolution to declare October 2017 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in the state of Michigan

Whereas, It has been more than 70 years since Congress designated a week in October, which has culminated into National Disability Employment Awareness Month with the 2017 theme being ‘Employment First for Michigan’; and

Whereas, Every person should be seen for their ability and not disability with valuable strengths and the potential to make important contributions to their local communities; and

Whereas, By promoting opportunities for all citizens with disabilities in Michigan, gaining individual integrated employment, and engaging businesses to value the contributions that employees with disabilities bring to their organization, we will enhance the employment landscape and enable Michigan to compete with other states to bring in high-demand businesses and jobs; and

Whereas, Disability Employment Awareness Month is an appropriate time to recognize Michigan’s employment accomplishments concerning persons with disabilities in integrated environments and to make sure all of Michigan’s citizens with intellectual and developmental disabilities are included;

 

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare October 2017 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in the state of Michigan.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Michigan ABLE Legislation (HB 4542) - 10/28/2015

An act to create the Michigan achieving a better life experience (ABLE) program; to provide for ABLE accounts; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state agencies, boards, and departments; to allow certain tax credits or deductions; and to provide for penalties and remedies.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Michigan Business Opportunity Act for Persons with Disabilities - 05/04/1998

An act to provide competitive opportunity in state procurements of goods, services, and construction for businesses owned by persons with disabilities; to provide powers and duties of the governor; to prescribe powers and duties of certain state departments and agencies; and to provide penalties.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Michigan SB 360 - Education Savings Program

An act to amend 2000 PA 161, entitled “An act to create the Michigan education savings program; to provide for education savings accounts; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state agencies, boards, and departments; to allow certain tax credits or deductions; and to provide for penalties and remedies,” by amending section 10 (MCL 390.1480), as amended by 2001 PA 215.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

“MiABLE Disability Savings Program Now Available in Michigan” - 11/01/2016

“Today, Michigan became the fifth state in the country to launch a disability savings program, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley announced. The Mi-ABLE (Michigan Achieving a Better Life Experience) program is a 529 (A) savings account, offering investment and tax incentives for families and others who wish to save for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Michigan Executive Order 2015-15: Employment First in Michigan - 11/18/2015

All state departments and agencies that provide services and support to persons with disabilities, and all state departments and agencies that provide employment, economic development, or other related services, shall implement Employment First in Michigan by coordinating efforts and collaborating to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures, and funding support competitive employment within an integrated setting as the first priority and optimal outcome for persons with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Michigan Executive Directive 2014-1: Employment Opportunities - 10/27/2014

“It is important that the State of Michigan provide a welcoming environment to those with disabilities and encourage their employment in state government in a competitive integrated setting. While many individuals desire that their disability be kept confidential, raising awareness and providing adequate training to all state employees can help bridge the gap to ensure every employee is treated with dignity and respect at all times.”   “In coordination with the Department of Civil Rights, the Civil Rights Commission and the Civil Service Commission, the SEODC shall recommend a program for attracting and retaining individuals with mental illness, intellectual or developmental disabilities and physical disabilities that includes competitive integrated employment opportunities. The program shall require the participation and engagement of all Executive Branch departments and agencies.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order No. 2004 State Americans with Disabilities Act Coordinator - 06/03/2004

“Whereas, in Michigan there are approximately 1.9 million persons with disabilities;

Whereas it has long been the policy of the State of Michigan and this Governor to ensure that all persons, including those persons with disabilities, are given equal participation opportunities in all aspects of public life;

Now, therefore, I, Jennifer M. Granholm, Governor of State of Michigan, by virtue of the power and authority vested in the Governor under the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and Michigan law, order the following:

Establishment of State ADA Coordinator; Designation of Departmental ADA Coordinators; Assistance of Departments of Agencies”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 30

Training Connect (MiTC) Policy Manual Requirements and Guidelines - 12/09/2019

“The workforce system established under the WIOA emphasizes informed consumer choice, job-driven training, provider performance, and continuous improvement. The quality and selection of providers and programs of training services is vital to achieving these core principles. As required by the WIOA, Section 122, states in partnership with Local Boards must identify eligible training providers and programs that are qualified to receive WIOA Title I-B funds to train adults and dislocated workers, including those with disabilities. The approved State list of eligible training providers and programs serves as an important tool for participants seeking training providers and programs, and relevant information, such as program cost and program outcomes.

 

Local boards must work with the state to ensure that:

There are sufficient numbers and types of providers of career services and training services (including eligible providers with expertise in assisting individuals with disabilities and eligible providers with expertise in assisting adults in need of adult education and literacy activities) serving the local area and providing services that maximize consumer choice and lead to competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities; and

Public dissemination of the MiTC through the local One-Stop system and its partner programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Employment First in Michigan - 11/15/2019

“This report builds on the 2014 Michigan Developmental Disabilities Network report, “Employment First in Michigan,” which examined the employment status of Michigan adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and/or dual diagnosis (co-occurring DD and mental illness) and state policies that align with employment First goals. The 2019 report on Employment First highlights where employment conditions have improved, what challenges remain, and what policy and practice changes are required to continue Michigan’s improvement in providing access to competitive, integrated employment for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Veteran Navigators - 07/01/2019

~~“Veteran Navigators was created to assist Veterans and military families of ALL eras and discharge types. They work to connect Veterans and their families to federal, state and local resources to ease issues regarding mental health, substance abuse, housing and other common issues that impact veterans in order to support healthier lifestyles and provide support.”

