Minnesota

States - Big Screen

Individuals with disabilities should reach for the stars and pursue their dreams when it comes to exploring their employment options in the North Star State of Minnesota!

2018 State Population.
0.62%
Change from
2017 to 2018
5,611,179
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.9%
Change from
2017 to 2018
296,481
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.08%
Change from
2017 to 2018
145,820
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.89%
Change from
2017 to 2018
49.18%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.02%
Change from
2017 to 2018
84.25%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 5,519,952 5,576,606 5,611,179
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 302,274 305,082 296,481
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 145,080 145,697 145,820
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,576,753 2,602,221 2,610,660
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 48.00% 47.76% 49.18%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 83.84% 84.23% 84.25%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.90% 3.50% 2.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.30% 18.00% 18.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.80% 8.40% 8.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 302,266 319,070 309,507
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 299,748 296,776 299,237
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 511,971 516,268 512,517
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 41,420 43,125 41,281
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,628 24,310 23,339
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,376 10,227 11,260
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 17,435 22,465 20,592
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 14,097 15,048 16,222
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,621 8,266 6,646

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 10,997 10,737 10,517
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 12.90% 12.60% 12.40%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 124,537 122,142 120,283

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 65,452 63,015 63,948
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 71,415 69,039 70,494
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 182,808 167,247 175,103
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 35.80% 37.70% 36.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50% 0.20% 0.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.10% 1.00% 1.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,007 N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 459 339 1,137
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,935 2,997 2,182
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 12,112 10,941 11,058
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 46 2 55
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 31 1 43
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 67.00% 50.00% 78.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.57 0.02 0.78

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
5,196
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 11 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 322 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 830 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,691 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,997 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 345 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 40.80% 40.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,248 5,732 5,796
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 187,379 185,523 184,653
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 162 131 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 333 218 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $20,628,000 $21,976,000 $24,599,235
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $253,024,000 $257,662,000 $253,960,955
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $17,482,000 $18,283,000 $23,192,061
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $97,396,000 $101,309,000 $110,306,334
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 8.00% 9.00% 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 8,015 8,908 10,152
Number of people served in facility based work. 14,374 14,718 14,533
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 2,181 2,141 2,523
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 40.50 48.30 57.25

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.45% 60.71% 60.91%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.08% 10.07% 10.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.15% 4.11% 4.17%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.40% 89.53% 79.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.86% 23.24% 27.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 69.25% 61.71% 65.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 86.78% 81.14% 80.05%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 44.39% 38.47% 38.53%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,448,836
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,880
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 33,646
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 162,155
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 195,801
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 159
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 201
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 360
AbilityOne wages (products). $284,324
AbilityOne wages (services). $1,837,245

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 63 65 59
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 63 65 59
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8,512 7,065 6,883
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8,512 7,065 6,883

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Person-Centered Thinking and Person-Centered Planning was a top strategic goal in 2017. Training was required for all VRS staff in fall of 2017. University of Minnesota Institute on Community Integration trainers were contracted to help staff understand the values-based concepts and incorporate client-centered practices in services we provide in accordance with WIOA, the Olmstead Plan and Employment First policy. Tools and techniques were introduced and practiced in the training. To further knowledge, skills and abilities in Person-Centered practices, a Community of Practice consisting of VRS staff will launch in December 2017. The purpose will be to create a culture of continuous improvement, construct processes, policy and guidance that are person-centered, and utilize online coursework available through the University of Minnesota for ongoing training. (Page 255) Title IV.

Customized Employment

~~• DEED’s VRS will ensure, as appropriate, that students with disabilities that are seeking subminimum wage employment and who have applied for VR services are determined eligible or ineligible for VR services; have an approved IPE; receive pre-employment transition services; and receive appropriate reasonable accommodations and appropriate supports and services, including supported and customized employment services, that assist in obtaining and maintaining a competitive integrated employment outcome. (Page 211) Title IV

• VRS along with a key Community Rehabilitation Provider is developing a Minnesota centric Customized Employment Training and pursuing ACRE (Association for Community Rehabilitation Educators) certification for the training participants. This training will include hands on learning opportunities for Discovery Assessment and Job Development portions of Customized Employment. Each participant will also receive mentoring from VRS & CRP staff who are certified by one of the key CE training entities that provide certification. The goal of this Customized Employment Training is to assist placement professionals develop an understanding of CE and demonstrate proficiency in providing Discovery and Job Development. The training is also essential for Program Managers, Rehabilitation Area Managers who supervise staff who are providing CE services. (Page 216) Title IV

Customized Employment. VRS has partnered with ProAct, Inc. and Occupational Development Center, WIOA Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC), and the Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC) to provide Marc Gold & Associates’ Customized Employment Training in Minnesota through June, 2018. Two cohorts began in 2017 that include 24 VRS placement professionals, counselors, RAMs and supervisors, along with community partner staff. Participants attend nine full days of certification training building skills to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and employer. (Page 228) Title IV

There are three specific strategies that VRS will play an active role in:
1) Promulgate changes to the State Rule governing Extended Employment, ending admissions to non-integrated and sub-minimum wage programs and shifting the state funding to integrated employment,
2) provide technical assistance to non-integrated employment programs to design new business models that lead to competitive employment in the most integrated setting, and
3) provide information about effective employment strategies, such as supported and customized employment, that make competitive employment possible for individuals with complex and significant disabilities. (Page 249) Title IV

VRS along with a key Community Rehabilitation Provider is developing a Minnesota centric Customized Employment Training and pursuing ACRE (Association for Community Rehabilitation Educators) certification for the training participants. This training will include hands on learning opportunities for Discovery Assessment and Job Development portions of Customized Employment. Each participant will also receive mentoring from VRS & CRP staff who are certified by one of the key CE training entities that provide certification. The goal of this Customized Employment Training is to assist placement professionals develop an understanding of CE and demonstrate proficiency in providing Discovery and Job Development. The training is also essential for Program Managers, Rehabilitation Area Managers who supervise staff who are providing CE services. (Page 259) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Moreover, the DEI has helped Minnesota to build the capacity of WDA staff to increase the number of youth with disabilities participating in career pathways programs by implementing an Integrated Resource Team (IRT) approach as well as incorporating the Guideposts for Success best practices framework into service delivery. This success has prompted the development of a guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s Personal Learning Plan (PLP). The guide was developed to assist WDA staff when working with youth with disabilities who have a Personal Learning Plan (PLP) or an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The guide provides suggestions for integrating the Guideposts for Success into student ILP activities for both in-school and out-of-school youth. For more information on the DEI and the guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s PLP, see the Disability Employment Initiative weblink: https://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/office-youth-development/special/disability-employment-initiative/  (Page 77) Title I

4. Work with Department of Human Services (DHS) in the Olmstead interagency workgroup focused on blending and braiding funding that allow access to extended services for the long term supports needed for customers desiring employment. Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) is currently working with DHS on developing an interagency agreement between DHS, VRS, and SSB for providing services to those customers who require long term supports. SSB does not see the high volume of customers who require extended services that VRS sees, although the interagency agreement will apply to SSB. (Page 319) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~• Disability Employment Initiative- Partners for Youth Career Pathways - Minnesota is currently managing a $2.5 million, 42-month DEI grant funded through the U.S. DOL’s Employment and Training Administration and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. This grant allows Minnesota to strengthen partnerships and strategically align youth and adult career pathways systems to effectively serve youth with disabilities through multiple entry and exit points. In addition, the DEI has allowed Minnesota to expand the number of Employment Networks in the state which will help increase services to Social Security disability beneficiaries participating career pathways programs.
Moreover, the DEI has helped Minnesota to build the capacity of WDA staff to increase the number of youth with disabilities participating in career pathways programs by implementing an Integrated Resource Team (IRT) approach as well as incorporating the Guideposts for Success best practices framework into service delivery. This success has prompted the development of a guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s Personal Learning Plan (PLP). The guide was developed to assist WDA staff when working with youth with disabilities who have a Personal Learning Plan (PLP) or an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The guide provides suggestions for integrating the Guideposts for Success into student ILP activities for both in-school and out-of-school youth. For more information on the DEI and the guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s PLP, see the Disability Employment Initiative weblink: https://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/office-youth-development/special/disability-employment-initiative/  (Page 77) Title I

• Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Career Pathways — Beginning in 2014 and recently extended, Minnesota’s DEI project supports job—driven approaches in career pathway systems and programs to equip youth and adults with disabilities (including individuals with significant disabilities) with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in—demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. Three Local Workforce Development Areas operate career pathways in manufacturing, health care, and information technology sectors. Disability Resources Coordinators work to strengthen partnerships with Vocational Rehabilitation, disability agencies, and employers and modify career pathway education and employment for individual success. The GWDB Disability Equity Committee is evaluating these three projects to develop recommendations that will result in better services and outcomes to individuals with disabilities not served under Title IV. Two primary recommendations are being considered to replicate and build state-wide capacity; 1. Navigators and local teams are key to developing sustainable strategies and 2. Nationally recognized training that is Minnesota designed and implemented. (Page 79-80) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~• SGA Project: the Institute on Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts — Boston has received RSA funding to demonstrate effective strategies to assist SSDI beneficiaries achieve income above the substantial gainful activity (SGA) level. Minnesota VRS is one of the demonstration sites. At time of enrollment, the SSDI beneficiary is assigned a counselor, placement specialist and financial specialist. Eligibility for services is presumed within three days and the Employment Plan is developed within 30 days of application. VRS has partnered with the DLL to provide financial counseling in VR offices. RSA funding was used to provide the benefits planners with financial literacy training so that in addition to benefits planning the financial specialists can provide assistance with improving credits scores, paying off credit card debt, and developing savings plans. It is hoped that the combination of rapid engagement and financial planning services will lead to better outcomes. Although the SGA Project does not receive any Medicaid funding, the financial specialist positions would not have been possible without the initial collaboration with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant. (Pages 285-286) Title I

School to Work Transition

~~The Guideposts for Success, a best practices framework that was developed by the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth (NCWD) is utilized to ensure that all youth, including those with disabilities are successful when transitioning to adulthood. The Guideposts for Success constitute five tenets that align closely with WIOA goals and outcomes. These five tenets are: school preparation, youth development and leadership, career preparation, connecting activities, and family involvement. When a youth has received services or hash had experiences that align with the Guideposts tenets, the youth is more likely to transition to adulthood successfully. For more information on how the Guideposts are being incorporated into the Round 7 Disability Employment Initiative follow this weblink: https://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/office-youth-development/special/disability-employment-initiative/  (Page 152) Title I

Goal 2: Increasing Pre-Employment Transition Services
VRS, schools, and the VR Community will focus on increasing vocational exploration and work based learning experiences for high school students with disabilities. (Page 236) Title IV

Goal 2: Increasing Pre-Employment Transition Services VRS, schools, and the VR community will focus on increasing vocational exploration and work based learning experiences for high school students with disabilities.
Strategic Priorities 
A. Develop strategies to implement the Pre-ETS requirements stipulated in WIOA
Action: Track required and authorized services and monitor expenditures and fiscal impact
Progress achieved: VRS delivers pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) through counseling staff (VR eligible persons) and contracts (VR potentially eligible persons). An Employment Plan is developed and services are tracked. 
VRS issued nine fee for service contracts in July, 2017 to vendors to provide required services to VR potentially eligible people. Requests for Proposals are currently being developed to expand the availability of Pre-ETS services within the Twin cities metropolitan area and northwestern Minnesota. (Page 254) Title IV

C. Increase the number of work based learning experiences prior to graduation for VR eligible students in high school
Action: Establish a baseline and track the number of VR students with paid and unpaid work based learning experience prior to graduation.
Progress achieved: Service codes have been developed and implemented to track Pre-ETS purchased services.  (Page 254) Title IV

With the new emphasis on Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), SSB will continue to work with traditional partners to promote these models and facilitate effective implementation of emerging school-to-work efforts. The activities detailed below are designed to facilitate outreach and referral efforts to transition-age students who are blind or visually impaired. The goals of this ongoing involvement by the counselor in the education of a student, beginning as early as age 14, are to enable a student to live independently before leaving a school setting, have a greater understanding of relevant employment options, and develop self-advocacy skills. (Page 279) Title IV

All transition students are expected to have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that aligns with their Individualized Education Program (IEP). The development of the IPE is expected to be within 90 days of eligibility and the job goal is one that this projected for the student. Work and career exploration must be part of the IPE. (Page 283-284) Title IV

A transition assessment tool guides counselors and teams about each student’s skill level in activities of daily living and identifies skill training needed for moving on to post-secondary life. This transition assessment has been instrumental in the development of concrete plans and strategies that can be woven into the students IPE and IEP. This results in a genuinely coordinated effort between schools and VR. Counselors are working with IEP teams to encourage the use of postsecondary options for students to take entry level college classes while still in high school. This gives students an opportunity to try out their technology, braille, and self- advocacy skills prior to attending college full time. (Page 316) Title IV

To provide an additional resource to parents of high school students, SSB has contracted with PACER, a parent advocacy group knowledgeable in the IEP and transition process. PACER advocates create materials, facilitate workshops for parents and students, and conduct surveys on parent satisfaction. (Page 316) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~• Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Career Pathways — Beginning in 2014 and recently extended, Minnesota’s DEI project supports job—driven approaches in career pathway systems and programs to equip youth and adults with disabilities (including individuals with significant disabilities) with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in—demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. Three Local Workforce Development Areas operate career pathways in manufacturing, health care, and information technology sectors. Disability Resources Coordinators work to strengthen partnerships with Vocational Rehabilitation, disability agencies, and employers and modify career pathway education and employment for individual success. The GWDB Disability Equity Committee is evaluating these three projects to develop recommendations that will result in better services and outcomes to individuals with disabilities not served under Title IV. Two primary recommendations are being considered to replicate and build state-wide capacity; 1. Navigators and local teams are key to developing sustainable strategies and 2. Nationally recognized training that is Minnesota designed and implemented. (Pages 79-80) Title I

DEED meets its ongoing obligation not to discriminate on the basis of disability by developing system wide policy and procedure initiatives that comply with Section 188 of WIOA. These policies include physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials to serve the needs of customers with disabilities. (Page 127) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

There are several opportunities for activities to be aligned and enhanced with the core programs. Training is needed for staff to understand the appropriate activities and career pathway opportunities for recipients within a system where job search and job placement have been primarily seen as the core activity. We need to continue to better understand how career pathways models including; work-based learning, apprenticeships, and skills training can be implemented to align with the needs of industry. Development of employer-led sector partnerships allow for opportunities for jobseekers with a priority to address the disparities gaps in race, disability, disconnected youth, and gender opportunities. This being said, it has been critical for providers to understand the regional sectors in demand. (Page 69) Title I Core Responsibility 1 — Develop employer outreach activities to establish, maintain, and facilitate regular contact with employers to promote employment and training opportunities for the benefit of Veterans. Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Develop job opportunities for Veteran job seekers through outreach efforts with Minnesota employers: job development phone contacts, in person employer visits, and participation in job fair activities on behalf of Veterans. 2) Communicate and coordinate with Business Services Representatives in the local AJC to facilitate and promote job opportunities for Veterans, especially those with significant barriers to employment. 3) Promote the "Veteran Friendly Employer" initiative to all businesses contacted. 4) Encourage employers to employ Veterans utilizing apprenticeships and OJT programs, State and Federal dislocated worker programs, and GI Bill benefits. 5) Maintain current information on employment and training opportunities. 6) Monitor Federal Contractor Job Listings (FCJL) and Vet Central job orders for Veterans using the WFC, or on the DVOP caseload. 7) Provide contacts and job leads to DVOPs. (Page 447) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Collaboration Grants to Provide Independent Living Services: Since 2008, the VRS/IL collaboration has served Minnesotans with the most significant disabilities who require both vocational rehabilitation and independent living services to meet their goals for working and living in the community. In FFY 2017 VRS dedicated $1.2 million in SSA program income to fund benefit coaches who are housed in every VRS office. The benefit coaches provide benefits and financial planning services for eligible consumers who are receiving SSI and/or SSDI Social Security benefits. This funding continues and expands the services previously provided by the SGA Project, a RSA funded demonstration project to improve employment outcomes for SSDI beneficiaries. (Page 204) Title IV
 Ticket to Work Employment Networks: VRS, State Services for the Blind and SSA co-host periodic meetings of the Employment Networks to provide staff training, updates on Ticket to Work procedural changes, and to promote Partnership Plus job retention services after VRS/SSB case closure.
The SGA Project: In 2017, Vocational Rehabilitation completed a two-year model demonstration project designed to provide SSDI beneficiaries information and support to develop an employment plan that maps out a pathway to achieve employment above Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA). The SGA Project utilized a rapid engagement approach in which eligibility is determined within three days, Transferable Skills and Labor Market Information are provided and Benefits Planning and Financial Education are initiated within seven days. Within 30 days of application, the IPE and a Placement Plan are developed. A benefits analysis is completed within eight weeks of application if needed. As a result of positive feedback from Treatment Team clients and staff, Minnesota has expanded the project statewide using a combination of SSA program income and state funding. (Page 205) Title IV

Statewide Collaboration VRS collaborates with the Minnesota Department of Education (MDE), Department of Human Services (DHS), and county and local service providers to offer statewide supported employment services. VRS is a partner in several state-level agreements that provide long-term supports. During development of an employment plan, VRS counselors and other service team members help consumers to select supported employment services that meet their needs. They identify which services will be provided by VRS, as well as the source of long-term supports in the community. VRS provides time-limited supports for up to 24 months, but an employment plan may be amended if additional time is needed to achieve job stability. The primary funding resources for long-term supports in the community following VRS case closure are county case managers, the VRS Extended Employment Program, DHS Medicaid-waiver funded services, and the Social Security Administration’s Impairment-Related Work Expense exclusions and Ticket to Work funding for persons on SSI and/or SSDI. (Page 213-214) Title IV

About 40 percent of VRS applicants receive SSA benefits. VRS was instrumental in establishing the Work Incentives Connection, a SSA funded program of Goodwill Industries that provides work incentives planning and assistance for consumers.
SSA, VRS and State Services for the Blind co-host periodic meetings of the Employment Networks. In addition to providing in-service training, the meetings provide an opportunity to learn more about the services offered by each Employment Network to assist consumers make informed choices when selecting a vendor for employment services and/or on-going job retention services. The current focus of this group is to expand the use of Ticket to Work funding to provide ongoing job retention supports, to promote the use of PASS Plans, and to ensure the continuation of benefits planning services as people transition from VRS services to job retention services.  (Page 250) Title IV

SSDI and SSI Beneficiaries: SSA and VRS continue to co—host bi-annual meetings of the Employment Networks Ticket—to—Work funding is used to supplement Supported Employment funding or to provide continued job retention services beyond the 90 days VRS typically provides. Benefit coaches have been added to each office to ensure beneficiaries fully understand the impact income will have on benefits. (Page 261) Title IV

SGA Project: the Institute on Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts — Boston has received RSA funding to demonstrate effective strategies to assist SSDI beneficiaries achieve income above the substantial gainful activity (SGA) level. Minnesota VRS is one of the demonstration sites. At time of enrollment, the SSDI beneficiary is assigned a counselor, placement specialist and financial specialist. Eligibility for services is presumed within three days and the Employment Plan is developed within 30 days of application. VRS has partnered with the DLL to provide financial counseling in VR offices. RSA funding was used to provide the benefits planners with financial literacy training so that in addition to benefits planning the financial specialists can provide assistance with improving credits scores, paying off credit card debt, and developing savings plans. It is hoped that the combination of rapid engagement and financial planning services will lead to better outcomes. Although the SGA Project does not receive any Medicaid funding, the financial specialist positions would not have been possible without the initial collaboration with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant. (Page 285-286) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Current business services involve a high degree of employer engagement. From those represented on the local workforce development boards, participating on training advisory groups with postsecondary education, employers provides direction to business services in Minnesota. Community engagement is a growing area of activity, as we work to address disparate impact among people of color, individuals with disabilities and disconnected youth. This presents a unique opportunity to bridge the divides of cultural differences and work place expectations. One recent example includes a workshop for employers to support their development of cultural competence in attracting and retaining a diverse quality workforce. A better understanding of the needs of employers and communities can lead to customer-centered design of services that benefit both job seekers and employers. (Page 41) Title I

Data Collection

C. VRS will lead and convene Placement Partnerships focused on developing, maintaining and strengthening relationships among VRS, VR Community Partners and Employers Action: The VRS Placement Specialist team will develop and disseminate a quarterly report on the major activities and outcomes for active placement partnerships Action: Work with partners to implement WIOA Common Performance Measure 6 focused on effectiveness in serving employers Progress achieved: The Disability Employment Resource (DER) was developed to support business engagement. The initiative helps businesses meet their workforce goals by employing people with disabilities in competitive integrated positions, while employment professionals learn more about how to align their placement goals with business needs. The DER curriculum improves business engagement by delivering information to bridge the gap between business and human services, dispelling myths that can prevent employers from considering people with disabilities, helping human service professionals understand the business perspective, providing tools for starting and building relationships, and connecting businesses with information and resources to help them succeed. (Page 258) Title IV

511

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students….
• Outline services and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), with regard to youth with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment.
• Provide assurance that neither the SEA nor the LEA will enter into an arrangement with an entity holding a special wage certificate under section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act for the purpose of operating a program under which a youth with a disability is engaged in work at a subminimum wage. (Page 207) Title IV

• DEED’s VRS and MDE’s Special Education and Career and College Success Divisions will work together with LEAs to ensure that outreach and identification of students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment in order for them to receive counseling and information and referral related to competitive integrated employment.
• DEED’s VRS will ensure, as appropriate, that students with disabilities that are seeking subminimum wage employment and who have applied for VR services are determined eligible or ineligible for VR services; have an approved IPE; receive pre-employment transition services; and receive appropriate reasonable accommodations and appropriate supports and services, including supported and customized employment services, that assist in obtaining and maintaining a competitive integrated employment outcome.
• DEED’s VRS and MDE’s Special Education and Career and College Success Divisions will provide LEAs the required processes and forms to document the required actions specified under WIOA for all students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment. (Page 211) Title IV

• DEED’s VRS will ensure that all students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment receive documentation of the required actions specified under WIOA within 45 calendar days of completion of the required actions. 
Assurance related to WIOA Section 511 and 34 CFR 397, Limitations on use of subminimum wage
In accordance with 34 CFR 397.31, MDE’s Special Education and Career and College Success Divisions, through the MDE Career Technical Education Program approval and expense approval process, will ensure that neither the SEA nor LEAs enter into a contract with an entity, as defined in WIOA 34 CFR 397.5(d) for the purpose of operating a program under which a student with a disability is engaged in work compensated at a subminimum wage. (Page 212) Title IV

3. Ensuring applicants fully understand the benefits of competitive integrated employment. As part of the intake process, emphasis is placed on competitive integrated employment. Individuals who are not pursuing competitive integrated employment are referred to other resources, including the Senior Services Unit, which can assist them in meeting their independent living needs. Career counseling and information and referral services on competitive integrated employment is provided to individuals in subminimum wage and extended employment, as well as to youth seeking subminimum wage employment. WDU’s intake counselor is responsible for providing this service to these individuals, consistent with the new 511 requirements.  (Page 319) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Prior to awarding a grant, a DEED conducts a risk analysis. In addition, in the early part of each year sub—grantees complete an electronic assessment and a fiscal monitoring guide. These assessment tools provide a sweeping array of information, in such important areas as: o How sub—grantees will serve and provide priority services to veterans o Policies regarding sub—grantee conflict—of—interest processes o The longevity of key directors and/or stakeholders o Sub—grantee customer complaint processes and physical and program accessibility o Sub—grantee accounting procedures, positive cash flow, third—party audit reports, review of debt ratio, including federal and state tax debt (Page 107) Title I

DEED meets its ongoing obligation not to discriminate on the basis of disability by developing system wide policy and procedure initiatives that comply with Section 188 of WIOA. These policies include physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials to serve the needs of customers with disabilities. The Determining the Location of a Minnesota WorkForce Center policy requires that the "The WFC location will be accessible to all populations including individuals with disabilities." The Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity is the final authority in determining if a location meets the accessibility criteria to be certified as a WorkForce Center. The Minnesota WorkForce Center System Certification Standards policy provides guidance on the implementation standards for the equal access obligations under WIOA. WorkForce Centers must be universally accessible to all populations including but not limited to various racial and ethnic groups, persons for which English is not their first language, ex— felons, people who are homeless, Veterans, various age groups, different genders, and individuals with disabilities. (Page 127) Title I

PROVIDE ARCHITECTURAL ACCESSIBILITY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES The WorkForce Center System provides integrated program services through the development and maintenance of an accessible environment. All facilities open to the public as well as administrative offices must be accessible to and useable by the broadest population. All partners are covered by Title II of the ADA and the equal opportunity and nondiscrimination elements of Section 188 of WIOA and, therefore, are subject to the same set of standards. (Page 128) Title I

Affiliate WorkForce Centers are required to provide full access and opportunities to all job seekers including serving individuals with disabilities. Physical locations, services and programs must comply with Section 188 of WIOA and provisions of the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended. DEED will work closely with Affiliate WorkForce Centers to have them provide an annual assessment on architectural and programmatic accessibility for individuals with disabilities. A review schedule for Affiliate WorkForce Centers will occur during Program Monitoring Visits. (Page 129) Title I

• The Minnesota WorkForce Center System Certification Standards discussed earlier identifies both physical and programmatic accessibility requirements. Customers with disabilities must be able to participate and benefit from the services available in the WorkForce Center System, as do all customers. In addition to the site accessibility standards, the Policy identifies the following requirements: • Development of an evacuation and safety plan • Notice displayed and available in alternate formats upon request • Inclusion of tag lines • Identification of Minnesota Relay • Availability of accommodation and modifications • Staff knowledge of assistive technology • Use of auxiliary aids and services • Community resources • Complaint processes. (Page 129) Title IV

Accessibility has been a central focus for the web development team. DEED’s accessibility resources in the Vocational Rehabilitation Unit as well as staff at State Services for the Blind continue to be involved in any webpage updates ensuring accessibility for the blind and visually impaired, as well as users who are Deaf or hard-of-hearing, or who have mobility impairments, and those with cognitive and reading disorders. DEED’s web development team strives for accessibility that extends beyond minimum compliance. If, however, users are unable to access information, they may request information in alternate formats and it will be provided in a timely manner. (Page 130-131) Title I

Vets

• Service in WorkForce Center System — The state’s WorkForce Center system provides the full array of labor and employment services to veterans around the state. Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPs) provide eligible veterans with employment services such as job matching and referral to posted job openings, vocational and career guidance, labor market information, plus workshops on resume preparation and conducting effective job searches. DVOPs also refer eligible and qualified veterans to appropriate WIOA—funded training programs and discretionary initiatives, as well as registered apprenticeship programs throughout the state. Local Veteran Employment Representatives (LVER) specialize in promoting veterans to employers, educating one—stop partners on current law, changing regulations, and the value veterans bring to an employer. • Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) — DVOP and LVER staff are funded through the JVSG and fulfill all responsibilities mandated by the grant programs. Services include the provision of intensive case management services to Chapter 31 Veterans, disabled veterans, homeless veterans, economically or educationally disadvantaged veterans, and veterans with "significant barriers to employment" as defined by the Department of Labor. (Page 78-79) Title I

In Minnesota, estimates indicate that a little over 1%, or 4000 Veterans per year will experience homelessness, or struggle with other life crises edging them toward homelessness. Of those 4000 Veterans, 27% have returned from service in Iraq or Afghanistan, and over 30% are disabled Veterans. Approximately 15% of Veterans served that are homeless are women Veterans. Many are single with children to care for. DVOP staff works closely with Minnesota’s HVRP grantee, Minnesota Assistance Council for Veterans (MACV). In addition to referring clients between our two agencies, we also collaborate with them on 3 StandDown events across the state each year and provide a liaison (LVER) to provide business contacts and help with some of their client-focused events. (Page 442) Title IV

Core Responsibility 1 — Develop employer outreach activities to establish, maintain, and facilitate regular contact with employers to promote employment and training opportunities for the benefit of Veterans. Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Develop job opportunities for Veteran job seekers through outreach efforts with Minnesota employers: job development phone contacts, in person employer visits, and participation in job fair activities on behalf of Veterans. 2) Communicate and coordinate with Business Services Representatives in the local AJC to facilitate and promote job opportunities for Veterans, especially those with significant barriers to employment. 3) Promote the "Veteran Friendly Employer" initiative to all businesses contacted. 4) Encourage employers to employ Veterans utilizing apprenticeships and OJT programs, State and Federal dislocated worker programs, and GI Bill benefits. 5) Maintain current information on employment and training opportunities. 6) Monitor Federal Contractor Job Listings (FCJL) and Vet Central job orders for Veterans using the WFC, or on the DVOP caseload. 7) Provide contacts and job leads to DVOPs. Core Responsibility 2 — Advocate on behalf of Veterans seeking employment and training opportunities with business, industry, and community—based organizations. Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Contact community leaders, employers, labor unions, training programs, and Veterans organizations. 2) Promote Veterans priority of service in employment and training programs. 3) Maintain current information on employment and training opportunities. 4) Plan and participate in job fairs to promote services to Veterans, and encourage participating employers to become a "Veteran Friendly Employer." 5) Promote licensing and certification assistance and training opportunities for Veterans using training providers and credentialing bodies. 6) Work with unions, apprenticeships programs, and business community to promote employment, On the Job Training (OJT), apprenticeships and other available training opportunities to employ Veterans. 7) Establish and maintain contact with National Guard, Reserve Family Readiness Groups and Family Assistance Centers in the assigned area. Provide education and information regarding DEED Vets employment services, WorkForce Centers, and Beyond the Yellow Ribbon events. (Page 447) Title IV

8) Assist employers with special job accommodations for disabled Veterans. This position works closely with community leaders, Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Facilitate and maintain the provision of labor exchange services by local WFC staff to Veterans including the identification of SBE Veterans, proper referral to a DVOP, or in the absence of the DVOP, to the individualized career services provider, and referral to vocational counseling, testing, job search assistance. 2) Provide job development and employer outreach on behalf of Veterans, with a focus on Veterans with an SBE being case managed by a local DVOP. 3) Coordinate or conduct job search assistance and networking workshops in conjunction with employers. 4) Provide Labor Market Information (LMI) to employers. 6) Work with DEED Veterans Chapter 31 Program Coordinator and Veterans Affairs (VA) regarding Chapter 31 clients. 7) Refer Veterans to the Department of Labor (DOL)/Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS) partner as needed to assist with reemployment rights issues covered under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) law. 8) Assist employers with special job accommodations for disabled Veterans. (Page 448) Title IV

Mental Health

~~The Minnesota Youth Program (MYP) provides short—term, contextualized and individualized training services for at—risk youth, ages 14 to 24. Coordinated at the local level by the Workforce Development Boards/Youth Committees, MYP eligibility criteria is more flexible (inclusive) than the WIOA Youth Program. MYP serves an extremely disadvantaged group of young men and women: participants have multiple challenges such as substance abuse, criminal records, mental health issues, and cognitive learning limitations, in addition to being poor. The Higher Education Career Advisors Pilot Project (HECAP) funded by the Minnesota State Legislature provides funding to focus on assistance to high schools through career exploration and helps students see connections between their education and future careers. HECAP builds on the work of local workforce. (Page 88) Title I

• DEED’s VRS will provide outreach to the following school staff to identify students in need of pre-employment transition services and/ or vocational rehabilitation services: teachers/case managers, work coordinators, guidance counselors, school nurses, 504 coordinators, school social workers, alternative learning center staff, principals, school mental health coordinators, and school psychologists. (Page 211) Title IV

The Minnesota General program has a long history of innovative collaboration with the State Mental Health Authority. This includes VR representation on the State Mental Health Planning Council and the newly formed State Behavioral Advisory Council. The two agencies have also collaborated to implement, sustain and expand the evidence based practice of supported employment, Individual Placement and Support. Starting with 4 local partnerships between mental health and employment providers in 2006, the IPS provider network in Minnesota, funded in part with state appropriations dedicated to IPS, has expanded to 29 IPS programs (partnerships between mental health agencies and employment services agencies) in 47 of Minnesota’s 87 counties. Minnesota VR and Mental Health agencies are partners in the National IPS Learning Community. (Pages 219-220) Title IV

IPS collaboration. Vocational Rehabilitation Services in the mid-state region was recognized with a Minnesota Social Services Association award for partnering in an IPS community collaboration with Functional Industries, Wright County Health & Human Services and Central MN Mental Health Center. Each agency brought their own mental health expertise to the table to support employment, therapy, and case management. This collaboration helps people with serious mental illness work in regular jobs, not jobs set aside for people with disabilities. Mental health practitioners not only help their clients consider employment but also provide employment specialists with their mental health expertise to assist with the individualized job search. (Page 228) Title IV

Funding for supported employment, within which Title VI Part B funds play a relatively small part, is governed by myriad federal and state laws and rules covering many categories of services. For example, a network of private, not-for-profit organizations, licensed by the Department of Human Services Disability Services Division, provides day training and habilitation services that may include supported employment. People with mental illness may receive work-related support through the State Comprehensive Mental Health Act. In these instances, each county determines the level of service that will be provided. (Page 247) Title IV

VRS, through state-funded extended employment services, provides ongoing work supports to approximately 5,100 individuals in Supported Employment annually. Many of these individuals received time-limited vocational rehabilitation services prior to entering supported employment. Part of Minnesota’s supported employment funding is dedicated to extended supports for persons with serious and persistent mental illness. VRS and the Department of Human Services Mental Health Division collaborate on Individual Placement and Support (IPS) projects to promote innovation in service delivery, including supported employment services, for this population. The projects are designed to provide functional assessment, individualized career planning, job skill acquisition, job placement, job development, and non-time-limited supports necessary to maintain and advance in employment. All recipients of grants under these projects are required to demonstrate collaboration with counties, the local community support program, VRS, and providers of employment services such as CRPs, regional treatment centers, and community mental health centers.  (Page 263) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 31 - 40 of 103

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshot Minnesota - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information on the RETAIN program in Minnesota including the lead agency, the amount of funding, and the target areas and population

Systems
  • Other

Employment Services - 01/08/2019

~~“Employment services are essential in assisting reintegrating homeless veterans into meaningful employment within the labor force. Minnesota Assistance Council for Veterans (MACV) Staff work with veterans throughout Minnesota in navigating access to resources for employment and training programs to find great employment opportunities.

