Mississippi

States - Big Screen

Mississippi "feels like coming home" for workers with disabilities who have found great jobs in their communities in the Magnolia State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Mississippi’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
-0.16%
Change from
2016 to 2017
2,984,100
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.46%
Change from
2016 to 2017
265,344
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.93%
Change from
2016 to 2017
73,203
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
27.59%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.7%
Change from
2016 to 2017
71.75%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 2,992,333 2,988,726 2,984,100
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 259,265 258,824 265,344
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 71,339 76,078 73,203
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,061,622 1,074,318 1,070,889
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 27.52% 29.39% 27.59%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 70.11% 71.25% 71.75%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.40% 5.80% 5.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 27.30% 26.30% 26.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 21.00% 19.80% 18.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 223,702 221,845 238,234
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 250,610 254,199 253,362
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 297,654 295,963 303,152
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 164,801 166,959 175,191
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 7,006 8,249 6,883
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,147 2,355 2,860
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,733 1,270 2,210
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 5,206 6,792 6,834
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,733 2,660 673

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,668 2,741 2,772
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.30% 2.40% 2.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 131,143 128,746 127,181

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 7,194 6,655 6,465
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 13,834 12,648 12,095
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 52,960 49,347 42,606
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.60% 13.50% 15.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 0.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 2.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 6.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 90.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A 6
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A 720
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A 2,154
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A 31,461

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,987 2,013 2,076
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 123 119 120
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 96 96 86
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 0.78% 81.00% 72.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 3.21 3.21 2.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,537
6,458
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 729 750 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,443 1,615 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,480 1,955 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,308 1,011 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 168 134 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,409 993 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 45.80% 48.70% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,150 1,925 1,712
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 204,438 203,145 200,763
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 144 147 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 210 165 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2011 2014 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $2,306,000 $201,000 $12,871,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $161,000 $237,000 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $13,248,000 $0 $9,953,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 11.00% 21.00% 57.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 800 1,927 167
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,821 472 863
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.00 20.80 45.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.27% 63.02% 63.01%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.42% 15.10% 15.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.08% 2.01% 1.87%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.98% 99.98% 99.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.45% 29.01% 27.79%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.96% 66.78% 67.12%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.85% 84.38% 85.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.51% 37.77% 39.33%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 558,965
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,561
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 63,390
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 241,418
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 304,808
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 49
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 300
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 349
AbilityOne wages (products). $548,297
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,097,679

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 14 15 12
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 15 16 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,285 1,534 1,265
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 49 49 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,334 1,583 1,265

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Customized Employment

~~MDRS continues to identify current information from research, rehabilitation trends and professional resources. This information is provided to agency staff through a variety of methods, including training at the state, regional, and district levels. Most recently this training has been focused on Autism and customized employment. Additionally, this information is posted and available to staff on MDRS Connect, the agency intranet. (Page 180) Title II

The SE Program will continue to emphasize individual employment placements. Other models will remain an option for clients and may be utilized when feasible. However, when given a choice, clients prefer individual placements by an overwhelming majority. Individual placement is the preferred option of MDRS as well as the clients because it achieves integration in the work environment, it is competitive integrated employment, and it provides more opportunities for career pathways and better quality jobs with more benefits.
Person Centered Planning and Customized Employment as integral parts of service provision continue to be high priorities. These service approaches have been embraced by mental health providers, the DD Council, and other service providers in the state as accepted best practices for model service delivery. (Page 205) Title II

SE staff also participate in both practices in coordinating services for SE clients in the education system throughout the state. These practices have proven to be successful for clients because of the enhanced teamwork with other agencies. Under WIOA customized employment is included in the definition of supported employment and VR is including it as a VR service that the SE client can choose to include in his/her IPE. Therefore, VR is expanding customized employment training to the majority of its direct service staff. These service approaches will continue to be made available to clients during the intake process and will be utilized when deemed appropriate and when chosen by the client. (Page 206) Title II

Plans for improving community rehabilitation programs (private and agency-supported) include training staff to provide Pre-ETS, customized employment services, and on-the-job tryout services which facilitate the agency’s ability to achieve the changes in WIOA. (Page 211) Title II

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~8. Increase collaboration within the state's workforce system to improve services to unemployed workers with disabilities who are eligible for VR services by better leveraging services with other workforce development programs. (Page 209) Title II

21. Increase collaboration within the Workforce System to improve services to unemployed workers with disabilities who are eligible for VR services by better leveraging services with other workforce development programs.
22. Play stronger roles on state and local Workforce Boards to assure that VR consumers and other individuals with disabilities are better served by the One-Stop System. (Page 215) Title II

Leveraging Resources from Key Partners to Support SCSEP
Area Agencies on Aging work with community colleges to provide training to SCSEP participants at a reduced cost; many provide tuition waivers for SCSEP participants. Community colleges are an integral component of the WIOA programs offered through the WIN Job Centers. SCSEP participants are encouraged to dual enroll in WIOA with the WIN Job Centers for job search assistance and training classes. (Page 283) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~o MDHS - The Mississippi Department of Human Services administers the TANF program through several legacy applications, including MAVERICS and JAWS. MAVERICS supports case management data such as intake and eligibility information, and JAWS supports TANF Work Program data. These systems do not inherently support web services, but various enterprise solutions exist to allow a modern, intermediate application to interface with such systems. This intermediate application, developed in Java, would be able to implement and consume web services on behalf of the legacy application. In addition, MDHS is in the process of a multi-year system modernization effort that will reduce the agency's reliance on legacy applications for case management. (Page 96) Title I

In order to accomplish this, OVR relies on many cooperative agreements, memorandums of understanding and contracts with various agencies, organizations and groups.
The entities that OVR is actively involved with include, but is not limited to:
o Mississippi Department of Education for the coordination of transition services and local school districts to carry out transition and youth career services plus implement a Transition Specialist in participating local school districts; (Page 160) Title II

VRB works closely with the education system through the VR Transition and Youth Career Services Program. There are approximately 20 VRB Counselors throughout the state who work in preparing students with vision loss for entry into the world of work. They serve as informational resources for teachers and other educational staff as well as provide resources and information about blindness for parents and transitioning youth throughout development of the youth’s individualized plan for employment (IPE).
VRB Counselors work closely with parents, education staff, and community service providers to promote development of skills needed for students to become as independent as possible and competitive in terms of employment. In addition to training parents and students about the special education rights and responsibilities, VRB provides educational support by working with the VR Transition Team, school officials, and families to develop and implement the IPE. Goals developed in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) are included in the IPE to facilitate successful completion of those goals. (Page 163) Title II

Restructuring of the VR Transition and Youth Career Services Program has resulted in additional VR Counselors carrying transition and youth cases, which provides for more individualized services to both eligible and potentially eligible students in school. VR Counselors work with the students, parents, and school personnel as well as attend (IEP) meetings to help identify students that may be able to benefit from transition and youth career services.
Prior to making services available, the VR Counselor uses school documentation, health records, and other pertinent information as deemed appropriate for determining a student with a disability potentially eligible for pre-employment transition services and/or for determination of eligibility for the VR Transition program. (Page 164) Title II

Transition planning between MDRS and MDE ultimately helps with the successful development and implementation of both the IEP and the IPE.
MDRS through the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and Vocational Rehabilitation for the Blind have recently sent Request for Proposals for third party providers to provide Pre-ETS activities in accordance with the Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act. At this time, two proposals have been awarded contracts and additional Request for Proposals are being sought. (Page 164) Title II
It is also the intent of this agreement to serve as a mechanism for OVR/OVRB and MDE OSE to clearly specify the plans, policies and procedures for coordinating services to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities, including:
1. Consultation and technical assistance in the planning for the transition of students with disabilities;
2. Transition planning by OVR/OVRB and educational personnel that facilitates the development and implementation of a student’s individualized education plan (IEP);
3. Roles and responsibilities, including financial and programmatic responsibilities of each agency;
4. Procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities;
5. Assessment of students’ potential need for transition services and pre-employment transition services;
6. Coordination necessary and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by WIOA, with regard to students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment. (Page 166) Title II

The point of contact to businesses for any assistance and support needed to hire and maintain employment.
Business Development Representatives are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the job seekers on VR caseloads that will be deemed Job Ready match the skills that are needed by businesses, allowing VR counselors to spend more time with clients who require intensive IPE development and career counseling.
The main services provided by the Business Rep. include the following:
o Train employers regarding employment of individuals with disabilities, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act, work incentives, and laws related to employment opportunities;
o Provide consultation, technical assistance, and support to employers on workplace accommodations and assistive technology;
o Provide resources and support through collaboration with community partners and employers; and,
o Provide employer recruitment services, job matching, hiring, and retention of qualified individuals with disabilities. (Page 170) Title II

As appropriate, describe the procedures and activities to coordinate the designated State unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
MDRS pursues efforts to coordinate cross training with MDE that will address education and rehabilitation under the provision of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Training conferences on transition services have been held and co-sponsored by MDRS and MDE. Specifically, regional training conferences bring together all VR counselors with transition caseloads, other agency personnel involved with transition services, and transition specialists, teachers, and special education coordinators from MDE. VR strives to help MDE to meet the mandate the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004. (Page 181) Title II

VR assures that the individualized plan for employment (IPE) is also coordinated with the employment goal in the school’s individualized educational plan (IEP) and, where appropriate, the (ISP) individualized service plans of the long term care providers.
The VR Counselor servicing local school districts as well as the VR Supported Employment Counselors work together with schools district to ensure that students with disabilities that previously entered subminimum wage employment are provided information and services to assist in diverting these individuals into competitive integrated employment.
VR facilitates the opening of cases for beginning at age 14 if required. Pre-ETS services are provided to students with disabilities as early as age 14. If these individuals require VR Transition services as early as age 14, VR facilities this need by opening a VR case. This service provision will help strengthen VRs efforts to reach more students and strengthens the opportunity for successful employment outcomes. (Page 195) Title II

While local school districts are responsible for providing education and transition services to students with disabilities who are still in the secondary school system, under WIOA, VR is the state unit that is mandated to make available Pre-ETS begin at age fourteen (14) for all eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities with parental consent.
District Managers and counselors are responsible for developing cooperative working relationships with the local education agency staff in the districts, and other agencies working with youth. Letters were sent by the State Transition Program Coordinator to all the Special Education Directors and 504 Coordinators for each school district to discuss VR services for students with IEPs and 504 plans. The counselor is to follow-up with their Special Education Directors and 504 Coordinators at least annually to discuss the provision of outreach services for students with disabilities and to determine the need for potential referrals. (Page 195) Title II

MDRS and the local school district may enter into a Cooperative Agreement to jointly fund a Transition Assistant position to ensure a smoother transition of services between the school and OVR/OVRB. The Transition Assistant will provide services to selected secondary students with disabilities who are: (a) between the ages of fourteen (14) and twenty-one (21), (b) in transition from school to work and community, and (c) eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. The addition of school-based transition services are intended to add a component to the overall school and rehabilitation service continuum, not supplant existing employment-related or other services which are potentially appropriate for a particular student (any service the school is already responsible for providing). The Transition Assistant will not serve students who, with or without modifications, can benefit from existing school programs (career/technical and educational training programs etc.).  (Page 196) Title II

The OOS does not discriminate against any eligible individual on the basis of gender, age, race, creed, color, religion, national origin, citizenship, type of disability, duration of residence in Mississippi, public assistance status, source of referral, expected employment outcome, need for specific services, anticipate cost of services required, or income level of an individual or his/her family.
MDRS in consultation with the SRC will close the Priority Categories designated to be closed. Any individual currently under an approved IPE at the time his/her priority category is closed will continue to receive with his/her IPE, including the provision of Pre-employment transition services and Post-Employment Services. (Page 201) Title II

MDRS has determined that sufficient resources are currently available to provide VR services to all individuals with disabilities that apply, those determined eligible in all priority categories and those under an IPE. Due to the increase in service needs and the staff resources in 2017 and 2018 to provide the services, if the projected resources for funds and personnel change before the next state plan modification, MDRS will make a determination whether it may need to close one or more of its priority categories.
During FF2018, MDRS will be able to serve all eligible individuals in all three priority categories. The total projected available resources including the federal allotment, non-federal contributions, carryover, and program income for FY 2018 is $67,705,332. MDRS will conduct reviews periodically during the year to help validate the order and assess the impact of unforeseen circumstances. (Page 203) Title II

SE staff also participate in both practices in coordinating services for SE clients in the education system throughout the state. These practices have proven to be successful for clients because of the enhanced teamwork with other agencies. Under WIOA customized employment is included in the definition of supported employment and VR is including it as a VR service that the SE client can choose to include in his/her IPE. Therefore, VR is expanding customized employment training to the majority of its direct service staff. These service approaches will continue to be made available to clients during the intake process and will be utilized when deemed appropriate and when chosen by the client. (Page 206) Title II

Goal III: Implement a statewide model for more effectively serving high school youth and students with disabilities including individuals with visual and/or hearing impairments.
o A statewide training was conducted in 2016 that included all VR/VRB counselors and staff, and Special Education coordinators from schools throughout the state. This training assist VR in explaining the role of VR in serving students that have an IEP and 504 plan as well as serving students that are not receiving special education services. We are in hopes that we will continually see an increase in referrals for these students.
o In 2017, the updated formal Interagency Cooperative Agreement was developed with the Mississippi Department of Education. MDRS also updated our local school agreements.
o In 2016, the OVR Transition Manual designed to assist staff in the delivery of transition services. This manual is used as technical assistance for transition planning purposes. Training was held in each district statewide with counselors that are assigned to local schools/school districts.
o Annually, the OVR Transition Coordinator updates and maintains a list of all 504 coordinators and special education staff for each school district. The list is a document that can be accessed by all staff on the MDRS intranet - MDRS Connect. (Page 218) Title II

Continue the referral process between the VR Transition Counselor and the VR (SE) Supported Employment Counselor for students with disabilities ages 14-21 who have been determined to need long term ongoing support services. The VR Transition Counselor will take the referral from the MDE, determine eligibility, complete the assessment and discovery process and work with the SE Counselor to develop the IPE with the student, parents/guardians, and school. Once the IPE has been signed by all the required parties, then the student’s case will be transferred to the SE Counselor’s caseload. (Page 220) Title II
 

Career Pathways

~~In accordance with section 101(d) of WIOA, the Mississippi State Workforce Investment Board (SWIB) will establish and operate through a SWIB WIOA Board Committee, whose membership will meet WIOA state board composition requirements, to perform the following services for the Governor:
1. Development, implementation, and modification of the state plan.
2. Collaboration with educational boards (MBE, MCCB, IHL), partners, and service providers to review statewide policies, statewide programs, and recommendations on actions that should be taken by the state to align workforce development programs in a manner that supports a comprehensive and streamlined workforce development system, including the review and provision of comments on state plans.
3. Collaboration with educational boards (MBE, MCCB, IHL), partners, and service providers in the development and continuous improvement of the workforce development system in the state, including:
a. Identification of barriers and means for removing barriers to better coordinate, align, and avoid duplication among the programs and activities carried out through the system.
b. Development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skill adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.
c. Development of strategies for providing effective outreach to and improved access for individuals and employers who could benefit from services provided through the workforce development system. (Page 64) Title I

 (2) The SE Program will continue to emphasize individual employment placements. Other models will remain an option for clients and may be utilized when feasible. However, when given a choice, clients prefer individual placements by an overwhelming majority. Individual placement is the preferred option of MDRS as well as the clients because it achieves integration in the work environment, it is competitive integrated employment, and it provides more opportunities for career pathways and better quality jobs with more benefits. (Page 205) Title II
  

Apprenticeship
No disability specific information found regarding this element
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Local workforce development boards have the option to include additional Affiliate One-Stop Centers with any subset of Combined Plan Partners as long as they include at least two partners. Local workforce development boards also have the flexibility to include additional partners in Affiliate One-Stop Centers. While local workforce development boards ultimately decide the logistics of affiliate centers, the WIOA law specifically identifies the following approved federally funded partners: employment and training programs administered by the Social Security Administration, including Ticket to Work and the Self Sufficiency Program; employment and training programs carried out by the Small Business Administration; Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) programs; Client Assistance Program; and programs authorized under the National and Community Service Act of 1990.
Local workforce development boards are also responsible for ensuring that local activities and local sector targets are in line with state-level sector analysis. The Mississippi LifeTracks system will constantly update web-accessible reports that feature dashboard numbers, pathway analysis, and supply and demand analysis to ensure that economic developers in Mississippi have a near real-time picture of the labor market. Sector analysis revealed laborshed zones that transcend local workforce development area boundaries and allow local workforce development boards to serve as intermediaries to connect local employers and training providers to meet labor market demands. Employers will communicate labor demand in real time by posting job orders in Mississippi Works Labor Exchange. (Page 88) Title I

Business Development Representatives are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the job seekers on VR caseloads that will be deemed Job Ready match the skills that are needed by businesses, allowing VR counselors to spend more time with clients who require intensive IPE development and career counseling.
The main services provided by the Business Rep. include the following:
o Train employers regarding employment of individuals with disabilities, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act, work incentives, and laws related to employment opportunities;
o Provide consultation, technical assistance, and support to employers on workplace accommodations and assistive technology;
o Provide resources and support through collaboration with community partners and employers; and,
o Provide employer recruitment services, job matching, hiring, and retention of qualified individuals with disabilities.
MDRS also works with employers to help youth with disabilities and students with disabilities have more opportunities, explore career interests, acquire workplace skills, and enter into competitive integrated employment. (Page 170) Title II

457. Business Relations Specialist will providing information to VR staff the areas as follows:
          *the services BRS provide to employers,
          *training and information regarding work incentives,
          *job analysis and job matching,
          *career opportunities in the local area; and
458. Develop and implement on campus work experience training in order to provide students who cannot get into or opportunities for vocational training are not readily available in a community based setting.
459. Refer those consumers receiving SSI/SSDI cash benefits who are interested in earnings that will eliminate their reliance on SSA cash benefits for work incentives benefits analysis and counseling.
460. Coordinate and conduct the Annual Governor’s Job Fair for individuals with disabilities.
461. Summer Internship Program for high school students with blindness and visual impairments; and deafness and hard of hearing. (Page 213) Title II
GOAL II: Improve the VR Service Delivery System to Individuals with disabilities
Strategies (Plan of Action):
462. Designate staff in each MDRS districts to be responsible for conducting outreach and orientation sessions on a regular basis.
463. Provide input to assure appropriate inclusion of vocational rehabilitation activities in, public service announcements, and agency website and publications.
464. Update and distribute vocational rehabilitation brochures to appropriate referral sources.
465. Designate and train specific staff members in each district to handle referrals and provide information to the public.
466. Assure that all geographic areas of the state are covered with appropriate service delivery staff. (Page 213) Title II
 

Employer/ Business

~~The point of contact to businesses for any assistance and support needed to hire and maintain employment.
Business Development Representatives are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the job seekers on VR caseloads that will be deemed Job Ready match the skills that are needed by businesses, allowing VR counselors to spend more time with clients who require intensive IPE development and career counseling.
The main services provided by the Business Rep. include the following:
o Train employers regarding employment of individuals with disabilities, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act, work incentives, and laws related to employment opportunities;
o Provide consultation, technical assistance, and support to employers on workplace accommodations and assistive technology;
o Provide resources and support through collaboration with community partners and employers; and,
o Provide employer recruitment services, job matching, hiring, and retention of qualified individuals with disabilities. (Page 170) Title II
 

Data Collection
No disability specific information found regarding this element.
511