Systems
  • Other

Michigan Disability Resources - 06/07/2019

~~“Welcome to Michigan's first website devoted specially to the interests, concerns, and needs of Michiganians with disabilities. Of Michigan's nearly 10 million residents, about 1.9 million have a disability. That's one in every five residents.

On these pages you will find the services and programs for people with disabilities offered by the State of Michigan as well as other sites of interest. Whether you're looking for assistance in finding a job, want to learn about the latest assistive technology, or have a question about your rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act, you will find it here.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Educational Development Plan (EDP) Fact Sheet - 05/04/2019

“Educational Development Plans (EDPs) are plans created by all students about career goals and action plans for reaching their goals. EDPs help students think about long-term education and career plans before entering high school. By going through this process, students learn more about themselves, consider different options for their future, and develop a more specific path for preparing for their career choice.

 

Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and EDPs

Although both the IEP and EDP promote positive outcomes after high school, they are two different documents with different purposes. EDPs do not replace IEPs. IEPs are created for students meeting special education eligibility under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Per IDEA, during transition planning, educators gather information about a student’s interests and strengths through age-appropriate assessments and work with the student to develop measurable postsecondary (after high school) goals related to education, training, employment, and, when appropriate, independent living skills. EDPs help students identify career paths and the education needed to reach career goals. Sometimes in developing the IEP, information from the EDP may be used to assist in transition planning.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Special Education Reevaluation Process - 04/30/2019

~~“A student’s special education needs may change throughout the course of their educational career, and the reevaluation process is developed to assess these evolving needs. A district must ensure a reevaluation of each student with a disability is conducted when: The district determines the student’s special education and related services and the student’s educational needs, including improved academic achievement and functional performance, warrant a reevaluation; or The child’s parent or teacher requests a reevaluation.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS) - 04/09/2019

~~“MISSIONTo improve public Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services delivered by the Bureau of Services for Blind Persons (BSBP) and Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS).

VISIONBSBP and MRS will provide VR services in manners that are respectful, equitable and effective in achieving meaningful employment outcomes for people with disabilities.”

MCRS was created under Executive Order (EO) (2012-10) in 2012.And oversight of implementing Employment First in Michigan (click here for Executive Order 2015-15). More about the mission of MCRS can be found by accessing the web-link.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mental Health Services - 02/08/2019

~~“The VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System Mental Health Service is a Partner Affiliate of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School. Together the departments host an internationally recognized faculty known for their contributions to the study of mood disorders, stress and anxiety disorders, substance use disorders as well as other psychiatric disorders….Community Based Services• Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center/Veteran's Empowerment and Recovery (VEAR) Center• Mental Health Intensive Care Management (MHICM)• Compensated Work Therapy Program (CWT)”

Systems
  • Other

Supports for Students with Disabilities - 11/16/2018

~~“Many offices, agencies, and organizations outside of the Office of Special Education (OSE) work with families and schools to support students with disabilities.”This site has links to a variety of services including Assistive Technology and Transition to employment 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Services Offered by the Detroit Regional Office - 11/15/2018

~~“VA’s Detroit Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Michigan. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs”

Systems
  • Other
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State of Michigan Unified State Plan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program Years 2020-2023 - 01/15/2020

“Michigan is in a unique position to address the needs of individuals, employers and communities to address the educational and economic means to reach their full potential.  All four Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) core programs (Titles I, II, III, and IV) are newly positioned within the Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity (LEO). Under Executive Order 2019-13, Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) (Title IV) was positioned under LEO and provides all four WIOA Core programs under one State department to allow for greater transparency and partnership.  VR continues to closely partner with the State’s One-Stop system and partners on strategic planning, and ways to collaboratively service our mutual customers (businesses and individuals with disabilities).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Employment First - 04/20/2019

~~“A critical priority for the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), is to invest in systems change efforts that result in increased community-based, integrated employment opportunities for individuals with significant disabilities. This priority reflects growing support for a national movement called Employment First, a framework for systems change that is centered on the premise that all citizens, including individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life.

Under this approach, publicly-financed systems are urged to align policies, service delivery practices, and reimbursement structures to commit to integrated employment as the priority option with respect to the use of publicly-financed day and employment services for youth and adults with significant disabilities. ODEP defines integrated employment as work paid directly by employers at the greater of minimum or prevailing wages with commensurate benefits, occurring in a typical work setting where the employee with a disability interacts or has the opportunity to interact continuously with co-workers without disabilities, has an opportunity for advancement and job mobility, and is preferably engaged full-time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Michigan "Better Off Working" - Disability Reform Work Group Strategic Plan - 08/01/2014

This report, developed by the Michigan Department of Human Services, Michigan Rehabilitation Services, Disability Determination Service, the Disability Network, and Michigan Employers, details goals to further the inclusive employment of individuals with disabilities in the state of Michigan. “The goals of the strategic plan include: “Coordinating government and private agency resources in cross-program settings to assist individuals with disabilities enter or return to the workforce.  Improving the health and well-being of individuals with disabilities by promoting work participation. De-emphasizing disability as a de facto public assistance program by refocusing on the goal of returning to work.”   
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Servic