MACV employment specialists provide additional assistance by forging strong relationships with employers throughout the community and to aid veterans with their employment search needs by providing supportive services, resume review & development and career networking events. By working closely with the staff at the Minnesota Workforce centers, a veteran is connected with Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Staff and Local Veterans Employment Representatives, giving the veteran an integrated team to work with as they conduct their employment search.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Adult Mental Health Targeted Case Management (AMH-TCM) and Outcome Reporting - 01/01/2019

~~“In collaboration with a coalition of AMH-TCM lead agencies and contracted vendors, DHS’ Mental Health Division determined that AMH-TCM agencies will report individual-level data on employment and housing outcomes only at this time. Data will include:1. Employment-related outcomes which align with the informed choice-employment initiative under Minnesota’s Olmstead Plan.2. Housing-related outcomes which align with the informed choice initiative under Minnesota’s Olmstead Plan.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Minnesota’s Home and Community-Based Services Rule Statewide Transition Plan - 12/17/2018

~~“Today, most  people  with  disabilities  grow  up  in  their  family  homes,  go  to  school  in  their  own  neighborhoods  and  have  many  of  the  same  hopes  and  dreams as people who don’t have disabilities. Yet, the service system hasn’t always offered the individualized options or flexibility that would allow those dreams to be realized.

The focus of Minnesota’s disability service system is on one person at a time. 

The principles of person-centered planning are the foundation of the HCBS rule. These principles further support people’s rights to make informed choices and decide what is important both to them and for them”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WIOA Limitations on the Use of Subminimum Wage - 12/17/2018

~~“For Youth Ages 24 and UnderWIOA requires youth ages 24 and under to have documentation that they completed the following actions before they can earn a subminimum wage:• participated in Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) and/or special education transition services and activities while still in high school and eligible for services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and• applied for VRS and determined ineligible or found eligible but unsuccessful in competitive, integrated employment and their VRS case was closed, and• received career counseling, information, and referral to resources that could assist in securing competitive, integrated employment.” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mental Health Promotion - 10/26/2018

~~“Mental health is more than the absence of disease. Everyone has a state of mental health, and this can change across the lifespan. Not having a mental illness, does not guarantee good mental health. Similarly, having a mental illness, does not guarantee poor mental health. It includes life satisfaction, self-acceptance, sense of purpose, identity, feeling connected and belonging, empowerment, and resilience, which is the ability to bounce back after set-backs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

VRS, SSB, IDEA and home and community-based employment services – Interim guidance - 10/19/2018

~~“This document provides information about:• Authorizing home and community-based services (HCBS) employment services• Background information• Best practices• Additional employment resources.

DHS is working to clarify and replace this interim guidance with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS), State Services for the Blind (SSB) and the Disability Services Division at DHS. When this happens, DHS will replace this guidance”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

VRS, SSB, IDEA and home and community-based employment services – Interim guidance - 10/19/2018

~~“This document provides information about:• Authorizing home and community-based services (HCBS) employment services• Background information• Best practices• Additional employment resources.

DHS is working to clarify and replace this interim guidance with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS), State Services for the Blind (SSB) and the Disability Services Division at DHS. When this happens, DHS will replace this guidance”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment Services - 07/01/2018

~~“Minnesota added three employment services to our home and community-based services (HCBS) waivers on July 1, 2018. We added the following services to the Developmental Disabilities (DD), Community Alternative Care (CAC), Community Access for Disability Inclusion (CADI) and Brain Injury (BI) waivers:• Employment exploration services: Community-based services that introduce people with disabilities to employment options and allow them to explore their options through work experiences. This service helps people to make an informed choice about working in competitive, integrated employment.• Employment development services: Individualized services that help people find competitive, integrated employment or attain self-employment.• Employment support services: Individualized services and supports that help people to maintain community employment in an individual or group arrangement.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Services Innovation Grants - 05/05/2018

“The Minnesota Department of Human Services offers disability services innovation grants. These grants promote innovative ideas to improve outcomes for people with disabilities. Funded projects include new ways to help people with disabilities in Minnesota:

-Achieve integrated, competitive employment

-Live in the most integrated setting

-Connect with others in their communities

During state fiscal year 2018, approximately $2 million will be available. Applications are now closed for this round of grants. DHS anticipates it will award contracts to four to 10 qualified responders. The maximum award will be $500,000.

DHS is distributing the innovation grants in three parts:

-The large grants program

-The microgrant program

-The small grant program”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

SF 2452 A bill for an act relating to health and human services; establishing the health and human services budget; - 04/30/2019

~~“Data on individuals collected, maintained, used, or disseminated by the welfare system are private data on individuals, and shall not be disclosed except:…

(9) between the Department of Human Services, the Department of Employment and Economic Development, and when applicable, the Department of Education, for the following purposes:…(iv) to analyze public assistance employment services and program utilization, cost,effectiveness, and outcomes as implemented under the authority established in Title II,Sections 201-204 of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

MN Statute 16C.16: Designation of Procurements from Small Businesses - 04/01/2016

The commissioner of administration shall periodically designate businesses that are majority owned and operated by women, persons with a substantial physical disability, or specific minorities as targeted group businesses within purchasing categories as determined by the commissioner. A group may be targeted within a purchasing category if the commissioner determines there is a statistical disparity between the percentage of purchasing from businesses owned by group members and the representation of businesses owned by group members among all businesses in the state in the purchasing category.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota SF 1458 - ABLE Plan - 05/22/2015

A savings plan known as the Minnesota ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] plan is established. In establishing this plan, the legislature seeks to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, and to provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act, the Supplemental Security Income program under title XVI of the Social Security Act, the beneficiary's employment, and other sources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Medical Assistance Reform Waiver (256B.021) - 06/01/2014

"It is the intent of the legislature to reform components of the medical assistance program for seniors and people with disabilities or other complex needs, and medical assistance enrollees in general, in order to achieve better outcomes, such as community integration and independence; improved health; reduced reliance on institutional care; maintained or obtained employment and housing; and long-term sustainability of needed services through better alignment of available services that most effectively meet people's needs, including other state agencies' services…."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Minnesota Medical Assistance Reform Waiver - 06/01/2014

“It is the intent of the legislature to reform components of the medical assistance program for seniors and people with disabilities or other complex needs, and medical assistance enrollees in general, in order to achieve better outcomes, such as community integration and independence; improved health; reduced reliance on institutional care; maintained or obtained employment and housing; and long-term sustainability of needed services through better alignment of available services that most effectively meet people's needs, including other state agencies' services….”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Minnesota Statute 268A.15: Extended Employment Program - 06/01/2011

The extended employment program shall have two categories of clients consisting of those with severe disabilities and those with severe impairment to employment. The purpose of the extended employment program for persons with severe disabilities is to provide the ongoing services necessary to maintain and advance the employment of persons with severe disabilities. The purpose of the extended employment program for persons with severe impairment to employment is to provide the ongoing support services necessary to secure, maintain, and advance in employment. Employment must encompass the broad range of employment choices available to all persons and promote an individual's self-sufficiency and financial independence.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

256B.0622 ASSERTIVE COMMUNITY TREATMENT AND INTENSIVE RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT SERVICES

“Subd. 7. Assertive community treatment service standards. (a) ACT teams must offer and have the capacity to directly provide the following services: (1) assertive engagement; (2) benefits and finance support; (3) co-occurring disorder treatment; (4) crisis assessment and intervention; (5) employment services;….. "Employment services" means assisting clients to work at jobs of their choosing. Services must follow the principles of the individual placement and support (IPS) employment model, including focusing on competitive employment; emphasizing individual client preferences and strengths; ensuring employment services are integrated with mental health services;…”

Systems
  • Other

Minnesota Statute 43A.09

The commissioner in cooperation with appointing authorities of all state agencies shall maintain an active recruiting program publicly conducted and designed to attract sufficient numbers of well-qualified people to meet the needs of the civil service, and to enhance the image and public esteem of state service employment. Special emphasis shall be given to recruitment of veterans and protected group members to assist state agencies in meeting affirmative action goals to achieve a balanced work force. 

Protected Groups:  females, persons with disabilities, and members of the following minorities: Black, Hispanic, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaskan native.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

“Connect 700” State Hiring Initiative - 10/13/2016

“Joined by community advocates and state hiring leaders, Governor Mark Dayton today announced the re-launch of the Connect 700 and the Supported Worker programs, two state hiring initiatives aimed at removing barriers and creating opportunities for Minnesotans with disabilities. This effort supports Governor Dayton’s 2014 executive order directing state agencies to increase employment for people with disabilities to at least seven percent by August 2018.” ““State government should reflect all of the people it serves. They should include Minnesotans with disabilities,” said Governor Dayton. “These programs will provide employment opportunities for more of our citizens, and help to create a more inclusive Minnesota.” Connect 700 (formerly known as 700-Hour Program On-The-Job Demonstration and Appointment) will give Minnesotans with disabilities an opportunity to demonstrate their ability through an on-the job trial work experience, lasting up to 700 hours. This gives hiring managers the ability to better match people with the best opportunities for success, based on their skills and abilities.”

Systems
  • Other

“Supported Worker Program” - 10/13/2016

“A second initiative, the Supported Worker program, offers people with disabilities integrated employment opportunities with up to 50 full time positions within various state agencies. These positions can be shared by up to three people with disabilities. State agencies that sponsor the positions will integrate employees into existing teams, and will provide job coaches as needed.”

Systems
  • Other

Minnesota Governor's Executive Order 15-03 - 01/28/2015

Supporting Freedom of Choice and Opportunity to Live, Work, and Participate in the Most Inclusive Setting for Individuals with Disabilities through the Implementation of Minnesota's Olmstead Plan; Rescinding Executive Order 13-01   “A Sub-Cabinet, appointed by the Governor, consisting ofthe Commissioner, or Commissioner' s designees, ofthe following State agencies, shall implement         Minnesota' s Olmstead Plan: a) Department ofHuman Services; b) Minnesota Housing Finance Agency; c) Department of Employment and Economic Development; d) Department of Transportation; e) Department of Corrections; f) Department of Health; g) Department of Human Rights; and h) Department of Education.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Minnesota Governor’s Executive Order 14-14 - 08/04/2014

The Governor’s Executive Order instructs Minnesota Management and Budget (MMB) and the State Director for Equal Opportunity to develop a model for recruitment and hiring strategies to increase the employment of people with disabilities. It also requires all state agencies to develop plans for promoting employment opportunities for Minnesotans with disabilities, and to begin reporting their progress on a quarterly basis. The Order also directs MMB to develop ways to help employees to more easily update their disability status with their employer.   Executive Order 14-14 is the latest initiative enacted by Dayton’s Administration to demonstrate its commitment to help Minnesotans with disabilities live more independently and improve the quality of their lives.  Other initiatives include:  -Creating Equitable Policies – The Department of Transportation updated its policies and implemented new trainings to help ensure that all employees with disabilities receive proper accommodations.   -Improving Life and Work Opportunities – Governor Dayton and the Department of Human Services launched Reform 2020, which will make it easier for people to understand and access services and support for Minnesotans with disabilities, while also redesigning and improving services and increasing service coordination and integration.   -Increasing Options and Independence – The Department of Employment and Economic Development’s Vocational Rehabilitation program helps those with disabilities prepare for, find and keep a job, and live as independently as possible. In 2013, the program assisted more than 19,500 people with disabilities.   -Supporting Stable Employment – The Department of Human Services began funding a new initiative to help individuals with disabilities find and maintain employment – helping Minnesotans with disabilities live more independently, and decreasing their need for other state aid.     -Encouraging Diverse Hiring – The Department of Human Rights held a statewide video conference in December to highlight the strategic advantages of hiring people with disabilities.   -Increasing Access to Work Opportunities – The budget signed by Governor Dayton increased funding for State Services for the Blind to help people with disabilities secure and maintain meaningful employment.   
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Governor's Executive Order 13-01 - 01/28/2013

A Sub-Cabinet, appointed by the Governor, consisting of the Commissioner, or Commissioner's designees, of the following State agencies, shall develop and implement a comprehensive Minnesota Olmstead Plan: (i) that uses measurable goals to increase the number of people with disabilities receiving services that best meet their individual needs and in the most integrated setting, and (ii) that is consistent and in accord with the U.S. Supreme Comi's decision in Olmstead v. L. C., 527 U.S. 581 (1999): a) Department of Human Services; b) Minnesota Housing Finance Agency; c) Department of Employment and Economic Development; d) Department of Transpmiation; e) Department of Corrections; f) Department of Health; g) Department of Human Rights; and h) Department of Education. 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 31 - 40 of 43

Annual Report of Department Programs and Services - 01/01/2017

~~“Overview Per Minnesota Statute §116J.0125, the Commissioner of the Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) is required to report on department programs and services annually. To fulfill that requirement, DEED staff prepared updated SFY2016 reports for each of the agency’s 74 programs featuring brief descriptions of DEED programs and their outcomes. Each summary contains current information on the program’s purpose, customers and services, performance measures, targeted population groups, funding sources and allocations, relevant statutory authority, and staff contact information.…..To address disparities and advance equity, data on populations groups served by programs are now included, where applicable, and include communities of color, individuals with disabilities, Veterans, and women. ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

2017 Biennial Report on Long-Term Services and Supports for People with Disabilities - 01/01/2017

~~“Employment First policyMinnesota’s Employment First policy asserts that people with disabilities can work, want to work and do work. Minnesota’s Employment First policy maintains that people with disabilities must have an informed choice about the range of employment options and opportunities open to them. It includes the idea that competitive, community-integrated employment is the preferred outcome.During 2016, DHS and the Minnesota departments of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) and Education (MDE) developed, piloted and implemented a statewide interagency informed-choice framework and resource toolkit. Service planners and teams who support people with disabilities use the informed-choice framework and resource toolkit.” 

Systems
  • Other

Olmstead Work Plans - 09/29/2016

“Strategy: Implement the Employment First Policy “Continue the implementation of the informed choice process with persons served by the Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Medicaid funded programs and students who are a part of the Employment Capacity Building Cohort as outlined in the Olmstead Employment goals. Minnesota's Employment First Policy promotes the opportunity for people with disabilities to make informed choices about employment. This policy views competitive, integrated employment as the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Employment First Policy - 08/10/2015

The State of Minnesota is committed that all Minnesotans including those with disabilities have a wide range of employment opportunities within the general workforce. The Minnesota Employment First Policy guides state agencies in their planning, decision making, implementation, and evaluation of services and supports for Minnesotans with disabilities to make employment the first and expected option considered. The Minnesota Employment First Policy provides state agencies with:

- A clear statewide vision supporting transformational change and a long-range goal of working age youth and adults with disabilities participating in the workforce at levels similar to their peers who do not have disabilities

- A guiding vision to increase public and business expectations about employing the abilities and capacities of all people with disabilities to work in the right job with the right level of support

- A policy framework that guides present and future decisions related to people with disabilitieswho receive public services

- Guidance to provide clarity on how this policy will be applied across state agencies

- Instruction to act to develop and implement plans to ensure the Employment First principles and informed choice are integrated into new and existing employment-related policies, services and supports for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Employment First Policy - Olmstead Sub-Cabinet Approval - 10/01/2014

MN APSE announces the approval of an Employment First Policy by the MN Olmstead Sub-Cabinet on September 29, 2014. The approval of this policy is [a] culmination of years of collaboration, partnership, education, and dedication of a group … united around the idea that people with disabilities are just as valued and have the same rights as other citizens. The idea that employment should be the first option for working aged Minnesotans with disabilities was not always embraced, but today Minnesota stands on the doorstep of real and permanent change by making employment an option for all Minnesotans with disabilities.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Employment First Policy - 09/29/2014

The Employment First Policy envisions a future where all people with disabilities can achieve competitive, integrated employment. Competitive employment means:

·         Full-time, part-time, or self-employment with and without supports

·         In the competitive labor force

·         On the payroll of a competitive business or industry

·         Pays at least minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by workers without a disability.

This policy increases options and choices for people with disabilities by aligning policies, funding practices and collaborative efforts among state agencies. This will help people who choose to work to enter an integrated, competitive workforce or become self-employed.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Human Services Disability Services Division Biennial Report on Long-term services for People with Disabilities - 01/15/2013

Employment is a priority of the Governor, DHS and DSD. DSD, in collaboration with many partners, developed Disability Benefits 101 (DB101), a web-based tool with on-line assistance, which can be used by people with disabilities and those who help them to understand how employment earnings affect benefits. Too often people assume that working will mean a loss of necessary benefits. DB101 helps people learn how to use available benefits to support the pursuit of their chosen lifestyle, rather than having benefits act as a barrier to their goals.

The Division will use the experience gained from the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, Pathways to Employment, to inform future changes to the service menu. DSD will propose policy changes that will encourage providers and support people in exploring and obtaining competitive employment (real work for real wages in integrated work conditions) and understanding their options. DSD will propose policy changes to incent providers to help people find and maintain competitive work.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN State Rehabilitation Council & VR Services: Center-Based Employment - 06/22/2011

A summary report of the public forum, sponsored by the Minnesota State Rehabilitation Council and Vocational Rehabilitation Services.

In June 2011, the Minnesota State Rehabilitation Council and Vocational Rehabilitation Services convened a day-long public forum to provide a

broad overview of how the system has evolved and continues to adapt to changes in public policy, shifts in social priorities, and ongoing debates over center-based and community employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation

Employment First Minnesota's Plan for Competitive, Integrated Employment

~~“Many people with disabilities want opportunities to be part of the general workforce, but don’t see how it’s possible or aren’t given resources they need to work. Minnesota works to help people with disabilities find competitive, integrated employment. DHS supports an Employment First approach.”

Systems
  • Other

A Guide to Starting a Business in Minnesota

“The Minnesota Emerging Entrepreneur Program (MEEP) was created during the 2016 Legislative session and replaces the Urban Initiative Loan Program (Chapter 189, Laws of Minnesota). The objective of the program is to fund loans to businesses throughout the state that are owned and operated by minorities, low-income persons, women, veterans and/or persons with disabilities; provide jobs for minority and/or low-income persons, create and strengthen minority business enterprises, and promote economic development in a low-income area.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

VR Portion of WIOA State Plan for Minnesota State Services for the Blind FY-2020 - 02/06/2020

“Interagency Cooperation

(1) the State Medicaid plan under title XIX of the Social Security Act;

In September 2019, DHS-DSD, VRS, and SSB signed a Memorandum of Understanding. The terms of the MOU are specific to individuals on a Medicaid waiver who want to pursue competitive, integrated employment. Employment First and Person-Centered principles form the basis of the shared vision for how our agencies can provide employment services for people with disabilities in a coordinated manner. The goal is to align systems so that common customers – those who receive home and community-based service disability waivers and vocational rehabilitation services from VRS or SSB – can get seamless and timely supports to make informed choices and meet their competitive integrated employment goals. The full implementation of the MOU is planned for January 2021 to allow time for communication, stakeholder involvement, and training.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

VRS, SSB, IDEA and home and community-based employment services – Interim guidance - 10/19/2018

~~“This document provides information about:• Authorizing home and community-based services (HCBS) employment services• Background information• Best practices• Additional employment resources.

DHS is working to clarify and replace this interim guidance with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS), State Services for the Blind (SSB) and the Disability Services Division at DHS. When this happens, DHS will replace this guidance”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Minnesota Job Skills Partnership Announces 10 New Training Projects - 03/27/2018

~~“The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) awarded workforce development grants totaling $1.5 million to train 2,919 workers under the Minnesota Job Skills Partnership (MJSP).

 “These training grants upgrade employee skills and effectively make Minnesota businesses more competitive and desirable places to work.”

Under the program, educational institutions and businesses work together to secure MJSP funding. Businesses initially meet with an accredited educational institution to explain their training needs and to learn options. Once they agree on a plan, the educational institution contacts DEED to determine eligibility for a grant.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Olmstead Work Plans - 09/29/2016

“Strategy: Implement the Employment First Policy “Continue the implementation of the informed choice process with persons served by the Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Medicaid funded programs and students who are a part of the Employment Capacity Building Cohort as outlined in the Olmstead Employment goals. Minnesota's Employment First Policy promotes the opportunity for people with disabilities to make informed choices about employment. This policy views competitive, integrated employment as the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota State Council on Disability - 06/01/1973

Established in 1973 by the state legislature, the Minnesota State Council on Disability (MSCOD) was created to advise the governor, state agencies, state legislature, and the public on disability issues. Our mission is to advocate for policies and programs in the public and private sectors that advance the rights of Minnesotans with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities (DD Council)

The mission of the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities is to provide information, education, and training to build knowledge, develop skills, and change attitudes that will lead to increased independence, productivity, self-determination, integration and inclusion (IPSII) for people with developmental disabilities and their families.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Goodwill-Easter Seals Minnesota - Work Incentives Connection

~~“Goodwill-Easter Seals Minnesota Work Incentives Connection provides specialized answers about the impact of work on government benefits. Armed with clear, accurate information about their options, people with disabilities can make informed and confident decisions about employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Employment First Coalition - Employment First Summits

Minnesota Employment First Summit Series

The Minnesota Employment First Coalition is a group of professionals, families, and advocates who are committed to making the vision of Employment First a reality in Minnesota. Since 2006, the Minnesota Employment First Coalition has tirelessly worked to provide education, support, technical assistance, and advocacy around the promotion of policies and practices that embraces the values of Employment First.

 

“The Minnesota Employment First Coalition hosted a number of Employment First Summits targeting community members, families, businesses, educators, and advocates to provide up to date and current best practices, as well as facilitate discussion around what it will take to make employment a reality for all Minnesotans with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Community Rehabilitation Program Advisory Committee

“The Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP) Advisory Committee provides strategic advice and consultation to DEED's Vocational Rehabilitation Services program on topics and issues that affect vocational rehabilitation and community rehabilitation services to Minnesotans with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Department of Employment and Economic Development "Services for Students in High School: What Comes Next?"

~~“Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) has a counselor assigned to every high school. We help students with disabilities plan the journey from school to what comes next.VRS counselors help students discover:• Their strengths and interests• Career and postsecondary education possibilities• How to gain work skills and experiences• What they’ll need to make their plan happen” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Disability Services innovation grants - 03/10/2020

“People in Minnesota who have disabilities want the same great quality of life that most people in Minnesota enjoy: to work and earn money, live in housing of their choice, choose their care providers, their friends and social activities.

The Disability Services Division launched its innovation grants program in 2016 to support new and innovative ideas to achieve these outcomes effectively and efficiently.

NEW: DHS is accepting applications for the next round of Disability Services Division innovation grants. DHS published a request for proposals in the State Register on March 23 and posted a revised RFP with extended deadlines on April 6.

To apply You may apply on the new online application portal. The new application deadline is June 26, 2020.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Mental Health Innovation Grant Program - 01/08/2020

“Mental Health Innovation Grant Program is a new grant program intended to improve access to and the quality of community-based, outpatient mental health services and reduce the number of people admitted to regional treatment centers and community behavioral health hospitals.

These grants add and develop services and supports to Minnesota’s mental health system including:

Short-term and critical access centers Collaborative efforts between crisis teams, hospitals and other services Transition services and care coordination”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

Organization-wide, School-wide, Facility-wide, and Center-wide Systems Change - 04/14/2019

~~“The goal of positive support at an organizational level is to first form a team that will work together to assess the strengths and needs of an organization. The team will represent all of the different types of individuals involved including those receiving services, staff members, administrators, family and community members to work together to solve problems. The types of problems that are identified will guide the group to select a positive support practice. Together, the team uses the information gathered to share the decision making process will everyone. Consensus building and buy-in increases when all individuals within a setting contribute to important decisions that are made. Empowering all individuals to work together to using information collected for progress monitoring and systems change helps improve outcomes. Celebration of success using the information gathered provides a powerful model for building community..”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Disability Services Innovation Grants - 05/05/2018

“The Minnesota Department of Human Services offers disability services innovation grants. These grants promote innovative ideas to improve outcomes for people with disabilities. Funded projects include new ways to help people with disabilities in Minnesota:

-Achieve integrated, competitive employment

-Live in the most integrated setting

-Connect with others in their communities

During state fiscal year 2018, approximately $2 million will be available. Applications are now closed for this round of grants. DHS anticipates it will award contracts to four to 10 qualified responders. The maximum award will be $500,000.

DHS is distributing the innovation grants in three parts:

-The large grants program

-The microgrant program

-The small grant program”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

“Six states receive nearly $15M in grants to expand employment opportunities for people with disabilities” - 09/14/2016

“Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development $2,500,000” This is the seventh round of DEI funding. Since 2010, the department has awarded grants of more than $123 million through the initiative to 49 projects in 28 states to improve education, training, and employment outcomes of youth and adults with disabilities. More information on the DEI is available here. DEI funds help refine and expand workforce strategies proven to be successful, and enhance inclusive service delivery through the public workforce system. Improvements include increasing the accessibility of American Job Centers, training front-line AJC and partner staff, and increasing partnerships and collaboration across numerous systems critical for assisting youth and adults with disabilities in securing meaningful employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Minnesota Empower and Encourage Work, Housing, and Independence - 07/01/2014

“Beginning July 1, 2014, DHS will establish a demonstration project to promote economic stability, increase independence, and reduce applications for disability benefits while providing a positive impact on the health and future of participants. Services provided under the demonstration project will include navigation, employment supports, and benefits planning. These services will be provided to a targeted group of federally funded Medicaid recipients.  The demonstration project will be funded with state general funds.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Minnesota DEI Grant Abstract (Round 3) - 12/11/2013

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. The Minnesota Workforce Investment Board (MWIB) was awarded a Round 3 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development

Minnesota DEI Grant Abstract (Round 5) - 10/01/2012

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. The Minnesota Workforce Investment Board (MWIB) was awarded a Round 3 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration.  Round 3 will end in 2015.  Round 5 was awarded in 2014 and will end in 2017.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Minnesota Money Follows the Person

“Moving Home Minnesota is a person-centered approach to help people … transition from nursing home and other institutional settings to community living that meets their needs and wants. Moving Home Minnesota services are available to eligible Minnesota residents for up to one year after their move from institutional care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 11 of 11

The Minnesota Training & Technical Assistance Center (MNTAT) - 04/01/2009

MNTAT will use a variety of formats and media to respond to constituents’ training and technical assistance needs throughout the state. The goal is to demonstrate and build flexible supports and strategies that will increase and improve the employment outcomes for Minnesotans with disabilities. Among the strategies MNTAT will employ include web-based training (webinars and webcasts); local and regional training events with the support of Minnesota APSE; and the presentation of an annual statewide disability employment conference. In addition, training and technical assistance will be provided in local communities through the establishment of local Community Action Teams (CATs) that will be used as a vehicle for training and technical assistance as well as examples of replicable employment practices that result in the flexible, customized employment of people with disabilities in their local communities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Thaleaha McBee vs. Team Industries, Inc. - 01/16/2018

“In February 2015, McBee sought medical attention for severe pain in her hands, back, and neck, including numbness in her hands and arms. In March 2015, McBee’s doctor gave her a ten-pound lifting restriction due to disc narrowing, a bulged disc, and bone spurs in her vertebrae. On March 10, 2015, McBee informed her supervisors at Team of her lifting restriction, who then instructed her to discuss the restriction with human resources. McBee’s supervisors placed her on a machine that produced parts weighing less than ten pounds, and she finished her shift. The next day, McBee met with human resources to discuss possible accommodations. Team terminated McBee on March 12, 2015, due to concerns relating to her medical restriction.