~~The scope of services between MDRS and MDE are described in (d)2. The scope of services between MDRS and the local school districts are intended to serve as a mechanism for OVR/OVRB and the local school districts to clearly specify the plans, policies and procedures for coordinating services to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities, including:
0. Responsibilities of MDRS/OVR
1. Responsibilities of School District
2. Referral Process
3. Joint Development of IEPs and IPEs; and
4. Coordination necessary and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by WIOA, with regard to students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment
This Memorandum of Agreement for Transition Planning for Secondary Students with Disabilities between is made and entered into by and between the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services, hereafter referred to as “MDRS,” for and on behalf of its Offices of Vocational Rehabilitation and Vocational Rehabilitation for the Blind, hereafter referred to as “OVR/OVRB,” and the Mississippi Department of Education, for and on behalf of its Office of Special Education, hereafter referred to as “MDE OSE.”
A formal interagency agreement is mandated under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 34 CFR 300.154, and section 101(a) (11) (D) of the Rehabilitation Act and its implementing regulations at 34 CFR 361.22 (b). Additional references used in this document include Sections 113 and 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the Final Regulations: State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program; State Supported Employment Services Program; Limitations on Use of Subminimum Wage.This agreement is designed to improve the cooperative and collaborative efforts between the OVR/OVRB, and MDE OSE to coordinate the receipt of pre-employment transition services, transition services and other vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to students with disabilities who are eligible for special education services under the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA), students who have a 504 plan, and other students with disabilities who are eligible or potentially eligible for services through OVR/OVRB, in order to facilitate their smooth transition from school to post-school employment-related activities and competitive, integrated employment. (Page 165-166) Title I

It is also the intent of this agreement to serve as a mechanism for OVR/OVRB and MDE OSE to clearly specify the plans, policies and procedures for coordinating services to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities, including:
1. Consultation and technical assistance in the planning for the transition of students with disabilities;
2. Transition planning by OVR/OVRB and educational personnel that facilitates the development and implementation of a student’s individualized education plan (IEP);
3. Roles and responsibilities, including financial and programmatic responsibilities of each agency;
4. Procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities;
5. Assessment of students’ potential need for transition services and pre-employment transition services;
6. Coordination necessary and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by WIOA, with regard to students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment.; and an
7. Assurance that the MDE OSE will not enter into an arrangement with an entity holding a special wage certificate under section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act for the purpose of operating a program under which a youth with a disability is engaged in work at a subminimum wage.
Additional considerations include grievance procedure to resolve disputes between OVR/OVRB and the MDE OSE, as appropriate, as well as procedures to resolve disputes between an individual with a disability and the entities specified above, and information about the Client Assistance Program. (Pages 166- 167) Title II
 

 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
No disability specific information found regarding this element.
Vets
The WIOA services that MDES administers will address the workforce and training needs of every eligible individual. Through Wagner-Peyser services, MDES provides job search, referral, and placement services to all eligible Mississippi workers. MDES funds adult training programs administered by local workforce development boards based on the needs of each local workforce development area. To serve dislocated workers, MDES coordinates Rapid Response services that assist employers and employees affected by layoffs or plant closures. MDES serves youth through specially trained Youth Providers who connect youth to targeted youth programs, other eligible core programs, and education and training opportunities based on the specific needs of the individual. In addition, there are two employment outreach groups: Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) and Disabled Veteran Outreach Specialists (DVOP). To fill job openings, LVER staff work directly with businesses, and DVOP staff work directly with unemployed or underemployed veterans. (Page 75) Title I o Referral of qualified veterans to new job openings, especially Federal Contractor job orders, prior to all non-veteran job referral activity. o Veteran placement at the top of WIOA waiting lists (ITAs and OJT) for limited training funds. MDES management will monitor priority of service by reviewing quarterly performance reports, manager reports, and MS Works reports. MDES management will monitor priority of service in covered programs at two levels. Workforce Investment Network (WIN) Job Centers will continue to use established protocol of identifying targeted groups. At the state level, management will continue to analyze performance reports, manager reports, and MS Works reports. WIN Job Center services are made available and provided to eligible veterans, transitioning service members, VA VR & E Chapter 31 veterans, Native American Veterans, other groups targeted for special consideration, and veterans with significant barriers to employment through outreach activities performed by Disabled Veteran Outreach Specialists (DVOPs). MDES will continue to encourage non-DOL program partners to focus on providing priority of service to targeted groups for special consideration. (Page 106) Title II In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes: A. HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG MDES plans to assign and utilize DVOP Specialists and other agency employees trained in case management to metropolitan WIN Job Centers throughout the state where the need of intensive services is greatest. DVOP Specialists will provide intensive services, through the case management framework, and facilitate placements to meet the employment needs of veterans, prioritizing services to special disabled veterans, other disabled veterans, and other categories of veterans in accordance with priorities determined by the Secretary of Labor. The DVOP Specialist, Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC), will continue to work with the Veterans Affairs’ Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment (VR & E) program. DVOP specialists will provide intensive services through the case management approach, including completion of an assessment and a written employability development plan. LVER staff trained in networking will be assigned and utilized within workforce areas. LVER staff will conduct outreach to employers within the workforce area to assist veterans in gaining employment, including conducting seminars for employers and, in conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups; and facilitate employment, training, and placement services furnished to veterans served by the WIN Job Centers. MDES plans to fill grant-funded vacancies expeditiously despite State budget problems, hiring freezes and furloughs. MDES plans to identify projected losses and retirements early when possible. Applicants will be given the following order of priority: qualified service-connected disabled veterans; qualified eligible veterans; and qualified eligible persons. Also, veteran (non-JVSG) staff in the agency may be considered for assignment to the program. (Page 259) Title II LVER Staff In accordance with Veterans’ Program Letter 07-10, 03-14 or most recent guidance, MDES Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVER) will conduct outreach to employers in the area to assist veterans in gaining employment, including conducting seminars for employers and, in conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups, and facilitating employment, training, and placement services furnished to veterans within WIN Job Centers. The LVERs will work with the local area management team to coordinate and conduct employer outreach activities. LVERs will advocate for all veterans served by the WIN Job Centers with business, industry, and other community-based organizations by participating in appropriate activities such as: o Planning and participating in job and career fairs; o Conducting employer outreach; o Educating all WIN Job Center staff and partners with current employment initiatives and programs for veterans; o Conducting job searches and workshops, and establishing job search groups, in conjunction with employers; o Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; o Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans; o Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and o Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. (Page 260) Title IV DVOP specialists and LVERs are an essential part of and fully integrated into the WIN Job Center network. They are included among the WIN Job Center partner staff, which consists of all staff employed by programs or activities operated by job center partners that provide job-driven online and/or in-person workforce development or related support services as part of the workforce development system. Other WIN Job Center partner staff members include staff of WIOA, WP, and other network partner programs. LVER staff will continue to be viable and effective in the WIN Job Center delivery system, e.g., facilitating and participating in employer marketing services, employer job fairs, etc. LVER staff will continue to be considered key players and team participants in business development activities and employer marketing efforts, developing jobs for WIN Job Centers, marketing veteran services to employers, assisting employers at job fairs and facilitating employer recruitments. Veterans with significant barriers to employment are referred to or assigned to the DVOP after initial core services. All of these activities translate into a fully integrated system with positive benefits and productivity for the WIN Job Centers and also subsequently result in the development of seamless employment opportunities for veterans. (Page 261) Title II
Mental Health

~~The entities that OVR is actively involved with include, but is not limited to:
o Mississippi Department of Education for the coordination of transition services and local school districts to carry out transition and youth career services plus implement a Transition Specialist in participating local school districts;
o Hinds Community College for the Deaf Services Program;
o Division of Medicaid to provide seamless, non-duplicated services to individuals who are eligible for both Medicaid and VR services and for maximum utilization of resources between the two agencies;
o Department of Mental Health (DMH) Planning and Advisory Council as federally mandated for advice and support. DMH to cover the costs for therapeutic medical services offered at secondary alcohol and drug treatment centers that have been approved by DMH;
o Department of Mental Health -Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to continue enhancing, expanding, and developing methods to support eligible persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities who express a desire for competitive integrated employment; establish a state-level work group to address system, policy and funding issues that impede the continuous provision of employment services by MDRS and DMH; engage MDRS staff and DMH providers and stakeholders at the local level in collaboration and cooperation in the accomplishment of the vision and desired outcomes; identify and disseminate best practices including training and funding strategies; and, provide individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities with quality employment services that lead to competitive integrated employment in a non-duplicated and seamless manner; ( Page 160-161) Title II

MDRS administers the Supported Employment (SE) Program as specified in Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act and amended in WIOA. VR works extensively with other state agencies, private non-profit entities, employers, family members, and consumer groups to ensure quality SE services are provided to all eligible individuals throughout all phases of the SE service delivery system.
MDRS- VR has entered into formal cooperative agreements with the Mississippi Division of Medicaid (Medicaid) and Department of Mental Health, Bureau for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, with respect to delivery of VR services, including extended services, for individuals with the most significant disabilities eligible for home and community-based services.
In addition to these formal agreements, MDRS collaborates on a more informal basis with public and private entities to ensure a comprehensive program of services is provided to SE eligible individuals.
Collaborative partners include local mental health facilities, Medicaid’s Bridge to Independence Program to help people move from qualified institutions to homes in the community, local school districts, businesses and industries, local projects funded by the DD Council, workforce development one-stop career centers, advocacy groups, and other relevant third parties as well as parents of SE eligible individuals. (Page 168) Title II

Collaborative partners include local mental health facilities, Medicaid’s Bridge to Independence Program to help people move from qualified institutions to homes in the community, local school districts, businesses and industries, local projects funded by the Mississippi Council on Development Disabilities (DD Council), workforce development one-stop career centers, advocacy groups, and other relevant third parties as well as parents of individuals with the most significant disabilities.
MDRS also has in place with the Mississippi Partnership for Employment a Memorandum of Understanding that includes the following partners:
1) DD Council;
2) The University of Southern Mississippi Institute for Disability Studies;
3) Disability Rights of Mississippi;
4) Mississippi Department of Education;
5) DMH;
6) Mississippi Department of Employment Security (the administering authority for the state’s workforce development system); and
7) Two self-advocates
The partnership’s intent is to build capacity across existing state systems to improve outcomes for youth and young adults with developmental disabilities including intellectual disabilities seeking competitive employment in integrated settings. (Page 172) Title II

SE staff members continue to make every effort to identify and facilitate natural supports that occur in the workplace in order to maximize utilization of funds. These natural supports do not replace the one-on-one intensive support provided to clients by the SE Counselors. However, when properly identified and utilized, these natural supports do result in decreased direct service costs and increased quality of support.
(2) The SE Program will continue to emphasize individual employment placements. Other models will remain an option for clients and may be utilized when feasible. However, when given a choice, clients prefer individual placements by an overwhelming majority. Individual placement is the preferred option of MDRS as well as the clients because it achieves integration in the work environment, it is competitive integrated employment, and it provides more opportunities for career pathways and better quality jobs with more benefits.
Person Centered Planning and Customized Employment as integral parts of service provision continue to be high priorities. These service approaches have been embraced by mental health providers, the DD Council, and other service providers in the state as accepted best practices for model service delivery. (Page 205) Title II

Cooperative arrangements will continue to be developed with other provider agencies and organizations, both public and private, to expand the SE Program to unserved and underserved populations. The focus of these arrangements is on promoting and enabling SE Counselors and service provider personnel from other agencies to work as teams to share expertise, provide technical support in specific disability areas, and conduct joint training.
With the interagency agreement and referral process that has been developed with the Department of Mental Health and the Division of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, we will continue to work with this agency in serving individuals who are eligible for the waiver as extended service providers. (Page 206) Title II

MDRS maintains formal agreements with the MDE and DMH as well as other public and private entities, which identify areas of collaboration to ensure a comprehensive program of services to SE eligible individuals. Staff members collaborate intensively with local mental health centers, school districts, SE businesses and industries, the DD Council, parents, advocacy groups and other relevant third parties.
The service approach for SE eligible clients emulates the nationally accepted "best practices" models of SE service delivery which include individual job placement, mobile crews, and temporary employment placement (TEP) for individuals with chronic mental illness. Central to each of these approaches is an emphasis on person centered planning and facilitation of natural supports. Individualized job development is conducted by SE staff based on job matching assessment information and client’s informed choice. SE clients are assisted with employment planning and placement by VTIs and job skills training is provided at the job site either by job coaches or through natural supports.
To fulfill the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended by WIOA, regarding transitional employment for individuals with chronic mental illness, MDRS utilizes the TEP model. This model involves placement in a series of temporary jobs that lead to permanent employment as an outcome. This service approach is implemented through coordination with local mental health centers. (Page 224) Title IV

Mississippi will coordinate services, where available, with public and private entities (i.e., Mississippi Departments of Rehabilitation Services, Employment Security and Mental Health, and the Mississippi Community College Board, etc.) to allow TANF families with barriers (i.e., little or no work experience, domestic violence, limited English proficiency, learning disabilities, mental, physical disabilities and/or substance abuse) an opportunity to gain access to services and resources needed to obtain the highest level of self-sufficiency within the constraints of the TANF time-limits. Special screening and referral procedures will be used to identify and refer the individual for the appropriate service. Mississippi will deny benefits to individuals who fail to comply with the activities provided by these entities. (Page 237) Title IV

Job Search and Job Readiness - Job search and job readiness assistance is defined as the act of seeking or obtaining employment, preparation to seek or obtain employment, including life skills training, and substance abuse treatment, mental health treatment, or rehabilitation activities for those who are otherwise employable.
Such treatment or therapy must be determined to be necessary and certified by a qualified medical, substance abuse or mental health professional. A qualified professional is defined as any individual who is licensed or certified. Job search and job readiness assistance activities are supervised daily by the case manager and/or job readiness trainer. (Page 239) Title IV

The MDHS will create a referral process to the Department of Child Protection Services (DCPS) to contact state and local law enforcement, the education system, and counseling services for recipients requiring assistance with statutory rape, domestic violence issues, mental health concerns, and drug/alcohol treatment. The counselors and educators can focus on problems that may be an underlying problem other than statutory rape. Individuals referred will complete an assessment, discuss educational barriers, and receive life skill strategies. MDHS established the Healthy Marriage Initiative, using Federal TANF funds, to promote the well-being of children in Mississippi by encouraging the involvement of mothers and fathers in their lives. The initiative will:
o Encourage stable family formation and healthy marriages,
o Promote responsible fathering,
o Increase paternity and child support objectives,
o Encourage community support for marriage, and
o Prevent out-of-wedlock pregnancies. (Page 250) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
1. Partner with Third Party Administrators (TPAs) — Statistical data from this cross match pilot project is currently being analyzed to determine if continuing the cross match would be beneficial. 2. Employers SIDES messaging — Explain to employer the importance and benefits of responding timely through E-Response. A mailing campaign is in progress to target a designated group of employers. 3. Claimant messaging — Generate a detail mailer/message alert to claimant after first payment advising them of the requirement and method to properly report earnings and return to work. Include the penalty for failing to do so but emphasize the potential overpayment issue and progression. (Page 273) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 54

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; African American, Faith-Based, Hispanic, Vietnamese, Native Americans, extremely rural communities; new mothers and women with children; vulnerable and special needs populations; millennials; and Medicaid/CHIP-eligible consumers  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are the Aaron E. Henry Community Health Services Center, Boat People SOS – Gulf Coast, CATCH Kids Tupelo, Mercy Housing and Human Development, and the Mid-South Churches Cooperative Conference State Convention. They will partner with the Faith and community groups representing over 1,500 houses of worship, Mississippi’s gaming industry, Employers and groups of employees, Health Centers, and Head Start Sites.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Michael MinorPhone: (901) 826-8355/(662) 298-3584Email: pastorminor@thehillhernnado.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) - 09/03/2019

~~“My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving The “left behind” populations, such as low wage earners and hourly wage workers; as well as individuals who do not have health insurance because of a lack of affordable coverage options in their area.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Open Arms Healthcare Center. They will partner with the Southwest Mississippi River Region (SMRR) Community Advisory Group, Faith and community-based organizations, Small business owners, Chambers of Commerce, City Governance, and Community health clinics and primary care clinics in the SMRR.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Henry FullerPhone: (601) 957-7710Email: hfuller@mbk-inc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mississippi ABLE - 06/02/2019

~~“What is an ABLE account?ABLE accounts are savings accounts for individuals with disabilities which will not affect their public benefits.  These accounts can be used for daily transactions and/or long-term savings.  Income earned in the accounts is not taxed if spent on qualified disability-related expenses.  Contributions can be made to an account by anyone and may qualify for a state tax deduction.”

This page also has links for more information on ABLE

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Supported Employment - 05/23/2019

~~“DMH  believes  that  work  plays  a  critical  role  in  improving  quality  of  life  and  mental  health  outcomes  of  the  people  we  serve  as  part  of  their  recovery  journey.  In  January  2015,  DMH  provided  funding  to  develop  four  pilot  sites  to  offer    Supported   Employment   to   75   individuals   with   mental   illness.  The  sites  are  located  in  Community  Mental  Health  Center Regions 2, 7, 10 and 12. Supported employment, an evidenced-based  way  to  help  people  diagnosed  with  mental  illnesses  secure  and  keep  employment,  begins  with  the  idea  that  every  person  with  a  serious  mental  illness  is  capable  of  working competitively in the community. In F Y18, the DMH Supported    Employment    Pilot    Prog ram    assisted    257    individuals  on  their  road  to  recovery  by  helping  them  to  become employed in the openly competitive job market.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Mississippi Disability Resources and Advocacy Organizations - 05/03/2019

~~This page has “links to government agencies and disability rights organizations in Mississippi. They may be able assist you with:• disability advocacy• home health services• home care• nursing aide services• Medicaid• accessing other community resources to help people with disabilities.

Many of these organizations work to address the unique needs associated with different disabilities, including but not limited to physical, intellectual, and developmental disabilities, and mental illness. Others focus on issues such as access to housing and legal assistance based on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).If you live in Mississippi and are a person with a disability, learning about state-specific resources to support people with disabilities can help you advocate for yourself. If you are a friend, family member, or caregiver of a person with disabilities in Mississippi, these resources can help you in supporting your loved one."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Long Term Care 1915(c) Waiver Provider Orientation - 01/25/2019

~~“The Office of Long Term Care is responsible for ensuring that all providers of 1915(c) home and community based waiver services for the following waivers meet credentialing requirements as documented in the CMS approved waiver applications.• Elderly & Disabled Waiver• Assisted Living Waiver• Independent Living Waiver• Traumatic Brain Injury/Spinal Cord Injury WaiverAgencies may currently apply to enroll as providers of Personal Care services, In-Home Respite services or Adult Day Care services under the Elderly & Disabled (E&D) Waiver or Assisted Living services under the Assisted Living (AL) Waiver.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/21/2018

~~“The Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities is responsible for planning, development and supervision of an array of services for people in the state with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  The service delivery system is comprised of the State-Operated Programs, ID/DD Waiver program, and the IDD Community Support Program.  The ID/DD Waiver and Community Support Programs provide support to assist people to live successfully at home and in the community.  These services are provided by community mental health centers and other community service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Delta WDA provides Small Business Development, Entrepreneurial, and Self-Employment Training to area residents and WIOA customers in accordance with DOL’s TEGL 12-10 “Supporting Entrepreneurial and Self-Employment Training through the Workforce Investment System.” This program addresses the role the workforce investment system plays in support of entrepreneurial activities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) Program is fully integrated as an essential part of the WIN Job Center network.Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOP), funded through the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG), are included among the WIN Job Center partner staff. The WIN Job Center staff assists veterans, eligible spouses, and veterans with barriers to employment.  Veterans and eligible spouses are asked to complete an assessment form to determine if they have significant barriers to employment. The WIN Job Center staff provides initial core services and refers veterans/eligible spouses with barriers to the DVOP for enhanced services.Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are viable and effective partners in the WIN Job Center delivery system. They participate in employer outreach, job fairs, and other activities related to the JVSG guidelines. LVERs are key members on the MDES Business Services Team participating in business development activities, employer outreach efforts, and in developing jobs for veterans."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Strategic Plan – Mississippi Department of Mental Health - 11/20/2018

~~“Goal 1To increase access to community-based care and supports for adults and children with mental illness and/or substance use disorders through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered and recovery-oriented system of care

GOAL 2To increase access to community-based care and supports for people with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered system of care”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

House Bill 909 - Medical benefits for retired public employees and dependents under age sixty-five (65) years and not eligible for Medicare benefits. - 07/01/2017

“(d)  Medical benefits for retired employees and dependents under age sixty-five (65) years and not eligible for Medicare benefits.  For employees who retire before July 1, 2005, and for employees retiring due to work-related disability under the Public Employees' Retirement System, the same health insurance coverage as for all other active employees and their dependents shall be available to retired employees and all dependents under age sixty-five (65) years who are not eligible for Medicare benefits, the level of benefits to be the same level as for all other active participants.  For employees who retire on or after July 1, 2005, and not retiring due to work-related disability under the Public Employees' Retirement System, the same health insurance coverage as for all other active employees and their dependents shall be available to those retiring employees and all dependents under age sixty-five (65) years who are not eligible for Medicare benefits only if the retiring employees were participants in the State and School Employees Health Insurance Plan for four (4) years or more before their retirement, the level of benefits to be the same level as for all other active participants.  This section will apply to those employees who retire due to one hundred percent (100%) medical disability as well as those employees electing early retirement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement

MS HB 836 (including amendments to Miss. Code Ann. §43-30-1) - 07/01/2015

An act to require state agencies that provide services an support to persons with disabilities to consider, as their first option, competitive employment in an integrated setting for persons with disabilities; to require all state agencies to follow this policy for employment by coordinating all collaborating efforts among agencies; to authorize state agencies to adopt rules and regulations to implement the provisions of this act; to require the Disability Resource Commission to review measurable goals and objectives as submitting to it by each relevant state agency to ensure implementation of this act; to provide reporting requirements for state agencies; to amend Section 43-30-1, Mississippi Code of 1972, in conformity thereto; and for related purposes. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

SB 2034 Employment First Act - 07/01/2014

“AN ACT TO CREATE THE "EMPLOYMENT FIRST ACT"; TO REQUIRE THAT STATE AGENCIES THAT PROVIDE SERVICES AND SUPPORT TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES SHALL CONSIDER, AS THEIR FIRST OPTION, COMPETITIVE EMPLOYMENT IN AN INTEGRATED SETTING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES; TO REQUIRE ALL STATE AGENCIES TO FOLLOW THIS POLICY FOR EMPLOYMENT BY COORDINATING ALL COLLABORATING EFFORTS AMONG AGENCIES; TO AUTHORIZE STATE AGENCIES TO ADOPT RULES AND REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT THE ACT; TO ESTABLISH AN EMPLOYMENT FIRST OVERSIGHT COMMISSION WHICH SHALL REVIEW MEASURABLE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES AS SUBMITTED TO IT BY EACH RELEVANT STATE AGENCY TO ENSURE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ACT; TO PROVIDE REPORTING REQUIREMENTS; AND FOR RELATED PURPOSES.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Mississippi Concurrent Resolution No. 563

“State agencies that provide services and support to persons with disabilities shall coordinate efforts and collaborate within and among such agencies to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures and funding support competitive employment in integrated settings for persons with disabilities who are of working age....

All state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems in order to track progress toward full implementation of ‘Employment First’ and shall adopt measurable goals and objectives to promote assessment of progress in implementing this resolution.

This resolution "died on calendar" in April 2013”

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Mississippi Executive Order 1335 - 01/14/2014

“Whereas, my administration is committed to supporting policies under which agencies that provide services to persons with disabilities and/or provide employment, economic development, or other related services explore employment in an integrated setting as the first priority option for persons with disabilities who are of working age.  Now, Therefore, I, Phil Bryant, Governor of the State of Mississippi, pursuant to the Constitution and laws of the State of Mississippi, do hereby order as follows:

State agencies that provide services to persons with disabilities, and state agencies which provide employment, economic development, or other related services, shall coordinate efforts and collaborate to ensure that state programs, policies, and procedures support employment in integrated settings as the first priority option, to the extent feasible, for persons with disabilities who are of working age. The same state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems and adopt measureable goals and objectives to track progress toward the achievement of the goals of this Executive Order. The Mississippi Disability Resource Commission, Miss. Code Ann. § 43-30-1, is authorized to monitor implementation of this Executive Order.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Mississippi ABLE - 06/02/2019

~~“What is an ABLE account?ABLE accounts are savings accounts for individuals with disabilities which will not affect their public benefits.  These accounts can be used for daily transactions and/or long-term savings.  Income earned in the accounts is not taxed if spent on qualified disability-related expenses.  Contributions can be made to an account by anyone and may qualify for a state tax deduction.”

This page also has links for more information on ABLE

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Supported Employment - 05/23/2019

~~“DMH  believes  that  work  plays  a  critical  role  in  improving  quality  of  life  and  mental  health  outcomes  of  the  people  we  serve  as  part  of  their  recovery  journey.  In  January  2015,  DMH  provided  funding  to  develop  four  pilot  sites  to  offer    Supported   Employment   to   75   individuals   with   mental   illness.  The  sites  are  located  in  Community  Mental  Health  Center Regions 2, 7, 10 and 12. Supported employment, an evidenced-based  way  to  help  people  diagnosed  with  mental  illnesses  secure  and  keep  employment,  begins  with  the  idea  that  every  person  with  a  serious  mental  illness  is  capable  of  working competitively in the community. In F Y18, the DMH Supported    Employment    Pilot    Prog ram    assisted    257    individuals  on  their  road  to  recovery  by  helping  them  to  become employed in the openly competitive job market.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Mississippi Disability Resources and Advocacy Organizations - 05/03/2019

~~This page has “links to government agencies and disability rights organizations in Mississippi. They may be able assist you with:• disability advocacy• home health services• home care• nursing aide services• Medicaid• accessing other community resources to help people with disabilities.

Many of these organizations work to address the unique needs associated with different disabilities, including but not limited to physical, intellectual, and developmental disabilities, and mental illness. Others focus on issues such as access to housing and legal assistance based on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).If you live in Mississippi and are a person with a disability, learning about state-specific resources to support people with disabilities can help you advocate for yourself. If you are a friend, family member, or caregiver of a person with disabilities in Mississippi, these resources can help you in supporting your loved one."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/21/2018

~~“The Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities is responsible for planning, development and supervision of an array of services for people in the state with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  The service delivery system is comprised of the State-Operated Programs, ID/DD Waiver program, and the IDD Community Support Program.  The ID/DD Waiver and Community Support Programs provide support to assist people to live successfully at home and in the community.  These services are provided by community mental health centers and other community service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Delta WDA provides Small Business Development, Entrepreneurial, and Self-Employment Training to area residents and WIOA customers in accordance with DOL’s TEGL 12-10 “Supporting Entrepreneurial and Self-Employment Training through the Workforce Investment System.” This program addresses the role the workforce investment system plays in support of entrepreneurial activities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) Program is fully integrated as an essential part of the WIN Job Center network.Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOP), funded through the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG), are included among the WIN Job Center partner staff. The WIN Job Center staff assists veterans, eligible spouses, and veterans with barriers to employment.  Veterans and eligible spouses are asked to complete an assessment form to determine if they have significant barriers to employment. The WIN Job Center staff provides initial core services and refers veterans/eligible spouses with barriers to the DVOP for enhanced services.Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are viable and effective partners in the WIN Job Center delivery system. They participate in employer outreach, job fairs, and other activities related to the JVSG guidelines. LVERs are key members on the MDES Business Services Team participating in business development activities, employer outreach efforts, and in developing jobs for veterans."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Strategic Plan – Mississippi Department of Mental Health - 11/20/2018

~~“Goal 1To increase access to community-based care and supports for adults and children with mental illness and/or substance use disorders through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered and recovery-oriented system of care

GOAL 2To increase access to community-based care and supports for people with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered system of care”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Career Exploration & Employability Skills - 11/05/2018

~~“The Vocational Rehabilitation Transition Counselor and the classroom teacher work together to implement a curriculum that students with disabilities may participate in through services provided at community rehabilitation programs throughout the state. The proposed schedule can be adapted to meet the needs of the student and the teacher and can be based on each school’s calendar year.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mississippi Council on Developmental Disabilities (MSCDD) State Work Plan - 10/01/2017

“The Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) stipulates that State Councils’ investments (grants, programs, and/or projects) support at least one of the following nine Areas of Emphasis:

 

1. Child Care

2. Community Supports (Formal or Informal)

3. Education and Early Intervention

4. Employment

5. Health

6. Housing

7. Quality Assurance

8. Recreation

9. Transportation”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

DMH Begins Implementation of Conflict Free Case Management - 08/01/2017

“The Mississippi Department of Mental Health (DMH) has begun the implementation of conflict-free case management services for the Intellectual Disabilities/Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD) Waiver.  Conflict-free case management is required for all states by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services, and will result in the transfer of a number of DMH employees to other community providers as it is implemented at DMH programs throughout the state.

 

DMH believes the function of Support Coordination is within the mission of the agency.  IDD regional programs will continue to provide Support Coordination services and no longer provide other ID/DD Waiver services. This plan has been approved by the Mississippi Division of Medicaid and CMS. The first implementation of conflict-free case management began at Ellisville State School in August 2017 and will be taking place at other DMH regional programs by the end of 2018. A large number of employees affected by these transitions will continue to serve Mississippians who require support from the ID/DD Waiver. There will not be a change in the type or amount of service people currently enrolled in the program receive.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

DD Network News: A Collaborative Publication from MSCDD, DRMS, and IDS - 02/01/2018

“Welcome! Thank you for reading the first issue of DD News, a joint publication of the Mississippi Council on Developmental Disabilities (MSCDD), Disability Rights Mississippi (DRMS), and the Institute for Disability Studies (IDS) at The University of Southern Mississippi. All three agencies are funded by the federal Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to ensure that people with developmental disabilities receive services as required by the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act. You can learn more about the agencies by researching their websites, listed on the agency pages of this newsletter.

The collaboration among our three agencies continues to expand and increase to benefit people with disabilities in our state. The more closely our agencies work together on issues to create the change that ultimately improves the lives of people with developmental and other disabilities, the greater the impact for all of Mississippi. We continue to collaborate with self-advocates, families, and professionals as evidenced by some of the work highlighted in this edition.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AbilityWorks - 11/03/2017

“AbilityWorks is a network of community rehabilitation programs that provide vocational assessment, job training, and actual work experience for individuals with disabilities. This is possible through a wide array of contract and subcontract services provided to local business and industry.

 

There are 17 locations in a statewide AbilityWorks network of vocationally oriented community programs and is a division of the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation. AbilityWork’s mission to clients is “to improve the quality of life, employment opportunities, and integration of people with disabilities into the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Vocational Rehabilitation Transition Services - 07/01/2017

“The Transition Services Program works with eligible secondary school students with disabilities to enable them to transition from school to subsequent work environments. Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) works cooperatively with the Mississippi Department of Education and local school districts in planning and implementing a variety of programs designed to provide training and assistance for students with disabilities to support them in making the difficult transition from school to work.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mississippi Council on Developmental Disabilities - 08/13/2012

Employment Objectives:

• “Identify and promote at least one Best Practice Model for increasing community employment options for individuals with Developmental Disabilities.” • “Identify at least one barrier to increasing community development options for individuals with Developmental Disabilities.” • “Determine and advocate for at least one Policy Change to improve Community Employment options for individuals with Developmental Disabilities.” • “Collaborate with other stakeholders to facilitate the transition [of] up to 15 individuals from work activity centers into community employment of their choosing.” • “Partner with others to achieve successful community employment for at least 10 individuals with Developmental Disabilities in their respective communities.”   Intermediaries and collaborators for this goal include State protection and advocacy system, university centers, and State DD Agency.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MS Balancing Incentives Program - 10/01/2011

“The Balancing Incentive Program authorizes grants to States to increase access to non-institutional long-term services and supports (LTSS) … [to] transform their long-term care systems by:

lowering costs through improved systems performance & efficiency creating tools to help consumers with care planning & assessment [and] improving quality measurement & oversight.

It “also provides new ways to serve more people in home and community-based settings, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as required by the Olmstead decision.”

 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mississippi Department of Mental Health MOU with DRS

“SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH IDD: DMH has implemented an MOU with the Department of Rehabilitation Services that is providing supported employment for people with IDD. Three hundred employees from DMH, MDRS, and the Division of Medicaid received training in early 2016 regarding supported employment services. As of June 2016, 18 people had been employed. 41 people have been referred for supported employment services through MDRS.”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mississippi Client Assistance Program (MSCAP)

~~Client Assistance Program, or often referred to as CAP, is a state managed and federally funded program designed to advise and inform clients and client applicants in the state of Mississippi. CAP assists in providing information obtaining to available services and benefits under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as well as the services and benefits available to individuals under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). In addition to this, CAP may assist and advocate for clients and client applicants in relation to projects, programs, and services provided under the Rehabilitation Act. CAP is funded through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) of the US Department of Education.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Recommendations for Improving School Funding in Mississippi - 01/16/2017

~~“Recommendation #3c: Create a commission to study and make recommendations related to service-based (IEP-based) fundingWhile multiple-tiered weights based on diagnosis alone would represent a big step forward for Mississippi, EdBuild believes that an IEP-based model, which incorporates consideration of both diagnosis and services, could move the needle even further to improve the precision of special education funding throughout the state. Funding based on student IEPs would take most of the guesswork out of the financing of special education and would significantly increase the impartiality of funding for students with special needs.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

MS CDD Grants and Contracts - 07/01/2016

“MS Partnerships in Employment grant from the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) – Disability Rights Mississippi; $74,410

DRMS’s responsibility within MSPE is to maintain the Employment Workgroup and carrying out its activities.  This group focuses on policies, removing barriers, improving access to competitive employment, and system change efforts.

 

MS Partnerships in Employment grant from the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities – Institute for Disability Studies; $144,000

IDS’s responsibility within MSPE is the Stakeholder’s Group and carrying out its activities.  The activities include focusing on innovative strategies and best practices for systems improved for competitive employment.  IDS provides knowledge and awareness to MSPE with periodic information sessions presented to the Employment Workgroup and the Consortium while assisting in carrying out various training activities across the State.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Mississippi Balancing Incentives Program - 05/01/2012

“The Balancing Incentive Program authorizes grants to States to increase access to non-institutional long-term services and supports (LTSS) … [to] transform their long-term care systems by:  • lowering costs through improved systems performance & efficiency  • creating tools to help consumers with care planning & assessment [and]  • improving quality measurement & oversight.   It “also provides new ways to serve more people in home and community-based settings, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as required by the Olmstead decision.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MS Partnerships in Employment

“Mississippi Partnerships in Employment (MSPE) will build capacity across existing state systems for sustainable systems change to improve outcomes for youth and young adults with DD/ID seeking competitive employment in integrated settings. The consortium will develop and implement policies that support competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with DD/ID seeking competitive employment in integrated settings by removing systemic barriers; identifying and implementing strategies and best practices that improve employment outcomes; and enhancing statewide collaboration that facilitates transition from secondary to post-secondary outcomes. Mississippi’s Partnership includes the DD Council, the University of Southern Mississippi’s UCEDD, Disability Rights Mississippi, VR, Department of Education, the Department of Mental Health Bureau of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities, the Department of Employment Security, and self-advocates”.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MS Money Follows the Person

“Money Follows the Person is a federal initiative to help states enhance community living options for persons with disabilities and establish person-driven and sustainable long-term care systems. The program is for qualified residents of nursing homes and intermediate care facilities and for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ICF/IID) who want to explore community living options.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; African American, Faith-Based, Hispanic, Vietnamese, Native Americans, extremely rural communities; new mothers and women with children; vulnerable and special needs populations; millennials; and Medicaid/CHIP-eligible consumers  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are the Aaron E. Henry Community Health Services Center, Boat People SOS – Gulf Coast, CATCH Kids Tupelo, Mercy Housing and Human Development, and the Mid-South Churches Cooperative Conference State Convention. They will partner with the Faith and community groups representing over 1,500 houses of worship, Mississippi’s gaming industry, Employers and groups of employees, Health Centers, and Head Start Sites.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Michael MinorPhone: (901) 826-8355/(662) 298-3584Email: pastorminor@thehillhernnado.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) - 09/03/2019

~~“My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving The “left behind” populations, such as low wage earners and hourly wage workers; as well as individuals who do not have health insurance because of a lack of affordable coverage options in their area.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Open Arms Healthcare Center. They will partner with the Southwest Mississippi River Region (SMRR) Community Advisory Group, Faith and community-based organizations, Small business owners, Chambers of Commerce, City Governance, and Community health clinics and primary care clinics in the SMRR.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Henry FullerPhone: (601) 957-7710Email: hfuller@mbk-inc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mississippi DMH Web-Based Training

“The Department of Mental Health provides Web-Based Training through Relias Learning (formerly Essential Learning) for registered providers. Relias is a customized learning management system and staff development tool. This training website, developed for DMH staff, presents and tracks training requirements in an accessible and easy to use format.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Mississippi Department of Mental Health Findings Letter - 12/22/2011

We [United States Department of Justice] conclude that the State of Mississippi fails to provide services to qualified individuals with disabilities, including mental illness and developmental disabilities, in the most integrated settings appropriate to their needs, in violation of the ADA. This has led to the needless and prolonged institutionalization of adults and children with disabilities who could be served in more integrated settings in the community with adequate services and supports. Further, systemic failures in the State’s system place qualified individuals with disabilities at risk of unnecessary institutionalization now and going forward.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Long Term Care 1915(c) Waiver Provider Orientation - 01/25/2019

~~“The Office of Long Term Care is responsible for ensuring that all providers of 1915(c) home and community based waiver services for the following waivers meet credentialing requirements as documented in the CMS approved waiver applications.• Elderly & Disabled Waiver• Assisted Living Waiver• Independent Living Waiver• Traumatic Brain Injury/Spinal Cord Injury WaiverAgencies may currently apply to enroll as providers of Personal Care services, In-Home Respite services or Adult Day Care services under the Elderly & Disabled (E&D) Waiver or Assisted Living services under the Assisted Living (AL) Waiver.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1915(i) State plan Home and Community-Based Services Administration and Operation - 11/01/2018

~~“The state implements the optional 1915(i) State plan Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) benefit for elderly and disabled individuals as set forth below.1. Services. (Specify the state’s service title(s) for the HCBS defined under “Services” and listed in Attachment 4.19-B):Day Services - Adult, Prevocational Services, Supported Employment Services, and Supported Living”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Elderly and Disabled Waiver - 07/01/2017

“The Elderly and Disabled Waiver program is administered directly by the Home and Community Based Services division (HCBS).