[…]

D E C I S I O N

 The district court did not err in dismissing McBee’s MHRA and MWCA claims. Because McBee’s medical restrictions rendered her unqualified for her position with or without reasonable accommodation, her employment posed a serious threat of harm to herself and her coworkers, Team’s successful serious-threat defense precludes her reprisal claim, and she did not engage in conduct protected by the workers’ compensation act, we affirm.

 Affirmed."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

MN DHS - Alternative Care Program (Section 1115) - 10/18/2013

On October 18, 2013 the Department of Human Services (DHS) received approval from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for federal financial participation (FFP) on the Alternative Care Program. This approval relates to the contingency items that were a part of Reform 2020. As required by Minnesota Laws 2013, DHS submitted a plan for investing the state dollars made available by the enhanced FFP for Alternative Care to Minnesota Management and Budget (MMB). This plan for the contingency items includes investments in proposals that were passed by the legislature: Enhancing Vulnerable Adult Protection; First Contact – Simplification, Access and Transition Support; HCBS Critical Access Study and Service Development; and Work – Empower and Encourage Independence. This plan was approved by MMB on October 30, 2013.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Minnesota CMS Section 1115 Waiver - 10/18/2013

~~“Federal waivers allow states to test new ways to deliver and pay for health care services. Changes to the state’s Medicaid program often require waivers approved by the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to continue receiving federal Medicaid funding. The website describes waivers that the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS) has applied for or received. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Minnesota DoE ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/09/2012

The Minnesota Department of Education’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 9, 2012.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Minnesota Olmstead Planning Committee

In January 2013, Governor Mark Dayton issued an Executive Order establishing a Sub-Cabinet to develop and implement a comprehensive plan supporting freedom of choice and opportunity for people with disabilities…The Sub-Cabinet evaluates policies, programs, statutes and regulations of state agencies against the standards set forth in the Olmstead decision to determine whether any should be revised or modified or require legislative action in an effort to improve the availability of community-based services for people with disabilities. The Sub-Cabinet seeks input from consumers, families of consumers, advocacy organizations, service providers and others

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is based on the requirements set forth in Title XIX of the Social Security Act and is a comprehensive written document created by the state of Minnesota that describes the nature and scope of its Medicaid program (known in Minnesota as Medical Assistance). It serves as a contractual agreement between the state of Minnesota and the federal government and must be administered in conformity with specific requirements of Title XIX of the Social Security Act and regulations outlined in Chapter IV of the Code of Federal Regulations. The state plan contains all information necessary for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to determine if the state can receive federal financial participation (FFP).

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Minnesota Money Follows the Person

~~“The Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration, offered through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, was created as part of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. The purpose of the demonstration is to promote a series of rebalancing objectives to reduce or eliminate barriers to receiving long-term care services in home and community settings, rather than in institutional settings.Minnesota’s Money Follows the Person Demonstration is called “Moving Home Minnesota.” The goal of the Moving Home Minnesota is to reduce or eliminate barriers to receiving long-term care services in home and community settings. “ 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Individuals with disabilities should reach for the stars and pursue their dreams when it comes to exploring their employment options in the North Star State of Minnesota!

2018 State Population.
0.62%
Change from
2017 to 2018
5,611,179
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.9%
Change from
2017 to 2018
296,481
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.08%
Change from
2017 to 2018
145,820
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.89%
Change from
2017 to 2018
49.18%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.02%
Change from
2017 to 2018
84.25%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 5,519,952 5,576,606 5,611,179
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 302,274 305,082 296,481
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 145,080 145,697 145,820
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,576,753 2,602,221 2,610,660
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 48.00% 47.76% 49.18%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 83.84% 84.23% 84.25%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.90% 3.50% 2.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.30% 18.00% 18.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.80% 8.40% 8.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 302,266 319,070 309,507
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 299,748 296,776 299,237
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 511,971 516,268 512,517
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 41,420 43,125 41,281
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,628 24,310 23,339
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,376 10,227 11,260
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 17,435 22,465 20,592
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 14,097 15,048 16,222
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,621 8,266 6,646

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 10,997 10,737 10,517
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 12.90% 12.60% 12.40%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 124,537 122,142 120,283

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 65,452 63,015 63,948
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 71,415 69,039 70,494
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 182,808 167,247 175,103
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 35.80% 37.70% 36.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50% 0.20% 0.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.10% 1.00% 1.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,007 N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 459 339 1,137
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,935 2,997 2,182
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 12,112 10,941 11,058
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 46 2 55
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 31 1 43
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 67.00% 50.00% 78.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.57 0.02 0.78

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
5,196
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 11 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 322 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 830 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,691 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,997 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 345 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 40.80% 40.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,248 5,732 5,796
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 187,379 185,523 184,653
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 162 131 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 333 218 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $20,628,000 $21,976,000 $24,599,235
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $253,024,000 $257,662,000 $253,960,955
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $17,482,000 $18,283,000 $23,192,061
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $97,396,000 $101,309,000 $110,306,334
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 8.00% 9.00% 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 8,015 8,908 10,152
Number of people served in facility based work. 14,374 14,718 14,533
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 2,181 2,141 2,523
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 40.50 48.30 57.25

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.45% 60.71% 60.91%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.08% 10.07% 10.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.15% 4.11% 4.17%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.40% 89.53% 79.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.86% 23.24% 27.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 69.25% 61.71% 65.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 86.78% 81.14% 80.05%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 44.39% 38.47% 38.53%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,448,836
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,880
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 33,646
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 162,155
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 195,801
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 159
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 201
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 360
AbilityOne wages (products). $284,324
AbilityOne wages (services). $1,837,245

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 63 65 59
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 63 65 59
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8,512 7,065 6,883
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8,512 7,065 6,883

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Person-Centered Thinking and Person-Centered Planning was a top strategic goal in 2017. Training was required for all VRS staff in fall of 2017. University of Minnesota Institute on Community Integration trainers were contracted to help staff understand the values-based concepts and incorporate client-centered practices in services we provide in accordance with WIOA, the Olmstead Plan and Employment First policy. Tools and techniques were introduced and practiced in the training. To further knowledge, skills and abilities in Person-Centered practices, a Community of Practice consisting of VRS staff will launch in December 2017. The purpose will be to create a culture of continuous improvement, construct processes, policy and guidance that are person-centered, and utilize online coursework available through the University of Minnesota for ongoing training. (Page 255) Title IV.

Customized Employment

~~• DEED’s VRS will ensure, as appropriate, that students with disabilities that are seeking subminimum wage employment and who have applied for VR services are determined eligible or ineligible for VR services; have an approved IPE; receive pre-employment transition services; and receive appropriate reasonable accommodations and appropriate supports and services, including supported and customized employment services, that assist in obtaining and maintaining a competitive integrated employment outcome. (Page 211) Title IV

• VRS along with a key Community Rehabilitation Provider is developing a Minnesota centric Customized Employment Training and pursuing ACRE (Association for Community Rehabilitation Educators) certification for the training participants. This training will include hands on learning opportunities for Discovery Assessment and Job Development portions of Customized Employment. Each participant will also receive mentoring from VRS & CRP staff who are certified by one of the key CE training entities that provide certification. The goal of this Customized Employment Training is to assist placement professionals develop an understanding of CE and demonstrate proficiency in providing Discovery and Job Development. The training is also essential for Program Managers, Rehabilitation Area Managers who supervise staff who are providing CE services. (Page 216) Title IV

Customized Employment. VRS has partnered with ProAct, Inc. and Occupational Development Center, WIOA Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC), and the Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC) to provide Marc Gold & Associates’ Customized Employment Training in Minnesota through June, 2018. Two cohorts began in 2017 that include 24 VRS placement professionals, counselors, RAMs and supervisors, along with community partner staff. Participants attend nine full days of certification training building skills to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and employer. (Page 228) Title IV

There are three specific strategies that VRS will play an active role in:
1) Promulgate changes to the State Rule governing Extended Employment, ending admissions to non-integrated and sub-minimum wage programs and shifting the state funding to integrated employment,
2) provide technical assistance to non-integrated employment programs to design new business models that lead to competitive employment in the most integrated setting, and
3) provide information about effective employment strategies, such as supported and customized employment, that make competitive employment possible for individuals with complex and significant disabilities. (Page 249) Title IV

VRS along with a key Community Rehabilitation Provider is developing a Minnesota centric Customized Employment Training and pursuing ACRE (Association for Community Rehabilitation Educators) certification for the training participants. This training will include hands on learning opportunities for Discovery Assessment and Job Development portions of Customized Employment. Each participant will also receive mentoring from VRS & CRP staff who are certified by one of the key CE training entities that provide certification. The goal of this Customized Employment Training is to assist placement professionals develop an understanding of CE and demonstrate proficiency in providing Discovery and Job Development. The training is also essential for Program Managers, Rehabilitation Area Managers who supervise staff who are providing CE services. (Page 259) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Moreover, the DEI has helped Minnesota to build the capacity of WDA staff to increase the number of youth with disabilities participating in career pathways programs by implementing an Integrated Resource Team (IRT) approach as well as incorporating the Guideposts for Success best practices framework into service delivery. This success has prompted the development of a guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s Personal Learning Plan (PLP). The guide was developed to assist WDA staff when working with youth with disabilities who have a Personal Learning Plan (PLP) or an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The guide provides suggestions for integrating the Guideposts for Success into student ILP activities for both in-school and out-of-school youth. For more information on the DEI and the guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s PLP, see the Disability Employment Initiative weblink: https://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/office-youth-development/special/disability-employment-initiative/  (Page 77) Title I

4. Work with Department of Human Services (DHS) in the Olmstead interagency workgroup focused on blending and braiding funding that allow access to extended services for the long term supports needed for customers desiring employment. Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) is currently working with DHS on developing an interagency agreement between DHS, VRS, and SSB for providing services to those customers who require long term supports. SSB does not see the high volume of customers who require extended services that VRS sees, although the interagency agreement will apply to SSB. (Page 319) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~• Disability Employment Initiative- Partners for Youth Career Pathways - Minnesota is currently managing a $2.5 million, 42-month DEI grant funded through the U.S. DOL’s Employment and Training Administration and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. This grant allows Minnesota to strengthen partnerships and strategically align youth and adult career pathways systems to effectively serve youth with disabilities through multiple entry and exit points. In addition, the DEI has allowed Minnesota to expand the number of Employment Networks in the state which will help increase services to Social Security disability beneficiaries participating career pathways programs.
Moreover, the DEI has helped Minnesota to build the capacity of WDA staff to increase the number of youth with disabilities participating in career pathways programs by implementing an Integrated Resource Team (IRT) approach as well as incorporating the Guideposts for Success best practices framework into service delivery. This success has prompted the development of a guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s Personal Learning Plan (PLP). The guide was developed to assist WDA staff when working with youth with disabilities who have a Personal Learning Plan (PLP) or an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The guide provides suggestions for integrating the Guideposts for Success into student ILP activities for both in-school and out-of-school youth. For more information on the DEI and the guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s PLP, see the Disability Employment Initiative weblink: https://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/office-youth-development/special/disability-employment-initiative/  (Page 77) Title I

• Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Career Pathways — Beginning in 2014 and recently extended, Minnesota’s DEI project supports job—driven approaches in career pathway systems and programs to equip youth and adults with disabilities (including individuals with significant disabilities) with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in—demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. Three Local Workforce Development Areas operate career pathways in manufacturing, health care, and information technology sectors. Disability Resources Coordinators work to strengthen partnerships with Vocational Rehabilitation, disability agencies, and employers and modify career pathway education and employment for individual success. The GWDB Disability Equity Committee is evaluating these three projects to develop recommendations that will result in better services and outcomes to individuals with disabilities not served under Title IV. Two primary recommendations are being considered to replicate and build state-wide capacity; 1. Navigators and local teams are key to developing sustainable strategies and 2. Nationally recognized training that is Minnesota designed and implemented. (Page 79-80) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~• SGA Project: the Institute on Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts — Boston has received RSA funding to demonstrate effective strategies to assist SSDI beneficiaries achieve income above the substantial gainful activity (SGA) level. Minnesota VRS is one of the demonstration sites. At time of enrollment, the SSDI beneficiary is assigned a counselor, placement specialist and financial specialist. Eligibility for services is presumed within three days and the Employment Plan is developed within 30 days of application. VRS has partnered with the DLL to provide financial counseling in VR offices. RSA funding was used to provide the benefits planners with financial literacy training so that in addition to benefits planning the financial specialists can provide assistance with improving credits scores, paying off credit card debt, and developing savings plans. It is hoped that the combination of rapid engagement and financial planning services will lead to better outcomes. Although the SGA Project does not receive any Medicaid funding, the financial specialist positions would not have been possible without the initial collaboration with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant. (Pages 285-286) Title I

School to Work Transition

~~The Guideposts for Success, a best practices framework that was developed by the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth (NCWD) is utilized to ensure that all youth, including those with disabilities are successful when transitioning to adulthood. The Guideposts for Success constitute five tenets that align closely with WIOA goals and outcomes. These five tenets are: school preparation, youth development and leadership, career preparation, connecting activities, and family involvement. When a youth has received services or hash had experiences that align with the Guideposts tenets, the youth is more likely to transition to adulthood successfully. For more information on how the Guideposts are being incorporated into the Round 7 Disability Employment Initiative follow this weblink: https://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/office-youth-development/special/disability-employment-initiative/  (Page 152) Title I

Goal 2: Increasing Pre-Employment Transition Services
VRS, schools, and the VR Community will focus on increasing vocational exploration and work based learning experiences for high school students with disabilities. (Page 236) Title IV

Goal 2: Increasing Pre-Employment Transition Services VRS, schools, and the VR community will focus on increasing vocational exploration and work based learning experiences for high school students with disabilities.
Strategic Priorities 
A. Develop strategies to implement the Pre-ETS requirements stipulated in WIOA
Action: Track required and authorized services and monitor expenditures and fiscal impact
Progress achieved: VRS delivers pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) through counseling staff (VR eligible persons) and contracts (VR potentially eligible persons). An Employment Plan is developed and services are tracked. 
VRS issued nine fee for service contracts in July, 2017 to vendors to provide required services to VR potentially eligible people. Requests for Proposals are currently being developed to expand the availability of Pre-ETS services within the Twin cities metropolitan area and northwestern Minnesota. (Page 254) Title IV

C. Increase the number of work based learning experiences prior to graduation for VR eligible students in high school
Action: Establish a baseline and track the number of VR students with paid and unpaid work based learning experience prior to graduation.
Progress achieved: Service codes have been developed and implemented to track Pre-ETS purchased services.  (Page 254) Title IV

With the new emphasis on Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), SSB will continue to work with traditional partners to promote these models and facilitate effective implementation of emerging school-to-work efforts. The activities detailed below are designed to facilitate outreach and referral efforts to transition-age students who are blind or visually impaired. The goals of this ongoing involvement by the counselor in the education of a student, beginning as early as age 14, are to enable a student to live independently before leaving a school setting, have a greater understanding of relevant employment options, and develop self-advocacy skills. (Page 279) Title IV

All transition students are expected to have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that aligns with their Individualized Education Program (IEP). The development of the IPE is expected to be within 90 days of eligibility and the job goal is one that this projected for the student. Work and career exploration must be part of the IPE. (Page 283-284) Title IV

A transition assessment tool guides counselors and teams about each student’s skill level in activities of daily living and identifies skill training needed for moving on to post-secondary life. This transition assessment has been instrumental in the development of concrete plans and strategies that can be woven into the students IPE and IEP. This results in a genuinely coordinated effort between schools and VR. Counselors are working with IEP teams to encourage the use of postsecondary options for students to take entry level college classes while still in high school. This gives students an opportunity to try out their technology, braille, and self- advocacy skills prior to attending college full time. (Page 316) Title IV

To provide an additional resource to parents of high school students, SSB has contracted with PACER, a parent advocacy group knowledgeable in the IEP and transition process. PACER advocates create materials, facilitate workshops for parents and students, and conduct surveys on parent satisfaction. (Page 316) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~• Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Career Pathways — Beginning in 2014 and recently extended, Minnesota’s DEI project supports job—driven approaches in career pathway systems and programs to equip youth and adults with disabilities (including individuals with significant disabilities) with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in—demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. Three Local Workforce Development Areas operate career pathways in manufacturing, health care, and information technology sectors. Disability Resources Coordinators work to strengthen partnerships with Vocational Rehabilitation, disability agencies, and employers and modify career pathway education and employment for individual success. The GWDB Disability Equity Committee is evaluating these three projects to develop recommendations that will result in better services and outcomes to individuals with disabilities not served under Title IV. Two primary recommendations are being considered to replicate and build state-wide capacity; 1. Navigators and local teams are key to developing sustainable strategies and 2. Nationally recognized training that is Minnesota designed and implemented. (Pages 79-80) Title I

DEED meets its ongoing obligation not to discriminate on the basis of disability by developing system wide policy and procedure initiatives that comply with Section 188 of WIOA. These policies include physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials to serve the needs of customers with disabilities. (Page 127) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

There are several opportunities for activities to be aligned and enhanced with the core programs. Training is needed for staff to understand the appropriate activities and career pathway opportunities for recipients within a system where job search and job placement have been primarily seen as the core activity. We need to continue to better understand how career pathways models including; work-based learning, apprenticeships, and skills training can be implemented to align with the needs of industry. Development of employer-led sector partnerships allow for opportunities for jobseekers with a priority to address the disparities gaps in race, disability, disconnected youth, and gender opportunities. This being said, it has been critical for providers to understand the regional sectors in demand. (Page 69) Title I Core Responsibility 1 — Develop employer outreach activities to establish, maintain, and facilitate regular contact with employers to promote employment and training opportunities for the benefit of Veterans. Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Develop job opportunities for Veteran job seekers through outreach efforts with Minnesota employers: job development phone contacts, in person employer visits, and participation in job fair activities on behalf of Veterans. 2) Communicate and coordinate with Business Services Representatives in the local AJC to facilitate and promote job opportunities for Veterans, especially those with significant barriers to employment. 3) Promote the "Veteran Friendly Employer" initiative to all businesses contacted. 4) Encourage employers to employ Veterans utilizing apprenticeships and OJT programs, State and Federal dislocated worker programs, and GI Bill benefits. 5) Maintain current information on employment and training opportunities. 6) Monitor Federal Contractor Job Listings (FCJL) and Vet Central job orders for Veterans using the WFC, or on the DVOP caseload. 7) Provide contacts and job leads to DVOPs. (Page 447) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Collaboration Grants to Provide Independent Living Services: Since 2008, the VRS/IL collaboration has served Minnesotans with the most significant disabilities who require both vocational rehabilitation and independent living services to meet their goals for working and living in the community. In FFY 2017 VRS dedicated $1.2 million in SSA program income to fund benefit coaches who are housed in every VRS office. The benefit coaches provide benefits and financial planning services for eligible consumers who are receiving SSI and/or SSDI Social Security benefits. This funding continues and expands the services previously provided by the SGA Project, a RSA funded demonstration project to improve employment outcomes for SSDI beneficiaries. (Page 204) Title IV
 Ticket to Work Employment Networks: VRS, State Services for the Blind and SSA co-host periodic meetings of the Employment Networks to provide staff training, updates on Ticket to Work procedural changes, and to promote Partnership Plus job retention services after VRS/SSB case closure.
The SGA Project: In 2017, Vocational Rehabilitation completed a two-year model demonstration project designed to provide SSDI beneficiaries information and support to develop an employment plan that maps out a pathway to achieve employment above Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA). The SGA Project utilized a rapid engagement approach in which eligibility is determined within three days, Transferable Skills and Labor Market Information are provided and Benefits Planning and Financial Education are initiated within seven days. Within 30 days of application, the IPE and a Placement Plan are developed. A benefits analysis is completed within eight weeks of application if needed. As a result of positive feedback from Treatment Team clients and staff, Minnesota has expanded the project statewide using a combination of SSA program income and state funding. (Page 205) Title IV

Statewide Collaboration VRS collaborates with the Minnesota Department of Education (MDE), Department of Human Services (DHS), and county and local service providers to offer statewide supported employment services. VRS is a partner in several state-level agreements that provide long-term supports. During development of an employment plan, VRS counselors and other service team members help consumers to select supported employment services that meet their needs. They identify which services will be provided by VRS, as well as the source of long-term supports in the community. VRS provides time-limited supports for up to 24 months, but an employment plan may be amended if additional time is needed to achieve job stability. The primary funding resources for long-term supports in the community following VRS case closure are county case managers, the VRS Extended Employment Program, DHS Medicaid-waiver funded services, and the Social Security Administration’s Impairment-Related Work Expense exclusions and Ticket to Work funding for persons on SSI and/or SSDI. (Page 213-214) Title IV

About 40 percent of VRS applicants receive SSA benefits. VRS was instrumental in establishing the Work Incentives Connection, a SSA funded program of Goodwill Industries that provides work incentives planning and assistance for consumers.
SSA, VRS and State Services for the Blind co-host periodic meetings of the Employment Networks. In addition to providing in-service training, the meetings provide an opportunity to learn more about the services offered by each Employment Network to assist consumers make informed choices when selecting a vendor for employment services and/or on-going job retention services. The current focus of this group is to expand the use of Ticket to Work funding to provide ongoing job retention supports, to promote the use of PASS Plans, and to ensure the continuation of benefits planning services as people transition from VRS services to job retention services.  (Page 250) Title IV

SSDI and SSI Beneficiaries: SSA and VRS continue to co—host bi-annual meetings of the Employment Networks Ticket—to—Work funding is used to supplement Supported Employment funding or to provide continued job retention services beyond the 90 days VRS typically provides. Benefit coaches have been added to each office to ensure beneficiaries fully understand the impact income will have on benefits. (Page 261) Title IV

SGA Project: the Institute on Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts — Boston has received RSA funding to demonstrate effective strategies to assist SSDI beneficiaries achieve income above the substantial gainful activity (SGA) level. Minnesota VRS is one of the demonstration sites. At time of enrollment, the SSDI beneficiary is assigned a counselor, placement specialist and financial specialist. Eligibility for services is presumed within three days and the Employment Plan is developed within 30 days of application. VRS has partnered with the DLL to provide financial counseling in VR offices. RSA funding was used to provide the benefits planners with financial literacy training so that in addition to benefits planning the financial specialists can provide assistance with improving credits scores, paying off credit card debt, and developing savings plans. It is hoped that the combination of rapid engagement and financial planning services will lead to better outcomes. Although the SGA Project does not receive any Medicaid funding, the financial specialist positions would not have been possible without the initial collaboration with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant. (Page 285-286) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Current business services involve a high degree of employer engagement. From those represented on the local workforce development boards, participating on training advisory groups with postsecondary education, employers provides direction to business services in Minnesota. Community engagement is a growing area of activity, as we work to address disparate impact among people of color, individuals with disabilities and disconnected youth. This presents a unique opportunity to bridge the divides of cultural differences and work place expectations. One recent example includes a workshop for employers to support their development of cultural competence in attracting and retaining a diverse quality workforce. A better understanding of the needs of employers and communities can lead to customer-centered design of services that benefit both job seekers and employers. (Page 41) Title I

Data Collection

C. VRS will lead and convene Placement Partnerships focused on developing, maintaining and strengthening relationships among VRS, VR Community Partners and Employers Action: The VRS Placement Specialist team will develop and disseminate a quarterly report on the major activities and outcomes for active placement partnerships Action: Work with partners to implement WIOA Common Performance Measure 6 focused on effectiveness in serving employers Progress achieved: The Disability Employment Resource (DER) was developed to support business engagement. The initiative helps businesses meet their workforce goals by employing people with disabilities in competitive integrated positions, while employment professionals learn more about how to align their placement goals with business needs. The DER curriculum improves business engagement by delivering information to bridge the gap between business and human services, dispelling myths that can prevent employers from considering people with disabilities, helping human service professionals understand the business perspective, providing tools for starting and building relationships, and connecting businesses with information and resources to help them succeed. (Page 258) Title IV

511

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students….
• Outline services and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), with regard to youth with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment.
• Provide assurance that neither the SEA nor the LEA will enter into an arrangement with an entity holding a special wage certificate under section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act for the purpose of operating a program under which a youth with a disability is engaged in work at a subminimum wage. (Page 207) Title IV

• DEED’s VRS and MDE’s Special Education and Career and College Success Divisions will work together with LEAs to ensure that outreach and identification of students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment in order for them to receive counseling and information and referral related to competitive integrated employment.
• DEED’s VRS will ensure, as appropriate, that students with disabilities that are seeking subminimum wage employment and who have applied for VR services are determined eligible or ineligible for VR services; have an approved IPE; receive pre-employment transition services; and receive appropriate reasonable accommodations and appropriate supports and services, including supported and customized employment services, that assist in obtaining and maintaining a competitive integrated employment outcome.
• DEED’s VRS and MDE’s Special Education and Career and College Success Divisions will provide LEAs the required processes and forms to document the required actions specified under WIOA for all students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment. (Page 211) Title IV

• DEED’s VRS will ensure that all students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment receive documentation of the required actions specified under WIOA within 45 calendar days of completion of the required actions. 
Assurance related to WIOA Section 511 and 34 CFR 397, Limitations on use of subminimum wage
In accordance with 34 CFR 397.31, MDE’s Special Education and Career and College Success Divisions, through the MDE Career Technical Education Program approval and expense approval process, will ensure that neither the SEA nor LEAs enter into a contract with an entity, as defined in WIOA 34 CFR 397.5(d) for the purpose of operating a program under which a student with a disability is engaged in work compensated at a subminimum wage. (Page 212) Title IV

3. Ensuring applicants fully understand the benefits of competitive integrated employment. As part of the intake process, emphasis is placed on competitive integrated employment. Individuals who are not pursuing competitive integrated employment are referred to other resources, including the Senior Services Unit, which can assist them in meeting their independent living needs. Career counseling and information and referral services on competitive integrated employment is provided to individuals in subminimum wage and extended employment, as well as to youth seeking subminimum wage employment. WDU’s intake counselor is responsible for providing this service to these individuals, consistent with the new 511 requirements.  (Page 319) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Prior to awarding a grant, a DEED conducts a risk analysis. In addition, in the early part of each year sub—grantees complete an electronic assessment and a fiscal monitoring guide. These assessment tools provide a sweeping array of information, in such important areas as: o How sub—grantees will serve and provide priority services to veterans o Policies regarding sub—grantee conflict—of—interest processes o The longevity of key directors and/or stakeholders o Sub—grantee customer complaint processes and physical and program accessibility o Sub—grantee accounting procedures, positive cash flow, third—party audit reports, review of debt ratio, including federal and state tax debt (Page 107) Title I

DEED meets its ongoing obligation not to discriminate on the basis of disability by developing system wide policy and procedure initiatives that comply with Section 188 of WIOA. These policies include physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials to serve the needs of customers with disabilities. The Determining the Location of a Minnesota WorkForce Center policy requires that the "The WFC location will be accessible to all populations including individuals with disabilities." The Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity is the final authority in determining if a location meets the accessibility criteria to be certified as a WorkForce Center. The Minnesota WorkForce Center System Certification Standards policy provides guidance on the implementation standards for the equal access obligations under WIOA. WorkForce Centers must be universally accessible to all populations including but not limited to various racial and ethnic groups, persons for which English is not their first language, ex— felons, people who are homeless, Veterans, various age groups, different genders, and individuals with disabilities. (Page 127) Title I

PROVIDE ARCHITECTURAL ACCESSIBILITY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES The WorkForce Center System provides integrated program services through the development and maintenance of an accessible environment. All facilities open to the public as well as administrative offices must be accessible to and useable by the broadest population. All partners are covered by Title II of the ADA and the equal opportunity and nondiscrimination elements of Section 188 of WIOA and, therefore, are subject to the same set of standards. (Page 128) Title I

Affiliate WorkForce Centers are required to provide full access and opportunities to all job seekers including serving individuals with disabilities. Physical locations, services and programs must comply with Section 188 of WIOA and provisions of the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended. DEED will work closely with Affiliate WorkForce Centers to have them provide an annual assessment on architectural and programmatic accessibility for individuals with disabilities. A review schedule for Affiliate WorkForce Centers will occur during Program Monitoring Visits. (Page 129) Title I

• The Minnesota WorkForce Center System Certification Standards discussed earlier identifies both physical and programmatic accessibility requirements. Customers with disabilities must be able to participate and benefit from the services available in the WorkForce Center System, as do all customers. In addition to the site accessibility standards, the Policy identifies the following requirements: • Development of an evacuation and safety plan • Notice displayed and available in alternate formats upon request • Inclusion of tag lines • Identification of Minnesota Relay • Availability of accommodation and modifications • Staff knowledge of assistive technology • Use of auxiliary aids and services • Community resources • Complaint processes. (Page 129) Title IV

Accessibility has been a central focus for the web development team. DEED’s accessibility resources in the Vocational Rehabilitation Unit as well as staff at State Services for the Blind continue to be involved in any webpage updates ensuring accessibility for the blind and visually impaired, as well as users who are Deaf or hard-of-hearing, or who have mobility impairments, and those with cognitive and reading disorders. DEED’s web development team strives for accessibility that extends beyond minimum compliance. If, however, users are unable to access information, they may request information in alternate formats and it will be provided in a timely manner. (Page 130-131) Title I

Vets

• Service in WorkForce Center System — The state’s WorkForce Center system provides the full array of labor and employment services to veterans around the state. Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPs) provide eligible veterans with employment services such as job matching and referral to posted job openings, vocational and career guidance, labor market information, plus workshops on resume preparation and conducting effective job searches. DVOPs also refer eligible and qualified veterans to appropriate WIOA—funded training programs and discretionary initiatives, as well as registered apprenticeship programs throughout the state. Local Veteran Employment Representatives (LVER) specialize in promoting veterans to employers, educating one—stop partners on current law, changing regulations, and the value veterans bring to an employer. • Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) — DVOP and LVER staff are funded through the JVSG and fulfill all responsibilities mandated by the grant programs. Services include the provision of intensive case management services to Chapter 31 Veterans, disabled veterans, homeless veterans, economically or educationally disadvantaged veterans, and veterans with "significant barriers to employment" as defined by the Department of Labor. (Page 78-79) Title I

In Minnesota, estimates indicate that a little over 1%, or 4000 Veterans per year will experience homelessness, or struggle with other life crises edging them toward homelessness. Of those 4000 Veterans, 27% have returned from service in Iraq or Afghanistan, and over 30% are disabled Veterans. Approximately 15% of Veterans served that are homeless are women Veterans. Many are single with children to care for. DVOP staff works closely with Minnesota’s HVRP grantee, Minnesota Assistance Council for Veterans (MACV). In addition to referring clients between our two agencies, we also collaborate with them on 3 StandDown events across the state each year and provide a liaison (LVER) to provide business contacts and help with some of their client-focused events. (Page 442) Title IV