The Elderly and Disabled Waiver program provides home and community-based services to individuals age 21 years old and older who, but for the provision of such services, would require the level of care provided in a nursing facility. Beneficiaries of this waiver must qualify for Medicaid as Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries or meet the income and resource eligibility requirements for income level up to 300% of the SSI federal benefit rate and meet medical criteria of the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Public Notice for the Elderly and Disabled (E&D) Waiver renewal - 02/28/2017

~~“Pursuant to 42 C.F.R. Section 441.304(e)-(f), public notice is hereby given to the submission of the Elderly and Disabled (E&D) Waiver renewal. The Division of Medicaid, in the Office of the Governor, will submit this proposed waiver renewal to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for the E&D Waiver effective July 1, 2017.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Revised Statewide Transition Plan Summary 1915(c) and 1915(i) Home and Community Based (HCB) Programs - 11/28/2016

“ID/DD Waiver services provided in the participant’s private home or a relative’s home which is fully integrated with opportunities for full access to the greater community include: • Home and Community Supports, • Occupational Therapy, • Physical Therapy, • Speech Therapy, • Crisis Support, • Crisis Intervention, • In-Home Nursing Respite, • Supported Living, • Transition Assistance, • Support Coordination, • Supported Employment, and • Specialized Medical Supplies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mississippi HCBS Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

On Jan. 16, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule, effective March 17, 2014, which amends the requirements for qualities of home and community-based (HCB) settings. These requirements reflect CMS’s intent that individuals receive services and supports in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. The final rule requires the use of a person-centered planning process to develop a participant/beneficiary’s annual Plan for Services and Supports (PSS).

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MS Intellectual Disabilities/DD Waiver (0282.R04.00) - 07/01/2013

Provides day services-adults, prevocational, residential hab, respite, support coordination, supported employment, behavior support/intervention, home and community supports, specialized medical supplies, therapy services for individuals w/autism, DD, MR ages 0 - no max age  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mississippi ESEA Flexibility Request - 07/19/2012

“The Mississippi Department Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on July 19, 2012.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mississippi Medicaid State Plan

The Mississippi Medicaid State Plan (State Plan) is a detailed agreement between the State of Mississippi and the Federal Government that describes the nature and scope of Mississippi’s Medicaid Program. The State Plan is based on the federal requirements and regulations found in Title XIX of the Social Security Act. Changes to the State Plan, called State Plan Amendments (SPAs), must be approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) prior to implementation

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Mississippi Money Follows the Person Bridge to Independence

~~“Attention: Long Term Care ProvidersThe Mississippi Division of Medicaid’s (DOM) Bridge to Independence (B2I) program, funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), completed it’s final year as a demonstration project. Effective January 2019, the Medicaid Extender’s Act of 2019 provided for an extension of B2I services. All new B2I participants that transition under the extension  will receive a 365 day follow up.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Mississippi "feels like coming home" for workers with disabilities who have found great jobs in their communities in the Magnolia State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Mississippi’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
-0.16%
Change from
2016 to 2017
2,984,100
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.46%
Change from
2016 to 2017
265,344
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.93%
Change from
2016 to 2017
73,203
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
27.59%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.7%
Change from
2016 to 2017
71.75%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 2,992,333 2,988,726 2,984,100
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 259,265 258,824 265,344
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 71,339 76,078 73,203
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,061,622 1,074,318 1,070,889
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 27.52% 29.39% 27.59%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 70.11% 71.25% 71.75%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.40% 5.80% 5.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 27.30% 26.30% 26.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 21.00% 19.80% 18.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 223,702 221,845 238,234
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 250,610 254,199 253,362
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 297,654 295,963 303,152
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 164,801 166,959 175,191
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 7,006 8,249 6,883
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,147 2,355 2,860
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,733 1,270 2,210
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 5,206 6,792 6,834
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,733 2,660 673

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,668 2,741 2,772
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.30% 2.40% 2.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 131,143 128,746 127,181

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 7,194 6,655 6,465
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 13,834 12,648 12,095
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 52,960 49,347 42,606
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.60% 13.50% 15.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 0.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 2.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 6.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 90.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A 6
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A 720
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A 2,154
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A 31,461

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,987 2,013 2,076
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 123 119 120
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 96 96 86
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 0.78% 81.00% 72.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 3.21 3.21 2.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,537
6,458
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 729 750 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,443 1,615 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,480 1,955 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,308 1,011 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 168 134 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,409 993 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 45.80% 48.70% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,150 1,925 1,712
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 204,438 203,145 200,763
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 144 147 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 210 165 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2011 2014 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $2,306,000 $201,000 $12,871,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $161,000 $237,000 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $13,248,000 $0 $9,953,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 11.00% 21.00% 57.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 800 1,927 167
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,821 472 863
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.00 20.80 45.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.27% 63.02% 63.01%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.42% 15.10% 15.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.08% 2.01% 1.87%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.98% 99.98% 99.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.45% 29.01% 27.79%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.96% 66.78% 67.12%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.85% 84.38% 85.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.51% 37.77% 39.33%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 558,965
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,561
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 63,390
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 241,418
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 304,808
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 49
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 300
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 349
AbilityOne wages (products). $548,297
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,097,679

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 14 15 12
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 15 16 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,285 1,534 1,265
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 49 49 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,334 1,583 1,265

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Customized Employment

~~MDRS continues to identify current information from research, rehabilitation trends and professional resources. This information is provided to agency staff through a variety of methods, including training at the state, regional, and district levels. Most recently this training has been focused on Autism and customized employment. Additionally, this information is posted and available to staff on MDRS Connect, the agency intranet. (Page 180) Title II

The SE Program will continue to emphasize individual employment placements. Other models will remain an option for clients and may be utilized when feasible. However, when given a choice, clients prefer individual placements by an overwhelming majority. Individual placement is the preferred option of MDRS as well as the clients because it achieves integration in the work environment, it is competitive integrated employment, and it provides more opportunities for career pathways and better quality jobs with more benefits.
Person Centered Planning and Customized Employment as integral parts of service provision continue to be high priorities. These service approaches have been embraced by mental health providers, the DD Council, and other service providers in the state as accepted best practices for model service delivery. (Page 205) Title II

SE staff also participate in both practices in coordinating services for SE clients in the education system throughout the state. These practices have proven to be successful for clients because of the enhanced teamwork with other agencies. Under WIOA customized employment is included in the definition of supported employment and VR is including it as a VR service that the SE client can choose to include in his/her IPE. Therefore, VR is expanding customized employment training to the majority of its direct service staff. These service approaches will continue to be made available to clients during the intake process and will be utilized when deemed appropriate and when chosen by the client. (Page 206) Title II

Plans for improving community rehabilitation programs (private and agency-supported) include training staff to provide Pre-ETS, customized employment services, and on-the-job tryout services which facilitate the agency’s ability to achieve the changes in WIOA. (Page 211) Title II

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~8. Increase collaboration within the state's workforce system to improve services to unemployed workers with disabilities who are eligible for VR services by better leveraging services with other workforce development programs. (Page 209) Title II

21. Increase collaboration within the Workforce System to improve services to unemployed workers with disabilities who are eligible for VR services by better leveraging services with other workforce development programs.
22. Play stronger roles on state and local Workforce Boards to assure that VR consumers and other individuals with disabilities are better served by the One-Stop System. (Page 215) Title II

Leveraging Resources from Key Partners to Support SCSEP
Area Agencies on Aging work with community colleges to provide training to SCSEP participants at a reduced cost; many provide tuition waivers for SCSEP participants. Community colleges are an integral component of the WIOA programs offered through the WIN Job Centers. SCSEP participants are encouraged to dual enroll in WIOA with the WIN Job Centers for job search assistance and training classes. (Page 283) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~o MDHS - The Mississippi Department of Human Services administers the TANF program through several legacy applications, including MAVERICS and JAWS. MAVERICS supports case management data such as intake and eligibility information, and JAWS supports TANF Work Program data. These systems do not inherently support web services, but various enterprise solutions exist to allow a modern, intermediate application to interface with such systems. This intermediate application, developed in Java, would be able to implement and consume web services on behalf of the legacy application. In addition, MDHS is in the process of a multi-year system modernization effort that will reduce the agency's reliance on legacy applications for case management. (Page 96) Title I

In order to accomplish this, OVR relies on many cooperative agreements, memorandums of understanding and contracts with various agencies, organizations and groups.
The entities that OVR is actively involved with include, but is not limited to:
o Mississippi Department of Education for the coordination of transition services and local school districts to carry out transition and youth career services plus implement a Transition Specialist in participating local school districts; (Page 160) Title II

VRB works closely with the education system through the VR Transition and Youth Career Services Program. There are approximately 20 VRB Counselors throughout the state who work in preparing students with vision loss for entry into the world of work. They serve as informational resources for teachers and other educational staff as well as provide resources and information about blindness for parents and transitioning youth throughout development of the youth’s individualized plan for employment (IPE).
VRB Counselors work closely with parents, education staff, and community service providers to promote development of skills needed for students to become as independent as possible and competitive in terms of employment. In addition to training parents and students about the special education rights and responsibilities, VRB provides educational support by working with the VR Transition Team, school officials, and families to develop and implement the IPE. Goals developed in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) are included in the IPE to facilitate successful completion of those goals. (Page 163) Title II

Restructuring of the VR Transition and Youth Career Services Program has resulted in additional VR Counselors carrying transition and youth cases, which provides for more individualized services to both eligible and potentially eligible students in school. VR Counselors work with the students, parents, and school personnel as well as attend (IEP) meetings to help identify students that may be able to benefit from transition and youth career services.
Prior to making services available, the VR Counselor uses school documentation, health records, and other pertinent information as deemed appropriate for determining a student with a disability potentially eligible for pre-employment transition services and/or for determination of eligibility for the VR Transition program. (Page 164) Title II

Transition planning between MDRS and MDE ultimately helps with the successful development and implementation of both the IEP and the IPE.
MDRS through the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and Vocational Rehabilitation for the Blind have recently sent Request for Proposals for third party providers to provide Pre-ETS activities in accordance with the Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act. At this time, two proposals have been awarded contracts and additional Request for Proposals are being sought. (Page 164) Title II
It is also the intent of this agreement to serve as a mechanism for OVR/OVRB and MDE OSE to clearly specify the plans, policies and procedures for coordinating services to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities, including:
1. Consultation and technical assistance in the planning for the transition of students with disabilities;
2. Transition planning by OVR/OVRB and educational personnel that facilitates the development and implementation of a student’s individualized education plan (IEP);
3. Roles and responsibilities, including financial and programmatic responsibilities of each agency;
4. Procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities;
5. Assessment of students’ potential need for transition services and pre-employment transition services;
6. Coordination necessary and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by WIOA, with regard to students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment. (Page 166) Title II

The point of contact to businesses for any assistance and support needed to hire and maintain employment.
Business Development Representatives are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the job seekers on VR caseloads that will be deemed Job Ready match the skills that are needed by businesses, allowing VR counselors to spend more time with clients who require intensive IPE development and career counseling.
The main services provided by the Business Rep. include the following:
o Train employers regarding employment of individuals with disabilities, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act, work incentives, and laws related to employment opportunities;
o Provide consultation, technical assistance, and support to employers on workplace accommodations and assistive technology;
o Provide resources and support through collaboration with community partners and employers; and,
o Provide employer recruitment services, job matching, hiring, and retention of qualified individuals with disabilities. (Page 170) Title II

As appropriate, describe the procedures and activities to coordinate the designated State unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
MDRS pursues efforts to coordinate cross training with MDE that will address education and rehabilitation under the provision of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Training conferences on transition services have been held and co-sponsored by MDRS and MDE. Specifically, regional training conferences bring together all VR counselors with transition caseloads, other agency personnel involved with transition services, and transition specialists, teachers, and special education coordinators from MDE. VR strives to help MDE to meet the mandate the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004. (Page 181) Title II

VR assures that the individualized plan for employment (IPE) is also coordinated with the employment goal in the school’s individualized educational plan (IEP) and, where appropriate, the (ISP) individualized service plans of the long term care providers.
The VR Counselor servicing local school districts as well as the VR Supported Employment Counselors work together with schools district to ensure that students with disabilities that previously entered subminimum wage employment are provided information and services to assist in diverting these individuals into competitive integrated employment.
VR facilitates the opening of cases for beginning at age 14 if required. Pre-ETS services are provided to students with disabilities as early as age 14. If these individuals require VR Transition services as early as age 14, VR facilities this need by opening a VR case. This service provision will help strengthen VRs efforts to reach more students and strengthens the opportunity for successful employment outcomes. (Page 195) Title II

While local school districts are responsible for providing education and transition services to students with disabilities who are still in the secondary school system, under WIOA, VR is the state unit that is mandated to make available Pre-ETS begin at age fourteen (14) for all eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities with parental consent.
District Managers and counselors are responsible for developing cooperative working relationships with the local education agency staff in the districts, and other agencies working with youth. Letters were sent by the State Transition Program Coordinator to all the Special Education Directors and 504 Coordinators for each school district to discuss VR services for students with IEPs and 504 plans. The counselor is to follow-up with their Special Education Directors and 504 Coordinators at least annually to discuss the provision of outreach services for students with disabilities and to determine the need for potential referrals. (Page 195) Title II

MDRS and the local school district may enter into a Cooperative Agreement to jointly fund a Transition Assistant position to ensure a smoother transition of services between the school and OVR/OVRB. The Transition Assistant will provide services to selected secondary students with disabilities who are: (a) between the ages of fourteen (14) and twenty-one (21), (b) in transition from school to work and community, and (c) eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. The addition of school-based transition services are intended to add a component to the overall school and rehabilitation service continuum, not supplant existing employment-related or other services which are potentially appropriate for a particular student (any service the school is already responsible for providing). The Transition Assistant will not serve students who, with or without modifications, can benefit from existing school programs (career/technical and educational training programs etc.).  (Page 196) Title II

The OOS does not discriminate against any eligible individual on the basis of gender, age, race, creed, color, religion, national origin, citizenship, type of disability, duration of residence in Mississippi, public assistance status, source of referral, expected employment outcome, need for specific services, anticipate cost of services required, or income level of an individual or his/her family.
MDRS in consultation with the SRC will close the Priority Categories designated to be closed. Any individual currently under an approved IPE at the time his/her priority category is closed will continue to receive with his/her IPE, including the provision of Pre-employment transition services and Post-Employment Services. (Page 201) Title II

MDRS has determined that sufficient resources are currently available to provide VR services to all individuals with disabilities that apply, those determined eligible in all priority categories and those under an IPE. Due to the increase in service needs and the staff resources in 2017 and 2018 to provide the services, if the projected resources for funds and personnel change before the next state plan modification, MDRS will make a determination whether it may need to close one or more of its priority categories.
During FF2018, MDRS will be able to serve all eligible individuals in all three priority categories. The total projected available resources including the federal allotment, non-federal contributions, carryover, and program income for FY 2018 is $67,705,332. MDRS will conduct reviews periodically during the year to help validate the order and assess the impact of unforeseen circumstances. (Page 203) Title II

SE staff also participate in both practices in coordinating services for SE clients in the education system throughout the state. These practices have proven to be successful for clients because of the enhanced teamwork with other agencies. Under WIOA customized employment is included in the definition of supported employment and VR is including it as a VR service that the SE client can choose to include in his/her IPE. Therefore, VR is expanding customized employment training to the majority of its direct service staff. These service approaches will continue to be made available to clients during the intake process and will be utilized when deemed appropriate and when chosen by the client. (Page 206) Title II

Goal III: Implement a statewide model for more effectively serving high school youth and students with disabilities including individuals with visual and/or hearing impairments.
o A statewide training was conducted in 2016 that included all VR/VRB counselors and staff, and Special Education coordinators from schools throughout the state. This training assist VR in explaining the role of VR in serving students that have an IEP and 504 plan as well as serving students that are not receiving special education services. We are in hopes that we will continually see an increase in referrals for these students.
o In 2017, the updated formal Interagency Cooperative Agreement was developed with the Mississippi Department of Education. MDRS also updated our local school agreements.
o In 2016, the OVR Transition Manual designed to assist staff in the delivery of transition services. This manual is used as technical assistance for transition planning purposes. Training was held in each district statewide with counselors that are assigned to local schools/school districts.
o Annually, the OVR Transition Coordinator updates and maintains a list of all 504 coordinators and special education staff for each school district. The list is a document that can be accessed by all staff on the MDRS intranet - MDRS Connect. (Page 218) Title II

Continue the referral process between the VR Transition Counselor and the VR (SE) Supported Employment Counselor for students with disabilities ages 14-21 who have been determined to need long term ongoing support services. The VR Transition Counselor will take the referral from the MDE, determine eligibility, complete the assessment and discovery process and work with the SE Counselor to develop the IPE with the student, parents/guardians, and school. Once the IPE has been signed by all the required parties, then the student’s case will be transferred to the SE Counselor’s caseload. (Page 220) Title II
 

Career Pathways

~~In accordance with section 101(d) of WIOA, the Mississippi State Workforce Investment Board (SWIB) will establish and operate through a SWIB WIOA Board Committee, whose membership will meet WIOA state board composition requirements, to perform the following services for the Governor:
1. Development, implementation, and modification of the state plan.
2. Collaboration with educational boards (MBE, MCCB, IHL), partners, and service providers to review statewide policies, statewide programs, and recommendations on actions that should be taken by the state to align workforce development programs in a manner that supports a comprehensive and streamlined workforce development system, including the review and provision of comments on state plans.
3. Collaboration with educational boards (MBE, MCCB, IHL), partners, and service providers in the development and continuous improvement of the workforce development system in the state, including:
a. Identification of barriers and means for removing barriers to better coordinate, align, and avoid duplication among the programs and activities carried out through the system.
b. Development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skill adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.
c. Development of strategies for providing effective outreach to and improved access for individuals and employers who could benefit from services provided through the workforce development system. (Page 64) Title I

 (2) The SE Program will continue to emphasize individual employment placements. Other models will remain an option for clients and may be utilized when feasible. However, when given a choice, clients prefer individual placements by an overwhelming majority. Individual placement is the preferred option of MDRS as well as the clients because it achieves integration in the work environment, it is competitive integrated employment, and it provides more opportunities for career pathways and better quality jobs with more benefits. (Page 205) Title II
  

Apprenticeship
No disability specific information found regarding this element
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Local workforce development boards have the option to include additional Affiliate One-Stop Centers with any subset of Combined Plan Partners as long as they include at least two partners. Local workforce development boards also have the flexibility to include additional partners in Affiliate One-Stop Centers. While local workforce development boards ultimately decide the logistics of affiliate centers, the WIOA law specifically identifies the following approved federally funded partners: employment and training programs administered by the Social Security Administration, including Ticket to Work and the Self Sufficiency Program; employment and training programs carried out by the Small Business Administration; Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) programs; Client Assistance Program; and programs authorized under the National and Community Service Act of 1990.
Local workforce development boards are also responsible for ensuring that local activities and local sector targets are in line with state-level sector analysis. The Mississippi LifeTracks system will constantly update web-accessible reports that feature dashboard numbers, pathway analysis, and supply and demand analysis to ensure that economic developers in Mississippi have a near real-time picture of the labor market. Sector analysis revealed laborshed zones that transcend local workforce development area boundaries and allow local workforce development boards to serve as intermediaries to connect local employers and training providers to meet labor market demands. Employers will communicate labor demand in real time by posting job orders in Mississippi Works Labor Exchange. (Page 88) Title I

Business Development Representatives are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the job seekers on VR caseloads that will be deemed Job Ready match the skills that are needed by businesses, allowing VR counselors to spend more time with clients who require intensive IPE development and career counseling.
The main services provided by the Business Rep. include the following:
o Train employers regarding employment of individuals with disabilities, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act, work incentives, and laws related to employment opportunities;
o Provide consultation, technical assistance, and support to employers on workplace accommodations and assistive technology;
o Provide resources and support through collaboration with community partners and employers; and,
o Provide employer recruitment services, job matching, hiring, and retention of qualified individuals with disabilities.
MDRS also works with employers to help youth with disabilities and students with disabilities have more opportunities, explore career interests, acquire workplace skills, and enter into competitive integrated employment. (Page 170) Title II

457. Business Relations Specialist will providing information to VR staff the areas as follows:
          *the services BRS provide to employers,
          *training and information regarding work incentives,
          *job analysis and job matching,
          *career opportunities in the local area; and
458. Develop and implement on campus work experience training in order to provide students who cannot get into or opportunities for vocational training are not readily available in a community based setting.
459. Refer those consumers receiving SSI/SSDI cash benefits who are interested in earnings that will eliminate their reliance on SSA cash benefits for work incentives benefits analysis and counseling.
460. Coordinate and conduct the Annual Governor’s Job Fair for individuals with disabilities.
461. Summer Internship Program for high school students with blindness and visual impairments; and deafness and hard of hearing. (Page 213) Title II
GOAL II: Improve the VR Service Delivery System to Individuals with disabilities
Strategies (Plan of Action):
462. Designate staff in each MDRS districts to be responsible for conducting outreach and orientation sessions on a regular basis.
463. Provide input to assure appropriate inclusion of vocational rehabilitation activities in, public service announcements, and agency website and publications.
464. Update and distribute vocational rehabilitation brochures to appropriate referral sources.
465. Designate and train specific staff members in each district to handle referrals and provide information to the public.
466. Assure that all geographic areas of the state are covered with appropriate service delivery staff. (Page 213) Title II
 

Employer/ Business

~~The point of contact to businesses for any assistance and support needed to hire and maintain employment.
Business Development Representatives are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the job seekers on VR caseloads that will be deemed Job Ready match the skills that are needed by businesses, allowing VR counselors to spend more time with clients who require intensive IPE development and career counseling.
The main services provided by the Business Rep. include the following:
o Train employers regarding employment of individuals with disabilities, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act, work incentives, and laws related to employment opportunities;
o Provide consultation, technical assistance, and support to employers on workplace accommodations and assistive technology;
o Provide resources and support through collaboration with community partners and employers; and,
o Provide employer recruitment services, job matching, hiring, and retention of qualified individuals with disabilities. (Page 170) Title II
 

Data Collection
No disability specific information found regarding this element.
511

~~The scope of services between MDRS and MDE are described in (d)2. The scope of services between MDRS and the local school districts are intended to serve as a mechanism for OVR/OVRB and the local school districts to clearly specify the plans, policies and procedures for coordinating services to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities, including:
0. Responsibilities of MDRS/OVR
1. Responsibilities of School District
2. Referral Process
3. Joint Development of IEPs and IPEs; and
4. Coordination necessary and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by WIOA, with regard to students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment
This Memorandum of Agreement for Transition Planning for Secondary Students with Disabilities between is made and entered into by and between the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services, hereafter referred to as “MDRS,” for and on behalf of its Offices of Vocational Rehabilitation and Vocational Rehabilitation for the Blind, hereafter referred to as “OVR/OVRB,” and the Mississippi Department of Education, for and on behalf of its Office of Special Education, hereafter referred to as “MDE OSE.”
A formal interagency agreement is mandated under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 34 CFR 300.154, and section 101(a) (11) (D) of the Rehabilitation Act and its implementing regulations at 34 CFR 361.22 (b). Additional references used in this document include Sections 113 and 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the Final Regulations: State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program; State Supported Employment Services Program; Limitations on Use of Subminimum Wage.This agreement is designed to improve the cooperative and collaborative efforts between the OVR/OVRB, and MDE OSE to coordinate the receipt of pre-employment transition services, transition services and other vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to students with disabilities who are eligible for special education services under the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA), students who have a 504 plan, and other students with disabilities who are eligible or potentially eligible for services through OVR/OVRB, in order to facilitate their smooth transition from school to post-school employment-related activities and competitive, integrated employment. (Page 165-166) Title I

It is also the intent of this agreement to serve as a mechanism for OVR/OVRB and MDE OSE to clearly specify the plans, policies and procedures for coordinating services to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities, including:
1. Consultation and technical assistance in the planning for the transition of students with disabilities;
2. Transition planning by OVR/OVRB and educational personnel that facilitates the development and implementation of a student’s individualized education plan (IEP);
3. Roles and responsibilities, including financial and programmatic responsibilities of each agency;
4. Procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities;
5. Assessment of students’ potential need for transition services and pre-employment transition services;
6. Coordination necessary and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by WIOA, with regard to students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment.; and an
7. Assurance that the MDE OSE will not enter into an arrangement with an entity holding a special wage certificate under section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act for the purpose of operating a program under which a youth with a disability is engaged in work at a subminimum wage.
Additional considerations include grievance procedure to resolve disputes between OVR/OVRB and the MDE OSE, as appropriate, as well as procedures to resolve disputes between an individual with a disability and the entities specified above, and information about the Client Assistance Program. (Pages 166- 167) Title II
 

 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
No disability specific information found regarding this element.
Vets
The WIOA services that MDES administers will address the workforce and training needs of every eligible individual. Through Wagner-Peyser services, MDES provides job search, referral, and placement services to all eligible Mississippi workers. MDES funds adult training programs administered by local workforce development boards based on the needs of each local workforce development area. To serve dislocated workers, MDES coordinates Rapid Response services that assist employers and employees affected by layoffs or plant closures. MDES serves youth through specially trained Youth Providers who connect youth to targeted youth programs, other eligible core programs, and education and training opportunities based on the specific needs of the individual. In addition, there are two employment outreach groups: Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) and Disabled Veteran Outreach Specialists (DVOP). To fill job openings, LVER staff work directly with businesses, and DVOP staff work directly with unemployed or underemployed veterans. (Page 75) Title I o Referral of qualified veterans to new job openings, especially Federal Contractor job orders, prior to all non-veteran job referral activity. o Veteran placement at the top of WIOA waiting lists (ITAs and OJT) for limited training funds. MDES management will monitor priority of service by reviewing quarterly performance reports, manager reports, and MS Works reports. MDES management will monitor priority of service in covered programs at two levels. Workforce Investment Network (WIN) Job Centers will continue to use established protocol of identifying targeted groups. At the state level, management will continue to analyze performance reports, manager reports, and MS Works reports. WIN Job Center services are made available and provided to eligible veterans, transitioning service members, VA VR & E Chapter 31 veterans, Native American Veterans, other groups targeted for special consideration, and veterans with significant barriers to employment through outreach activities performed by Disabled Veteran Outreach Specialists (DVOPs). MDES will continue to encourage non-DOL program partners to focus on providing priority of service to targeted groups for special consideration. (Page 106) Title II In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes: A. HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG MDES plans to assign and utilize DVOP Specialists and other agency employees trained in case management to metropolitan WIN Job Centers throughout the state where the need of intensive services is greatest. DVOP Specialists will provide intensive services, through the case management framework, and facilitate placements to meet the employment needs of veterans, prioritizing services to special disabled veterans, other disabled veterans, and other categories of veterans in accordance with priorities determined by the Secretary of Labor. The DVOP Specialist, Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC), will continue to work with the Veterans Affairs’ Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment (VR & E) program. DVOP specialists will provide intensive services through the case management approach, including completion of an assessment and a written employability development plan. LVER staff trained in networking will be assigned and utilized within workforce areas. LVER staff will conduct outreach to employers within the workforce area to assist veterans in gaining employment, including conducting seminars for employers and, in conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups; and facilitate employment, training, and placement services furnished to veterans served by the WIN Job Centers. MDES plans to fill grant-funded vacancies expeditiously despite State budget problems, hiring freezes and furloughs. MDES plans to identify projected losses and retirements early when possible. Applicants will be given the following order of priority: qualified service-connected disabled veterans; qualified eligible veterans; and qualified eligible persons. Also, veteran (non-JVSG) staff in the agency may be considered for assignment to the program. (Page 259) Title II LVER Staff In accordance with Veterans’ Program Letter 07-10, 03-14 or most recent guidance, MDES Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVER) will conduct outreach to employers in the area to assist veterans in gaining employment, including conducting seminars for employers and, in conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups, and facilitating employment, training, and placement services furnished to veterans within WIN Job Centers. The LVERs will work with the local area management team to coordinate and conduct employer outreach activities. LVERs will advocate for all veterans served by the WIN Job Centers with business, industry, and other community-based organizations by participating in appropriate activities such as: o Planning and participating in job and career fairs; o Conducting employer outreach; o Educating all WIN Job Center staff and partners with current employment initiatives and programs for veterans; o Conducting job searches and workshops, and establishing job search groups, in conjunction with employers; o Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; o Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans; o Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and o Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. (Page 260) Title IV DVOP specialists and LVERs are an essential part of and fully integrated into the WIN Job Center network. They are included among the WIN Job Center partner staff, which consists of all staff employed by programs or activities operated by job center partners that provide job-driven online and/or in-person workforce development or related support services as part of the workforce development system. Other WIN Job Center partner staff members include staff of WIOA, WP, and other network partner programs. LVER staff will continue to be viable and effective in the WIN Job Center delivery system, e.g., facilitating and participating in employer marketing services, employer job fairs, etc. LVER staff will continue to be considered key players and team participants in business development activities and employer marketing efforts, developing jobs for WIN Job Centers, marketing veteran services to employers, assisting employers at job fairs and facilitating employer recruitments. Veterans with significant barriers to employment are referred to or assigned to the DVOP after initial core services. All of these activities translate into a fully integrated system with positive benefits and productivity for the WIN Job Centers and also subsequently result in the development of seamless employment opportunities for veterans. (Page 261) Title II
Mental Health

~~The entities that OVR is actively involved with include, but is not limited to:
o Mississippi Department of Education for the coordination of transition services and local school districts to carry out transition and youth career services plus implement a Transition Specialist in participating local school districts;
o Hinds Community College for the Deaf Services Program;
o Division of Medicaid to provide seamless, non-duplicated services to individuals who are eligible for both Medicaid and VR services and for maximum utilization of resources between the two agencies;
o Department of Mental Health (DMH) Planning and Advisory Council as federally mandated for advice and support. DMH to cover the costs for therapeutic medical services offered at secondary alcohol and drug treatment centers that have been approved by DMH;
o Department of Mental Health -Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to continue enhancing, expanding, and developing methods to support eligible persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities who express a desire for competitive integrated employment; establish a state-level work group to address system, policy and funding issues that impede the continuous provision of employment services by MDRS and DMH; engage MDRS staff and DMH providers and stakeholders at the local level in collaboration and cooperation in the accomplishment of the vision and desired outcomes; identify and disseminate best practices including training and funding strategies; and, provide individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities with quality employment services that lead to competitive integrated employment in a non-duplicated and seamless manner; ( Page 160-161) Title II

MDRS administers the Supported Employment (SE) Program as specified in Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act and amended in WIOA. VR works extensively with other state agencies, private non-profit entities, employers, family members, and consumer groups to ensure quality SE services are provided to all eligible individuals throughout all phases of the SE service delivery system.
MDRS- VR has entered into formal cooperative agreements with the Mississippi Division of Medicaid (Medicaid) and Department of Mental Health, Bureau for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, with respect to delivery of VR services, including extended services, for individuals with the most significant disabilities eligible for home and community-based services.
In addition to these formal agreements, MDRS collaborates on a more informal basis with public and private entities to ensure a comprehensive program of services is provided to SE eligible individuals.
Collaborative partners include local mental health facilities, Medicaid’s Bridge to Independence Program to help people move from qualified institutions to homes in the community, local school districts, businesses and industries, local projects funded by the DD Council, workforce development one-stop career centers, advocacy groups, and other relevant third parties as well as parents of SE eligible individuals. (Page 168) Title II

Collaborative partners include local mental health facilities, Medicaid’s Bridge to Independence Program to help people move from qualified institutions to homes in the community, local school districts, businesses and industries, local projects funded by the Mississippi Council on Development Disabilities (DD Council), workforce development one-stop career centers, advocacy groups, and other relevant third parties as well as parents of individuals with the most significant disabilities.
MDRS also has in place with the Mississippi Partnership for Employment a Memorandum of Understanding that includes the following partners:
1) DD Council;
2) The University of Southern Mississippi Institute for Disability Studies;
3) Disability Rights of Mississippi;
4) Mississippi Department of Education;
5) DMH;
6) Mississippi Department of Employment Security (the administering authority for the state’s workforce development system); and
7) Two self-advocates
The partnership’s intent is to build capacity across existing state systems to improve outcomes for youth and young adults with developmental disabilities including intellectual disabilities seeking competitive employment in integrated settings. (Page 172) Title II

SE staff members continue to make every effort to identify and facilitate natural supports that occur in the workplace in order to maximize utilization of funds. These natural supports do not replace the one-on-one intensive support provided to clients by the SE Counselors. However, when properly identified and utilized, these natural supports do result in decreased direct service costs and increased quality of support.
(2) The SE Program will continue to emphasize individual employment placements. Other models will remain an option for clients and may be utilized when feasible. However, when given a choice, clients prefer individual placements by an overwhelming majority. Individual placement is the preferred option of MDRS as well as the clients because it achieves integration in the work environment, it is competitive integrated employment, and it provides more opportunities for career pathways and better quality jobs with more benefits.
Person Centered Planning and Customized Employment as integral parts of service provision continue to be high priorities. These service approaches have been embraced by mental health providers, the DD Council, and other service providers in the state as accepted best practices for model service delivery. (Page 205) Title II

Cooperative arrangements will continue to be developed with other provider agencies and organizations, both public and private, to expand the SE Program to unserved and underserved populations. The focus of these arrangements is on promoting and enabling SE Counselors and service provider personnel from other agencies to work as teams to share expertise, provide technical support in specific disability areas, and conduct joint training.
With the interagency agreement and referral process that has been developed with the Department of Mental Health and the Division of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, we will continue to work with this agency in serving individuals who are eligible for the waiver as extended service providers. (Page 206) Title II

MDRS maintains formal agreements with the MDE and DMH as well as other public and private entities, which identify areas of collaboration to ensure a comprehensive program of services to SE eligible individuals. Staff members collaborate intensively with local mental health centers, school districts, SE businesses and industries, the DD Council, parents, advocacy groups and other relevant third parties.
The service approach for SE eligible clients emulates the nationally accepted "best practices" models of SE service delivery which include individual job placement, mobile crews, and temporary employment placement (TEP) for individuals with chronic mental illness. Central to each of these approaches is an emphasis on person centered planning and facilitation of natural supports. Individualized job development is conducted by SE staff based on job matching assessment information and client’s informed choice. SE clients are assisted with employment planning and placement by VTIs and job skills training is provided at the job site either by job coaches or through natural supports.
To fulfill the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended by WIOA, regarding transitional employment for individuals with chronic mental illness, MDRS utilizes the TEP model. This model involves placement in a series of temporary jobs that lead to permanent employment as an outcome. This service approach is implemented through coordination with local mental health centers. (Page 224) Title IV

Mississippi will coordinate services, where available, with public and private entities (i.e., Mississippi Departments of Rehabilitation Services, Employment Security and Mental Health, and the Mississippi Community College Board, etc.) to allow TANF families with barriers (i.e., little or no work experience, domestic violence, limited English proficiency, learning disabilities, mental, physical disabilities and/or substance abuse) an opportunity to gain access to services and resources needed to obtain the highest level of self-sufficiency within the constraints of the TANF time-limits. Special screening and referral procedures will be used to identify and refer the individual for the appropriate service. Mississippi will deny benefits to individuals who fail to comply with the activities provided by these entities. (Page 237) Title IV

Job Search and Job Readiness - Job search and job readiness assistance is defined as the act of seeking or obtaining employment, preparation to seek or obtain employment, including life skills training, and substance abuse treatment, mental health treatment, or rehabilitation activities for those who are otherwise employable.
Such treatment or therapy must be determined to be necessary and certified by a qualified medical, substance abuse or mental health professional. A qualified professional is defined as any individual who is licensed or certified. Job search and job readiness assistance activities are supervised daily by the case manager and/or job readiness trainer. (Page 239) Title IV

The MDHS will create a referral process to the Department of Child Protection Services (DCPS) to contact state and local law enforcement, the education system, and counseling services for recipients requiring assistance with statutory rape, domestic violence issues, mental health concerns, and drug/alcohol treatment. The counselors and educators can focus on problems that may be an underlying problem other than statutory rape. Individuals referred will complete an assessment, discuss educational barriers, and receive life skill strategies. MDHS established the Healthy Marriage Initiative, using Federal TANF funds, to promote the well-being of children in Mississippi by encouraging the involvement of mothers and fathers in their lives. The initiative will:
o Encourage stable family formation and healthy marriages,
o Promote responsible fathering,
o Increase paternity and child support objectives,
o Encourage community support for marriage, and
o Prevent out-of-wedlock pregnancies. (Page 250) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
1. Partner with Third Party Administrators (TPAs) — Statistical data from this cross match pilot project is currently being analyzed to determine if continuing the cross match would be beneficial. 2. Employers SIDES messaging — Explain to employer the importance and benefits of responding timely through E-Response. A mailing campaign is in progress to target a designated group of employers. 3. Claimant messaging — Generate a detail mailer/message alert to claimant after first payment advising them of the requirement and method to properly report earnings and return to work. Include the penalty for failing to do so but emphasize the potential overpayment issue and progression. (Page 273) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 54

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; African American, Faith-Based, Hispanic, Vietnamese, Native Americans, extremely rural communities; new mothers and women with children; vulnerable and special needs populations; millennials; and Medicaid/CHIP-eligible consumers  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are the Aaron E. Henry Community Health Services Center, Boat People SOS – Gulf Coast, CATCH Kids Tupelo, Mercy Housing and Human Development, and the Mid-South Churches Cooperative Conference State Convention. They will partner with the Faith and community groups representing over 1,500 houses of worship, Mississippi’s gaming industry, Employers and groups of employees, Health Centers, and Head Start Sites.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Michael MinorPhone: (901) 826-8355/(662) 298-3584Email: pastorminor@thehillhernnado.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) - 09/03/2019

~~“My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving The “left behind” populations, such as low wage earners and hourly wage workers; as well as individuals who do not have health insurance because of a lack of affordable coverage options in their area.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Open Arms Healthcare Center. They will partner with the Southwest Mississippi River Region (SMRR) Community Advisory Group, Faith and community-based organizations, Small business owners, Chambers of Commerce, City Governance, and Community health clinics and primary care clinics in the SMRR.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Henry FullerPhone: (601) 957-7710Email: hfuller@mbk-inc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mississippi ABLE - 06/02/2019

~~“What is an ABLE account?ABLE accounts are savings accounts for individuals with disabilities which will not affect their public benefits.  These accounts can be used for daily transactions and/or long-term savings.  Income earned in the accounts is not taxed if spent on qualified disability-related expenses.  Contributions can be made to an account by anyone and may qualify for a state tax deduction.”