Core Responsibility 1 — Develop employer outreach activities to establish, maintain, and facilitate regular contact with employers to promote employment and training opportunities for the benefit of Veterans. Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Develop job opportunities for Veteran job seekers through outreach efforts with Minnesota employers: job development phone contacts, in person employer visits, and participation in job fair activities on behalf of Veterans. 2) Communicate and coordinate with Business Services Representatives in the local AJC to facilitate and promote job opportunities for Veterans, especially those with significant barriers to employment. 3) Promote the "Veteran Friendly Employer" initiative to all businesses contacted. 4) Encourage employers to employ Veterans utilizing apprenticeships and OJT programs, State and Federal dislocated worker programs, and GI Bill benefits. 5) Maintain current information on employment and training opportunities. 6) Monitor Federal Contractor Job Listings (FCJL) and Vet Central job orders for Veterans using the WFC, or on the DVOP caseload. 7) Provide contacts and job leads to DVOPs. Core Responsibility 2 — Advocate on behalf of Veterans seeking employment and training opportunities with business, industry, and community—based organizations. Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Contact community leaders, employers, labor unions, training programs, and Veterans organizations. 2) Promote Veterans priority of service in employment and training programs. 3) Maintain current information on employment and training opportunities. 4) Plan and participate in job fairs to promote services to Veterans, and encourage participating employers to become a "Veteran Friendly Employer." 5) Promote licensing and certification assistance and training opportunities for Veterans using training providers and credentialing bodies. 6) Work with unions, apprenticeships programs, and business community to promote employment, On the Job Training (OJT), apprenticeships and other available training opportunities to employ Veterans. 7) Establish and maintain contact with National Guard, Reserve Family Readiness Groups and Family Assistance Centers in the assigned area. Provide education and information regarding DEED Vets employment services, WorkForce Centers, and Beyond the Yellow Ribbon events. (Page 447) Title IV

8) Assist employers with special job accommodations for disabled Veterans. This position works closely with community leaders, Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Facilitate and maintain the provision of labor exchange services by local WFC staff to Veterans including the identification of SBE Veterans, proper referral to a DVOP, or in the absence of the DVOP, to the individualized career services provider, and referral to vocational counseling, testing, job search assistance. 2) Provide job development and employer outreach on behalf of Veterans, with a focus on Veterans with an SBE being case managed by a local DVOP. 3) Coordinate or conduct job search assistance and networking workshops in conjunction with employers. 4) Provide Labor Market Information (LMI) to employers. 6) Work with DEED Veterans Chapter 31 Program Coordinator and Veterans Affairs (VA) regarding Chapter 31 clients. 7) Refer Veterans to the Department of Labor (DOL)/Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS) partner as needed to assist with reemployment rights issues covered under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) law. 8) Assist employers with special job accommodations for disabled Veterans. (Page 448) Title IV

Mental Health

~~The Minnesota Youth Program (MYP) provides short—term, contextualized and individualized training services for at—risk youth, ages 14 to 24. Coordinated at the local level by the Workforce Development Boards/Youth Committees, MYP eligibility criteria is more flexible (inclusive) than the WIOA Youth Program. MYP serves an extremely disadvantaged group of young men and women: participants have multiple challenges such as substance abuse, criminal records, mental health issues, and cognitive learning limitations, in addition to being poor. The Higher Education Career Advisors Pilot Project (HECAP) funded by the Minnesota State Legislature provides funding to focus on assistance to high schools through career exploration and helps students see connections between their education and future careers. HECAP builds on the work of local workforce. (Page 88) Title I

• DEED’s VRS will provide outreach to the following school staff to identify students in need of pre-employment transition services and/ or vocational rehabilitation services: teachers/case managers, work coordinators, guidance counselors, school nurses, 504 coordinators, school social workers, alternative learning center staff, principals, school mental health coordinators, and school psychologists. (Page 211) Title IV

The Minnesota General program has a long history of innovative collaboration with the State Mental Health Authority. This includes VR representation on the State Mental Health Planning Council and the newly formed State Behavioral Advisory Council. The two agencies have also collaborated to implement, sustain and expand the evidence based practice of supported employment, Individual Placement and Support. Starting with 4 local partnerships between mental health and employment providers in 2006, the IPS provider network in Minnesota, funded in part with state appropriations dedicated to IPS, has expanded to 29 IPS programs (partnerships between mental health agencies and employment services agencies) in 47 of Minnesota’s 87 counties. Minnesota VR and Mental Health agencies are partners in the National IPS Learning Community. (Pages 219-220) Title IV

IPS collaboration. Vocational Rehabilitation Services in the mid-state region was recognized with a Minnesota Social Services Association award for partnering in an IPS community collaboration with Functional Industries, Wright County Health & Human Services and Central MN Mental Health Center. Each agency brought their own mental health expertise to the table to support employment, therapy, and case management. This collaboration helps people with serious mental illness work in regular jobs, not jobs set aside for people with disabilities. Mental health practitioners not only help their clients consider employment but also provide employment specialists with their mental health expertise to assist with the individualized job search. (Page 228) Title IV

Funding for supported employment, within which Title VI Part B funds play a relatively small part, is governed by myriad federal and state laws and rules covering many categories of services. For example, a network of private, not-for-profit organizations, licensed by the Department of Human Services Disability Services Division, provides day training and habilitation services that may include supported employment. People with mental illness may receive work-related support through the State Comprehensive Mental Health Act. In these instances, each county determines the level of service that will be provided. (Page 247) Title IV

VRS, through state-funded extended employment services, provides ongoing work supports to approximately 5,100 individuals in Supported Employment annually. Many of these individuals received time-limited vocational rehabilitation services prior to entering supported employment. Part of Minnesota’s supported employment funding is dedicated to extended supports for persons with serious and persistent mental illness. VRS and the Department of Human Services Mental Health Division collaborate on Individual Placement and Support (IPS) projects to promote innovation in service delivery, including supported employment services, for this population. The projects are designed to provide functional assessment, individualized career planning, job skill acquisition, job placement, job development, and non-time-limited supports necessary to maintain and advance in employment. All recipients of grants under these projects are required to demonstrate collaboration with counties, the local community support program, VRS, and providers of employment services such as CRPs, regional treatment centers, and community mental health centers.  (Page 263) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 103

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshot Minnesota - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information on the RETAIN program in Minnesota including the lead agency, the amount of funding, and the target areas and population

Systems
  • Other

Employment Services - 01/08/2019

~~“Employment services are essential in assisting reintegrating homeless veterans into meaningful employment within the labor force. Minnesota Assistance Council for Veterans (MACV) Staff work with veterans throughout Minnesota in navigating access to resources for employment and training programs to find great employment opportunities.

MACV employment specialists provide additional assistance by forging strong relationships with employers throughout the community and to aid veterans with their employment search needs by providing supportive services, resume review & development and career networking events. By working closely with the staff at the Minnesota Workforce centers, a veteran is connected with Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Staff and Local Veterans Employment Representatives, giving the veteran an integrated team to work with as they conduct their employment search.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Adult Mental Health Targeted Case Management (AMH-TCM) and Outcome Reporting - 01/01/2019

~~“In collaboration with a coalition of AMH-TCM lead agencies and contracted vendors, DHS’ Mental Health Division determined that AMH-TCM agencies will report individual-level data on employment and housing outcomes only at this time. Data will include:1. Employment-related outcomes which align with the informed choice-employment initiative under Minnesota’s Olmstead Plan.2. Housing-related outcomes which align with the informed choice initiative under Minnesota’s Olmstead Plan.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Minnesota’s Home and Community-Based Services Rule Statewide Transition Plan - 12/17/2018

~~“Today, most  people  with  disabilities  grow  up  in  their  family  homes,  go  to  school  in  their  own  neighborhoods  and  have  many  of  the  same  hopes  and  dreams as people who don’t have disabilities. Yet, the service system hasn’t always offered the individualized options or flexibility that would allow those dreams to be realized.

The focus of Minnesota’s disability service system is on one person at a time. 

The principles of person-centered planning are the foundation of the HCBS rule. These principles further support people’s rights to make informed choices and decide what is important both to them and for them”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WIOA Limitations on the Use of Subminimum Wage - 12/17/2018

~~“For Youth Ages 24 and UnderWIOA requires youth ages 24 and under to have documentation that they completed the following actions before they can earn a subminimum wage:• participated in Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) and/or special education transition services and activities while still in high school and eligible for services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and• applied for VRS and determined ineligible or found eligible but unsuccessful in competitive, integrated employment and their VRS case was closed, and• received career counseling, information, and referral to resources that could assist in securing competitive, integrated employment.” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mental Health Promotion - 10/26/2018

~~“Mental health is more than the absence of disease. Everyone has a state of mental health, and this can change across the lifespan. Not having a mental illness, does not guarantee good mental health. Similarly, having a mental illness, does not guarantee poor mental health. It includes life satisfaction, self-acceptance, sense of purpose, identity, feeling connected and belonging, empowerment, and resilience, which is the ability to bounce back after set-backs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

VRS, SSB, IDEA and home and community-based employment services – Interim guidance - 10/19/2018

~~“This document provides information about:• Authorizing home and community-based services (HCBS) employment services• Background information• Best practices• Additional employment resources.

DHS is working to clarify and replace this interim guidance with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS), State Services for the Blind (SSB) and the Disability Services Division at DHS. When this happens, DHS will replace this guidance”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

VRS, SSB, IDEA and home and community-based employment services – Interim guidance - 10/19/2018

~~“This document provides information about:• Authorizing home and community-based services (HCBS) employment services• Background information• Best practices• Additional employment resources.

DHS is working to clarify and replace this interim guidance with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS), State Services for the Blind (SSB) and the Disability Services Division at DHS. When this happens, DHS will replace this guidance”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment Services - 07/01/2018

~~“Minnesota added three employment services to our home and community-based services (HCBS) waivers on July 1, 2018. We added the following services to the Developmental Disabilities (DD), Community Alternative Care (CAC), Community Access for Disability Inclusion (CADI) and Brain Injury (BI) waivers:• Employment exploration services: Community-based services that introduce people with disabilities to employment options and allow them to explore their options through work experiences. This service helps people to make an informed choice about working in competitive, integrated employment.• Employment development services: Individualized services that help people find competitive, integrated employment or attain self-employment.• Employment support services: Individualized services and supports that help people to maintain community employment in an individual or group arrangement.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Services Innovation Grants - 05/05/2018

“The Minnesota Department of Human Services offers disability services innovation grants. These grants promote innovative ideas to improve outcomes for people with disabilities. Funded projects include new ways to help people with disabilities in Minnesota:

-Achieve integrated, competitive employment

-Live in the most integrated setting

-Connect with others in their communities

During state fiscal year 2018, approximately $2 million will be available. Applications are now closed for this round of grants. DHS anticipates it will award contracts to four to 10 qualified responders. The maximum award will be $500,000.

DHS is distributing the innovation grants in three parts:

-The large grants program

-The microgrant program

-The small grant program”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

SF 2452 A bill for an act relating to health and human services; establishing the health and human services budget; - 04/30/2019

~~“Data on individuals collected, maintained, used, or disseminated by the welfare system are private data on individuals, and shall not be disclosed except:…

(9) between the Department of Human Services, the Department of Employment and Economic Development, and when applicable, the Department of Education, for the following purposes:…(iv) to analyze public assistance employment services and program utilization, cost,effectiveness, and outcomes as implemented under the authority established in Title II,Sections 201-204 of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

MN Statute 16C.16: Designation of Procurements from Small Businesses - 04/01/2016

The commissioner of administration shall periodically designate businesses that are majority owned and operated by women, persons with a substantial physical disability, or specific minorities as targeted group businesses within purchasing categories as determined by the commissioner. A group may be targeted within a purchasing category if the commissioner determines there is a statistical disparity between the percentage of purchasing from businesses owned by group members and the representation of businesses owned by group members among all businesses in the state in the purchasing category.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota SF 1458 - ABLE Plan - 05/22/2015

A savings plan known as the Minnesota ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] plan is established. In establishing this plan, the legislature seeks to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, and to provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act, the Supplemental Security Income program under title XVI of the Social Security Act, the beneficiary's employment, and other sources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Medical Assistance Reform Waiver (256B.021) - 06/01/2014

"It is the intent of the legislature to reform components of the medical assistance program for seniors and people with disabilities or other complex needs, and medical assistance enrollees in general, in order to achieve better outcomes, such as community integration and independence; improved health; reduced reliance on institutional care; maintained or obtained employment and housing; and long-term sustainability of needed services through better alignment of available services that most effectively meet people's needs, including other state agencies' services…."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Minnesota Medical Assistance Reform Waiver - 06/01/2014

“It is the intent of the legislature to reform components of the medical assistance program for seniors and people with disabilities or other complex needs, and medical assistance enrollees in general, in order to achieve better outcomes, such as community integration and independence; improved health; reduced reliance on institutional care; maintained or obtained employment and housing; and long-term sustainability of needed services through better alignment of available services that most effectively meet people's needs, including other state agencies' services….”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Minnesota Statute 268A.15: Extended Employment Program - 06/01/2011

The extended employment program shall have two categories of clients consisting of those with severe disabilities and those with severe impairment to employment. The purpose of the extended employment program for persons with severe disabilities is to provide the ongoing services necessary to maintain and advance the employment of persons with severe disabilities. The purpose of the extended employment program for persons with severe impairment to employment is to provide the ongoing support services necessary to secure, maintain, and advance in employment. Employment must encompass the broad range of employment choices available to all persons and promote an individual's self-sufficiency and financial independence.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

256B.0622 ASSERTIVE COMMUNITY TREATMENT AND INTENSIVE RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT SERVICES

“Subd. 7. Assertive community treatment service standards. (a) ACT teams must offer and have the capacity to directly provide the following services: (1) assertive engagement; (2) benefits and finance support; (3) co-occurring disorder treatment; (4) crisis assessment and intervention; (5) employment services;….. "Employment services" means assisting clients to work at jobs of their choosing. Services must follow the principles of the individual placement and support (IPS) employment model, including focusing on competitive employment; emphasizing individual client preferences and strengths; ensuring employment services are integrated with mental health services;…”

Systems
  • Other

Minnesota Statute 43A.09

The commissioner in cooperation with appointing authorities of all state agencies shall maintain an active recruiting program publicly conducted and designed to attract sufficient numbers of well-qualified people to meet the needs of the civil service, and to enhance the image and public esteem of state service employment. Special emphasis shall be given to recruitment of veterans and protected group members to assist state agencies in meeting affirmative action goals to achieve a balanced work force. 

Protected Groups:  females, persons with disabilities, and members of the following minorities: Black, Hispanic, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaskan native.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

“Connect 700” State Hiring Initiative - 10/13/2016

“Joined by community advocates and state hiring leaders, Governor Mark Dayton today announced the re-launch of the Connect 700 and the Supported Worker programs, two state hiring initiatives aimed at removing barriers and creating opportunities for Minnesotans with disabilities. This effort supports Governor Dayton’s 2014 executive order directing state agencies to increase employment for people with disabilities to at least seven percent by August 2018.” ““State government should reflect all of the people it serves. They should include Minnesotans with disabilities,” said Governor Dayton. “These programs will provide employment opportunities for more of our citizens, and help to create a more inclusive Minnesota.” Connect 700 (formerly known as 700-Hour Program On-The-Job Demonstration and Appointment) will give Minnesotans with disabilities an opportunity to demonstrate their ability through an on-the job trial work experience, lasting up to 700 hours. This gives hiring managers the ability to better match people with the best opportunities for success, based on their skills and abilities.”

Systems
  • Other

“Supported Worker Program” - 10/13/2016

“A second initiative, the Supported Worker program, offers people with disabilities integrated employment opportunities with up to 50 full time positions within various state agencies. These positions can be shared by up to three people with disabilities. State agencies that sponsor the positions will integrate employees into existing teams, and will provide job coaches as needed.”

Systems
  • Other

Minnesota Governor's Executive Order 15-03 - 01/28/2015

Supporting Freedom of Choice and Opportunity to Live, Work, and Participate in the Most Inclusive Setting for Individuals with Disabilities through the Implementation of Minnesota's Olmstead Plan; Rescinding Executive Order 13-01   “A Sub-Cabinet, appointed by the Governor, consisting ofthe Commissioner, or Commissioner' s designees, ofthe following State agencies, shall implement         Minnesota' s Olmstead Plan: a) Department ofHuman Services; b) Minnesota Housing Finance Agency; c) Department of Employment and Economic Development; d) Department of Transportation; e) Department of Corrections; f) Department of Health; g) Department of Human Rights; and h) Department of Education.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Minnesota Governor’s Executive Order 14-14 - 08/04/2014

The Governor’s Executive Order instructs Minnesota Management and Budget (MMB) and the State Director for Equal Opportunity to develop a model for recruitment and hiring strategies to increase the employment of people with disabilities. It also requires all state agencies to develop plans for promoting employment opportunities for Minnesotans with disabilities, and to begin reporting their progress on a quarterly basis. The Order also directs MMB to develop ways to help employees to more easily update their disability status with their employer.   Executive Order 14-14 is the latest initiative enacted by Dayton’s Administration to demonstrate its commitment to help Minnesotans with disabilities live more independently and improve the quality of their lives.  Other initiatives include:  -Creating Equitable Policies – The Department of Transportation updated its policies and implemented new trainings to help ensure that all employees with disabilities receive proper accommodations.   -Improving Life and Work Opportunities – Governor Dayton and the Department of Human Services launched Reform 2020, which will make it easier for people to understand and access services and support for Minnesotans with disabilities, while also redesigning and improving services and increasing service coordination and integration.   -Increasing Options and Independence – The Department of Employment and Economic Development’s Vocational Rehabilitation program helps those with disabilities prepare for, find and keep a job, and live as independently as possible. In 2013, the program assisted more than 19,500 people with disabilities.   -Supporting Stable Employment – The Department of Human Services began funding a new initiative to help individuals with disabilities find and maintain employment – helping Minnesotans with disabilities live more independently, and decreasing their need for other state aid.     -Encouraging Diverse Hiring – The Department of Human Rights held a statewide video conference in December to highlight the strategic advantages of hiring people with disabilities.   -Increasing Access to Work Opportunities – The budget signed by Governor Dayton increased funding for State Services for the Blind to help people with disabilities secure and maintain meaningful employment.   
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Governor's Executive Order 13-01 - 01/28/2013

A Sub-Cabinet, appointed by the Governor, consisting of the Commissioner, or Commissioner's designees, of the following State agencies, shall develop and implement a comprehensive Minnesota Olmstead Plan: (i) that uses measurable goals to increase the number of people with disabilities receiving services that best meet their individual needs and in the most integrated setting, and (ii) that is consistent and in accord with the U.S. Supreme Comi's decision in Olmstead v. L. C., 527 U.S. 581 (1999): a) Department of Human Services; b) Minnesota Housing Finance Agency; c) Department of Employment and Economic Development; d) Department of Transpmiation; e) Department of Corrections; f) Department of Health; g) Department of Human Rights; and h) Department of Education. 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 31 - 40 of 43

Annual Report of Department Programs and Services - 01/01/2017

~~“Overview Per Minnesota Statute §116J.0125, the Commissioner of the Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) is required to report on department programs and services annually. To fulfill that requirement, DEED staff prepared updated SFY2016 reports for each of the agency’s 74 programs featuring brief descriptions of DEED programs and their outcomes. Each summary contains current information on the program’s purpose, customers and services, performance measures, targeted population groups, funding sources and allocations, relevant statutory authority, and staff contact information.…..To address disparities and advance equity, data on populations groups served by programs are now included, where applicable, and include communities of color, individuals with disabilities, Veterans, and women. ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

2017 Biennial Report on Long-Term Services and Supports for People with Disabilities - 01/01/2017

~~“Employment First policyMinnesota’s Employment First policy asserts that people with disabilities can work, want to work and do work. Minnesota’s Employment First policy maintains that people with disabilities must have an informed choice about the range of employment options and opportunities open to them. It includes the idea that competitive, community-integrated employment is the preferred outcome.During 2016, DHS and the Minnesota departments of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) and Education (MDE) developed, piloted and implemented a statewide interagency informed-choice framework and resource toolkit. Service planners and teams who support people with disabilities use the informed-choice framework and resource toolkit.” 

Systems
  • Other

Olmstead Work Plans - 09/29/2016

“Strategy: Implement the Employment First Policy “Continue the implementation of the informed choice process with persons served by the Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Medicaid funded programs and students who are a part of the Employment Capacity Building Cohort as outlined in the Olmstead Employment goals. Minnesota's Employment First Policy promotes the opportunity for people with disabilities to make informed choices about employment. This policy views competitive, integrated employment as the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Employment First Policy - 08/10/2015

The State of Minnesota is committed that all Minnesotans including those with disabilities have a wide range of employment opportunities within the general workforce. The Minnesota Employment First Policy guides state agencies in their planning, decision making, implementation, and evaluation of services and supports for Minnesotans with disabilities to make employment the first and expected option considered. The Minnesota Employment First Policy provides state agencies with:

- A clear statewide vision supporting transformational change and a long-range goal of working age youth and adults with disabilities participating in the workforce at levels similar to their peers who do not have disabilities

- A guiding vision to increase public and business expectations about employing the abilities and capacities of all people with disabilities to work in the right job with the right level of support

- A policy framework that guides present and future decisions related to people with disabilitieswho receive public services

- Guidance to provide clarity on how this policy will be applied across state agencies

- Instruction to act to develop and implement plans to ensure the Employment First principles and informed choice are integrated into new and existing employment-related policies, services and supports for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Employment First Policy - Olmstead Sub-Cabinet Approval - 10/01/2014

MN APSE announces the approval of an Employment First Policy by the MN Olmstead Sub-Cabinet on September 29, 2014. The approval of this policy is [a] culmination of years of collaboration, partnership, education, and dedication of a group … united around the idea that people with disabilities are just as valued and have the same rights as other citizens. The idea that employment should be the first option for working aged Minnesotans with disabilities was not always embraced, but today Minnesota stands on the doorstep of real and permanent change by making employment an option for all Minnesotans with disabilities.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Employment First Policy - 09/29/2014

The Employment First Policy envisions a future where all people with disabilities can achieve competitive, integrated employment. Competitive employment means:

·         Full-time, part-time, or self-employment with and without supports

·         In the competitive labor force

·         On the payroll of a competitive business or industry

·         Pays at least minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by workers without a disability.

This policy increases options and choices for people with disabilities by aligning policies, funding practices and collaborative efforts among state agencies. This will help people who choose to work to enter an integrated, competitive workforce or become self-employed.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Human Services Disability Services Division Biennial Report on Long-term services for People with Disabilities - 01/15/2013

Employment is a priority of the Governor, DHS and DSD. DSD, in collaboration with many partners, developed Disability Benefits 101 (DB101), a web-based tool with on-line assistance, which can be used by people with disabilities and those who help them to understand how employment earnings affect benefits. Too often people assume that working will mean a loss of necessary benefits. DB101 helps people learn how to use available benefits to support the pursuit of their chosen lifestyle, rather than having benefits act as a barrier to their goals.

The Division will use the experience gained from the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, Pathways to Employment, to inform future changes to the service menu. DSD will propose policy changes that will encourage providers and support people in exploring and obtaining competitive employment (real work for real wages in integrated work conditions) and understanding their options. DSD will propose policy changes to incent providers to help people find and maintain competitive work.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN State Rehabilitation Council & VR Services: Center-Based Employment - 06/22/2011

A summary report of the public forum, sponsored by the Minnesota State Rehabilitation Council and Vocational Rehabilitation Services.

In June 2011, the Minnesota State Rehabilitation Council and Vocational Rehabilitation Services convened a day-long public forum to provide a

broad overview of how the system has evolved and continues to adapt to changes in public policy, shifts in social priorities, and ongoing debates over center-based and community employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation

Employment First Minnesota's Plan for Competitive, Integrated Employment

~~“Many people with disabilities want opportunities to be part of the general workforce, but don’t see how it’s possible or aren’t given resources they need to work. Minnesota works to help people with disabilities find competitive, integrated employment. DHS supports an Employment First approach.”

Systems
  • Other

A Guide to Starting a Business in Minnesota

“The Minnesota Emerging Entrepreneur Program (MEEP) was created during the 2016 Legislative session and replaces the Urban Initiative Loan Program (Chapter 189, Laws of Minnesota). The objective of the program is to fund loans to businesses throughout the state that are owned and operated by minorities, low-income persons, women, veterans and/or persons with disabilities; provide jobs for minority and/or low-income persons, create and strengthen minority business enterprises, and promote economic development in a low-income area.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

VR Portion of WIOA State Plan for Minnesota State Services for the Blind FY-2020 - 02/06/2020

“Interagency Cooperation

(1) the State Medicaid plan under title XIX of the Social Security Act;

In September 2019, DHS-DSD, VRS, and SSB signed a Memorandum of Understanding. The terms of the MOU are specific to individuals on a Medicaid waiver who want to pursue competitive, integrated employment. Employment First and Person-Centered principles form the basis of the shared vision for how our agencies can provide employment services for people with disabilities in a coordinated manner. The goal is to align systems so that common customers – those who receive home and community-based service disability waivers and vocational rehabilitation services from VRS or SSB – can get seamless and timely supports to make informed choices and meet their competitive integrated employment goals. The full implementation of the MOU is planned for January 2021 to allow time for communication, stakeholder involvement, and training.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

VRS, SSB, IDEA and home and community-based employment services – Interim guidance - 10/19/2018

~~“This document provides information about:• Authorizing home and community-based services (HCBS) employment services• Background information• Best practices• Additional employment resources.

DHS is working to clarify and replace this interim guidance with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS), State Services for the Blind (SSB) and the Disability Services Division at DHS. When this happens, DHS will replace this guidance”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Minnesota Job Skills Partnership Announces 10 New Training Projects - 03/27/2018

~~“The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) awarded workforce development grants totaling $1.5 million to train 2,919 workers under the Minnesota Job Skills Partnership (MJSP).

 “These training grants upgrade employee skills and effectively make Minnesota businesses more competitive and desirable places to work.”

Under the program, educational institutions and businesses work together to secure MJSP funding. Businesses initially meet with an accredited educational institution to explain their training needs and to learn options. Once they agree on a plan, the educational institution contacts DEED to determine eligibility for a grant.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Olmstead Work Plans - 09/29/2016

“Strategy: Implement the Employment First Policy “Continue the implementation of the informed choice process with persons served by the Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Medicaid funded programs and students who are a part of the Employment Capacity Building Cohort as outlined in the Olmstead Employment goals. Minnesota's Employment First Policy promotes the opportunity for people with disabilities to make informed choices about employment. This policy views competitive, integrated employment as the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota State Council on Disability - 06/01/1973

Established in 1973 by the state legislature, the Minnesota State Council on Disability (MSCOD) was created to advise the governor, state agencies, state legislature, and the public on disability issues. Our mission is to advocate for policies and programs in the public and private sectors that advance the rights of Minnesotans with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities (DD Council)

The mission of the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities is to provide information, education, and training to build knowledge, develop skills, and change attitudes that will lead to increased independence, productivity, self-determination, integration and inclusion (IPSII) for people with developmental disabilities and their families.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Goodwill-Easter Seals Minnesota - Work Incentives Connection

~~“Goodwill-Easter Seals Minnesota Work Incentives Connection provides specialized answers about the impact of work on government benefits. Armed with clear, accurate information about their options, people with disabilities can make informed and confident decisions about employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Employment First Coalition - Employment First Summits

Minnesota Employment First Summit Series

The Minnesota Employment First Coalition is a group of professionals, families, and advocates who are committed to making the vision of Employment First a reality in Minnesota. Since 2006, the Minnesota Employment First Coalition has tirelessly worked to provide education, support, technical assistance, and advocacy around the promotion of policies and practices that embraces the values of Employment First.

 

“The Minnesota Employment First Coalition hosted a number of Employment First Summits targeting community members, families, businesses, educators, and advocates to provide up to date and current best practices, as well as facilitate discussion around what it will take to make employment a reality for all Minnesotans with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Community Rehabilitation Program Advisory Committee

“The Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP) Advisory Committee provides strategic advice and consultation to DEED's Vocational Rehabilitation Services program on topics and issues that affect vocational rehabilitation and community rehabilitation services to Minnesotans with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Department of Employment and Economic Development "Services for Students in High School: What Comes Next?"

~~“Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) has a counselor assigned to every high school. We help students with disabilities plan the journey from school to what comes next.VRS counselors help students discover:• Their strengths and interests• Career and postsecondary education possibilities• How to gain work skills and experiences• What they’ll need to make their plan happen” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Disability Services innovation grants - 03/10/2020

“People in Minnesota who have disabilities want the same great quality of life that most people in Minnesota enjoy: to work and earn money, live in housing of their choice, choose their care providers, their friends and social activities.

The Disability Services Division launched its innovation grants program in 2016 to support new and innovative ideas to achieve these outcomes effectively and efficiently.

NEW: DHS is accepting applications for the next round of Disability Services Division innovation grants. DHS published a request for proposals in the State Register on March 23 and posted a revised RFP with extended deadlines on April 6.

To apply You may apply on the new online application portal. The new application deadline is June 26, 2020.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Mental Health Innovation Grant Program - 01/08/2020

“Mental Health Innovation Grant Program is a new grant program intended to improve access to and the quality of community-based, outpatient mental health services and reduce the number of people admitted to regional treatment centers and community behavioral health hospitals.

These grants add and develop services and supports to Minnesota’s mental health system including:

Short-term and critical access centers Collaborative efforts between crisis teams, hospitals and other services Transition services and care coordination”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

Organization-wide, School-wide, Facility-wide, and Center-wide Systems Change - 04/14/2019

~~“The goal of positive support at an organizational level is to first form a team that will work together to assess the strengths and needs of an organization. The team will represent all of the different types of individuals involved including those receiving services, staff members, administrators, family and community members to work together to solve problems. The types of problems that are identified will guide the group to select a positive support practice. Together, the team uses the information gathered to share the decision making process will everyone. Consensus building and buy-in increases when all individuals within a setting contribute to important decisions that are made. Empowering all individuals to work together to using information collected for progress monitoring and systems change helps improve outcomes. Celebration of success using the information gathered provides a powerful model for building community..”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Disability Services Innovation Grants - 05/05/2018

“The Minnesota Department of Human Services offers disability services innovation grants. These grants promote innovative ideas to improve outcomes for people with disabilities. Funded projects include new ways to help people with disabilities in Minnesota:

-Achieve integrated, competitive employment

-Live in the most integrated setting

-Connect with others in their communities

During state fiscal year 2018, approximately $2 million will be available. Applications are now closed for this round of grants. DHS anticipates it will award contracts to four to 10 qualified responders. The maximum award will be $500,000.

DHS is distributing the innovation grants in three parts:

-The large grants program

-The microgrant program

-The small grant program”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

“Six states receive nearly $15M in grants to expand employment opportunities for people with disabilities” - 09/14/2016

“Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development $2,500,000” This is the seventh round of DEI funding. Since 2010, the department has awarded grants of more than $123 million through the initiative to 49 projects in 28 states to improve education, training, and employment outcomes of youth and adults with disabilities. More information on the DEI is available here. DEI funds help refine and expand workforce strategies proven to be successful, and enhance inclusive service delivery through the public workforce system. Improvements include increasing the accessibility of American Job Centers, training front-line AJC and partner staff, and increasing partnerships and collaboration across numerous systems critical for assisting youth and adults with disabilities in securing meaningful employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Minnesota Empower and Encourage Work, Housing, and Independence - 07/01/2014

“Beginning July 1, 2014, DHS will establish a demonstration project to promote economic stability, increase independence, and reduce applications for disability benefits while providing a positive impact on the health and future of participants. Services provided under the demonstration project will include navigation, employment supports, and benefits planning. These services will be provided to a targeted group of federally funded Medicaid recipients.  The demonstration project will be funded with state general funds.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Minnesota DEI Grant Abstract (Round 3) - 12/11/2013

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. The Minnesota Workforce Investment Board (MWIB) was awarded a Round 3 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development

Minnesota DEI Grant Abstract (Round 5) - 10/01/2012

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. The Minnesota Workforce Investment Board (MWIB) was awarded a Round 3 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration.  Round 3 will end in 2015.  Round 5 was awarded in 2014 and will end in 2017.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Minnesota Money Follows the Person

“Moving Home Minnesota is a person-centered approach to help people … transition from nursing home and other institutional settings to community living that meets their needs and wants. Moving Home Minnesota services are available to eligible Minnesota residents for up to one year after their move from institutional care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 11 of 11

The Minnesota Training & Technical Assistance Center (MNTAT) - 04/01/2009

MNTAT will use a variety of formats and media to respond to constituents’ training and technical assistance needs throughout the state. The goal is to demonstrate and build flexible supports and strategies that will increase and improve the employment outcomes for Minnesotans with disabilities. Among the strategies MNTAT will employ include web-based training (webinars and webcasts); local and regional training events with the support of Minnesota APSE; and the presentation of an annual statewide disability employment conference. In addition, training and technical assistance will be provided in local communities through the establishment of local Community Action Teams (CATs) that will be used as a vehicle for training and technical assistance as well as examples of replicable employment practices that result in the flexible, customized employment of people with disabilities in their local communities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Thaleaha McBee vs. Team Industries, Inc. - 01/16/2018

“In February 2015, McBee sought medical attention for severe pain in her hands, back, and neck, including numbness in her hands and arms. In March 2015, McBee’s doctor gave her a ten-pound lifting restriction due to disc narrowing, a bulged disc, and bone spurs in her vertebrae. On March 10, 2015, McBee informed her supervisors at Team of her lifting restriction, who then instructed her to discuss the restriction with human resources. McBee’s supervisors placed her on a machine that produced parts weighing less than ten pounds, and she finished her shift. The next day, McBee met with human resources to discuss possible accommodations. Team terminated McBee on March 12, 2015, due to concerns relating to her medical restriction.

[…]

D E C I S I O N

 The district court did not err in dismissing McBee’s MHRA and MWCA claims. Because McBee’s medical restrictions rendered her unqualified for her position with or without reasonable accommodation, her employment posed a serious threat of harm to herself and her coworkers, Team’s successful serious-threat defense precludes her reprisal claim, and she did not engage in conduct protected by the workers’ compensation act, we affirm.

 Affirmed."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

MN DHS - Alternative Care Program (Section 1115) - 10/18/2013

On October 18, 2013 the Department of Human Services (DHS) received approval from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for federal financial participation (FFP) on the Alternative Care Program. This approval relates to the contingency items that were a part of Reform 2020. As required by Minnesota Laws 2013, DHS submitted a plan for investing the state dollars made available by the enhanced FFP for Alternative Care to Minnesota Management and Budget (MMB). This plan for the contingency items includes investments in proposals that were passed by the legislature: Enhancing Vulnerable Adult Protection; First Contact – Simplification, Access and Transition Support; HCBS Critical Access Study and Service Development; and Work – Empower and Encourage Independence. This plan was approved by MMB on October 30, 2013.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Minnesota CMS Section 1115 Waiver - 10/18/2013

~~“Federal waivers allow states to test new ways to deliver and pay for health care services. Changes to the state’s Medicaid program often require waivers approved by the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to continue receiving federal Medicaid funding. The website describes waivers that the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS) has applied for or received. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Minnesota DoE ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/09/2012

The Minnesota Department of Education’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 9, 2012.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Minnesota Olmstead Planning Committee

In January 2013, Governor Mark Dayton issued an Executive Order establishing a Sub-Cabinet to develop and implement a comprehensive plan supporting freedom of choice and opportunity for people with disabilities…The Sub-Cabinet evaluates policies, programs, statutes and regulations of state agencies against the standards set forth in the Olmstead decision to determine whether any should be revised or modified or require legislative action in an effort to improve the availability of community-based services for people with disabilities. The Sub-Cabinet seeks input from consumers, families of consumers, advocacy organizations, service providers and others

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is based on the requirements set forth in Title XIX of the Social Security Act and is a comprehensive written document created by the state of Minnesota that describes the nature and scope of its Medicaid program (known in Minnesota as Medical Assistance). It serves as a contractual agreement between the state of Minnesota and the federal government and must be administered in conformity with specific requirements of Title XIX of the Social Security Act and regulations outlined in Chapter IV of the Code of Federal Regulations. The state plan contains all information necessary for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to determine if the state can receive federal financial participation (FFP).

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Minnesota Money Follows the Person

~~“The Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration, offered through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, was created as part of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. The purpose of the demonstration is to promote a series of rebalancing objectives to reduce or eliminate barriers to receiving long-term care services in home and community settings, rather than in institutional settings.Minnesota’s Money Follows the Person Demonstration is called “Moving Home Minnesota.” The goal of the Moving Home Minnesota is to reduce or eliminate barriers to receiving long-term care services in home and community settings. “ 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Individuals with disabilities should reach for the stars and pursue their dreams when it comes to exploring their employment options in the North Star State of Minnesota!

2018 State Population.
0.62%
Change from
2017 to 2018
5,611,179
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.9%
Change from
2017 to 2018
296,481
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.08%
Change from
2017 to 2018
145,820
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.89%
Change from
2017 to 2018
49.18%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.02%
Change from
2017 to 2018
84.25%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 5,519,952 5,576,606 5,611,179
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 302,274 305,082 296,481
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 145,080 145,697 145,820
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,576,753 2,602,221 2,610,660
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 48.00% 47.76% 49.18%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 83.84% 84.23% 84.25%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.90% 3.50% 2.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.30% 18.00% 18.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.80% 8.40% 8.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 302,266 319,070 309,507
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 299,748 296,776 299,237
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 511,971 516,268 512,517
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 41,420 43,125 41,281
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,628 24,310 23,339
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,376 10,227 11,260
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 17,435 22,465 20,592
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 14,097 15,048 16,222
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,621 8,266 6,646

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 10,997 10,737 10,517
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 12.90% 12.60% 12.40%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 124,537 122,142 120,283

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 65,452 63,015 63,948
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 71,415 69,039 70,494
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 182,808 167,247 175,103
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 35.80% 37.70% 36.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50% 0.20% 0.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.10% 1.00% 1.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,007 N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 459 339 1,137
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,935 2,997 2,182
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 12,112 10,941 11,058
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 46 2 55
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 31 1 43
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 67.00% 50.00% 78.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.57 0.02 0.78

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
5,196
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 11 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 322 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 830 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,691 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,997 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 345 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 40.80% 40.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,248 5,732 5,796
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 187,379 185,523 184,653
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 162 131 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 333 218 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $20,628,000 $21,976,000 $24,599,235
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $253,024,000 $257,662,000 $253,960,955
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $17,482,000 $18,283,000 $23,192,061
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $97,396,000 $101,309,000 $110,306,334
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 8.00% 9.00% 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 8,015 8,908 10,152
Number of people served in facility based work. 14,374 14,718 14,533
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 2,181 2,141 2,523
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 40.50 48.30 57.25

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.45% 60.71% 60.91%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.08% 10.07% 10.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.15% 4.11% 4.17%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.40% 89.53% 79.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.86% 23.24% 27.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 69.25% 61.71% 65.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 86.78% 81.14% 80.05%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 44.39% 38.47% 38.53%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,448,836
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,880
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 33,646
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 162,155
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 195,801
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 159
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 201
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 360
AbilityOne wages (products). $284,324
AbilityOne wages (services). $1,837,245

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 63 65 59
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 63 65 59
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8,512 7,065 6,883
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8,512 7,065 6,883

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Person-Centered Thinking and Person-Centered Planning was a top strategic goal in 2017. Training was required for all VRS staff in fall of 2017. University of Minnesota Institute on Community Integration trainers were contracted to help staff understand the values-based concepts and incorporate client-centered practices in services we provide in accordance with WIOA, the Olmstead Plan and Employment First policy. Tools and techniques were introduced and practiced in the training. To further knowledge, skills and abilities in Person-Centered practices, a Community of Practice consisting of VRS staff will launch in December 2017. The purpose will be to create a culture of continuous improvement, construct processes, policy and guidance that are person-centered, and utilize online coursework available through the University of Minnesota for ongoing training. (Page 255) Title IV.

Customized Employment

~~• DEED’s VRS will ensure, as appropriate, that students with disabilities that are seeking subminimum wage employment and who have applied for VR services are determined eligible or ineligible for VR services; have an approved IPE; receive pre-employment transition services; and receive appropriate reasonable accommodations and appropriate supports and services, including supported and customized employment services, that assist in obtaining and maintaining a competitive integrated employment outcome. (Page 211) Title IV

• VRS along with a key Community Rehabilitation Provider is developing a Minnesota centric Customized Employment Training and pursuing ACRE (Association for Community Rehabilitation Educators) certification for the training participants. This training will include hands on learning opportunities for Discovery Assessment and Job Development portions of Customized Employment. Each participant will also receive mentoring from VRS & CRP staff who are certified by one of the key CE training entities that provide certification. The goal of this Customized Employment Training is to assist placement professionals develop an understanding of CE and demonstrate proficiency in providing Discovery and Job Development. The training is also essential for Program Managers, Rehabilitation Area Managers who supervise staff who are providing CE services. (Page 216) Title IV

Customized Employment. VRS has partnered with ProAct, Inc. and Occupational Development Center, WIOA Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC), and the Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC) to provide Marc Gold & Associates’ Customized Employment Training in Minnesota through June, 2018. Two cohorts began in 2017 that include 24 VRS placement professionals, counselors, RAMs and supervisors, along with community partner staff. Participants attend nine full days of certification training building skills to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and employer. (Page 228) Title IV

There are three specific strategies that VRS will play an active role in:
1) Promulgate changes to the State Rule governing Extended Employment, ending admissions to non-integrated and sub-minimum wage programs and shifting the state funding to integrated employment,
2) provide technical assistance to non-integrated employment programs to design new business models that lead to competitive employment in the most integrated setting, and
3) provide information about effective employment strategies, such as supported and customized employment, that make competitive employment possible for individuals with complex and significant disabilities. (Page 249) Title IV

VRS along with a key Community Rehabilitation Provider is developing a Minnesota centric Customized Employment Training and pursuing ACRE (Association for Community Rehabilitation Educators) certification for the training participants. This training will include hands on learning opportunities for Discovery Assessment and Job Development portions of Customized Employment. Each participant will also receive mentoring from VRS & CRP staff who are certified by one of the key CE training entities that provide certification. The goal of this Customized Employment Training is to assist placement professionals develop an understanding of CE and demonstrate proficiency in providing Discovery and Job Development. The training is also essential for Program Managers, Rehabilitation Area Managers who supervise staff who are providing CE services. (Page 259) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Moreover, the DEI has helped Minnesota to build the capacity of WDA staff to increase the number of youth with disabilities participating in career pathways programs by implementing an Integrated Resource Team (IRT) approach as well as incorporating the Guideposts for Success best practices framework into service delivery. This success has prompted the development of a guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s Personal Learning Plan (PLP). The guide was developed to assist WDA staff when working with youth with disabilities who have a Personal Learning Plan (PLP) or an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The guide provides suggestions for integrating the Guideposts for Success into student ILP activities for both in-school and out-of-school youth. For more information on the DEI and the guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s PLP, see the Disability Employment Initiative weblink: https://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/office-youth-development/special/disability-employment-initiative/  (Page 77) Title I

4. Work with Department of Human Services (DHS) in the Olmstead interagency workgroup focused on blending and braiding funding that allow access to extended services for the long term supports needed for customers desiring employment. Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) is currently working with DHS on developing an interagency agreement between DHS, VRS, and SSB for providing services to those customers who require long term supports. SSB does not see the high volume of customers who require extended services that VRS sees, although the interagency agreement will apply to SSB. (Page 319) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~• Disability Employment Initiative- Partners for Youth Career Pathways - Minnesota is currently managing a $2.5 million, 42-month DEI grant funded through the U.S. DOL’s Employment and Training Administration and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. This grant allows Minnesota to strengthen partnerships and strategically align youth and adult career pathways systems to effectively serve youth with disabilities through multiple entry and exit points. In addition, the DEI has allowed Minnesota to expand the number of Employment Networks in the state which will help increase services to Social Security disability beneficiaries participating career pathways programs.
Moreover, the DEI has helped Minnesota to build the capacity of WDA staff to increase the number of youth with disabilities participating in career pathways programs by implementing an Integrated Resource Team (IRT) approach as well as incorporating the Guideposts for Success best practices framework into service delivery. This success has prompted the development of a guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s Personal Learning Plan (PLP). The guide was developed to assist WDA staff when working with youth with disabilities who have a Personal Learning Plan (PLP) or an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The guide provides suggestions for integrating the Guideposts for Success into student ILP activities for both in-school and out-of-school youth. For more information on the DEI and the guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s PLP, see the Disability Employment Initiative weblink: https://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/office-youth-development/special/disability-employment-initiative/  (Page 77) Title I

• Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Career Pathways — Beginning in 2014 and recently extended, Minnesota’s DEI project supports job—driven approaches in career pathway systems and programs to equip youth and adults with disabilities (including individuals with significant disabilities) with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in—demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. Three Local Workforce Development Areas operate career pathways in manufacturing, health care, and information technology sectors. Disability Resources Coordinators work to strengthen partnerships with Vocational Rehabilitation, disability agencies, and employers and modify career pathway education and employment for individual success. The GWDB Disability Equity Committee is evaluating these three projects to develop recommendations that will result in better services and outcomes to individuals with disabilities not served under Title IV. Two primary recommendations are being considered to replicate and build state-wide capacity; 1. Navigators and local teams are key to developing sustainable strategies and 2. Nationally recognized training that is Minnesota designed and implemented. (Page 79-80) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~• SGA Project: the Institute on Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts — Boston has received RSA funding to demonstrate effective strategies to assist SSDI beneficiaries achieve income above the substantial gainful activity (SGA) level. Minnesota VRS is one of the demonstration sites. At time of enrollment, the SSDI beneficiary is assigned a counselor, placement specialist and financial specialist. Eligibility for services is presumed within three days and the Employment Plan is developed within 30 days of application. VRS has partnered with the DLL to provide financial counseling in VR offices. RSA funding was used to provide the benefits planners with financial literacy training so that in addition to benefits planning the financial specialists can provide assistance with improving credits scores, paying off credit card debt, and developing savings plans. It is hoped that the combination of rapid engagement and financial planning services will lead to better outcomes. Although the SGA Project does not receive any Medicaid funding, the financial specialist positions would not have been possible without the initial collaboration with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant. (Pages 285-286) Title I

School to Work Transition

~~The Guideposts for Success, a best practices framework that was developed by the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth (NCWD) is utilized to ensure that all youth, including those with disabilities are successful when transitioning to adulthood. The Guideposts for Success constitute five tenets that align closely with WIOA goals and outcomes. These five tenets are: school preparation, youth development and leadership, career preparation, connecting activities, and family involvement. When a youth has received services or hash had experiences that align with the Guideposts tenets, the youth is more likely to transition to adulthood successfully. For more information on how the Guideposts are being incorporated into the Round 7 Disability Employment Initiative follow this weblink: https://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/office-youth-development/special/disability-employment-initiative/  (Page 152) Title I

Goal 2: Increasing Pre-Employment Transition Services
VRS, schools, and the VR Community will focus on increasing vocational exploration and work based learning experiences for high school students with disabilities. (Page 236) Title IV

Goal 2: Increasing Pre-Employment Transition Services VRS, schools, and the VR community will focus on increasing vocational exploration and work based learning experiences for high school students with disabilities.
Strategic Priorities 
A. Develop strategies to implement the Pre-ETS requirements stipulated in WIOA
Action: Track required and authorized services and monitor expenditures and fiscal impact
Progress achieved: VRS delivers pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) through counseling staff (VR eligible persons) and contracts (VR potentially eligible persons). An Employment Plan is developed and services are tracked. 
VRS issued nine fee for service contracts in July, 2017 to vendors to provide required services to VR potentially eligible people. Requests for Proposals are currently being developed to expand the availability of Pre-ETS services within the Twin cities metropolitan area and northwestern Minnesota. (Page 254) Title IV

C. Increase the number of work based learning experiences prior to graduation for VR eligible students in high school
Action: Establish a baseline and track the number of VR students with paid and unpaid work based learning experience prior to graduation.
Progress achieved: Service codes have been developed and implemented to track Pre-ETS purchased services.  (Page 254) Title IV

With the new emphasis on Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), SSB will continue to work with traditional partners to promote these models and facilitate effective implementation of emerging school-to-work efforts. The activities detailed below are designed to facilitate outreach and referral efforts to transition-age students who are blind or visually impaired. The goals of this ongoing involvement by the counselor in the education of a student, beginning as early as age 14, are to enable a student to live independently before leaving a school setting, have a greater understanding of relevant employment options, and develop self-advocacy skills. (Page 279) Title IV

All transition students are expected to have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that aligns with their Individualized Education Program (IEP). The development of the IPE is expected to be within 90 days of eligibility and the job goal is one that this projected for the student. Work and career exploration must be part of the IPE. (Page 283-284) Title IV

A transition assessment tool guides counselors and teams about each student’s skill level in activities of daily living and identifies skill training needed for moving on to post-secondary life. This transition assessment has been instrumental in the development of concrete plans and strategies that can be woven into the students IPE and IEP. This results in a genuinely coordinated effort between schools and VR. Counselors are working with IEP teams to encourage the use of postsecondary options for students to take entry level college classes while still in high school. This gives students an opportunity to try out their technology, braille, and self- advocacy skills prior to attending college full time. (Page 316) Title IV

To provide an additional resource to parents of high school students, SSB has contracted with PACER, a parent advocacy group knowledgeable in the IEP and transition process. PACER advocates create materials, facilitate workshops for parents and students, and conduct surveys on parent satisfaction. (Page 316) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~• Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Career Pathways — Beginning in 2014 and recently extended, Minnesota’s DEI project supports job—driven approaches in career pathway systems and programs to equip youth and adults with disabilities (including individuals with significant disabilities) with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in—demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. Three Local Workforce Development Areas operate career pathways in manufacturing, health care, and information technology sectors. Disability Resources Coordinators work to strengthen partnerships with Vocational Rehabilitation, disability agencies, and employers and modify career pathway education and employment for individual success. The GWDB Disability Equity Committee is evaluating these three projects to develop recommendations that will result in better services and outcomes to individuals with disabilities not served under Title IV. Two primary recommendations are being considered to replicate and build state-wide capacity; 1. Navigators and local teams are key to developing sustainable strategies and 2. Nationally recognized training that is Minnesota designed and implemented. (Pages 79-80) Title I

DEED meets its ongoing obligation not to discriminate on the basis of disability by developing system wide policy and procedure initiatives that comply with Section 188 of WIOA. These policies include physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials to serve the needs of customers with disabilities. (Page 127) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

There are several opportunities for activities to be aligned and enhanced with the core programs. Training is needed for staff to understand the appropriate activities and career pathway opportunities for recipients within a system where job search and job placement have been primarily seen as the core activity. We need to continue to better understand how career pathways models including; work-based learning, apprenticeships, and skills training can be implemented to align with the needs of industry. Development of employer-led sector partnerships allow for opportunities for jobseekers with a priority to address the disparities gaps in race, disability, disconnected youth, and gender opportunities. This being said, it has been critical for providers to understand the regional sectors in demand. (Page 69) Title I Core Responsibility 1 — Develop employer outreach activities to establish, maintain, and facilitate regular contact with employers to promote employment and training opportunities for the benefit of Veterans. Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Develop job opportunities for Veteran job seekers through outreach efforts with Minnesota employers: job development phone contacts, in person employer visits, and participation in job fair activities on behalf of Veterans. 2) Communicate and coordinate with Business Services Representatives in the local AJC to facilitate and promote job opportunities for Veterans, especially those with significant barriers to employment. 3) Promote the "Veteran Friendly Employer" initiative to all businesses contacted. 4) Encourage employers to employ Veterans utilizing apprenticeships and OJT programs, State and Federal dislocated worker programs, and GI Bill benefits. 5) Maintain current information on employment and training opportunities. 6) Monitor Federal Contractor Job Listings (FCJL) and Vet Central job orders for Veterans using the WFC, or on the DVOP caseload. 7) Provide contacts and job leads to DVOPs. (Page 447) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Collaboration Grants to Provide Independent Living Services: Since 2008, the VRS/IL collaboration has served Minnesotans with the most significant disabilities who require both vocational rehabilitation and independent living services to meet their goals for working and living in the community. In FFY 2017 VRS dedicated $1.2 million in SSA program income to fund benefit coaches who are housed in every VRS office. The benefit coaches provide benefits and financial planning services for eligible consumers who are receiving SSI and/or SSDI Social Security benefits. This funding continues and expands the services previously provided by the SGA Project, a RSA funded demonstration project to improve employment outcomes for SSDI beneficiaries. (Page 204) Title IV
 Ticket to Work Employment Networks: VRS, State Services for the Blind and SSA co-host periodic meetings of the Employment Networks to provide staff training, updates on Ticket to Work procedural changes, and to promote Partnership Plus job retention services after VRS/SSB case closure.
The SGA Project: In 2017, Vocational Rehabilitation completed a two-year model demonstration project designed to provide SSDI beneficiaries information and support to develop an employment plan that maps out a pathway to achieve employment above Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA). The SGA Project utilized a rapid engagement approach in which eligibility is determined within three days, Transferable Skills and Labor Market Information are provided and Benefits Planning and Financial Education are initiated within seven days. Within 30 days of application, the IPE and a Placement Plan are developed. A benefits analysis is completed within eight weeks of application if needed. As a result of positive feedback from Treatment Team clients and staff, Minnesota has expanded the project statewide using a combination of SSA program income and state funding. (Page 205) Title IV

Statewide Collaboration VRS collaborates with the Minnesota Department of Education (MDE), Department of Human Services (DHS), and county and local service providers to offer statewide supported employment services. VRS is a partner in several state-level agreements that provide long-term supports. During development of an employment plan, VRS counselors and other service team members help consumers to select supported employment services that meet their needs. They identify which services will be provided by VRS, as well as the source of long-term supports in the community. VRS provides time-limited supports for up to 24 months, but an employment plan may be amended if additional time is needed to achieve job stability. The primary funding resources for long-term supports in the community following VRS case closure are county case managers, the VRS Extended Employment Program, DHS Medicaid-waiver funded services, and the Social Security Administration’s Impairment-Related Work Expense exclusions and Ticket to Work funding for persons on SSI and/or SSDI. (Page 213-214) Title IV

About 40 percent of VRS applicants receive SSA benefits. VRS was instrumental in establishing the Work Incentives Connection, a SSA funded program of Goodwill Industries that provides work incentives planning and assistance for consumers.
SSA, VRS and State Services for the Blind co-host periodic meetings of the Employment Networks. In addition to providing in-service training, the meetings provide an opportunity to learn more about the services offered by each Employment Network to assist consumers make informed choices when selecting a vendor for employment services and/or on-going job retention services. The current focus of this group is to expand the use of Ticket to Work funding to provide ongoing job retention supports, to promote the use of PASS Plans, and to ensure the continuation of benefits planning services as people transition from VRS services to job retention services.  (Page 250) Title IV

SSDI and SSI Beneficiaries: SSA and VRS continue to co—host bi-annual meetings of the Employment Networks Ticket—to—Work funding is used to supplement Supported Employment funding or to provide continued job retention services beyond the 90 days VRS typically provides. Benefit coaches have been added to each office to ensure beneficiaries fully understand the impact income will have on benefits. (Page 261) Title IV

SGA Project: the Institute on Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts — Boston has received RSA funding to demonstrate effective strategies to assist SSDI beneficiaries achieve income above the substantial gainful activity (SGA) level. Minnesota VRS is one of the demonstration sites. At time of enrollment, the SSDI beneficiary is assigned a counselor, placement specialist and financial specialist. Eligibility for services is presumed within three days and the Employment Plan is developed within 30 days of application. VRS has partnered with the DLL to provide financial counseling in VR offices. RSA funding was used to provide the benefits planners with financial literacy training so that in addition to benefits planning the financial specialists can provide assistance with improving credits scores, paying off credit card debt, and developing savings plans. It is hoped that the combination of rapid engagement and financial planning services will lead to better outcomes. Although the SGA Project does not receive any Medicaid funding, the financial specialist positions would not have been possible without the initial collaboration with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant. (Page 285-286) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Current business services involve a high degree of employer engagement. From those represented on the local workforce development boards, participating on training advisory groups with postsecondary education, employers provides direction to business services in Minnesota. Community engagement is a growing area of activity, as we work to address disparate impact among people of color, individuals with disabilities and disconnected youth. This presents a unique opportunity to bridge the divides of cultural differences and work place expectations. One recent example includes a workshop for employers to support their development of cultural competence in attracting and retaining a diverse quality workforce. A better understanding of the needs of employers and communities can lead to customer-centered design of services that benefit both job seekers and employers. (Page 41) Title I

Data Collection

C. VRS will lead and convene Placement Partnerships focused on developing, maintaining and strengthening relationships among VRS, VR Community Partners and Employers Action: The VRS Placement Specialist team will develop and disseminate a quarterly report on the major activities and outcomes for active placement partnerships Action: Work with partners to implement WIOA Common Performance Measure 6 focused on effectiveness in serving employers Progress achieved: The Disability Employment Resource (DER) was developed to support business engagement. The initiative helps businesses meet their workforce goals by employing people with disabilities in competitive integrated positions, while employment professionals learn more about how to align their placement goals with business needs. The DER curriculum improves business engagement by delivering information to bridge the gap between business and human services, dispelling myths that can prevent employers from considering people with disabilities, helping human service professionals understand the business perspective, providing tools for starting and building relationships, and connecting businesses with information and resources to help them succeed. (Page 258) Title IV

511

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students….
• Outline services and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), with regard to youth with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment.
• Provide assurance that neither the SEA nor the LEA will enter into an arrangement with an entity holding a special wage certificate under section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act for the purpose of operating a program under which a youth with a disability is engaged in work at a subminimum wage. (Page 207) Title IV

• DEED’s VRS and MDE’s Special Education and Career and College Success Divisions will work together with LEAs to ensure that outreach and identification of students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment in order for them to receive counseling and information and referral related to competitive integrated employment.
• DEED’s VRS will ensure, as appropriate, that students with disabilities that are seeking subminimum wage employment and who have applied for VR services are determined eligible or ineligible for VR services; have an approved IPE; receive pre-employment transition services; and receive appropriate reasonable accommodations and appropriate supports and services, including supported and customized employment services, that assist in obtaining and maintaining a competitive integrated employment outcome.
• DEED’s VRS and MDE’s Special Education and Career and College Success Divisions will provide LEAs the required processes and forms to document the required actions specified under WIOA for all students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment. (Page 211) Title IV

• DEED’s VRS will ensure that all students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment receive documentation of the required actions specified under WIOA within 45 calendar days of completion of the required actions. 
Assurance related to WIOA Section 511 and 34 CFR 397, Limitations on use of subminimum wage
In accordance with 34 CFR 397.31, MDE’s Special Education and Career and College Success Divisions, through the MDE Career Technical Education Program approval and expense approval process, will ensure that neither the SEA nor LEAs enter into a contract with an entity, as defined in WIOA 34 CFR 397.5(d) for the purpose of operating a program under which a student with a disability is engaged in work compensated at a subminimum wage. (Page 212) Title IV

3. Ensuring applicants fully understand the benefits of competitive integrated employment. As part of the intake process, emphasis is placed on competitive integrated employment. Individuals who are not pursuing competitive integrated employment are referred to other resources, including the Senior Services Unit, which can assist them in meeting their independent living needs. Career counseling and information and referral services on competitive integrated employment is provided to individuals in subminimum wage and extended employment, as well as to youth seeking subminimum wage employment. WDU’s intake counselor is responsible for providing this service to these individuals, consistent with the new 511 requirements.  (Page 319) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Prior to awarding a grant, a DEED conducts a risk analysis. In addition, in the early part of each year sub—grantees complete an electronic assessment and a fiscal monitoring guide. These assessment tools provide a sweeping array of information, in such important areas as: o How sub—grantees will serve and provide priority services to veterans o Policies regarding sub—grantee conflict—of—interest processes o The longevity of key directors and/or stakeholders o Sub—grantee customer complaint processes and physical and program accessibility o Sub—grantee accounting procedures, positive cash flow, third—party audit reports, review of debt ratio, including federal and state tax debt (Page 107) Title I

DEED meets its ongoing obligation not to discriminate on the basis of disability by developing system wide policy and procedure initiatives that comply with Section 188 of WIOA. These policies include physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials to serve the needs of customers with disabilities. The Determining the Location of a Minnesota WorkForce Center policy requires that the "The WFC location will be accessible to all populations including individuals with disabilities." The Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity is the final authority in determining if a location meets the accessibility criteria to be certified as a WorkForce Center. The Minnesota WorkForce Center System Certification Standards policy provides guidance on the implementation standards for the equal access obligations under WIOA. WorkForce Centers must be universally accessible to all populations including but not limited to various racial and ethnic groups, persons for which English is not their first language, ex— felons, people who are homeless, Veterans, various age groups, different genders, and individuals with disabilities. (Page 127) Title I