This page also has links for more information on ABLE

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Supported Employment - 05/23/2019

~~“DMH  believes  that  work  plays  a  critical  role  in  improving  quality  of  life  and  mental  health  outcomes  of  the  people  we  serve  as  part  of  their  recovery  journey.  In  January  2015,  DMH  provided  funding  to  develop  four  pilot  sites  to  offer    Supported   Employment   to   75   individuals   with   mental   illness.  The  sites  are  located  in  Community  Mental  Health  Center Regions 2, 7, 10 and 12. Supported employment, an evidenced-based  way  to  help  people  diagnosed  with  mental  illnesses  secure  and  keep  employment,  begins  with  the  idea  that  every  person  with  a  serious  mental  illness  is  capable  of  working competitively in the community. In F Y18, the DMH Supported    Employment    Pilot    Prog ram    assisted    257    individuals  on  their  road  to  recovery  by  helping  them  to  become employed in the openly competitive job market.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Mississippi Disability Resources and Advocacy Organizations - 05/03/2019

~~This page has “links to government agencies and disability rights organizations in Mississippi. They may be able assist you with:• disability advocacy• home health services• home care• nursing aide services• Medicaid• accessing other community resources to help people with disabilities.

Many of these organizations work to address the unique needs associated with different disabilities, including but not limited to physical, intellectual, and developmental disabilities, and mental illness. Others focus on issues such as access to housing and legal assistance based on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).If you live in Mississippi and are a person with a disability, learning about state-specific resources to support people with disabilities can help you advocate for yourself. If you are a friend, family member, or caregiver of a person with disabilities in Mississippi, these resources can help you in supporting your loved one."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Long Term Care 1915(c) Waiver Provider Orientation - 01/25/2019

~~“The Office of Long Term Care is responsible for ensuring that all providers of 1915(c) home and community based waiver services for the following waivers meet credentialing requirements as documented in the CMS approved waiver applications.• Elderly & Disabled Waiver• Assisted Living Waiver• Independent Living Waiver• Traumatic Brain Injury/Spinal Cord Injury WaiverAgencies may currently apply to enroll as providers of Personal Care services, In-Home Respite services or Adult Day Care services under the Elderly & Disabled (E&D) Waiver or Assisted Living services under the Assisted Living (AL) Waiver.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/21/2018

~~“The Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities is responsible for planning, development and supervision of an array of services for people in the state with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  The service delivery system is comprised of the State-Operated Programs, ID/DD Waiver program, and the IDD Community Support Program.  The ID/DD Waiver and Community Support Programs provide support to assist people to live successfully at home and in the community.  These services are provided by community mental health centers and other community service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Delta WDA provides Small Business Development, Entrepreneurial, and Self-Employment Training to area residents and WIOA customers in accordance with DOL’s TEGL 12-10 “Supporting Entrepreneurial and Self-Employment Training through the Workforce Investment System.” This program addresses the role the workforce investment system plays in support of entrepreneurial activities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) Program is fully integrated as an essential part of the WIN Job Center network.Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOP), funded through the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG), are included among the WIN Job Center partner staff. The WIN Job Center staff assists veterans, eligible spouses, and veterans with barriers to employment.  Veterans and eligible spouses are asked to complete an assessment form to determine if they have significant barriers to employment. The WIN Job Center staff provides initial core services and refers veterans/eligible spouses with barriers to the DVOP for enhanced services.Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are viable and effective partners in the WIN Job Center delivery system. They participate in employer outreach, job fairs, and other activities related to the JVSG guidelines. LVERs are key members on the MDES Business Services Team participating in business development activities, employer outreach efforts, and in developing jobs for veterans."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Strategic Plan – Mississippi Department of Mental Health - 11/20/2018

~~“Goal 1To increase access to community-based care and supports for adults and children with mental illness and/or substance use disorders through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered and recovery-oriented system of care

GOAL 2To increase access to community-based care and supports for people with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered system of care”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

House Bill 909 - Medical benefits for retired public employees and dependents under age sixty-five (65) years and not eligible for Medicare benefits. - 07/01/2017

“(d)  Medical benefits for retired employees and dependents under age sixty-five (65) years and not eligible for Medicare benefits.  For employees who retire before July 1, 2005, and for employees retiring due to work-related disability under the Public Employees' Retirement System, the same health insurance coverage as for all other active employees and their dependents shall be available to retired employees and all dependents under age sixty-five (65) years who are not eligible for Medicare benefits, the level of benefits to be the same level as for all other active participants.  For employees who retire on or after July 1, 2005, and not retiring due to work-related disability under the Public Employees' Retirement System, the same health insurance coverage as for all other active employees and their dependents shall be available to those retiring employees and all dependents under age sixty-five (65) years who are not eligible for Medicare benefits only if the retiring employees were participants in the State and School Employees Health Insurance Plan for four (4) years or more before their retirement, the level of benefits to be the same level as for all other active participants.  This section will apply to those employees who retire due to one hundred percent (100%) medical disability as well as those employees electing early retirement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement

MS HB 836 (including amendments to Miss. Code Ann. §43-30-1) - 07/01/2015

An act to require state agencies that provide services an support to persons with disabilities to consider, as their first option, competitive employment in an integrated setting for persons with disabilities; to require all state agencies to follow this policy for employment by coordinating all collaborating efforts among agencies; to authorize state agencies to adopt rules and regulations to implement the provisions of this act; to require the Disability Resource Commission to review measurable goals and objectives as submitting to it by each relevant state agency to ensure implementation of this act; to provide reporting requirements for state agencies; to amend Section 43-30-1, Mississippi Code of 1972, in conformity thereto; and for related purposes. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

SB 2034 Employment First Act - 07/01/2014

“AN ACT TO CREATE THE "EMPLOYMENT FIRST ACT"; TO REQUIRE THAT STATE AGENCIES THAT PROVIDE SERVICES AND SUPPORT TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES SHALL CONSIDER, AS THEIR FIRST OPTION, COMPETITIVE EMPLOYMENT IN AN INTEGRATED SETTING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES; TO REQUIRE ALL STATE AGENCIES TO FOLLOW THIS POLICY FOR EMPLOYMENT BY COORDINATING ALL COLLABORATING EFFORTS AMONG AGENCIES; TO AUTHORIZE STATE AGENCIES TO ADOPT RULES AND REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT THE ACT; TO ESTABLISH AN EMPLOYMENT FIRST OVERSIGHT COMMISSION WHICH SHALL REVIEW MEASURABLE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES AS SUBMITTED TO IT BY EACH RELEVANT STATE AGENCY TO ENSURE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ACT; TO PROVIDE REPORTING REQUIREMENTS; AND FOR RELATED PURPOSES.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Mississippi Concurrent Resolution No. 563

“State agencies that provide services and support to persons with disabilities shall coordinate efforts and collaborate within and among such agencies to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures and funding support competitive employment in integrated settings for persons with disabilities who are of working age....

All state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems in order to track progress toward full implementation of ‘Employment First’ and shall adopt measurable goals and objectives to promote assessment of progress in implementing this resolution.

This resolution "died on calendar" in April 2013”

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Mississippi Executive Order 1335 - 01/14/2014

“Whereas, my administration is committed to supporting policies under which agencies that provide services to persons with disabilities and/or provide employment, economic development, or other related services explore employment in an integrated setting as the first priority option for persons with disabilities who are of working age.  Now, Therefore, I, Phil Bryant, Governor of the State of Mississippi, pursuant to the Constitution and laws of the State of Mississippi, do hereby order as follows:

State agencies that provide services to persons with disabilities, and state agencies which provide employment, economic development, or other related services, shall coordinate efforts and collaborate to ensure that state programs, policies, and procedures support employment in integrated settings as the first priority option, to the extent feasible, for persons with disabilities who are of working age. The same state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems and adopt measureable goals and objectives to track progress toward the achievement of the goals of this Executive Order. The Mississippi Disability Resource Commission, Miss. Code Ann. § 43-30-1, is authorized to monitor implementation of this Executive Order.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Mississippi ABLE - 06/02/2019

~~“What is an ABLE account?ABLE accounts are savings accounts for individuals with disabilities which will not affect their public benefits.  These accounts can be used for daily transactions and/or long-term savings.  Income earned in the accounts is not taxed if spent on qualified disability-related expenses.  Contributions can be made to an account by anyone and may qualify for a state tax deduction.”

This page also has links for more information on ABLE

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Supported Employment - 05/23/2019

~~“DMH  believes  that  work  plays  a  critical  role  in  improving  quality  of  life  and  mental  health  outcomes  of  the  people  we  serve  as  part  of  their  recovery  journey.  In  January  2015,  DMH  provided  funding  to  develop  four  pilot  sites  to  offer    Supported   Employment   to   75   individuals   with   mental   illness.  The  sites  are  located  in  Community  Mental  Health  Center Regions 2, 7, 10 and 12. Supported employment, an evidenced-based  way  to  help  people  diagnosed  with  mental  illnesses  secure  and  keep  employment,  begins  with  the  idea  that  every  person  with  a  serious  mental  illness  is  capable  of  working competitively in the community. In F Y18, the DMH Supported    Employment    Pilot    Prog ram    assisted    257    individuals  on  their  road  to  recovery  by  helping  them  to  become employed in the openly competitive job market.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Mississippi Disability Resources and Advocacy Organizations - 05/03/2019

~~This page has “links to government agencies and disability rights organizations in Mississippi. They may be able assist you with:• disability advocacy• home health services• home care• nursing aide services• Medicaid• accessing other community resources to help people with disabilities.

Many of these organizations work to address the unique needs associated with different disabilities, including but not limited to physical, intellectual, and developmental disabilities, and mental illness. Others focus on issues such as access to housing and legal assistance based on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).If you live in Mississippi and are a person with a disability, learning about state-specific resources to support people with disabilities can help you advocate for yourself. If you are a friend, family member, or caregiver of a person with disabilities in Mississippi, these resources can help you in supporting your loved one."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/21/2018

~~“The Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities is responsible for planning, development and supervision of an array of services for people in the state with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  The service delivery system is comprised of the State-Operated Programs, ID/DD Waiver program, and the IDD Community Support Program.  The ID/DD Waiver and Community Support Programs provide support to assist people to live successfully at home and in the community.  These services are provided by community mental health centers and other community service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Delta WDA provides Small Business Development, Entrepreneurial, and Self-Employment Training to area residents and WIOA customers in accordance with DOL’s TEGL 12-10 “Supporting Entrepreneurial and Self-Employment Training through the Workforce Investment System.” This program addresses the role the workforce investment system plays in support of entrepreneurial activities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) Program is fully integrated as an essential part of the WIN Job Center network.Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOP), funded through the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG), are included among the WIN Job Center partner staff. The WIN Job Center staff assists veterans, eligible spouses, and veterans with barriers to employment.  Veterans and eligible spouses are asked to complete an assessment form to determine if they have significant barriers to employment. The WIN Job Center staff provides initial core services and refers veterans/eligible spouses with barriers to the DVOP for enhanced services.Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are viable and effective partners in the WIN Job Center delivery system. They participate in employer outreach, job fairs, and other activities related to the JVSG guidelines. LVERs are key members on the MDES Business Services Team participating in business development activities, employer outreach efforts, and in developing jobs for veterans."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Strategic Plan – Mississippi Department of Mental Health - 11/20/2018

~~“Goal 1To increase access to community-based care and supports for adults and children with mental illness and/or substance use disorders through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered and recovery-oriented system of care

GOAL 2To increase access to community-based care and supports for people with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered system of care”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Career Exploration & Employability Skills - 11/05/2018

~~“The Vocational Rehabilitation Transition Counselor and the classroom teacher work together to implement a curriculum that students with disabilities may participate in through services provided at community rehabilitation programs throughout the state. The proposed schedule can be adapted to meet the needs of the student and the teacher and can be based on each school’s calendar year.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mississippi Council on Developmental Disabilities (MSCDD) State Work Plan - 10/01/2017

“The Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) stipulates that State Councils’ investments (grants, programs, and/or projects) support at least one of the following nine Areas of Emphasis:

 

1. Child Care

2. Community Supports (Formal or Informal)

3. Education and Early Intervention

4. Employment

5. Health

6. Housing

7. Quality Assurance

8. Recreation

9. Transportation”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

DMH Begins Implementation of Conflict Free Case Management - 08/01/2017

“The Mississippi Department of Mental Health (DMH) has begun the implementation of conflict-free case management services for the Intellectual Disabilities/Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD) Waiver.  Conflict-free case management is required for all states by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services, and will result in the transfer of a number of DMH employees to other community providers as it is implemented at DMH programs throughout the state.

 

DMH believes the function of Support Coordination is within the mission of the agency.  IDD regional programs will continue to provide Support Coordination services and no longer provide other ID/DD Waiver services. This plan has been approved by the Mississippi Division of Medicaid and CMS. The first implementation of conflict-free case management began at Ellisville State School in August 2017 and will be taking place at other DMH regional programs by the end of 2018. A large number of employees affected by these transitions will continue to serve Mississippians who require support from the ID/DD Waiver. There will not be a change in the type or amount of service people currently enrolled in the program receive.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

DD Network News: A Collaborative Publication from MSCDD, DRMS, and IDS - 02/01/2018

“Welcome! Thank you for reading the first issue of DD News, a joint publication of the Mississippi Council on Developmental Disabilities (MSCDD), Disability Rights Mississippi (DRMS), and the Institute for Disability Studies (IDS) at The University of Southern Mississippi. All three agencies are funded by the federal Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to ensure that people with developmental disabilities receive services as required by the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act. You can learn more about the agencies by researching their websites, listed on the agency pages of this newsletter.

The collaboration among our three agencies continues to expand and increase to benefit people with disabilities in our state. The more closely our agencies work together on issues to create the change that ultimately improves the lives of people with developmental and other disabilities, the greater the impact for all of Mississippi. We continue to collaborate with self-advocates, families, and professionals as evidenced by some of the work highlighted in this edition.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AbilityWorks - 11/03/2017

“AbilityWorks is a network of community rehabilitation programs that provide vocational assessment, job training, and actual work experience for individuals with disabilities. This is possible through a wide array of contract and subcontract services provided to local business and industry.

 

There are 17 locations in a statewide AbilityWorks network of vocationally oriented community programs and is a division of the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation. AbilityWork’s mission to clients is “to improve the quality of life, employment opportunities, and integration of people with disabilities into the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Vocational Rehabilitation Transition Services - 07/01/2017

“The Transition Services Program works with eligible secondary school students with disabilities to enable them to transition from school to subsequent work environments. Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) works cooperatively with the Mississippi Department of Education and local school districts in planning and implementing a variety of programs designed to provide training and assistance for students with disabilities to support them in making the difficult transition from school to work.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mississippi Council on Developmental Disabilities - 08/13/2012

Employment Objectives:

• “Identify and promote at least one Best Practice Model for increasing community employment options for individuals with Developmental Disabilities.” • “Identify at least one barrier to increasing community development options for individuals with Developmental Disabilities.” • “Determine and advocate for at least one Policy Change to improve Community Employment options for individuals with Developmental Disabilities.” • “Collaborate with other stakeholders to facilitate the transition [of] up to 15 individuals from work activity centers into community employment of their choosing.” • “Partner with others to achieve successful community employment for at least 10 individuals with Developmental Disabilities in their respective communities.”   Intermediaries and collaborators for this goal include State protection and advocacy system, university centers, and State DD Agency.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MS Balancing Incentives Program - 10/01/2011

“The Balancing Incentive Program authorizes grants to States to increase access to non-institutional long-term services and supports (LTSS) … [to] transform their long-term care systems by:

lowering costs through improved systems performance & efficiency creating tools to help consumers with care planning & assessment [and] improving quality measurement & oversight.

It “also provides new ways to serve more people in home and community-based settings, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as required by the Olmstead decision.”

 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mississippi Department of Mental Health MOU with DRS

“SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH IDD: DMH has implemented an MOU with the Department of Rehabilitation Services that is providing supported employment for people with IDD. Three hundred employees from DMH, MDRS, and the Division of Medicaid received training in early 2016 regarding supported employment services. As of June 2016, 18 people had been employed. 41 people have been referred for supported employment services through MDRS.”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mississippi Client Assistance Program (MSCAP)

~~Client Assistance Program, or often referred to as CAP, is a state managed and federally funded program designed to advise and inform clients and client applicants in the state of Mississippi. CAP assists in providing information obtaining to available services and benefits under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as well as the services and benefits available to individuals under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). In addition to this, CAP may assist and advocate for clients and client applicants in relation to projects, programs, and services provided under the Rehabilitation Act. CAP is funded through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) of the US Department of Education.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Recommendations for Improving School Funding in Mississippi - 01/16/2017

~~“Recommendation #3c: Create a commission to study and make recommendations related to service-based (IEP-based) fundingWhile multiple-tiered weights based on diagnosis alone would represent a big step forward for Mississippi, EdBuild believes that an IEP-based model, which incorporates consideration of both diagnosis and services, could move the needle even further to improve the precision of special education funding throughout the state. Funding based on student IEPs would take most of the guesswork out of the financing of special education and would significantly increase the impartiality of funding for students with special needs.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

MS CDD Grants and Contracts - 07/01/2016

“MS Partnerships in Employment grant from the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) – Disability Rights Mississippi; $74,410

DRMS’s responsibility within MSPE is to maintain the Employment Workgroup and carrying out its activities.  This group focuses on policies, removing barriers, improving access to competitive employment, and system change efforts.

 

MS Partnerships in Employment grant from the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities – Institute for Disability Studies; $144,000

IDS’s responsibility within MSPE is the Stakeholder’s Group and carrying out its activities.  The activities include focusing on innovative strategies and best practices for systems improved for competitive employment.  IDS provides knowledge and awareness to MSPE with periodic information sessions presented to the Employment Workgroup and the Consortium while assisting in carrying out various training activities across the State.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Mississippi Balancing Incentives Program - 05/01/2012

“The Balancing Incentive Program authorizes grants to States to increase access to non-institutional long-term services and supports (LTSS) … [to] transform their long-term care systems by:  • lowering costs through improved systems performance & efficiency  • creating tools to help consumers with care planning & assessment [and]  • improving quality measurement & oversight.   It “also provides new ways to serve more people in home and community-based settings, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as required by the Olmstead decision.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MS Partnerships in Employment

“Mississippi Partnerships in Employment (MSPE) will build capacity across existing state systems for sustainable systems change to improve outcomes for youth and young adults with DD/ID seeking competitive employment in integrated settings. The consortium will develop and implement policies that support competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with DD/ID seeking competitive employment in integrated settings by removing systemic barriers; identifying and implementing strategies and best practices that improve employment outcomes; and enhancing statewide collaboration that facilitates transition from secondary to post-secondary outcomes. Mississippi’s Partnership includes the DD Council, the University of Southern Mississippi’s UCEDD, Disability Rights Mississippi, VR, Department of Education, the Department of Mental Health Bureau of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities, the Department of Employment Security, and self-advocates”.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MS Money Follows the Person

“Money Follows the Person is a federal initiative to help states enhance community living options for persons with disabilities and establish person-driven and sustainable long-term care systems. The program is for qualified residents of nursing homes and intermediate care facilities and for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ICF/IID) who want to explore community living options.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; African American, Faith-Based, Hispanic, Vietnamese, Native Americans, extremely rural communities; new mothers and women with children; vulnerable and special needs populations; millennials; and Medicaid/CHIP-eligible consumers  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are the Aaron E. Henry Community Health Services Center, Boat People SOS – Gulf Coast, CATCH Kids Tupelo, Mercy Housing and Human Development, and the Mid-South Churches Cooperative Conference State Convention. They will partner with the Faith and community groups representing over 1,500 houses of worship, Mississippi’s gaming industry, Employers and groups of employees, Health Centers, and Head Start Sites.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Michael MinorPhone: (901) 826-8355/(662) 298-3584Email: pastorminor@thehillhernnado.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) - 09/03/2019

~~“My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving The “left behind” populations, such as low wage earners and hourly wage workers; as well as individuals who do not have health insurance because of a lack of affordable coverage options in their area.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Open Arms Healthcare Center. They will partner with the Southwest Mississippi River Region (SMRR) Community Advisory Group, Faith and community-based organizations, Small business owners, Chambers of Commerce, City Governance, and Community health clinics and primary care clinics in the SMRR.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Henry FullerPhone: (601) 957-7710Email: hfuller@mbk-inc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mississippi DMH Web-Based Training

“The Department of Mental Health provides Web-Based Training through Relias Learning (formerly Essential Learning) for registered providers. Relias is a customized learning management system and staff development tool. This training website, developed for DMH staff, presents and tracks training requirements in an accessible and easy to use format.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Mississippi Department of Mental Health Findings Letter - 12/22/2011

We [United States Department of Justice] conclude that the State of Mississippi fails to provide services to qualified individuals with disabilities, including mental illness and developmental disabilities, in the most integrated settings appropriate to their needs, in violation of the ADA. This has led to the needless and prolonged institutionalization of adults and children with disabilities who could be served in more integrated settings in the community with adequate services and supports. Further, systemic failures in the State’s system place qualified individuals with disabilities at risk of unnecessary institutionalization now and going forward.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Long Term Care 1915(c) Waiver Provider Orientation - 01/25/2019

~~“The Office of Long Term Care is responsible for ensuring that all providers of 1915(c) home and community based waiver services for the following waivers meet credentialing requirements as documented in the CMS approved waiver applications.• Elderly & Disabled Waiver• Assisted Living Waiver• Independent Living Waiver• Traumatic Brain Injury/Spinal Cord Injury WaiverAgencies may currently apply to enroll as providers of Personal Care services, In-Home Respite services or Adult Day Care services under the Elderly & Disabled (E&D) Waiver or Assisted Living services under the Assisted Living (AL) Waiver.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1915(i) State plan Home and Community-Based Services Administration and Operation - 11/01/2018

~~“The state implements the optional 1915(i) State plan Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) benefit for elderly and disabled individuals as set forth below.1. Services. (Specify the state’s service title(s) for the HCBS defined under “Services” and listed in Attachment 4.19-B):Day Services - Adult, Prevocational Services, Supported Employment Services, and Supported Living”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Elderly and Disabled Waiver - 07/01/2017

“The Elderly and Disabled Waiver program is administered directly by the Home and Community Based Services division (HCBS).

The Elderly and Disabled Waiver program provides home and community-based services to individuals age 21 years old and older who, but for the provision of such services, would require the level of care provided in a nursing facility. Beneficiaries of this waiver must qualify for Medicaid as Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries or meet the income and resource eligibility requirements for income level up to 300% of the SSI federal benefit rate and meet medical criteria of the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Public Notice for the Elderly and Disabled (E&D) Waiver renewal - 02/28/2017

~~“Pursuant to 42 C.F.R. Section 441.304(e)-(f), public notice is hereby given to the submission of the Elderly and Disabled (E&D) Waiver renewal. The Division of Medicaid, in the Office of the Governor, will submit this proposed waiver renewal to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for the E&D Waiver effective July 1, 2017.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Revised Statewide Transition Plan Summary 1915(c) and 1915(i) Home and Community Based (HCB) Programs - 11/28/2016

“ID/DD Waiver services provided in the participant’s private home or a relative’s home which is fully integrated with opportunities for full access to the greater community include: • Home and Community Supports, • Occupational Therapy, • Physical Therapy, • Speech Therapy, • Crisis Support, • Crisis Intervention, • In-Home Nursing Respite, • Supported Living, • Transition Assistance, • Support Coordination, • Supported Employment, and • Specialized Medical Supplies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mississippi HCBS Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

On Jan. 16, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule, effective March 17, 2014, which amends the requirements for qualities of home and community-based (HCB) settings. These requirements reflect CMS’s intent that individuals receive services and supports in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. The final rule requires the use of a person-centered planning process to develop a participant/beneficiary’s annual Plan for Services and Supports (PSS).

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MS Intellectual Disabilities/DD Waiver (0282.R04.00) - 07/01/2013

Provides day services-adults, prevocational, residential hab, respite, support coordination, supported employment, behavior support/intervention, home and community supports, specialized medical supplies, therapy services for individuals w/autism, DD, MR ages 0 - no max age  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mississippi ESEA Flexibility Request - 07/19/2012

“The Mississippi Department Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on July 19, 2012.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mississippi Medicaid State Plan

The Mississippi Medicaid State Plan (State Plan) is a detailed agreement between the State of Mississippi and the Federal Government that describes the nature and scope of Mississippi’s Medicaid Program. The State Plan is based on the federal requirements and regulations found in Title XIX of the Social Security Act. Changes to the State Plan, called State Plan Amendments (SPAs), must be approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) prior to implementation

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Mississippi Money Follows the Person Bridge to Independence

~~“Attention: Long Term Care ProvidersThe Mississippi Division of Medicaid’s (DOM) Bridge to Independence (B2I) program, funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), completed it’s final year as a demonstration project. Effective January 2019, the Medicaid Extender’s Act of 2019 provided for an extension of B2I services. All new B2I participants that transition under the extension  will receive a 365 day follow up.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Mississippi "feels like coming home" for workers with disabilities who have found great jobs in their communities in the Magnolia State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Mississippi’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
-0.16%
Change from
2016 to 2017
2,984,100
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.46%
Change from
2016 to 2017
265,344
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.93%
Change from
2016 to 2017
73,203
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
27.59%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.7%
Change from
2016 to 2017
71.75%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 2,992,333 2,988,726 2,984,100
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 259,265 258,824 265,344
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 71,339 76,078 73,203
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,061,622 1,074,318 1,070,889
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 27.52% 29.39% 27.59%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 70.11% 71.25% 71.75%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.40% 5.80% 5.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 27.30% 26.30% 26.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 21.00% 19.80% 18.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 223,702 221,845 238,234
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 250,610 254,199 253,362
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 297,654 295,963 303,152
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 164,801 166,959 175,191
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 7,006 8,249 6,883
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,147 2,355 2,860
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,733 1,270 2,210
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 5,206 6,792 6,834
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,733 2,660 673

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,668 2,741 2,772
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.30% 2.40% 2.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 131,143 128,746 127,181

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 7,194 6,655 6,465
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 13,834 12,648 12,095
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 52,960 49,347 42,606
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.60% 13.50% 15.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 0.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 2.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 6.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 90.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A 6
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A 720
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A 2,154
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A 31,461

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,987 2,013 2,076
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 123 119 120
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 96 96 86
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 0.78% 81.00% 72.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 3.21 3.21 2.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,537
6,458
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 729 750 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,443 1,615 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,480 1,955 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,308 1,011 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 168 134 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,409 993 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 45.80% 48.70% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,150 1,925 1,712
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 204,438 203,145 200,763
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 144 147 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 210 165 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2011 2014 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $2,306,000 $201,000 $12,871,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $161,000 $237,000 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $13,248,000 $0 $9,953,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 11.00% 21.00% 57.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 800 1,927 167
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,821 472 863
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.00 20.80 45.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.27% 63.02% 63.01%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.42% 15.10% 15.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.08% 2.01% 1.87%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.98% 99.98% 99.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.45% 29.01% 27.79%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.96% 66.78% 67.12%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.85% 84.38% 85.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.51% 37.77% 39.33%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 558,965
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,561
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 63,390
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 241,418
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 304,808
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 49
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 300
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 349
AbilityOne wages (products). $548,297
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,097,679

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 14 15 12
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 15 16 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,285 1,534 1,265
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 49 49 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,334 1,583 1,265

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Customized Employment

~~MDRS continues to identify current information from research, rehabilitation trends and professional resources. This information is provided to agency staff through a variety of methods, including training at the state, regional, and district levels. Most recently this training has been focused on Autism and customized employment. Additionally, this information is posted and available to staff on MDRS Connect, the agency intranet. (Page 180) Title II

The SE Program will continue to emphasize individual employment placements. Other models will remain an option for clients and may be utilized when feasible. However, when given a choice, clients prefer individual placements by an overwhelming majority. Individual placement is the preferred option of MDRS as well as the clients because it achieves integration in the work environment, it is competitive integrated employment, and it provides more opportunities for career pathways and better quality jobs with more benefits.
Person Centered Planning and Customized Employment as integral parts of service provision continue to be high priorities. These service approaches have been embraced by mental health providers, the DD Council, and other service providers in the state as accepted best practices for model service delivery. (Page 205) Title II

SE staff also participate in both practices in coordinating services for SE clients in the education system throughout the state. These practices have proven to be successful for clients because of the enhanced teamwork with other agencies. Under WIOA customized employment is included in the definition of supported employment and VR is including it as a VR service that the SE client can choose to include in his/her IPE. Therefore, VR is expanding customized employment training to the majority of its direct service staff. These service approaches will continue to be made available to clients during the intake process and will be utilized when deemed appropriate and when chosen by the client. (Page 206) Title II

Plans for improving community rehabilitation programs (private and agency-supported) include training staff to provide Pre-ETS, customized employment services, and on-the-job tryout services which facilitate the agency’s ability to achieve the changes in WIOA. (Page 211) Title II

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~8. Increase collaboration within the state's workforce system to improve services to unemployed workers with disabilities who are eligible for VR services by better leveraging services with other workforce development programs. (Page 209) Title II

21. Increase collaboration within the Workforce System to improve services to unemployed workers with disabilities who are eligible for VR services by better leveraging services with other workforce development programs.
22. Play stronger roles on state and local Workforce Boards to assure that VR consumers and other individuals with disabilities are better served by the One-Stop System. (Page 215) Title II

Leveraging Resources from Key Partners to Support SCSEP
Area Agencies on Aging work with community colleges to provide training to SCSEP participants at a reduced cost; many provide tuition waivers for SCSEP participants. Community colleges are an integral component of the WIOA programs offered through the WIN Job Centers. SCSEP participants are encouraged to dual enroll in WIOA with the WIN Job Centers for job search assistance and training classes. (Page 283) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~o MDHS - The Mississippi Department of Human Services administers the TANF program through several legacy applications, including MAVERICS and JAWS. MAVERICS supports case management data such as intake and eligibility information, and JAWS supports TANF Work Program data. These systems do not inherently support web services, but various enterprise solutions exist to allow a modern, intermediate application to interface with such systems. This intermediate application, developed in Java, would be able to implement and consume web services on behalf of the legacy application. In addition, MDHS is in the process of a multi-year system modernization effort that will reduce the agency's reliance on legacy applications for case management. (Page 96) Title I

In order to accomplish this, OVR relies on many cooperative agreements, memorandums of understanding and contracts with various agencies, organizations and groups.
The entities that OVR is actively involved with include, but is not limited to:
o Mississippi Department of Education for the coordination of transition services and local school districts to carry out transition and youth career services plus implement a Transition Specialist in participating local school districts; (Page 160) Title II

VRB works closely with the education system through the VR Transition and Youth Career Services Program. There are approximately 20 VRB Counselors throughout the state who work in preparing students with vision loss for entry into the world of work. They serve as informational resources for teachers and other educational staff as well as provide resources and information about blindness for parents and transitioning youth throughout development of the youth’s individualized plan for employment (IPE).
VRB Counselors work closely with parents, education staff, and community service providers to promote development of skills needed for students to become as independent as possible and competitive in terms of employment. In addition to training parents and students about the special education rights and responsibilities, VRB provides educational support by working with the VR Transition Team, school officials, and families to develop and implement the IPE. Goals developed in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) are included in the IPE to facilitate successful completion of those goals. (Page 163) Title II

Restructuring of the VR Transition and Youth Career Services Program has resulted in additional VR Counselors carrying transition and youth cases, which provides for more individualized services to both eligible and potentially eligible students in school. VR Counselors work with the students, parents, and school personnel as well as attend (IEP) meetings to help identify students that may be able to benefit from transition and youth career services.
Prior to making services available, the VR Counselor uses school documentation, health records, and other pertinent information as deemed appropriate for determining a student with a disability potentially eligible for pre-employment transition services and/or for determination of eligibility for the VR Transition program. (Page 164) Title II

Transition planning between MDRS and MDE ultimately helps with the successful development and implementation of both the IEP and the IPE.
MDRS through the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and Vocational Rehabilitation for the Blind have recently sent Request for Proposals for third party providers to provide Pre-ETS activities in accordance with the Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act. At this time, two proposals have been awarded contracts and additional Request for Proposals are being sought. (Page 164) Title II
It is also the intent of this agreement to serve as a mechanism for OVR/OVRB and MDE OSE to clearly specify the plans, policies and procedures for coordinating services to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities, including:
1. Consultation and technical assistance in the planning for the transition of students with disabilities;
2. Transition planning by OVR/OVRB and educational personnel that facilitates the development and implementation of a student’s individualized education plan (IEP);
3. Roles and responsibilities, including financial and programmatic responsibilities of each agency;
4. Procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities;
5. Assessment of students’ potential need for transition services and pre-employment transition services;
6. Coordination necessary and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by WIOA, with regard to students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment. (Page 166) Title II

The point of contact to businesses for any assistance and support needed to hire and maintain employment.
Business Development Representatives are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the job seekers on VR caseloads that will be deemed Job Ready match the skills that are needed by businesses, allowing VR counselors to spend more time with clients who require intensive IPE development and career counseling.
The main services provided by the Business Rep. include the following:
o Train employers regarding employment of individuals with disabilities, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act, work incentives, and laws related to employment opportunities;
o Provide consultation, technical assistance, and support to employers on workplace accommodations and assistive technology;
o Provide resources and support through collaboration with community partners and employers; and,
o Provide employer recruitment services, job matching, hiring, and retention of qualified individuals with disabilities. (Page 170) Title II

As appropriate, describe the procedures and activities to coordinate the designated State unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
MDRS pursues efforts to coordinate cross training with MDE that will address education and rehabilitation under the provision of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Training conferences on transition services have been held and co-sponsored by MDRS and MDE. Specifically, regional training conferences bring together all VR counselors with transition caseloads, other agency personnel involved with transition services, and transition specialists, teachers, and special education coordinators from MDE. VR strives to help MDE to meet the mandate the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004. (Page 181) Title II

VR assures that the individualized plan for employment (IPE) is also coordinated with the employment goal in the school’s individualized educational plan (IEP) and, where appropriate, the (ISP) individualized service plans of the long term care providers.
The VR Counselor servicing local school districts as well as the VR Supported Employment Counselors work together with schools district to ensure that students with disabilities that previously entered subminimum wage employment are provided information and services to assist in diverting these individuals into competitive integrated employment.
VR facilitates the opening of cases for beginning at age 14 if required. Pre-ETS services are provided to students with disabilities as early as age 14. If these individuals require VR Transition services as early as age 14, VR facilities this need by opening a VR case. This service provision will help strengthen VRs efforts to reach more students and strengthens the opportunity for successful employment outcomes. (Page 195) Title II

While local school districts are responsible for providing education and transition services to students with disabilities who are still in the secondary school system, under WIOA, VR is the state unit that is mandated to make available Pre-ETS begin at age fourteen (14) for all eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities with parental consent.
District Managers and counselors are responsible for developing cooperative working relationships with the local education agency staff in the districts, and other agencies working with youth. Letters were sent by the State Transition Program Coordinator to all the Special Education Directors and 504 Coordinators for each school district to discuss VR services for students with IEPs and 504 plans. The counselor is to follow-up with their Special Education Directors and 504 Coordinators at least annually to discuss the provision of outreach services for students with disabilities and to determine the need for potential referrals. (Page 195) Title II

MDRS and the local school district may enter into a Cooperative Agreement to jointly fund a Transition Assistant position to ensure a smoother transition of services between the school and OVR/OVRB. The Transition Assistant will provide services to selected secondary students with disabilities who are: (a) between the ages of fourteen (14) and twenty-one (21), (b) in transition from school to work and community, and (c) eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. The addition of school-based transition services are intended to add a component to the overall school and rehabilitation service continuum, not supplant existing employment-related or other services which are potentially appropriate for a particular student (any service the school is already responsible for providing). The Transition Assistant will not serve students who, with or without modifications, can benefit from existing school programs (career/technical and educational training programs etc.).  (Page 196) Title II

The OOS does not discriminate against any eligible individual on the basis of gender, age, race, creed, color, religion, national origin, citizenship, type of disability, duration of residence in Mississippi, public assistance status, source of referral, expected employment outcome, need for specific services, anticipate cost of services required, or income level of an individual or his/her family.
MDRS in consultation with the SRC will close the Priority Categories designated to be closed. Any individual currently under an approved IPE at the time his/her priority category is closed will continue to receive with his/her IPE, including the provision of Pre-employment transition services and Post-Employment Services. (Page 201) Title II

MDRS has determined that sufficient resources are currently available to provide VR services to all individuals with disabilities that apply, those determined eligible in all priority categories and those under an IPE. Due to the increase in service needs and the staff resources in 2017 and 2018 to provide the services, if the projected resources for funds and personnel change before the next state plan modification, MDRS will make a determination whether it may need to close one or more of its priority categories.
During FF2018, MDRS will be able to serve all eligible individuals in all three priority categories. The total projected available resources including the federal allotment, non-federal contributions, carryover, and program income for FY 2018 is $67,705,332. MDRS will conduct reviews periodically during the year to help validate the order and assess the impact of unforeseen circumstances. (Page 203) Title II

SE staff also participate in both practices in coordinating services for SE clients in the education system throughout the state. These practices have proven to be successful for clients because of the enhanced teamwork with other agencies. Under WIOA customized employment is included in the definition of supported employment and VR is including it as a VR service that the SE client can choose to include in his/her IPE. Therefore, VR is expanding customized employment training to the majority of its direct service staff. These service approaches will continue to be made available to clients during the intake process and will be utilized when deemed appropriate and when chosen by the client. (Page 206) Title II

Goal III: Implement a statewide model for more effectively serving high school youth and students with disabilities including individuals with visual and/or hearing impairments.
o A statewide training was conducted in 2016 that included all VR/VRB counselors and staff, and Special Education coordinators from schools throughout the state. This training assist VR in explaining the role of VR in serving students that have an IEP and 504 plan as well as serving students that are not receiving special education services. We are in hopes that we will continually see an increase in referrals for these students.
o In 2017, the updated formal Interagency Cooperative Agreement was developed with the Mississippi Department of Education. MDRS also updated our local school agreements.
o In 2016, the OVR Transition Manual designed to assist staff in the delivery of transition services. This manual is used as technical assistance for transition planning purposes. Training was held in each district statewide with counselors that are assigned to local schools/school districts.
o Annually, the OVR Transition Coordinator updates and maintains a list of all 504 coordinators and special education staff for each school district. The list is a document that can be accessed by all staff on the MDRS intranet - MDRS Connect. (Page 218) Title II

Continue the referral process between the VR Transition Counselor and the VR (SE) Supported Employment Counselor for students with disabilities ages 14-21 who have been determined to need long term ongoing support services. The VR Transition Counselor will take the referral from the MDE, determine eligibility, complete the assessment and discovery process and work with the SE Counselor to develop the IPE with the student, parents/guardians, and school. Once the IPE has been signed by all the required parties, then the student’s case will be transferred to the SE Counselor’s caseload. (Page 220) Title II
 