PROVIDE ARCHITECTURAL ACCESSIBILITY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES The WorkForce Center System provides integrated program services through the development and maintenance of an accessible environment. All facilities open to the public as well as administrative offices must be accessible to and useable by the broadest population. All partners are covered by Title II of the ADA and the equal opportunity and nondiscrimination elements of Section 188 of WIOA and, therefore, are subject to the same set of standards. (Page 128) Title I

Affiliate WorkForce Centers are required to provide full access and opportunities to all job seekers including serving individuals with disabilities. Physical locations, services and programs must comply with Section 188 of WIOA and provisions of the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended. DEED will work closely with Affiliate WorkForce Centers to have them provide an annual assessment on architectural and programmatic accessibility for individuals with disabilities. A review schedule for Affiliate WorkForce Centers will occur during Program Monitoring Visits. (Page 129) Title I

• The Minnesota WorkForce Center System Certification Standards discussed earlier identifies both physical and programmatic accessibility requirements. Customers with disabilities must be able to participate and benefit from the services available in the WorkForce Center System, as do all customers. In addition to the site accessibility standards, the Policy identifies the following requirements: • Development of an evacuation and safety plan • Notice displayed and available in alternate formats upon request • Inclusion of tag lines • Identification of Minnesota Relay • Availability of accommodation and modifications • Staff knowledge of assistive technology • Use of auxiliary aids and services • Community resources • Complaint processes. (Page 129) Title IV

Accessibility has been a central focus for the web development team. DEED’s accessibility resources in the Vocational Rehabilitation Unit as well as staff at State Services for the Blind continue to be involved in any webpage updates ensuring accessibility for the blind and visually impaired, as well as users who are Deaf or hard-of-hearing, or who have mobility impairments, and those with cognitive and reading disorders. DEED’s web development team strives for accessibility that extends beyond minimum compliance. If, however, users are unable to access information, they may request information in alternate formats and it will be provided in a timely manner. (Page 130-131) Title I

Vets

• Service in WorkForce Center System — The state’s WorkForce Center system provides the full array of labor and employment services to veterans around the state. Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPs) provide eligible veterans with employment services such as job matching and referral to posted job openings, vocational and career guidance, labor market information, plus workshops on resume preparation and conducting effective job searches. DVOPs also refer eligible and qualified veterans to appropriate WIOA—funded training programs and discretionary initiatives, as well as registered apprenticeship programs throughout the state. Local Veteran Employment Representatives (LVER) specialize in promoting veterans to employers, educating one—stop partners on current law, changing regulations, and the value veterans bring to an employer. • Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) — DVOP and LVER staff are funded through the JVSG and fulfill all responsibilities mandated by the grant programs. Services include the provision of intensive case management services to Chapter 31 Veterans, disabled veterans, homeless veterans, economically or educationally disadvantaged veterans, and veterans with "significant barriers to employment" as defined by the Department of Labor. (Page 78-79) Title I

In Minnesota, estimates indicate that a little over 1%, or 4000 Veterans per year will experience homelessness, or struggle with other life crises edging them toward homelessness. Of those 4000 Veterans, 27% have returned from service in Iraq or Afghanistan, and over 30% are disabled Veterans. Approximately 15% of Veterans served that are homeless are women Veterans. Many are single with children to care for. DVOP staff works closely with Minnesota’s HVRP grantee, Minnesota Assistance Council for Veterans (MACV). In addition to referring clients between our two agencies, we also collaborate with them on 3 StandDown events across the state each year and provide a liaison (LVER) to provide business contacts and help with some of their client-focused events. (Page 442) Title IV

Core Responsibility 1 — Develop employer outreach activities to establish, maintain, and facilitate regular contact with employers to promote employment and training opportunities for the benefit of Veterans. Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Develop job opportunities for Veteran job seekers through outreach efforts with Minnesota employers: job development phone contacts, in person employer visits, and participation in job fair activities on behalf of Veterans. 2) Communicate and coordinate with Business Services Representatives in the local AJC to facilitate and promote job opportunities for Veterans, especially those with significant barriers to employment. 3) Promote the "Veteran Friendly Employer" initiative to all businesses contacted. 4) Encourage employers to employ Veterans utilizing apprenticeships and OJT programs, State and Federal dislocated worker programs, and GI Bill benefits. 5) Maintain current information on employment and training opportunities. 6) Monitor Federal Contractor Job Listings (FCJL) and Vet Central job orders for Veterans using the WFC, or on the DVOP caseload. 7) Provide contacts and job leads to DVOPs. Core Responsibility 2 — Advocate on behalf of Veterans seeking employment and training opportunities with business, industry, and community—based organizations. Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Contact community leaders, employers, labor unions, training programs, and Veterans organizations. 2) Promote Veterans priority of service in employment and training programs. 3) Maintain current information on employment and training opportunities. 4) Plan and participate in job fairs to promote services to Veterans, and encourage participating employers to become a "Veteran Friendly Employer." 5) Promote licensing and certification assistance and training opportunities for Veterans using training providers and credentialing bodies. 6) Work with unions, apprenticeships programs, and business community to promote employment, On the Job Training (OJT), apprenticeships and other available training opportunities to employ Veterans. 7) Establish and maintain contact with National Guard, Reserve Family Readiness Groups and Family Assistance Centers in the assigned area. Provide education and information regarding DEED Vets employment services, WorkForce Centers, and Beyond the Yellow Ribbon events. (Page 447) Title IV

8) Assist employers with special job accommodations for disabled Veterans. This position works closely with community leaders, Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Facilitate and maintain the provision of labor exchange services by local WFC staff to Veterans including the identification of SBE Veterans, proper referral to a DVOP, or in the absence of the DVOP, to the individualized career services provider, and referral to vocational counseling, testing, job search assistance. 2) Provide job development and employer outreach on behalf of Veterans, with a focus on Veterans with an SBE being case managed by a local DVOP. 3) Coordinate or conduct job search assistance and networking workshops in conjunction with employers. 4) Provide Labor Market Information (LMI) to employers. 6) Work with DEED Veterans Chapter 31 Program Coordinator and Veterans Affairs (VA) regarding Chapter 31 clients. 7) Refer Veterans to the Department of Labor (DOL)/Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS) partner as needed to assist with reemployment rights issues covered under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) law. 8) Assist employers with special job accommodations for disabled Veterans. (Page 448) Title IV

Mental Health

~~The Minnesota Youth Program (MYP) provides short—term, contextualized and individualized training services for at—risk youth, ages 14 to 24. Coordinated at the local level by the Workforce Development Boards/Youth Committees, MYP eligibility criteria is more flexible (inclusive) than the WIOA Youth Program. MYP serves an extremely disadvantaged group of young men and women: participants have multiple challenges such as substance abuse, criminal records, mental health issues, and cognitive learning limitations, in addition to being poor. The Higher Education Career Advisors Pilot Project (HECAP) funded by the Minnesota State Legislature provides funding to focus on assistance to high schools through career exploration and helps students see connections between their education and future careers. HECAP builds on the work of local workforce. (Page 88) Title I

• DEED’s VRS will provide outreach to the following school staff to identify students in need of pre-employment transition services and/ or vocational rehabilitation services: teachers/case managers, work coordinators, guidance counselors, school nurses, 504 coordinators, school social workers, alternative learning center staff, principals, school mental health coordinators, and school psychologists. (Page 211) Title IV

The Minnesota General program has a long history of innovative collaboration with the State Mental Health Authority. This includes VR representation on the State Mental Health Planning Council and the newly formed State Behavioral Advisory Council. The two agencies have also collaborated to implement, sustain and expand the evidence based practice of supported employment, Individual Placement and Support. Starting with 4 local partnerships between mental health and employment providers in 2006, the IPS provider network in Minnesota, funded in part with state appropriations dedicated to IPS, has expanded to 29 IPS programs (partnerships between mental health agencies and employment services agencies) in 47 of Minnesota’s 87 counties. Minnesota VR and Mental Health agencies are partners in the National IPS Learning Community. (Pages 219-220) Title IV

IPS collaboration. Vocational Rehabilitation Services in the mid-state region was recognized with a Minnesota Social Services Association award for partnering in an IPS community collaboration with Functional Industries, Wright County Health & Human Services and Central MN Mental Health Center. Each agency brought their own mental health expertise to the table to support employment, therapy, and case management. This collaboration helps people with serious mental illness work in regular jobs, not jobs set aside for people with disabilities. Mental health practitioners not only help their clients consider employment but also provide employment specialists with their mental health expertise to assist with the individualized job search. (Page 228) Title IV

Funding for supported employment, within which Title VI Part B funds play a relatively small part, is governed by myriad federal and state laws and rules covering many categories of services. For example, a network of private, not-for-profit organizations, licensed by the Department of Human Services Disability Services Division, provides day training and habilitation services that may include supported employment. People with mental illness may receive work-related support through the State Comprehensive Mental Health Act. In these instances, each county determines the level of service that will be provided. (Page 247) Title IV

VRS, through state-funded extended employment services, provides ongoing work supports to approximately 5,100 individuals in Supported Employment annually. Many of these individuals received time-limited vocational rehabilitation services prior to entering supported employment. Part of Minnesota’s supported employment funding is dedicated to extended supports for persons with serious and persistent mental illness. VRS and the Department of Human Services Mental Health Division collaborate on Individual Placement and Support (IPS) projects to promote innovation in service delivery, including supported employment services, for this population. The projects are designed to provide functional assessment, individualized career planning, job skill acquisition, job placement, job development, and non-time-limited supports necessary to maintain and advance in employment. All recipients of grants under these projects are required to demonstrate collaboration with counties, the local community support program, VRS, and providers of employment services such as CRPs, regional treatment centers, and community mental health centers.  (Page 263) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 103

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshot Minnesota - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information on the RETAIN program in Minnesota including the lead agency, the amount of funding, and the target areas and population

Systems
  • Other

Employment Services - 01/08/2019

~~“Employment services are essential in assisting reintegrating homeless veterans into meaningful employment within the labor force. Minnesota Assistance Council for Veterans (MACV) Staff work with veterans throughout Minnesota in navigating access to resources for employment and training programs to find great employment opportunities.

MACV employment specialists provide additional assistance by forging strong relationships with employers throughout the community and to aid veterans with their employment search needs by providing supportive services, resume review & development and career networking events. By working closely with the staff at the Minnesota Workforce centers, a veteran is connected with Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Staff and Local Veterans Employment Representatives, giving the veteran an integrated team to work with as they conduct their employment search.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Adult Mental Health Targeted Case Management (AMH-TCM) and Outcome Reporting - 01/01/2019

~~“In collaboration with a coalition of AMH-TCM lead agencies and contracted vendors, DHS’ Mental Health Division determined that AMH-TCM agencies will report individual-level data on employment and housing outcomes only at this time. Data will include:1. Employment-related outcomes which align with the informed choice-employment initiative under Minnesota’s Olmstead Plan.2. Housing-related outcomes which align with the informed choice initiative under Minnesota’s Olmstead Plan.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Minnesota’s Home and Community-Based Services Rule Statewide Transition Plan - 12/17/2018

~~“Today, most  people  with  disabilities  grow  up  in  their  family  homes,  go  to  school  in  their  own  neighborhoods  and  have  many  of  the  same  hopes  and  dreams as people who don’t have disabilities. Yet, the service system hasn’t always offered the individualized options or flexibility that would allow those dreams to be realized.

The focus of Minnesota’s disability service system is on one person at a time. 

The principles of person-centered planning are the foundation of the HCBS rule. These principles further support people’s rights to make informed choices and decide what is important both to them and for them”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WIOA Limitations on the Use of Subminimum Wage - 12/17/2018

~~“For Youth Ages 24 and UnderWIOA requires youth ages 24 and under to have documentation that they completed the following actions before they can earn a subminimum wage:• participated in Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) and/or special education transition services and activities while still in high school and eligible for services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and• applied for VRS and determined ineligible or found eligible but unsuccessful in competitive, integrated employment and their VRS case was closed, and• received career counseling, information, and referral to resources that could assist in securing competitive, integrated employment.” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mental Health Promotion - 10/26/2018

~~“Mental health is more than the absence of disease. Everyone has a state of mental health, and this can change across the lifespan. Not having a mental illness, does not guarantee good mental health. Similarly, having a mental illness, does not guarantee poor mental health. It includes life satisfaction, self-acceptance, sense of purpose, identity, feeling connected and belonging, empowerment, and resilience, which is the ability to bounce back after set-backs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

VRS, SSB, IDEA and home and community-based employment services – Interim guidance - 10/19/2018

~~“This document provides information about:• Authorizing home and community-based services (HCBS) employment services• Background information• Best practices• Additional employment resources.

DHS is working to clarify and replace this interim guidance with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS), State Services for the Blind (SSB) and the Disability Services Division at DHS. When this happens, DHS will replace this guidance”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

VRS, SSB, IDEA and home and community-based employment services – Interim guidance - 10/19/2018

~~“This document provides information about:• Authorizing home and community-based services (HCBS) employment services• Background information• Best practices• Additional employment resources.

DHS is working to clarify and replace this interim guidance with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS), State Services for the Blind (SSB) and the Disability Services Division at DHS. When this happens, DHS will replace this guidance”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment Services - 07/01/2018

~~“Minnesota added three employment services to our home and community-based services (HCBS) waivers on July 1, 2018. We added the following services to the Developmental Disabilities (DD), Community Alternative Care (CAC), Community Access for Disability Inclusion (CADI) and Brain Injury (BI) waivers:• Employment exploration services: Community-based services that introduce people with disabilities to employment options and allow them to explore their options through work experiences. This service helps people to make an informed choice about working in competitive, integrated employment.• Employment development services: Individualized services that help people find competitive, integrated employment or attain self-employment.• Employment support services: Individualized services and supports that help people to maintain community employment in an individual or group arrangement.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Services Innovation Grants - 05/05/2018

“The Minnesota Department of Human Services offers disability services innovation grants. These grants promote innovative ideas to improve outcomes for people with disabilities. Funded projects include new ways to help people with disabilities in Minnesota:

-Achieve integrated, competitive employment

-Live in the most integrated setting

-Connect with others in their communities

During state fiscal year 2018, approximately $2 million will be available. Applications are now closed for this round of grants. DHS anticipates it will award contracts to four to 10 qualified responders. The maximum award will be $500,000.

DHS is distributing the innovation grants in three parts:

-The large grants program

-The microgrant program

-The small grant program”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

SF 2452 A bill for an act relating to health and human services; establishing the health and human services budget; - 04/30/2019

~~“Data on individuals collected, maintained, used, or disseminated by the welfare system are private data on individuals, and shall not be disclosed except:…

(9) between the Department of Human Services, the Department of Employment and Economic Development, and when applicable, the Department of Education, for the following purposes:…(iv) to analyze public assistance employment services and program utilization, cost,effectiveness, and outcomes as implemented under the authority established in Title II,Sections 201-204 of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

MN Statute 16C.16: Designation of Procurements from Small Businesses - 04/01/2016

The commissioner of administration shall periodically designate businesses that are majority owned and operated by women, persons with a substantial physical disability, or specific minorities as targeted group businesses within purchasing categories as determined by the commissioner. A group may be targeted within a purchasing category if the commissioner determines there is a statistical disparity between the percentage of purchasing from businesses owned by group members and the representation of businesses owned by group members among all businesses in the state in the purchasing category.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota SF 1458 - ABLE Plan - 05/22/2015

A savings plan known as the Minnesota ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] plan is established. In establishing this plan, the legislature seeks to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, and to provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act, the Supplemental Security Income program under title XVI of the Social Security Act, the beneficiary's employment, and other sources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Medical Assistance Reform Waiver (256B.021) - 06/01/2014

"It is the intent of the legislature to reform components of the medical assistance program for seniors and people with disabilities or other complex needs, and medical assistance enrollees in general, in order to achieve better outcomes, such as community integration and independence; improved health; reduced reliance on institutional care; maintained or obtained employment and housing; and long-term sustainability of needed services through better alignment of available services that most effectively meet people's needs, including other state agencies' services…."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Minnesota Medical Assistance Reform Waiver - 06/01/2014

“It is the intent of the legislature to reform components of the medical assistance program for seniors and people with disabilities or other complex needs, and medical assistance enrollees in general, in order to achieve better outcomes, such as community integration and independence; improved health; reduced reliance on institutional care; maintained or obtained employment and housing; and long-term sustainability of needed services through better alignment of available services that most effectively meet people's needs, including other state agencies' services….”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Minnesota Statute 268A.15: Extended Employment Program - 06/01/2011

The extended employment program shall have two categories of clients consisting of those with severe disabilities and those with severe impairment to employment. The purpose of the extended employment program for persons with severe disabilities is to provide the ongoing services necessary to maintain and advance the employment of persons with severe disabilities. The purpose of the extended employment program for persons with severe impairment to employment is to provide the ongoing support services necessary to secure, maintain, and advance in employment. Employment must encompass the broad range of employment choices available to all persons and promote an individual's self-sufficiency and financial independence.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

256B.0622 ASSERTIVE COMMUNITY TREATMENT AND INTENSIVE RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT SERVICES

“Subd. 7. Assertive community treatment service standards. (a) ACT teams must offer and have the capacity to directly provide the following services: (1) assertive engagement; (2) benefits and finance support; (3) co-occurring disorder treatment; (4) crisis assessment and intervention; (5) employment services;….. "Employment services" means assisting clients to work at jobs of their choosing. Services must follow the principles of the individual placement and support (IPS) employment model, including focusing on competitive employment; emphasizing individual client preferences and strengths; ensuring employment services are integrated with mental health services;…”

Systems
  • Other

Minnesota Statute 43A.09

The commissioner in cooperation with appointing authorities of all state agencies shall maintain an active recruiting program publicly conducted and designed to attract sufficient numbers of well-qualified people to meet the needs of the civil service, and to enhance the image and public esteem of state service employment. Special emphasis shall be given to recruitment of veterans and protected group members to assist state agencies in meeting affirmative action goals to achieve a balanced work force. 

Protected Groups:  females, persons with disabilities, and members of the following minorities: Black, Hispanic, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaskan native.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

“Connect 700” State Hiring Initiative - 10/13/2016

“Joined by community advocates and state hiring leaders, Governor Mark Dayton today announced the re-launch of the Connect 700 and the Supported Worker programs, two state hiring initiatives aimed at removing barriers and creating opportunities for Minnesotans with disabilities. This effort supports Governor Dayton’s 2014 executive order directing state agencies to increase employment for people with disabilities to at least seven percent by August 2018.” ““State government should reflect all of the people it serves. They should include Minnesotans with disabilities,” said Governor Dayton. “These programs will provide employment opportunities for more of our citizens, and help to create a more inclusive Minnesota.” Connect 700 (formerly known as 700-Hour Program On-The-Job Demonstration and Appointment) will give Minnesotans with disabilities an opportunity to demonstrate their ability through an on-the job trial work experience, lasting up to 700 hours. This gives hiring managers the ability to better match people with the best opportunities for success, based on their skills and abilities.”

Systems
  • Other

“Supported Worker Program” - 10/13/2016

“A second initiative, the Supported Worker program, offers people with disabilities integrated employment opportunities with up to 50 full time positions within various state agencies. These positions can be shared by up to three people with disabilities. State agencies that sponsor the positions will integrate employees into existing teams, and will provide job coaches as needed.”

Systems
  • Other

Minnesota Governor's Executive Order 15-03 - 01/28/2015

Supporting Freedom of Choice and Opportunity to Live, Work, and Participate in the Most Inclusive Setting for Individuals with Disabilities through the Implementation of Minnesota's Olmstead Plan; Rescinding Executive Order 13-01   “A Sub-Cabinet, appointed by the Governor, consisting ofthe Commissioner, or Commissioner' s designees, ofthe following State agencies, shall implement         Minnesota' s Olmstead Plan: a) Department ofHuman Services; b) Minnesota Housing Finance Agency; c) Department of Employment and Economic Development; d) Department of Transportation; e) Department of Corrections; f) Department of Health; g) Department of Human Rights; and h) Department of Education.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Minnesota Governor’s Executive Order 14-14 - 08/04/2014

The Governor’s Executive Order instructs Minnesota Management and Budget (MMB) and the State Director for Equal Opportunity to develop a model for recruitment and hiring strategies to increase the employment of people with disabilities. It also requires all state agencies to develop plans for promoting employment opportunities for Minnesotans with disabilities, and to begin reporting their progress on a quarterly basis. The Order also directs MMB to develop ways to help employees to more easily update their disability status with their employer.   Executive Order 14-14 is the latest initiative enacted by Dayton’s Administration to demonstrate its commitment to help Minnesotans with disabilities live more independently and improve the quality of their lives.  Other initiatives include:  -Creating Equitable Policies – The Department of Transportation updated its policies and implemented new trainings to help ensure that all employees with disabilities receive proper accommodations.   -Improving Life and Work Opportunities – Governor Dayton and the Department of Human Services launched Reform 2020, which will make it easier for people to understand and access services and support for Minnesotans with disabilities, while also redesigning and improving services and increasing service coordination and integration.   -Increasing Options and Independence – The Department of Employment and Economic Development’s Vocational Rehabilitation program helps those with disabilities prepare for, find and keep a job, and live as independently as possible. In 2013, the program assisted more than 19,500 people with disabilities.   -Supporting Stable Employment – The Department of Human Services began funding a new initiative to help individuals with disabilities find and maintain employment – helping Minnesotans with disabilities live more independently, and decreasing their need for other state aid.     -Encouraging Diverse Hiring – The Department of Human Rights held a statewide video conference in December to highlight the strategic advantages of hiring people with disabilities.   -Increasing Access to Work Opportunities – The budget signed by Governor Dayton increased funding for State Services for the Blind to help people with disabilities secure and maintain meaningful employment.   
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Governor's Executive Order 13-01 - 01/28/2013

A Sub-Cabinet, appointed by the Governor, consisting of the Commissioner, or Commissioner's designees, of the following State agencies, shall develop and implement a comprehensive Minnesota Olmstead Plan: (i) that uses measurable goals to increase the number of people with disabilities receiving services that best meet their individual needs and in the most integrated setting, and (ii) that is consistent and in accord with the U.S. Supreme Comi's decision in Olmstead v. L. C., 527 U.S. 581 (1999): a) Department of Human Services; b) Minnesota Housing Finance Agency; c) Department of Employment and Economic Development; d) Department of Transpmiation; e) Department of Corrections; f) Department of Health; g) Department of Human Rights; and h) Department of Education. 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 31 - 40 of 43

Annual Report of Department Programs and Services - 01/01/2017

~~“Overview Per Minnesota Statute §116J.0125, the Commissioner of the Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) is required to report on department programs and services annually. To fulfill that requirement, DEED staff prepared updated SFY2016 reports for each of the agency’s 74 programs featuring brief descriptions of DEED programs and their outcomes. Each summary contains current information on the program’s purpose, customers and services, performance measures, targeted population groups, funding sources and allocations, relevant statutory authority, and staff contact information.…..To address disparities and advance equity, data on populations groups served by programs are now included, where applicable, and include communities of color, individuals with disabilities, Veterans, and women. ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

2017 Biennial Report on Long-Term Services and Supports for People with Disabilities - 01/01/2017

~~“Employment First policyMinnesota’s Employment First policy asserts that people with disabilities can work, want to work and do work. Minnesota’s Employment First policy maintains that people with disabilities must have an informed choice about the range of employment options and opportunities open to them. It includes the idea that competitive, community-integrated employment is the preferred outcome.During 2016, DHS and the Minnesota departments of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) and Education (MDE) developed, piloted and implemented a statewide interagency informed-choice framework and resource toolkit. Service planners and teams who support people with disabilities use the informed-choice framework and resource toolkit.” 

Systems
  • Other

Olmstead Work Plans - 09/29/2016

“Strategy: Implement the Employment First Policy “Continue the implementation of the informed choice process with persons served by the Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Medicaid funded programs and students who are a part of the Employment Capacity Building Cohort as outlined in the Olmstead Employment goals. Minnesota's Employment First Policy promotes the opportunity for people with disabilities to make informed choices about employment. This policy views competitive, integrated employment as the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Employment First Policy - 08/10/2015

The State of Minnesota is committed that all Minnesotans including those with disabilities have a wide range of employment opportunities within the general workforce. The Minnesota Employment First Policy guides state agencies in their planning, decision making, implementation, and evaluation of services and supports for Minnesotans with disabilities to make employment the first and expected option considered. The Minnesota Employment First Policy provides state agencies with:

- A clear statewide vision supporting transformational change and a long-range goal of working age youth and adults with disabilities participating in the workforce at levels similar to their peers who do not have disabilities

- A guiding vision to increase public and business expectations about employing the abilities and capacities of all people with disabilities to work in the right job with the right level of support

- A policy framework that guides present and future decisions related to people with disabilitieswho receive public services

- Guidance to provide clarity on how this policy will be applied across state agencies

- Instruction to act to develop and implement plans to ensure the Employment First principles and informed choice are integrated into new and existing employment-related policies, services and supports for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Employment First Policy - Olmstead Sub-Cabinet Approval - 10/01/2014

MN APSE announces the approval of an Employment First Policy by the MN Olmstead Sub-Cabinet on September 29, 2014. The approval of this policy is [a] culmination of years of collaboration, partnership, education, and dedication of a group … united around the idea that people with disabilities are just as valued and have the same rights as other citizens. The idea that employment should be the first option for working aged Minnesotans with disabilities was not always embraced, but today Minnesota stands on the doorstep of real and permanent change by making employment an option for all Minnesotans with disabilities.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Employment First Policy - 09/29/2014

The Employment First Policy envisions a future where all people with disabilities can achieve competitive, integrated employment. Competitive employment means:

·         Full-time, part-time, or self-employment with and without supports

·         In the competitive labor force

·         On the payroll of a competitive business or industry

·         Pays at least minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by workers without a disability.

This policy increases options and choices for people with disabilities by aligning policies, funding practices and collaborative efforts among state agencies. This will help people who choose to work to enter an integrated, competitive workforce or become self-employed.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Human Services Disability Services Division Biennial Report on Long-term services for People with Disabilities - 01/15/2013

Employment is a priority of the Governor, DHS and DSD. DSD, in collaboration with many partners, developed Disability Benefits 101 (DB101), a web-based tool with on-line assistance, which can be used by people with disabilities and those who help them to understand how employment earnings affect benefits. Too often people assume that working will mean a loss of necessary benefits. DB101 helps people learn how to use available benefits to support the pursuit of their chosen lifestyle, rather than having benefits act as a barrier to their goals.

The Division will use the experience gained from the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, Pathways to Employment, to inform future changes to the service menu. DSD will propose policy changes that will encourage providers and support people in exploring and obtaining competitive employment (real work for real wages in integrated work conditions) and understanding their options. DSD will propose policy changes to incent providers to help people find and maintain competitive work.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN State Rehabilitation Council & VR Services: Center-Based Employment - 06/22/2011

A summary report of the public forum, sponsored by the Minnesota State Rehabilitation Council and Vocational Rehabilitation Services.

In June 2011, the Minnesota State Rehabilitation Council and Vocational Rehabilitation Services convened a day-long public forum to provide a

broad overview of how the system has evolved and continues to adapt to changes in public policy, shifts in social priorities, and ongoing debates over center-based and community employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation

Employment First Minnesota's Plan for Competitive, Integrated Employment

~~“Many people with disabilities want opportunities to be part of the general workforce, but don’t see how it’s possible or aren’t given resources they need to work. Minnesota works to help people with disabilities find competitive, integrated employment. DHS supports an Employment First approach.”

Systems
  • Other

A Guide to Starting a Business in Minnesota

“The Minnesota Emerging Entrepreneur Program (MEEP) was created during the 2016 Legislative session and replaces the Urban Initiative Loan Program (Chapter 189, Laws of Minnesota). The objective of the program is to fund loans to businesses throughout the state that are owned and operated by minorities, low-income persons, women, veterans and/or persons with disabilities; provide jobs for minority and/or low-income persons, create and strengthen minority business enterprises, and promote economic development in a low-income area.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

VR Portion of WIOA State Plan for Minnesota State Services for the Blind FY-2020 - 02/06/2020

“Interagency Cooperation

(1) the State Medicaid plan under title XIX of the Social Security Act;

In September 2019, DHS-DSD, VRS, and SSB signed a Memorandum of Understanding. The terms of the MOU are specific to individuals on a Medicaid waiver who want to pursue competitive, integrated employment. Employment First and Person-Centered principles form the basis of the shared vision for how our agencies can provide employment services for people with disabilities in a coordinated manner. The goal is to align systems so that common customers – those who receive home and community-based service disability waivers and vocational rehabilitation services from VRS or SSB – can get seamless and timely supports to make informed choices and meet their competitive integrated employment goals. The full implementation of the MOU is planned for January 2021 to allow time for communication, stakeholder involvement, and training.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

VRS, SSB, IDEA and home and community-based employment services – Interim guidance - 10/19/2018

~~“This document provides information about:• Authorizing home and community-based services (HCBS) employment services• Background information• Best practices• Additional employment resources.

DHS is working to clarify and replace this interim guidance with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS), State Services for the Blind (SSB) and the Disability Services Division at DHS. When this happens, DHS will replace this guidance”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Minnesota Job Skills Partnership Announces 10 New Training Projects - 03/27/2018

~~“The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) awarded workforce development grants totaling $1.5 million to train 2,919 workers under the Minnesota Job Skills Partnership (MJSP).

 “These training grants upgrade employee skills and effectively make Minnesota businesses more competitive and desirable places to work.”

Under the program, educational institutions and businesses work together to secure MJSP funding. Businesses initially meet with an accredited educational institution to explain their training needs and to learn options. Once they agree on a plan, the educational institution contacts DEED to determine eligibility for a grant.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Olmstead Work Plans - 09/29/2016

“Strategy: Implement the Employment First Policy “Continue the implementation of the informed choice process with persons served by the Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Medicaid funded programs and students who are a part of the Employment Capacity Building Cohort as outlined in the Olmstead Employment goals. Minnesota's Employment First Policy promotes the opportunity for people with disabilities to make informed choices about employment. This policy views competitive, integrated employment as the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota State Council on Disability - 06/01/1973

Established in 1973 by the state legislature, the Minnesota State Council on Disability (MSCOD) was created to advise the governor, state agencies, state legislature, and the public on disability issues. Our mission is to advocate for policies and programs in the public and private sectors that advance the rights of Minnesotans with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities (DD Council)

The mission of the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities is to provide information, education, and training to build knowledge, develop skills, and change attitudes that will lead to increased independence, productivity, self-determination, integration and inclusion (IPSII) for people with developmental disabilities and their families.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Goodwill-Easter Seals Minnesota - Work Incentives Connection

~~“Goodwill-Easter Seals Minnesota Work Incentives Connection provides specialized answers about the impact of work on government benefits. Armed with clear, accurate information about their options, people with disabilities can make informed and confident decisions about employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Employment First Coalition - Employment First Summits

Minnesota Employment First Summit Series

The Minnesota Employment First Coalition is a group of professionals, families, and advocates who are committed to making the vision of Employment First a reality in Minnesota. Since 2006, the Minnesota Employment First Coalition has tirelessly worked to provide education, support, technical assistance, and advocacy around the promotion of policies and practices that embraces the values of Employment First.

 

“The Minnesota Employment First Coalition hosted a number of Employment First Summits targeting community members, families, businesses, educators, and advocates to provide up to date and current best practices, as well as facilitate discussion around what it will take to make employment a reality for all Minnesotans with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Community Rehabilitation Program Advisory Committee

“The Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP) Advisory Committee provides strategic advice and consultation to DEED's Vocational Rehabilitation Services program on topics and issues that affect vocational rehabilitation and community rehabilitation services to Minnesotans with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Department of Employment and Economic Development "Services for Students in High School: What Comes Next?"

~~“Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) has a counselor assigned to every high school. We help students with disabilities plan the journey from school to what comes next.VRS counselors help students discover:• Their strengths and interests• Career and postsecondary education possibilities• How to gain work skills and experiences• What they’ll need to make their plan happen” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Disability Services innovation grants - 03/10/2020

“People in Minnesota who have disabilities want the same great quality of life that most people in Minnesota enjoy: to work and earn money, live in housing of their choice, choose their care providers, their friends and social activities.

The Disability Services Division launched its innovation grants program in 2016 to support new and innovative ideas to achieve these outcomes effectively and efficiently.

NEW: DHS is accepting applications for the next round of Disability Services Division innovation grants. DHS published a request for proposals in the State Register on March 23 and posted a revised RFP with extended deadlines on April 6.

To apply You may apply on the new online application portal. The new application deadline is June 26, 2020.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Mental Health Innovation Grant Program - 01/08/2020

“Mental Health Innovation Grant Program is a new grant program intended to improve access to and the quality of community-based, outpatient mental health services and reduce the number of people admitted to regional treatment centers and community behavioral health hospitals.

These grants add and develop services and supports to Minnesota’s mental health system including:

Short-term and critical access centers Collaborative efforts between crisis teams, hospitals and other services Transition services and care coordination”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

Organization-wide, School-wide, Facility-wide, and Center-wide Systems Change - 04/14/2019

~~“The goal of positive support at an organizational level is to first form a team that will work together to assess the strengths and needs of an organization. The team will represent all of the different types of individuals involved including those receiving services, staff members, administrators, family and community members to work together to solve problems. The types of problems that are identified will guide the group to select a positive support practice. Together, the team uses the information gathered to share the decision making process will everyone. Consensus building and buy-in increases when all individuals within a setting contribute to important decisions that are made. Empowering all individuals to work together to using information collected for progress monitoring and systems change helps improve outcomes. Celebration of success using the information gathered provides a powerful model for building community..”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Disability Services Innovation Grants - 05/05/2018

“The Minnesota Department of Human Services offers disability services innovation grants. These grants promote innovative ideas to improve outcomes for people with disabilities. Funded projects include new ways to help people with disabilities in Minnesota:

-Achieve integrated, competitive employment

-Live in the most integrated setting

-Connect with others in their communities

During state fiscal year 2018, approximately $2 million will be available. Applications are now closed for this round of grants. DHS anticipates it will award contracts to four to 10 qualified responders. The maximum award will be $500,000.

DHS is distributing the innovation grants in three parts:

-The large grants program

-The microgrant program

-The small grant program”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

“Six states receive nearly $15M in grants to expand employment opportunities for people with disabilities” - 09/14/2016

“Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development $2,500,000” This is the seventh round of DEI funding. Since 2010, the department has awarded grants of more than $123 million through the initiative to 49 projects in 28 states to improve education, training, and employment outcomes of youth and adults with disabilities. More information on the DEI is available here. DEI funds help refine and expand workforce strategies proven to be successful, and enhance inclusive service delivery through the public workforce system. Improvements include increasing the accessibility of American Job Centers, training front-line AJC and partner staff, and increasing partnerships and collaboration across numerous systems critical for assisting youth and adults with disabilities in securing meaningful employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Minnesota Empower and Encourage Work, Housing, and Independence - 07/01/2014

“Beginning July 1, 2014, DHS will establish a demonstration project to promote economic stability, increase independence, and reduce applications for disability benefits while providing a positive impact on the health and future of participants. Services provided under the demonstration project will include navigation, employment supports, and benefits planning. These services will be provided to a targeted group of federally funded Medicaid recipients.  The demonstration project will be funded with state general funds.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Minnesota DEI Grant Abstract (Round 3) - 12/11/2013

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. The Minnesota Workforce Investment Board (MWIB) was awarded a Round 3 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development

Minnesota DEI Grant Abstract (Round 5) - 10/01/2012

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. The Minnesota Workforce Investment Board (MWIB) was awarded a Round 3 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration.  Round 3 will end in 2015.  Round 5 was awarded in 2014 and will end in 2017.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Minnesota Money Follows the Person

“Moving Home Minnesota is a person-centered approach to help people … transition from nursing home and other institutional settings to community living that meets their needs and wants. Moving Home Minnesota services are available to eligible Minnesota residents for up to one year after their move from institutional care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 11 of 11

The Minnesota Training & Technical Assistance Center (MNTAT) - 04/01/2009

MNTAT will use a variety of formats and media to respond to constituents’ training and technical assistance needs throughout the state. The goal is to demonstrate and build flexible supports and strategies that will increase and improve the employment outcomes for Minnesotans with disabilities. Among the strategies MNTAT will employ include web-based training (webinars and webcasts); local and regional training events with the support of Minnesota APSE; and the presentation of an annual statewide disability employment conference. In addition, training and technical assistance will be provided in local communities through the establishment of local Community Action Teams (CATs) that will be used as a vehicle for training and technical assistance as well as examples of replicable employment practices that result in the flexible, customized employment of people with disabilities in their local communities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Thaleaha McBee vs. Team Industries, Inc. - 01/16/2018

“In February 2015, McBee sought medical attention for severe pain in her hands, back, and neck, including numbness in her hands and arms. In March 2015, McBee’s doctor gave her a ten-pound lifting restriction due to disc narrowing, a bulged disc, and bone spurs in her vertebrae. On March 10, 2015, McBee informed her supervisors at Team of her lifting restriction, who then instructed her to discuss the restriction with human resources. McBee’s supervisors placed her on a machine that produced parts weighing less than ten pounds, and she finished her shift. The next day, McBee met with human resources to discuss possible accommodations. Team terminated McBee on March 12, 2015, due to concerns relating to her medical restriction.

[…]

D E C I S I O N

 The district court did not err in dismissing McBee’s MHRA and MWCA claims. Because McBee’s medical restrictions rendered her unqualified for her position with or without reasonable accommodation, her employment posed a serious threat of harm to herself and her coworkers, Team’s successful serious-threat defense precludes her reprisal claim, and she did not engage in conduct protected by the workers’ compensation act, we affirm.

 Affirmed."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

MN DHS - Alternative Care Program (Section 1115) - 10/18/2013

On October 18, 2013 the Department of Human Services (DHS) received approval from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for federal financial participation (FFP) on the Alternative Care Program. This approval relates to the contingency items that were a part of Reform 2020. As required by Minnesota Laws 2013, DHS submitted a plan for investing the state dollars made available by the enhanced FFP for Alternative Care to Minnesota Management and Budget (MMB). This plan for the contingency items includes investments in proposals that were passed by the legislature: Enhancing Vulnerable Adult Protection; First Contact – Simplification, Access and Transition Support; HCBS Critical Access Study and Service Development; and Work – Empower and Encourage Independence. This plan was approved by MMB on October 30, 2013.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Minnesota CMS Section 1115 Waiver - 10/18/2013

~~“Federal waivers allow states to test new ways to deliver and pay for health care services. Changes to the state’s Medicaid program often require waivers approved by the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to continue receiving federal Medicaid funding. The website describes waivers that the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS) has applied for or received. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Minnesota DoE ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/09/2012

The Minnesota Department of Education’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 9, 2012.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Minnesota Olmstead Planning Committee

In January 2013, Governor Mark Dayton issued an Executive Order establishing a Sub-Cabinet to develop and implement a comprehensive plan supporting freedom of choice and opportunity for people with disabilities…The Sub-Cabinet evaluates policies, programs, statutes and regulations of state agencies against the standards set forth in the Olmstead decision to determine whether any should be revised or modified or require legislative action in an effort to improve the availability of community-based services for people with disabilities. The Sub-Cabinet seeks input from consumers, families of consumers, advocacy organizations, service providers and others

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is based on the requirements set forth in Title XIX of the Social Security Act and is a comprehensive written document created by the state of Minnesota that describes the nature and scope of its Medicaid program (known in Minnesota as Medical Assistance). It serves as a contractual agreement between the state of Minnesota and the federal government and must be administered in conformity with specific requirements of Title XIX of the Social Security Act and regulations outlined in Chapter IV of the Code of Federal Regulations. The state plan contains all information necessary for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to determine if the state can receive federal financial participation (FFP).

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Minnesota Money Follows the Person

~~“The Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration, offered through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, was created as part of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. The purpose of the demonstration is to promote a series of rebalancing objectives to reduce or eliminate barriers to receiving long-term care services in home and community settings, rather than in institutional settings.Minnesota’s Money Follows the Person Demonstration is called “Moving Home Minnesota.” The goal of the Moving Home Minnesota is to reduce or eliminate barriers to receiving long-term care services in home and community settings. “ 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

Individuals with disabilities should reach for the stars and pursue their dreams when it comes to exploring their employment options in the North Star State of Minnesota!

2018 State Population.
0.62%
Change from
2017 to 2018
5,611,179
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.9%
Change from
2017 to 2018
296,481
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.08%
Change from
2017 to 2018
145,820
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.89%
Change from
2017 to 2018
49.18%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.02%
Change from
2017 to 2018
84.25%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 5,611,179
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 296,481
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 145,820
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,610,660
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 49.18%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 84.25%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 309,507
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 299,237
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 512,517
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 41,281
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 23,339
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 11,260
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 20,592
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 16,222
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 6,646

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 10,517
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 12.40%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 120,283

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 63,948
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 70,494
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 175,103
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 36.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,137
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 2,182
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 11,058
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 55
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 43
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 78.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.78

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,796
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 184,653
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $24,599,235
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $253,960,955
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $23,192,061
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $110,306,334
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 10,152
Number of people served in facility based work. 14,533
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 2,523
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 57.25

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.91%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.17%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 79.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 27.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 65.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.05%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 38.53%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,448,836
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,880
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 33,646
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 162,155
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 195,801
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 159
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 201
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 360
AbilityOne wages (products). $284,324
AbilityOne wages (services). $1,837,245

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 59
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 59
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 6,883
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6,883

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Person-Centered Thinking and Person-Centered Planning was a top strategic goal in 2017. Training was required for all VRS staff in fall of 2017. University of Minnesota Institute on Community Integration trainers were contracted to help staff understand the values-based concepts and incorporate client-centered practices in services we provide in accordance with WIOA, the Olmstead Plan and Employment First policy. Tools and techniques were introduced and practiced in the training. To further knowledge, skills and abilities in Person-Centered practices, a Community of Practice consisting of VRS staff will launch in December 2017. The purpose will be to create a culture of continuous improvement, construct processes, policy and guidance that are person-centered, and utilize online coursework available through the University of Minnesota for ongoing training. (Page 255) Title IV.

Customized Employment

~~• DEED’s VRS will ensure, as appropriate, that students with disabilities that are seeking subminimum wage employment and who have applied for VR services are determined eligible or ineligible for VR services; have an approved IPE; receive pre-employment transition services; and receive appropriate reasonable accommodations and appropriate supports and services, including supported and customized employment services, that assist in obtaining and maintaining a competitive integrated employment outcome. (Page 211) Title IV

• VRS along with a key Community Rehabilitation Provider is developing a Minnesota centric Customized Employment Training and pursuing ACRE (Association for Community Rehabilitation Educators) certification for the training participants. This training will include hands on learning opportunities for Discovery Assessment and Job Development portions of Customized Employment. Each participant will also receive mentoring from VRS & CRP staff who are certified by one of the key CE training entities that provide certification. The goal of this Customized Employment Training is to assist placement professionals develop an understanding of CE and demonstrate proficiency in providing Discovery and Job Development. The training is also essential for Program Managers, Rehabilitation Area Managers who supervise staff who are providing CE services. (Page 216) Title IV

Customized Employment. VRS has partnered with ProAct, Inc. and Occupational Development Center, WIOA Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC), and the Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC) to provide Marc Gold & Associates’ Customized Employment Training in Minnesota through June, 2018. Two cohorts began in 2017 that include 24 VRS placement professionals, counselors, RAMs and supervisors, along with community partner staff. Participants attend nine full days of certification training building skills to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and employer. (Page 228) Title IV

There are three specific strategies that VRS will play an active role in:
1) Promulgate changes to the State Rule governing Extended Employment, ending admissions to non-integrated and sub-minimum wage programs and shifting the state funding to integrated employment,
2) provide technical assistance to non-integrated employment programs to design new business models that lead to competitive employment in the most integrated setting, and
3) provide information about effective employment strategies, such as supported and customized employment, that make competitive employment possible for individuals with complex and significant disabilities. (Page 249) Title IV

VRS along with a key Community Rehabilitation Provider is developing a Minnesota centric Customized Employment Training and pursuing ACRE (Association for Community Rehabilitation Educators) certification for the training participants. This training will include hands on learning opportunities for Discovery Assessment and Job Development portions of Customized Employment. Each participant will also receive mentoring from VRS & CRP staff who are certified by one of the key CE training entities that provide certification. The goal of this Customized Employment Training is to assist placement professionals develop an understanding of CE and demonstrate proficiency in providing Discovery and Job Development. The training is also essential for Program Managers, Rehabilitation Area Managers who supervise staff who are providing CE services. (Page 259) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Moreover, the DEI has helped Minnesota to build the capacity of WDA staff to increase the number of youth with disabilities participating in career pathways programs by implementing an Integrated Resource Team (IRT) approach as well as incorporating the Guideposts for Success best practices framework into service delivery. This success has prompted the development of a guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s Personal Learning Plan (PLP). The guide was developed to assist WDA staff when working with youth with disabilities who have a Personal Learning Plan (PLP) or an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The guide provides suggestions for integrating the Guideposts for Success into student ILP activities for both in-school and out-of-school youth. For more information on the DEI and the guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s PLP, see the Disability Employment Initiative weblink: https://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/office-youth-development/special/disability-employment-initiative/  (Page 77) Title I

4. Work with Department of Human Services (DHS) in the Olmstead interagency workgroup focused on blending and braiding funding that allow access to extended services for the long term supports needed for customers desiring employment. Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) is currently working with DHS on developing an interagency agreement between DHS, VRS, and SSB for providing services to those customers who require long term supports. SSB does not see the high volume of customers who require extended services that VRS sees, although the interagency agreement will apply to SSB. (Page 319) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~• Disability Employment Initiative- Partners for Youth Career Pathways - Minnesota is currently managing a $2.5 million, 42-month DEI grant funded through the U.S. DOL’s Employment and Training Administration and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. This grant allows Minnesota to strengthen partnerships and strategically align youth and adult career pathways systems to effectively serve youth with disabilities through multiple entry and exit points. In addition, the DEI has allowed Minnesota to expand the number of Employment Networks in the state which will help increase services to Social Security disability beneficiaries participating career pathways programs.
Moreover, the DEI has helped Minnesota to build the capacity of WDA staff to increase the number of youth with disabilities participating in career pathways programs by implementing an Integrated Resource Team (IRT) approach as well as incorporating the Guideposts for Success best practices framework into service delivery. This success has prompted the development of a guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s Personal Learning Plan (PLP). The guide was developed to assist WDA staff when working with youth with disabilities who have a Personal Learning Plan (PLP) or an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The guide provides suggestions for integrating the Guideposts for Success into student ILP activities for both in-school and out-of-school youth. For more information on the DEI and the guide on incorporating the Guideposts for Success into Minnesota’s PLP, see the Disability Employment Initiative weblink: https://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/office-youth-development/special/disability-employment-initiative/  (Page 77) Title I

• Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Career Pathways — Beginning in 2014 and recently extended, Minnesota’s DEI project supports job—driven approaches in career pathway systems and programs to equip youth and adults with disabilities (including individuals with significant disabilities) with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in—demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. Three Local Workforce Development Areas operate career pathways in manufacturing, health care, and information technology sectors. Disability Resources Coordinators work to strengthen partnerships with Vocational Rehabilitation, disability agencies, and employers and modify career pathway education and employment for individual success. The GWDB Disability Equity Committee is evaluating these three projects to develop recommendations that will result in better services and outcomes to individuals with disabilities not served under Title IV. Two primary recommendations are being considered to replicate and build state-wide capacity; 1. Navigators and local teams are key to developing sustainable strategies and 2. Nationally recognized training that is Minnesota designed and implemented. (Page 79-80) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~• SGA Project: the Institute on Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts — Boston has received RSA funding to demonstrate effective strategies to assist SSDI beneficiaries achieve income above the substantial gainful activity (SGA) level. Minnesota VRS is one of the demonstration sites. At time of enrollment, the SSDI beneficiary is assigned a counselor, placement specialist and financial specialist. Eligibility for services is presumed within three days and the Employment Plan is developed within 30 days of application. VRS has partnered with the DLL to provide financial counseling in VR offices. RSA funding was used to provide the benefits planners with financial literacy training so that in addition to benefits planning the financial specialists can provide assistance with improving credits scores, paying off credit card debt, and developing savings plans. It is hoped that the combination of rapid engagement and financial planning services will lead to better outcomes. Although the SGA Project does not receive any Medicaid funding, the financial specialist positions would not have been possible without the initial collaboration with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant. (Pages 285-286) Title I

School to Work Transition

~~The Guideposts for Success, a best practices framework that was developed by the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth (NCWD) is utilized to ensure that all youth, including those with disabilities are successful when transitioning to adulthood. The Guideposts for Success constitute five tenets that align closely with WIOA goals and outcomes. These five tenets are: school preparation, youth development and leadership, career preparation, connecting activities, and family involvement. When a youth has received services or hash had experiences that align with the Guideposts tenets, the youth is more likely to transition to adulthood successfully. For more information on how the Guideposts are being incorporated into the Round 7 Disability Employment Initiative follow this weblink: https://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/office-youth-development/special/disability-employment-initiative/  (Page 152) Title I

Goal 2: Increasing Pre-Employment Transition Services
VRS, schools, and the VR Community will focus on increasing vocational exploration and work based learning experiences for high school students with disabilities. (Page 236) Title IV

Goal 2: Increasing Pre-Employment Transition Services VRS, schools, and the VR community will focus on increasing vocational exploration and work based learning experiences for high school students with disabilities.
Strategic Priorities 
A. Develop strategies to implement the Pre-ETS requirements stipulated in WIOA
Action: Track required and authorized services and monitor expenditures and fiscal impact
Progress achieved: VRS delivers pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) through counseling staff (VR eligible persons) and contracts (VR potentially eligible persons). An Employment Plan is developed and services are tracked. 
VRS issued nine fee for service contracts in July, 2017 to vendors to provide required services to VR potentially eligible people. Requests for Proposals are currently being developed to expand the availability of Pre-ETS services within the Twin cities metropolitan area and northwestern Minnesota. (Page 254) Title IV

C. Increase the number of work based learning experiences prior to graduation for VR eligible students in high school
Action: Establish a baseline and track the number of VR students with paid and unpaid work based learning experience prior to graduation.
Progress achieved: Service codes have been developed and implemented to track Pre-ETS purchased services.  (Page 254) Title IV

With the new emphasis on Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), SSB will continue to work with traditional partners to promote these models and facilitate effective implementation of emerging school-to-work efforts. The activities detailed below are designed to facilitate outreach and referral efforts to transition-age students who are blind or visually impaired. The goals of this ongoing involvement by the counselor in the education of a student, beginning as early as age 14, are to enable a student to live independently before leaving a school setting, have a greater understanding of relevant employment options, and develop self-advocacy skills. (Page 279) Title IV

All transition students are expected to have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that aligns with their Individualized Education Program (IEP). The development of the IPE is expected to be within 90 days of eligibility and the job goal is one that this projected for the student. Work and career exploration must be part of the IPE. (Page 283-284) Title IV

A transition assessment tool guides counselors and teams about each student’s skill level in activities of daily living and identifies skill training needed for moving on to post-secondary life. This transition assessment has been instrumental in the development of concrete plans and strategies that can be woven into the students IPE and IEP. This results in a genuinely coordinated effort between schools and VR. Counselors are working with IEP teams to encourage the use of postsecondary options for students to take entry level college classes while still in high school. This gives students an opportunity to try out their technology, braille, and self- advocacy skills prior to attending college full time. (Page 316) Title IV

To provide an additional resource to parents of high school students, SSB has contracted with PACER, a parent advocacy group knowledgeable in the IEP and transition process. PACER advocates create materials, facilitate workshops for parents and students, and conduct surveys on parent satisfaction. (Page 316) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~• Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Career Pathways — Beginning in 2014 and recently extended, Minnesota’s DEI project supports job—driven approaches in career pathway systems and programs to equip youth and adults with disabilities (including individuals with significant disabilities) with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in—demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. Three Local Workforce Development Areas operate career pathways in manufacturing, health care, and information technology sectors. Disability Resources Coordinators work to strengthen partnerships with Vocational Rehabilitation, disability agencies, and employers and modify career pathway education and employment for individual success. The GWDB Disability Equity Committee is evaluating these three projects to develop recommendations that will result in better services and outcomes to individuals with disabilities not served under Title IV. Two primary recommendations are being considered to replicate and build state-wide capacity; 1. Navigators and local teams are key to developing sustainable strategies and 2. Nationally recognized training that is Minnesota designed and implemented. (Pages 79-80) Title I

DEED meets its ongoing obligation not to discriminate on the basis of disability by developing system wide policy and procedure initiatives that comply with Section 188 of WIOA. These policies include physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials to serve the needs of customers with disabilities. (Page 127) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

There are several opportunities for activities to be aligned and enhanced with the core programs. Training is needed for staff to understand the appropriate activities and career pathway opportunities for recipients within a system where job search and job placement have been primarily seen as the core activity. We need to continue to better understand how career pathways models including; work-based learning, apprenticeships, and skills training can be implemented to align with the needs of industry. Development of employer-led sector partnerships allow for opportunities for jobseekers with a priority to address the disparities gaps in race, disability, disconnected youth, and gender opportunities. This being said, it has been critical for providers to understand the regional sectors in demand. (Page 69) Title I Core Responsibility 1 — Develop employer outreach activities to establish, maintain, and facilitate regular contact with employers to promote employment and training opportunities for the benefit of Veterans. Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Develop job opportunities for Veteran job seekers through outreach efforts with Minnesota employers: job development phone contacts, in person employer visits, and participation in job fair activities on behalf of Veterans. 2) Communicate and coordinate with Business Services Representatives in the local AJC to facilitate and promote job opportunities for Veterans, especially those with significant barriers to employment. 3) Promote the "Veteran Friendly Employer" initiative to all businesses contacted. 4) Encourage employers to employ Veterans utilizing apprenticeships and OJT programs, State and Federal dislocated worker programs, and GI Bill benefits. 5) Maintain current information on employment and training opportunities. 6) Monitor Federal Contractor Job Listings (FCJL) and Vet Central job orders for Veterans using the WFC, or on the DVOP caseload. 7) Provide contacts and job leads to DVOPs. (Page 447) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Collaboration Grants to Provide Independent Living Services: Since 2008, the VRS/IL collaboration has served Minnesotans with the most significant disabilities who require both vocational rehabilitation and independent living services to meet their goals for working and living in the community. In FFY 2017 VRS dedicated $1.2 million in SSA program income to fund benefit coaches who are housed in every VRS office. The benefit coaches provide benefits and financial planning services for eligible consumers who are receiving SSI and/or SSDI Social Security benefits. This funding continues and expands the services previously provided by the SGA Project, a RSA funded demonstration project to improve employment outcomes for SSDI beneficiaries. (Page 204) Title IV
 Ticket to Work Employment Networks: VRS, State Services for the Blind and SSA co-host periodic meetings of the Employment Networks to provide staff training, updates on Ticket to Work procedural changes, and to promote Partnership Plus job retention services after VRS/SSB case closure.
The SGA Project: In 2017, Vocational Rehabilitation completed a two-year model demonstration project designed to provide SSDI beneficiaries information and support to develop an employment plan that maps out a pathway to achieve employment above Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA). The SGA Project utilized a rapid engagement approach in which eligibility is determined within three days, Transferable Skills and Labor Market Information are provided and Benefits Planning and Financial Education are initiated within seven days. Within 30 days of application, the IPE and a Placement Plan are developed. A benefits analysis is completed within eight weeks of application if needed. As a result of positive feedback from Treatment Team clients and staff, Minnesota has expanded the project statewide using a combination of SSA program income and state funding. (Page 205) Title IV

Statewide Collaboration VRS collaborates with the Minnesota Department of Education (MDE), Department of Human Services (DHS), and county and local service providers to offer statewide supported employment services. VRS is a partner in several state-level agreements that provide long-term supports. During development of an employment plan, VRS counselors and other service team members help consumers to select supported employment services that meet their needs. They identify which services will be provided by VRS, as well as the source of long-term supports in the community. VRS provides time-limited supports for up to 24 months, but an employment plan may be amended if additional time is needed to achieve job stability. The primary funding resources for long-term supports in the community following VRS case closure are county case managers, the VRS Extended Employment Program, DHS Medicaid-waiver funded services, and the Social Security Administration’s Impairment-Related Work Expense exclusions and Ticket to Work funding for persons on SSI and/or SSDI. (Page 213-214) Title IV

About 40 percent of VRS applicants receive SSA benefits. VRS was instrumental in establishing the Work Incentives Connection, a SSA funded program of Goodwill Industries that provides work incentives planning and assistance for consumers.
SSA, VRS and State Services for the Blind co-host periodic meetings of the Employment Networks. In addition to providing in-service training, the meetings provide an opportunity to learn more about the services offered by each Employment Network to assist consumers make informed choices when selecting a vendor for employment services and/or on-going job retention services. The current focus of this group is to expand the use of Ticket to Work funding to provide ongoing job retention supports, to promote the use of PASS Plans, and to ensure the continuation of benefits planning services as people transition from VRS services to job retention services.  (Page 250) Title IV

SSDI and SSI Beneficiaries: SSA and VRS continue to co—host bi-annual meetings of the Employment Networks Ticket—to—Work funding is used to supplement Supported Employment funding or to provide continued job retention services beyond the 90 days VRS typically provides. Benefit coaches have been added to each office to ensure beneficiaries fully understand the impact income will have on benefits. (Page 261) Title IV

SGA Project: the Institute on Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts — Boston has received RSA funding to demonstrate effective strategies to assist SSDI beneficiaries achieve income above the substantial gainful activity (SGA) level. Minnesota VRS is one of the demonstration sites. At time of enrollment, the SSDI beneficiary is assigned a counselor, placement specialist and financial specialist. Eligibility for services is presumed within three days and the Employment Plan is developed within 30 days of application. VRS has partnered with the DLL to provide financial counseling in VR offices. RSA funding was used to provide the benefits planners with financial literacy training so that in addition to benefits planning the financial specialists can provide assistance with improving credits scores, paying off credit card debt, and developing savings plans. It is hoped that the combination of rapid engagement and financial planning services will lead to better outcomes. Although the SGA Project does not receive any Medicaid funding, the financial specialist positions would not have been possible without the initial collaboration with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant. (Page 285-286) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Current business services involve a high degree of employer engagement. From those represented on the local workforce development boards, participating on training advisory groups with postsecondary education, employers provides direction to business services in Minnesota. Community engagement is a growing area of activity, as we work to address disparate impact among people of color, individuals with disabilities and disconnected youth. This presents a unique opportunity to bridge the divides of cultural differences and work place expectations. One recent example includes a workshop for employers to support their development of cultural competence in attracting and retaining a diverse quality workforce. A better understanding of the needs of employers and communities can lead to customer-centered design of services that benefit both job seekers and employers. (Page 41) Title I

Data Collection

C. VRS will lead and convene Placement Partnerships focused on developing, maintaining and strengthening relationships among VRS, VR Community Partners and Employers Action: The VRS Placement Specialist team will develop and disseminate a quarterly report on the major activities and outcomes for active placement partnerships Action: Work with partners to implement WIOA Common Performance Measure 6 focused on effectiveness in serving employers Progress achieved: The Disability Employment Resource (DER) was developed to support business engagement. The initiative helps businesses meet their workforce goals by employing people with disabilities in competitive integrated positions, while employment professionals learn more about how to align their placement goals with business needs. The DER curriculum improves business engagement by delivering information to bridge the gap between business and human services, dispelling myths that can prevent employers from considering people with disabilities, helping human service professionals understand the business perspective, providing tools for starting and building relationships, and connecting businesses with information and resources to help them succeed. (Page 258) Title IV

511

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students….
• Outline services and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), with regard to youth with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment.
• Provide assurance that neither the SEA nor the LEA will enter into an arrangement with an entity holding a special wage certificate under section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act for the purpose of operating a program under which a youth with a disability is engaged in work at a subminimum wage. (Page 207) Title IV

• DEED’s VRS and MDE’s Special Education and Career and College Success Divisions will work together with LEAs to ensure that outreach and identification of students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment in order for them to receive counseling and information and referral related to competitive integrated employment.
• DEED’s VRS will ensure, as appropriate, that students with disabilities that are seeking subminimum wage employment and who have applied for VR services are determined eligible or ineligible for VR services; have an approved IPE; receive pre-employment transition services; and receive appropriate reasonable accommodations and appropriate supports and services, including supported and customized employment services, that assist in obtaining and maintaining a competitive integrated employment outcome.
• DEED’s VRS and MDE’s Special Education and Career and College Success Divisions will provide LEAs the required processes and forms to document the required actions specified under WIOA for all students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment. (Page 211) Title IV

• DEED’s VRS will ensure that all students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment receive documentation of the required actions specified under WIOA within 45 calendar days of completion of the required actions. 
Assurance related to WIOA Section 511 and 34 CFR 397, Limitations on use of subminimum wage
In accordance with 34 CFR 397.31, MDE’s Special Education and Career and College Success Divisions, through the MDE Career Technical Education Program approval and expense approval process, will ensure that neither the SEA nor LEAs enter into a contract with an entity, as defined in WIOA 34 CFR 397.5(d) for the purpose of operating a program under which a student with a disability is engaged in work compensated at a subminimum wage. (Page 212) Title IV

3. Ensuring applicants fully understand the benefits of competitive integrated employment. As part of the intake process, emphasis is placed on competitive integrated employment. Individuals who are not pursuing competitive integrated employment are referred to other resources, including the Senior Services Unit, which can assist them in meeting their independent living needs. Career counseling and information and referral services on competitive integrated employment is provided to individuals in subminimum wage and extended employment, as well as to youth seeking subminimum wage employment. WDU’s intake counselor is responsible for providing this service to these individuals, consistent with the new 511 requirements.  (Page 319) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Prior to awarding a grant, a DEED conducts a risk analysis. In addition, in the early part of each year sub—grantees complete an electronic assessment and a fiscal monitoring guide. These assessment tools provide a sweeping array of information, in such important areas as: o How sub—grantees will serve and provide priority services to veterans o Policies regarding sub—grantee conflict—of—interest processes o The longevity of key directors and/or stakeholders o Sub—grantee customer complaint processes and physical and program accessibility o Sub—grantee accounting procedures, positive cash flow, third—party audit reports, review of debt ratio, including federal and state tax debt (Page 107) Title I

DEED meets its ongoing obligation not to discriminate on the basis of disability by developing system wide policy and procedure initiatives that comply with Section 188 of WIOA. These policies include physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials to serve the needs of customers with disabilities. The Determining the Location of a Minnesota WorkForce Center policy requires that the "The WFC location will be accessible to all populations including individuals with disabilities." The Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity is the final authority in determining if a location meets the accessibility criteria to be certified as a WorkForce Center. The Minnesota WorkForce Center System Certification Standards policy provides guidance on the implementation standards for the equal access obligations under WIOA. WorkForce Centers must be universally accessible to all populations including but not limited to various racial and ethnic groups, persons for which English is not their first language, ex— felons, people who are homeless, Veterans, various age groups, different genders, and individuals with disabilities. (Page 127) Title I

PROVIDE ARCHITECTURAL ACCESSIBILITY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES The WorkForce Center System provides integrated program services through the development and maintenance of an accessible environment. All facilities open to the public as well as administrative offices must be accessible to and useable by the broadest population. All partners are covered by Title II of the ADA and the equal opportunity and nondiscrimination elements of Section 188 of WIOA and, therefore, are subject to the same set of standards. (Page 128) Title I

Affiliate WorkForce Centers are required to provide full access and opportunities to all job seekers including serving individuals with disabilities. Physical locations, services and programs must comply with Section 188 of WIOA and provisions of the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended. DEED will work closely with Affiliate WorkForce Centers to have them provide an annual assessment on architectural and programmatic accessibility for individuals with disabilities. A review schedule for Affiliate WorkForce Centers will occur during Program Monitoring Visits. (Page 129) Title I

• The Minnesota WorkForce Center System Certification Standards discussed earlier identifies both physical and programmatic accessibility requirements. Customers with disabilities must be able to participate and benefit from the services available in the WorkForce Center System, as do all customers. In addition to the site accessibility standards, the Policy identifies the following requirements: • Development of an evacuation and safety plan • Notice displayed and available in alternate formats upon request • Inclusion of tag lines • Identification of Minnesota Relay • Availability of accommodation and modifications • Staff knowledge of assistive technology • Use of auxiliary aids and services • Community resources • Complaint processes. (Page 129) Title IV

Accessibility has been a central focus for the web development team. DEED’s accessibility resources in the Vocational Rehabilitation Unit as well as staff at State Services for the Blind continue to be involved in any webpage updates ensuring accessibility for the blind and visually impaired, as well as users who are Deaf or hard-of-hearing, or who have mobility impairments, and those with cognitive and reading disorders. DEED’s web development team strives for accessibility that extends beyond minimum compliance. If, however, users are unable to access information, they may request information in alternate formats and it will be provided in a timely manner. (Page 130-131) Title I

Vets

• Service in WorkForce Center System — The state’s WorkForce Center system provides the full array of labor and employment services to veterans around the state. Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPs) provide eligible veterans with employment services such as job matching and referral to posted job openings, vocational and career guidance, labor market information, plus workshops on resume preparation and conducting effective job searches. DVOPs also refer eligible and qualified veterans to appropriate WIOA—funded training programs and discretionary initiatives, as well as registered apprenticeship programs throughout the state. Local Veteran Employment Representatives (LVER) specialize in promoting veterans to employers, educating one—stop partners on current law, changing regulations, and the value veterans bring to an employer. • Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) — DVOP and LVER staff are funded through the JVSG and fulfill all responsibilities mandated by the grant programs. Services include the provision of intensive case management services to Chapter 31 Veterans, disabled veterans, homeless veterans, economically or educationally disadvantaged veterans, and veterans with "significant barriers to employment" as defined by the Department of Labor. (Page 78-79) Title I

In Minnesota, estimates indicate that a little over 1%, or 4000 Veterans per year will experience homelessness, or struggle with other life crises edging them toward homelessness. Of those 4000 Veterans, 27% have returned from service in Iraq or Afghanistan, and over 30% are disabled Veterans. Approximately 15% of Veterans served that are homeless are women Veterans. Many are single with children to care for. DVOP staff works closely with Minnesota’s HVRP grantee, Minnesota Assistance Council for Veterans (MACV). In addition to referring clients between our two agencies, we also collaborate with them on 3 StandDown events across the state each year and provide a liaison (LVER) to provide business contacts and help with some of their client-focused events. (Page 442) Title IV

Core Responsibility 1 — Develop employer outreach activities to establish, maintain, and facilitate regular contact with employers to promote employment and training opportunities for the benefit of Veterans. Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Develop job opportunities for Veteran job seekers through outreach efforts with Minnesota employers: job development phone contacts, in person employer visits, and participation in job fair activities on behalf of Veterans. 2) Communicate and coordinate with Business Services Representatives in the local AJC to facilitate and promote job opportunities for Veterans, especially those with significant barriers to employment. 3) Promote the "Veteran Friendly Employer" initiative to all businesses contacted. 4) Encourage employers to employ Veterans utilizing apprenticeships and OJT programs, State and Federal dislocated worker programs, and GI Bill benefits. 5) Maintain current information on employment and training opportunities. 6) Monitor Federal Contractor Job Listings (FCJL) and Vet Central job orders for Veterans using the WFC, or on the DVOP caseload. 7) Provide contacts and job leads to DVOPs. Core Responsibility 2 — Advocate on behalf of Veterans seeking employment and training opportunities with business, industry, and community—based organizations. Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Contact community leaders, employers, labor unions, training programs, and Veterans organizations. 2) Promote Veterans priority of service in employment and training programs. 3) Maintain current information on employment and training opportunities. 4) Plan and participate in job fairs to promote services to Veterans, and encourage participating employers to become a "Veteran Friendly Employer." 5) Promote licensing and certification assistance and training opportunities for Veterans using training providers and credentialing bodies. 6) Work with unions, apprenticeships programs, and business community to promote employment, On the Job Training (OJT), apprenticeships and other available training opportunities to employ Veterans. 7) Establish and maintain contact with National Guard, Reserve Family Readiness Groups and Family Assistance Centers in the assigned area. Provide education and information regarding DEED Vets employment services, WorkForce Centers, and Beyond the Yellow Ribbon events. (Page 447) Title IV

8) Assist employers with special job accommodations for disabled Veterans. This position works closely with community leaders, Tasks for this responsibility will include: 1) Facilitate and maintain the provision of labor exchange services by local WFC staff to Veterans including the identification of SBE Veterans, proper referral to a DVOP, or in the absence of the DVOP, to the individualized career services provider, and referral to vocational counseling, testing, job search assistance. 2) Provide job development and employer outreach on behalf of Veterans, with a focus on Veterans with an SBE being case managed by a local DVOP. 3) Coordinate or conduct job search assistance and networking workshops in conjunction with employers. 4) Provide Labor Market Information (LMI) to employers. 6) Work with DEED Veterans Chapter 31 Program Coordinator and Veterans Affairs (VA) regarding Chapter 31 clients. 7) Refer Veterans to the Department of Labor (DOL)/Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS) partner as needed to assist with reemployment rights issues covered under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) law. 8) Assist employers with special job accommodations for disabled Veterans. (Page 448) Title IV

Mental Health

~~The Minnesota Youth Program (MYP) provides short—term, contextualized and individualized training services for at—risk youth, ages 14 to 24. Coordinated at the local level by the Workforce Development Boards/Youth Committees, MYP eligibility criteria is more flexible (inclusive) than the WIOA Youth Program. MYP serves an extremely disadvantaged group of young men and women: participants have multiple challenges such as substance abuse, criminal records, mental health issues, and cognitive learning limitations, in addition to being poor. The Higher Education Career Advisors Pilot Project (HECAP) funded by the Minnesota State Legislature provides funding to focus on assistance to high schools through career exploration and helps students see connections between their education and future careers. HECAP builds on the work of local workforce. (Page 88) Title I

• DEED’s VRS will provide outreach to the following school staff to identify students in need of pre-employment transition services and/ or vocational rehabilitation services: teachers/case managers, work coordinators, guidance counselors, school nurses, 504 coordinators, school social workers, alternative learning center staff, principals, school mental health coordinators, and school psychologists. (Page 211) Title IV

The Minnesota General program has a long history of innovative collaboration with the State Mental Health Authority. This includes VR representation on the State Mental Health Planning Council and the newly formed State Behavioral Advisory Council. The two agencies have also collaborated to implement, sustain and expand the evidence based practice of supported employment, Individual Placement and Support. Starting with 4 local partnerships between mental health and employment providers in 2006, the IPS provider network in Minnesota, funded in part with state appropriations dedicated to IPS, has expanded to 29 IPS programs (partnerships between mental health agencies and employment services agencies) in 47 of Minnesota’s 87 counties. Minnesota VR and Mental Health agencies are partners in the National IPS Learning Community. (Pages 219-220) Title IV

IPS collaboration. Vocational Rehabilitation Services in the mid-state region was recognized with a Minnesota Social Services Association award for partnering in an IPS community collaboration with Functional Industries, Wright County Health & Human Services and Central MN Mental Health Center. Each agency brought their own mental health expertise to the table to support employment, therapy, and case management. This collaboration helps people with serious mental illness work in regular jobs, not jobs set aside for people with disabilities. Mental health practitioners not only help their clients consider employment but also provide employment specialists with their mental health expertise to assist with the individualized job search. (Page 228) Title IV

Funding for supported employment, within which Title VI Part B funds play a relatively small part, is governed by myriad federal and state laws and rules covering many categories of services. For example, a network of private, not-for-profit organizations, licensed by the Department of Human Services Disability Services Division, provides day training and habilitation services that may include supported employment. People with mental illness may receive work-related support through the State Comprehensive Mental Health Act. In these instances, each county determines the level of service that will be provided. (Page 247) Title IV

VRS, through state-funded extended employment services, provides ongoing work supports to approximately 5,100 individuals in Supported Employment annually. Many of these individuals received time-limited vocational rehabilitation services prior to entering supported employment. Part of Minnesota’s supported employment funding is dedicated to extended supports for persons with serious and persistent mental illness. VRS and the Department of Human Services Mental Health Division collaborate on Individual Placement and Support (IPS) projects to promote innovation in service delivery, including supported employment services, for this population. The projects are designed to provide functional assessment, individualized career planning, job skill acquisition, job placement, job development, and non-time-limited supports necessary to maintain and advance in employment. All recipients of grants under these projects are required to demonstrate collaboration with counties, the local community support program, VRS, and providers of employment services such as CRPs, regional treatment centers, and community mental health centers.  (Page 263) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 103

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshot Minnesota - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information on the RETAIN program in Minnesota including the lead agency, the amount of funding, and the target areas and population

Systems
  • Other

Employment Services - 01/08/2019

~~“Employment services are essential in assisting reintegrating homeless veterans into meaningful employment within the labor force. Minnesota Assistance Council for Veterans (MACV) Staff work with veterans throughout Minnesota in navigating access to resources for employment and training programs to find great employment opportunities.

MACV employment specialists provide additional assistance by forging strong relationships with employers throughout the community and to aid veterans with their employment search needs by providing supportive services, resume review & development and career networking events. By working closely with the staff at the Minnesota Workforce centers, a veteran is connected with Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Staff and Local Veterans Employment Representatives, giving the veteran an integrated team to work with as they conduct their employment search.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Adult Mental Health Targeted Case Management (AMH-TCM) and Outcome Reporting - 01/01/2019

~~“In collaboration with a coalition of AMH-TCM lead agencies and contracted vendors, DHS’ Mental Health Division determined that AMH-TCM agencies will report individual-level data on employment and housing outcomes only at this time. Data will include:1. Employment-related outcomes which align with the informed choice-employment initiative under Minnesota’s Olmstead Plan.2. Housing-related outcomes which align with the informed choice initiative under Minnesota’s Olmstead Plan.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Minnesota’s Home and Community-Based Services Rule Statewide Transition Plan - 12/17/2018

~~“Today, most  people  with  disabilities  grow  up  in  their  family  homes,  go  to  school  in  their  own  neighborhoods  and  have  many  of  the  same  hopes  and  dreams as people who don’t have disabilities. Yet, the service system hasn’t always offered the individualized options or flexibility that would allow those dreams to be realized.

The focus of Minnesota’s disability service system is on one person at a time. 

The principles of person-centered planning are the foundation of the HCBS rule. These principles further support people’s rights to make informed choices and decide what is important both to them and for them”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WIOA Limitations on the Use of Subminimum Wage - 12/17/2018

~~“For Youth Ages 24 and UnderWIOA requires youth ages 24 and under to have documentation that they completed the following actions before they can earn a subminimum wage:• participated in Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) and/or special education transition services and activities while still in high school and eligible for services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and• applied for VRS and determined ineligible or found eligible but unsuccessful in competitive, integrated employment and their VRS case was closed, and• received career counseling, information, and referral to resources that could assist in securing competitive, integrated employment.” 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mental Health Promotion - 10/26/2018

~~“Mental health is more than the absence of disease. Everyone has a state of mental health, and this can change across the lifespan. Not having a mental illness, does not guarantee good mental health. Similarly, having a mental illness, does not guarantee poor mental health. It includes life satisfaction, self-acceptance, sense of purpose, identity, feeling connected and belonging, empowerment, and resilience, which is the ability to bounce back after set-backs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

VRS, SSB, IDEA and home and community-based employment services – Interim guidance - 10/19/2018

~~“This document provides information about:• Authorizing home and community-based services (HCBS) employment services• Background information• Best practices• Additional employment resources.

DHS is working to clarify and replace this interim guidance with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS), State Services for the Blind (SSB) and the Disability Services Division at DHS. When this happens, DHS will replace this guidance”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

VRS, SSB, IDEA and home and community-based employment services – Interim guidance - 10/19/2018

~~“This document provides information about:• Authorizing home and community-based services (HCBS) employment services• Background information• Best practices• Additional employment resources.

DHS is working to clarify and replace this interim guidance with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS), State Services for the Blind (SSB) and the Disability Services Division at DHS. When this happens, DHS will replace this guidance”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment Services - 07/01/2018

~~“Minnesota added three employment services to our home and community-based services (HCBS) waivers on July 1, 2018. We added the following services to the Developmental Disabilities (DD), Community Alternative Care (CAC), Community Access for Disability Inclusion (CADI) and Brain Injury (BI) waivers:• Employment exploration services: Community-based services that introduce people with disabilities to employment options and allow them to explore their options through work experiences. This service helps people to make an informed choice about working in competitive, integrated employment.• Employment development services: Individualized services that help people find competitive, integrated employment or attain self-employment.• Employment support services: Individualized services and supports that help people to maintain community employment in an individual or group arrangement.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Services Innovation Grants - 05/05/2018

“The Minnesota Department of Human Services offers disability services innovation grants. These grants promote innovative ideas to improve outcomes for people with disabilities. Funded projects include new ways to help people with disabilities in Minnesota:

-Achieve integrated, competitive employment

-Live in the most integrated setting

-Connect with others in their communities

During state fiscal year 2018, approximately $2 million will be available. Applications are now closed for this round of grants. DHS anticipates it will award contracts to four to 10 qualified responders. The maximum award will be $500,000.

DHS is distributing the innovation grants in three parts:

-The large grants program

-The microgrant program

-The small grant program”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

SF 2452 A bill for an act relating to health and human services; establishing the health and human services budget; - 04/30/2019

~~“Data on individuals collected, maintained, used, or disseminated by the welfare system are private data on individuals, and shall not be disclosed except:…

(9) between the Department of Human Services, the Department of Employment and Economic Development, and when applicable, the Department of Education, for the following purposes:…(iv) to analyze public assistance employment services and program utilization, cost,effectiveness, and outcomes as implemented under the authority established in Title II,Sections 201-204 of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

MN Statute 16C.16: Designation of Procurements from Small Businesses - 04/01/2016

The commissioner of administration shall periodically designate businesses that are majority owned and operated by women, persons with a substantial physical disability, or specific minorities as targeted group businesses within purchasing categories as determined by the commissioner. A group may be targeted within a purchasing category if the commissioner determines there is a statistical disparity between the percentage of purchasing from businesses owned by group members and the representation of businesses owned by group members among all businesses in the state in the purchasing category.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota SF 1458 - ABLE Plan - 05/22/2015

A savings plan known as the Minnesota ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] plan is established. In establishing this plan, the legislature seeks to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, and to provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act, the Supplemental Security Income program under title XVI of the Social Security Act, the beneficiary's employment, and other sources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Medical Assistance Reform Waiver (256B.021) - 06/01/2014

"It is the intent of the legislature to reform components of the medical assistance program for seniors and people with disabilities or other complex needs, and medical assistance enrollees in general, in order to achieve better outcomes, such as community integration and independence; improved health; reduced reliance on institutional care; maintained or obtained employment and housing; and long-term sustainability of needed services through better alignment of available services that most effectively meet people's needs, including other state agencies' services…."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Minnesota Medical Assistance Reform Waiver - 06/01/2014

“It is the intent of the legislature to reform components of the medical assistance program for seniors and people with disabilities or other complex needs, and medical assistance enrollees in general, in order to achieve better outcomes, such as community integration and independence; improved health; reduced reliance on institutional care; maintained or obtained employment and housing; and long-term sustainability of needed services through better alignment of available services that most effectively meet people's needs, including other state agencies' services….”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Minnesota Statute 268A.15: Extended Employment Program - 06/01/2011

The extended employment program shall have two categories of clients consisting of those with severe disabilities and those with severe impairment to employment. The purpose of the extended employment program for persons with severe disabilities is to provide the ongoing services necessary to maintain and advance the employment of persons with severe disabilities. The purpose of the extended employment program for persons with severe impairment to employment is to provide the ongoing support services necessary to secure, maintain, and advance in employment. Employment must encompass the broad range of employment choices available to all persons and promote an individual's self-sufficiency and financial independence.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

256B.0622 ASSERTIVE COMMUNITY TREATMENT AND INTENSIVE RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT SERVICES

“Subd. 7. Assertive community treatment service standards. (a) ACT teams must offer and have the capacity to directly provide the following services: (1) assertive engagement; (2) benefits and finance support; (3) co-occurring disorder treatment; (4) crisis assessment and intervention; (5) employment services;….. "Employment services" means assisting clients to work at jobs of their choosing. Services must follow the principles of the individual placement and support (IPS) employment model, including focusing on competitive employment; emphasizing individual client preferences and strengths; ensuring employment services are integrated with mental health services;…”

Systems
  • Other

Minnesota Statute 43A.09

The commissioner in cooperation with appointing authorities of all state agencies shall maintain an active recruiting program publicly conducted and designed to attract sufficient numbers of well-qualified people to meet the needs of the civil service, and to enhance the image and public esteem of state service employment. Special emphasis shall be given to recruitment of veterans and protected group members to assist state agencies in meeting affirmative action goals to achieve a balanced work force. 

Protected Groups:  females, persons with disabilities, and members of the following minorities: Black, Hispanic, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaskan native.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

“Connect 700” State Hiring Initiative - 10/13/2016

“Joined by community advocates and state hiring leaders, Governor Mark Dayton today announced the re-launch of the Connect 700 and the Supported Worker programs, two state hiring initiatives aimed at removing barriers and creating opportunities for Minnesotans with disabilities. This effort supports Governor Dayton’s 2014 executive order directing state agencies to increase employment for people with disabilities to at least seven percent by August 2018.” ““State government should reflect all of the people it serves. They should include Minnesotans with disabilities,” said Governor Dayton. “These programs will provide employment opportunities for more of our citizens, and help to create a more inclusive Minnesota.” Connect 700 (formerly known as 700-Hour Program On-The-Job Demonstration and Appointment) will give Minnesotans with disabilities an opportunity to demonstrate their ability through an on-the job trial work experience, lasting up to 700 hours. This gives hiring managers the ability to better match people with the best opportunities for success, based on their skills and abilities.”

Systems
  • Other

“Supported Worker Program” - 10/13/2016

“A second initiative, the Supported Worker program, offers people with disabilities integrated employment opportunities with up to 50 full time positions within various state agencies. These positions can be shared by up to three people with disabilities. State agencies that sponsor the positions will integrate employees into existing teams, and will provide job coaches as needed.”

Systems
  • Other

Minnesota Governor's Executive Order 15-03 - 01/28/2015

Supporting Freedom of Choice and Opportunity to Live, Work, and Participate in the Most Inclusive Setting for Individuals with Disabilities through the Implementation of Minnesota's Olmstead Plan; Rescinding Executive Order 13-01   “A Sub-Cabinet, appointed by the Governor, consisting ofthe Commissioner, or Commissioner' s designees, ofthe following State agencies, shall implement         Minnesota' s Olmstead Plan: a) Department ofHuman Services; b) Minnesota Housing Finance Agency; c) Department of Employment and Economic Development; d) Department of Transportation; e) Department of Corrections; f) Department of Health; g) Department of Human Rights; and h) Department of Education.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Minnesota Governor’s Executive Order 14-14 - 08/04/2014

The Governor’s Executive Order instructs Minnesota Management and Budget (MMB) and the State Director for Equal Opportunity to develop a model for recruitment and hiring strategies to increase the employment of people with disabilities. It also requires all state agencies to develop plans for promoting employment opportunities for Minnesotans with disabilities, and to begin reporting their progress on a quarterly basis. The Order also directs MMB to develop ways to help employees to more easily update their disability status with their employer.   Executive Order 14-14 is the latest initiative enacted by Dayton’s Administration to demonstrate its commitment to help Minnesotans with disabilities live more independently and improve the quality of their lives.  Other initiatives include:  -Creating Equitable Policies – The Department of Transportation updated its policies and implemented new trainings to help ensure that all employees with disabilities receive proper accommodations.   -Improving Life and Work Opportunities – Governor Dayton and the Department of Human Services launched Reform 2020, which will make it easier for people to understand and access services and support for Minnesotans with disabilities, while also redesigning and improving services and increasing service coordination and integration.   -Increasing Options and Independence – The Department of Employment and Economic Development’s Vocational Rehabilitation program helps those with disabilities prepare for, find and keep a job, and live as independently as possible. In 2013, the program assisted more than 19,500 people with disabilities.   -Supporting Stable Employment – The Department of Human Services began funding a new initiative to help individuals with disabilities find and maintain employment – helping Minnesotans with disabilities live more independently, and decreasing their need for other state aid.     -Encouraging Diverse Hiring – The Department of Human Rights held a statewide video conference in December to highlight the strategic advantages of hiring people with disabilities.   -Increasing Access to Work Opportunities – The budget signed by Governor Dayton increased funding for State Services for the Blind to help people with disabilities secure and maintain meaningful employment.   
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Governor's Executive Order 13-01 - 01/28/2013

A Sub-Cabinet, appointed by the Governor, consisting of the Commissioner, or Commissioner's designees, of the following State agencies, shall develop and implement a comprehensive Minnesota Olmstead Plan: (i) that uses measurable goals to increase the number of people with disabilities receiving services that best meet their individual needs and in the most integrated setting, and (ii) that is consistent and in accord with the U.S. Supreme Comi's decision in Olmstead v. L. C., 527 U.S. 581 (1999): a) Department of Human Services; b) Minnesota Housing Finance Agency; c) Department of Employment and Economic Development; d) Department of Transpmiation; e) Department of Corrections; f) Department of Health; g) Department of Human Rights; and h) Department of Education. 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 31 - 40 of 43

Annual Report of Department Programs and Services - 01/01/2017

~~“Overview Per Minnesota Statute §116J.0125, the Commissioner of the Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) is required to report on department programs and services annually. To fulfill that requirement, DEED staff prepared updated SFY2016 reports for each of the agency’s 74 programs featuring brief descriptions of DEED programs and their outcomes. Each summary contains current information on the program’s purpose, customers and services, performance measures, targeted population groups, funding sources and allocations, relevant statutory authority, and staff contact information.…..To address disparities and advance equity, data on populations groups served by programs are now included, where applicable, and include communities of color, individuals with disabilities, Veterans, and women. ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

2017 Biennial Report on Long-Term Services and Supports for People with Disabilities - 01/01/2017

~~“Employment First policyMinnesota’s Employment First policy asserts that people with disabilities can work, want to work and do work. Minnesota’s Employment First policy maintains that people with disabilities must have an informed choice about the range of employment options and opportunities open to them. It includes the idea that competitive, community-integrated employment is the preferred outcome.During 2016, DHS and the Minnesota departments of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) and Education (MDE) developed, piloted and implemented a statewide interagency informed-choice framework and resource toolkit. Service planners and teams who support people with disabilities use the informed-choice framework and resource toolkit.” 

Systems
  • Other

Olmstead Work Plans - 09/29/2016

“Strategy: Implement the Employment First Policy “Continue the implementation of the informed choice process with persons served by the Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Medicaid funded programs and students who are a part of the Employment Capacity Building Cohort as outlined in the Olmstead Employment goals. Minnesota's Employment First Policy promotes the opportunity for people with disabilities to make informed choices about employment. This policy views competitive, integrated employment as the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Employment First Policy - 08/10/2015

The State of Minnesota is committed that all Minnesotans including those with disabilities have a wide range of employment opportunities within the general workforce. The Minnesota Employment First Policy guides state agencies in their planning, decision making, implementation, and evaluation of services and supports for Minnesotans with disabilities to make employment the first and expected option considered. The Minnesota Employment First Policy provides state agencies with:

- A clear statewide vision supporting transformational change and a long-range goal of working age youth and adults with disabilities participating in the workforce at levels similar to their peers who do not have disabilities

- A guiding vision to increase public and business expectations about employing the abilities and capacities of all people with disabilities to work in the right job with the right level of support

- A policy framework that guides present and future decisions related to people with disabilitieswho receive public services

- Guidance to provide clarity on how this policy will be applied across state agencies

- Instruction to act to develop and implement plans to ensure the Employment First principles and informed choice are integrated into new and existing employment-related policies, services and supports for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN Employment First Policy - Olmstead Sub-Cabinet Approval - 10/01/2014

MN APSE announces the approval of an Employment First Policy by the MN Olmstead Sub-Cabinet on September 29, 2014. The approval of this policy is [a] culmination of years of collaboration, partnership, education, and dedication of a group … united around the idea that people with disabilities are just as valued and have the same rights as other citizens. The idea that employment should be the first option for working aged Minnesotans with disabilities was not always embraced, but today Minnesota stands on the doorstep of real and permanent change by making employment an option for all Minnesotans with disabilities.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Minnesota Employment First Policy - 09/29/2014

The Employment First Policy envisions a future where all people with disabilities can achieve competitive, integrated employment. Competitive employment means:

·         Full-time, part-time, or self-employment with and without supports

·         In the competitive labor force

·         On the payroll of a competitive business or industry

·         Pays at least minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by workers without a disability.

This policy increases options and choices for people with disabilities by aligning policies, funding practices and collaborative efforts among state agencies. This will help people who choose to work to enter an integrated, competitive workforce or become self-employed.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Human Services Disability Services Division Biennial Report on Long-term services for People with Disabilities - 01/15/2013

Employment is a priority of the Governor, DHS and DSD. DSD, in collaboration with many partners, developed Disability Benefits 101 (DB101), a web-based tool with on-line assistance, which can be used by people with disabilities and those who help them to understand how employment earnings affect benefits. Too often people assume that working will mean a loss of necessary benefits. DB101 helps people learn how to use available benefits to support the pursuit of their chosen lifestyle, rather than having benefits act as a barrier to their goals.

The Division will use the experience gained from the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, Pathways to Employment, to inform future changes to the service menu. DSD will propose policy changes that will encourage providers and support people in exploring and obtaining competitive employment (real work for real wages in integrated work conditions) and understanding their options. DSD will propose policy changes to incent providers to help people find and maintain competitive work.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MN State Rehabilitation Council & VR Services: Center-Based Employment - 06/22/2011

A summary report of the public forum, sponsored by the Minnesota State Rehabilitation Council and Vocational Rehabilitation Services.

In June 2011, the Minnesota State Rehabilitation Council and Vocational Rehabilitation Services convened a day-long public forum to provide a

broad overview of how the system has evolved and continues to adapt to changes in public policy, shifts in social priorities, and ongoing debates over center-based and community employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation

Employment First Minnesota's Plan for Competitive, Integrated Employment

~~“Many people with disabilities want opportunities to be part of the general workforce, but don’t see how it’s possible or aren’t given resources they need to work. Minnesota works to help people with disabilities find competitive, integrated employment. DHS supports an Employment First approach.”

Systems
  • Other

A Guide to Starting a Business in Minnesota

“The Minnesota Emerging Entrepreneur Program (MEEP) was created during the 2016 Legislative session and replaces the Urban Initiative Loan Program (Chapter 189, Laws of Minnesota). The objective of the program is to fund loans to businesses throughout the state that are owned and operated by minorities, low-income persons, women, veterans and/or persons with disabilities; provide jobs for minority and/or low-income persons, create and strengthen minority business enterprises, and promote economic development in a low-income area.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

VR Portion of WIOA State Plan for Minnesota State Services for the Blind FY-2020 - 02/06/2020

“Interagency Cooperation

(1) the State Medicaid plan under title XIX of the Social Security Act;

In September 2019, DHS-DSD, VRS, and SSB signed a Memorandum of Understanding. The terms of the MOU are specific to individuals on a Medicaid waiver who want to pursue competitive, integrated employment. Employment First and Person-Centered principles form the basis of the shared vision for how our agencies can provide employment services for people with disabilities in a coordinated manner. The goal is to align systems so that common customers – those who receive home and community-based service disability waivers and vocational rehabilitation services from VRS or SSB – can get seamless and timely supports to make informed choices and meet their competitive integrated employment goals. The full implementation of the MOU is planned for January 2021 to allow time for communication, stakeholder involvement, and training.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

VRS, SSB, IDEA and home and community-based employment services – Interim guidance - 10/19/2018

~~“This document provides information about:• Authorizing home and community-based services (HCBS) employment services• Background information• Best practices• Additional employment resources.

DHS is working to clarify and replace this interim guidance with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Vocational R