Career Pathways

~~In accordance with section 101(d) of WIOA, the Mississippi State Workforce Investment Board (SWIB) will establish and operate through a SWIB WIOA Board Committee, whose membership will meet WIOA state board composition requirements, to perform the following services for the Governor:
1. Development, implementation, and modification of the state plan.
2. Collaboration with educational boards (MBE, MCCB, IHL), partners, and service providers to review statewide policies, statewide programs, and recommendations on actions that should be taken by the state to align workforce development programs in a manner that supports a comprehensive and streamlined workforce development system, including the review and provision of comments on state plans.
3. Collaboration with educational boards (MBE, MCCB, IHL), partners, and service providers in the development and continuous improvement of the workforce development system in the state, including:
a. Identification of barriers and means for removing barriers to better coordinate, align, and avoid duplication among the programs and activities carried out through the system.
b. Development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skill adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.
c. Development of strategies for providing effective outreach to and improved access for individuals and employers who could benefit from services provided through the workforce development system. (Page 64) Title I

 (2) The SE Program will continue to emphasize individual employment placements. Other models will remain an option for clients and may be utilized when feasible. However, when given a choice, clients prefer individual placements by an overwhelming majority. Individual placement is the preferred option of MDRS as well as the clients because it achieves integration in the work environment, it is competitive integrated employment, and it provides more opportunities for career pathways and better quality jobs with more benefits. (Page 205) Title II
  

Apprenticeship
No disability specific information found regarding this element
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Local workforce development boards have the option to include additional Affiliate One-Stop Centers with any subset of Combined Plan Partners as long as they include at least two partners. Local workforce development boards also have the flexibility to include additional partners in Affiliate One-Stop Centers. While local workforce development boards ultimately decide the logistics of affiliate centers, the WIOA law specifically identifies the following approved federally funded partners: employment and training programs administered by the Social Security Administration, including Ticket to Work and the Self Sufficiency Program; employment and training programs carried out by the Small Business Administration; Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) programs; Client Assistance Program; and programs authorized under the National and Community Service Act of 1990.
Local workforce development boards are also responsible for ensuring that local activities and local sector targets are in line with state-level sector analysis. The Mississippi LifeTracks system will constantly update web-accessible reports that feature dashboard numbers, pathway analysis, and supply and demand analysis to ensure that economic developers in Mississippi have a near real-time picture of the labor market. Sector analysis revealed laborshed zones that transcend local workforce development area boundaries and allow local workforce development boards to serve as intermediaries to connect local employers and training providers to meet labor market demands. Employers will communicate labor demand in real time by posting job orders in Mississippi Works Labor Exchange. (Page 88) Title I

Business Development Representatives are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the job seekers on VR caseloads that will be deemed Job Ready match the skills that are needed by businesses, allowing VR counselors to spend more time with clients who require intensive IPE development and career counseling.
The main services provided by the Business Rep. include the following:
o Train employers regarding employment of individuals with disabilities, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act, work incentives, and laws related to employment opportunities;
o Provide consultation, technical assistance, and support to employers on workplace accommodations and assistive technology;
o Provide resources and support through collaboration with community partners and employers; and,
o Provide employer recruitment services, job matching, hiring, and retention of qualified individuals with disabilities.
MDRS also works with employers to help youth with disabilities and students with disabilities have more opportunities, explore career interests, acquire workplace skills, and enter into competitive integrated employment. (Page 170) Title II

457. Business Relations Specialist will providing information to VR staff the areas as follows:
          *the services BRS provide to employers,
          *training and information regarding work incentives,
          *job analysis and job matching,
          *career opportunities in the local area; and
458. Develop and implement on campus work experience training in order to provide students who cannot get into or opportunities for vocational training are not readily available in a community based setting.
459. Refer those consumers receiving SSI/SSDI cash benefits who are interested in earnings that will eliminate their reliance on SSA cash benefits for work incentives benefits analysis and counseling.
460. Coordinate and conduct the Annual Governor’s Job Fair for individuals with disabilities.
461. Summer Internship Program for high school students with blindness and visual impairments; and deafness and hard of hearing. (Page 213) Title II
GOAL II: Improve the VR Service Delivery System to Individuals with disabilities
Strategies (Plan of Action):
462. Designate staff in each MDRS districts to be responsible for conducting outreach and orientation sessions on a regular basis.
463. Provide input to assure appropriate inclusion of vocational rehabilitation activities in, public service announcements, and agency website and publications.
464. Update and distribute vocational rehabilitation brochures to appropriate referral sources.
465. Designate and train specific staff members in each district to handle referrals and provide information to the public.
466. Assure that all geographic areas of the state are covered with appropriate service delivery staff. (Page 213) Title II
 

Employer/ Business

~~The point of contact to businesses for any assistance and support needed to hire and maintain employment.
Business Development Representatives are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the job seekers on VR caseloads that will be deemed Job Ready match the skills that are needed by businesses, allowing VR counselors to spend more time with clients who require intensive IPE development and career counseling.
The main services provided by the Business Rep. include the following:
o Train employers regarding employment of individuals with disabilities, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act, work incentives, and laws related to employment opportunities;
o Provide consultation, technical assistance, and support to employers on workplace accommodations and assistive technology;
o Provide resources and support through collaboration with community partners and employers; and,
o Provide employer recruitment services, job matching, hiring, and retention of qualified individuals with disabilities. (Page 170) Title II
 

Data Collection
No disability specific information found regarding this element.
511

~~The scope of services between MDRS and MDE are described in (d)2. The scope of services between MDRS and the local school districts are intended to serve as a mechanism for OVR/OVRB and the local school districts to clearly specify the plans, policies and procedures for coordinating services to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities, including:
0. Responsibilities of MDRS/OVR
1. Responsibilities of School District
2. Referral Process
3. Joint Development of IEPs and IPEs; and
4. Coordination necessary and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by WIOA, with regard to students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment
This Memorandum of Agreement for Transition Planning for Secondary Students with Disabilities between is made and entered into by and between the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services, hereafter referred to as “MDRS,” for and on behalf of its Offices of Vocational Rehabilitation and Vocational Rehabilitation for the Blind, hereafter referred to as “OVR/OVRB,” and the Mississippi Department of Education, for and on behalf of its Office of Special Education, hereafter referred to as “MDE OSE.”
A formal interagency agreement is mandated under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 34 CFR 300.154, and section 101(a) (11) (D) of the Rehabilitation Act and its implementing regulations at 34 CFR 361.22 (b). Additional references used in this document include Sections 113 and 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the Final Regulations: State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program; State Supported Employment Services Program; Limitations on Use of Subminimum Wage.This agreement is designed to improve the cooperative and collaborative efforts between the OVR/OVRB, and MDE OSE to coordinate the receipt of pre-employment transition services, transition services and other vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to students with disabilities who are eligible for special education services under the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA), students who have a 504 plan, and other students with disabilities who are eligible or potentially eligible for services through OVR/OVRB, in order to facilitate their smooth transition from school to post-school employment-related activities and competitive, integrated employment. (Page 165-166) Title I

It is also the intent of this agreement to serve as a mechanism for OVR/OVRB and MDE OSE to clearly specify the plans, policies and procedures for coordinating services to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities, including:
1. Consultation and technical assistance in the planning for the transition of students with disabilities;
2. Transition planning by OVR/OVRB and educational personnel that facilitates the development and implementation of a student’s individualized education plan (IEP);
3. Roles and responsibilities, including financial and programmatic responsibilities of each agency;
4. Procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities;
5. Assessment of students’ potential need for transition services and pre-employment transition services;
6. Coordination necessary and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by WIOA, with regard to students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment.; and an
7. Assurance that the MDE OSE will not enter into an arrangement with an entity holding a special wage certificate under section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act for the purpose of operating a program under which a youth with a disability is engaged in work at a subminimum wage.
Additional considerations include grievance procedure to resolve disputes between OVR/OVRB and the MDE OSE, as appropriate, as well as procedures to resolve disputes between an individual with a disability and the entities specified above, and information about the Client Assistance Program. (Pages 166- 167) Title II
 

 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
No disability specific information found regarding this element.
Vets
The WIOA services that MDES administers will address the workforce and training needs of every eligible individual. Through Wagner-Peyser services, MDES provides job search, referral, and placement services to all eligible Mississippi workers. MDES funds adult training programs administered by local workforce development boards based on the needs of each local workforce development area. To serve dislocated workers, MDES coordinates Rapid Response services that assist employers and employees affected by layoffs or plant closures. MDES serves youth through specially trained Youth Providers who connect youth to targeted youth programs, other eligible core programs, and education and training opportunities based on the specific needs of the individual. In addition, there are two employment outreach groups: Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) and Disabled Veteran Outreach Specialists (DVOP). To fill job openings, LVER staff work directly with businesses, and DVOP staff work directly with unemployed or underemployed veterans. (Page 75) Title I o Referral of qualified veterans to new job openings, especially Federal Contractor job orders, prior to all non-veteran job referral activity. o Veteran placement at the top of WIOA waiting lists (ITAs and OJT) for limited training funds. MDES management will monitor priority of service by reviewing quarterly performance reports, manager reports, and MS Works reports. MDES management will monitor priority of service in covered programs at two levels. Workforce Investment Network (WIN) Job Centers will continue to use established protocol of identifying targeted groups. At the state level, management will continue to analyze performance reports, manager reports, and MS Works reports. WIN Job Center services are made available and provided to eligible veterans, transitioning service members, VA VR & E Chapter 31 veterans, Native American Veterans, other groups targeted for special consideration, and veterans with significant barriers to employment through outreach activities performed by Disabled Veteran Outreach Specialists (DVOPs). MDES will continue to encourage non-DOL program partners to focus on providing priority of service to targeted groups for special consideration. (Page 106) Title II In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes: A. HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG MDES plans to assign and utilize DVOP Specialists and other agency employees trained in case management to metropolitan WIN Job Centers throughout the state where the need of intensive services is greatest. DVOP Specialists will provide intensive services, through the case management framework, and facilitate placements to meet the employment needs of veterans, prioritizing services to special disabled veterans, other disabled veterans, and other categories of veterans in accordance with priorities determined by the Secretary of Labor. The DVOP Specialist, Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC), will continue to work with the Veterans Affairs’ Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment (VR & E) program. DVOP specialists will provide intensive services through the case management approach, including completion of an assessment and a written employability development plan. LVER staff trained in networking will be assigned and utilized within workforce areas. LVER staff will conduct outreach to employers within the workforce area to assist veterans in gaining employment, including conducting seminars for employers and, in conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups; and facilitate employment, training, and placement services furnished to veterans served by the WIN Job Centers. MDES plans to fill grant-funded vacancies expeditiously despite State budget problems, hiring freezes and furloughs. MDES plans to identify projected losses and retirements early when possible. Applicants will be given the following order of priority: qualified service-connected disabled veterans; qualified eligible veterans; and qualified eligible persons. Also, veteran (non-JVSG) staff in the agency may be considered for assignment to the program. (Page 259) Title II LVER Staff In accordance with Veterans’ Program Letter 07-10, 03-14 or most recent guidance, MDES Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVER) will conduct outreach to employers in the area to assist veterans in gaining employment, including conducting seminars for employers and, in conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups, and facilitating employment, training, and placement services furnished to veterans within WIN Job Centers. The LVERs will work with the local area management team to coordinate and conduct employer outreach activities. LVERs will advocate for all veterans served by the WIN Job Centers with business, industry, and other community-based organizations by participating in appropriate activities such as: o Planning and participating in job and career fairs; o Conducting employer outreach; o Educating all WIN Job Center staff and partners with current employment initiatives and programs for veterans; o Conducting job searches and workshops, and establishing job search groups, in conjunction with employers; o Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; o Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans; o Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and o Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. (Page 260) Title IV DVOP specialists and LVERs are an essential part of and fully integrated into the WIN Job Center network. They are included among the WIN Job Center partner staff, which consists of all staff employed by programs or activities operated by job center partners that provide job-driven online and/or in-person workforce development or related support services as part of the workforce development system. Other WIN Job Center partner staff members include staff of WIOA, WP, and other network partner programs. LVER staff will continue to be viable and effective in the WIN Job Center delivery system, e.g., facilitating and participating in employer marketing services, employer job fairs, etc. LVER staff will continue to be considered key players and team participants in business development activities and employer marketing efforts, developing jobs for WIN Job Centers, marketing veteran services to employers, assisting employers at job fairs and facilitating employer recruitments. Veterans with significant barriers to employment are referred to or assigned to the DVOP after initial core services. All of these activities translate into a fully integrated system with positive benefits and productivity for the WIN Job Centers and also subsequently result in the development of seamless employment opportunities for veterans. (Page 261) Title II
Mental Health

~~The entities that OVR is actively involved with include, but is not limited to:
o Mississippi Department of Education for the coordination of transition services and local school districts to carry out transition and youth career services plus implement a Transition Specialist in participating local school districts;
o Hinds Community College for the Deaf Services Program;
o Division of Medicaid to provide seamless, non-duplicated services to individuals who are eligible for both Medicaid and VR services and for maximum utilization of resources between the two agencies;
o Department of Mental Health (DMH) Planning and Advisory Council as federally mandated for advice and support. DMH to cover the costs for therapeutic medical services offered at secondary alcohol and drug treatment centers that have been approved by DMH;
o Department of Mental Health -Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to continue enhancing, expanding, and developing methods to support eligible persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities who express a desire for competitive integrated employment; establish a state-level work group to address system, policy and funding issues that impede the continuous provision of employment services by MDRS and DMH; engage MDRS staff and DMH providers and stakeholders at the local level in collaboration and cooperation in the accomplishment of the vision and desired outcomes; identify and disseminate best practices including training and funding strategies; and, provide individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities with quality employment services that lead to competitive integrated employment in a non-duplicated and seamless manner; ( Page 160-161) Title II

MDRS administers the Supported Employment (SE) Program as specified in Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act and amended in WIOA. VR works extensively with other state agencies, private non-profit entities, employers, family members, and consumer groups to ensure quality SE services are provided to all eligible individuals throughout all phases of the SE service delivery system.
MDRS- VR has entered into formal cooperative agreements with the Mississippi Division of Medicaid (Medicaid) and Department of Mental Health, Bureau for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, with respect to delivery of VR services, including extended services, for individuals with the most significant disabilities eligible for home and community-based services.
In addition to these formal agreements, MDRS collaborates on a more informal basis with public and private entities to ensure a comprehensive program of services is provided to SE eligible individuals.
Collaborative partners include local mental health facilities, Medicaid’s Bridge to Independence Program to help people move from qualified institutions to homes in the community, local school districts, businesses and industries, local projects funded by the DD Council, workforce development one-stop career centers, advocacy groups, and other relevant third parties as well as parents of SE eligible individuals. (Page 168) Title II

Collaborative partners include local mental health facilities, Medicaid’s Bridge to Independence Program to help people move from qualified institutions to homes in the community, local school districts, businesses and industries, local projects funded by the Mississippi Council on Development Disabilities (DD Council), workforce development one-stop career centers, advocacy groups, and other relevant third parties as well as parents of individuals with the most significant disabilities.
MDRS also has in place with the Mississippi Partnership for Employment a Memorandum of Understanding that includes the following partners:
1) DD Council;
2) The University of Southern Mississippi Institute for Disability Studies;
3) Disability Rights of Mississippi;
4) Mississippi Department of Education;
5) DMH;
6) Mississippi Department of Employment Security (the administering authority for the state’s workforce development system); and
7) Two self-advocates
The partnership’s intent is to build capacity across existing state systems to improve outcomes for youth and young adults with developmental disabilities including intellectual disabilities seeking competitive employment in integrated settings. (Page 172) Title II

SE staff members continue to make every effort to identify and facilitate natural supports that occur in the workplace in order to maximize utilization of funds. These natural supports do not replace the one-on-one intensive support provided to clients by the SE Counselors. However, when properly identified and utilized, these natural supports do result in decreased direct service costs and increased quality of support.
(2) The SE Program will continue to emphasize individual employment placements. Other models will remain an option for clients and may be utilized when feasible. However, when given a choice, clients prefer individual placements by an overwhelming majority. Individual placement is the preferred option of MDRS as well as the clients because it achieves integration in the work environment, it is competitive integrated employment, and it provides more opportunities for career pathways and better quality jobs with more benefits.
Person Centered Planning and Customized Employment as integral parts of service provision continue to be high priorities. These service approaches have been embraced by mental health providers, the DD Council, and other service providers in the state as accepted best practices for model service delivery. (Page 205) Title II

Cooperative arrangements will continue to be developed with other provider agencies and organizations, both public and private, to expand the SE Program to unserved and underserved populations. The focus of these arrangements is on promoting and enabling SE Counselors and service provider personnel from other agencies to work as teams to share expertise, provide technical support in specific disability areas, and conduct joint training.
With the interagency agreement and referral process that has been developed with the Department of Mental Health and the Division of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, we will continue to work with this agency in serving individuals who are eligible for the waiver as extended service providers. (Page 206) Title II

MDRS maintains formal agreements with the MDE and DMH as well as other public and private entities, which identify areas of collaboration to ensure a comprehensive program of services to SE eligible individuals. Staff members collaborate intensively with local mental health centers, school districts, SE businesses and industries, the DD Council, parents, advocacy groups and other relevant third parties.
The service approach for SE eligible clients emulates the nationally accepted "best practices" models of SE service delivery which include individual job placement, mobile crews, and temporary employment placement (TEP) for individuals with chronic mental illness. Central to each of these approaches is an emphasis on person centered planning and facilitation of natural supports. Individualized job development is conducted by SE staff based on job matching assessment information and client’s informed choice. SE clients are assisted with employment planning and placement by VTIs and job skills training is provided at the job site either by job coaches or through natural supports.
To fulfill the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended by WIOA, regarding transitional employment for individuals with chronic mental illness, MDRS utilizes the TEP model. This model involves placement in a series of temporary jobs that lead to permanent employment as an outcome. This service approach is implemented through coordination with local mental health centers. (Page 224) Title IV

Mississippi will coordinate services, where available, with public and private entities (i.e., Mississippi Departments of Rehabilitation Services, Employment Security and Mental Health, and the Mississippi Community College Board, etc.) to allow TANF families with barriers (i.e., little or no work experience, domestic violence, limited English proficiency, learning disabilities, mental, physical disabilities and/or substance abuse) an opportunity to gain access to services and resources needed to obtain the highest level of self-sufficiency within the constraints of the TANF time-limits. Special screening and referral procedures will be used to identify and refer the individual for the appropriate service. Mississippi will deny benefits to individuals who fail to comply with the activities provided by these entities. (Page 237) Title IV

Job Search and Job Readiness - Job search and job readiness assistance is defined as the act of seeking or obtaining employment, preparation to seek or obtain employment, including life skills training, and substance abuse treatment, mental health treatment, or rehabilitation activities for those who are otherwise employable.
Such treatment or therapy must be determined to be necessary and certified by a qualified medical, substance abuse or mental health professional. A qualified professional is defined as any individual who is licensed or certified. Job search and job readiness assistance activities are supervised daily by the case manager and/or job readiness trainer. (Page 239) Title IV

The MDHS will create a referral process to the Department of Child Protection Services (DCPS) to contact state and local law enforcement, the education system, and counseling services for recipients requiring assistance with statutory rape, domestic violence issues, mental health concerns, and drug/alcohol treatment. The counselors and educators can focus on problems that may be an underlying problem other than statutory rape. Individuals referred will complete an assessment, discuss educational barriers, and receive life skill strategies. MDHS established the Healthy Marriage Initiative, using Federal TANF funds, to promote the well-being of children in Mississippi by encouraging the involvement of mothers and fathers in their lives. The initiative will:
o Encourage stable family formation and healthy marriages,
o Promote responsible fathering,
o Increase paternity and child support objectives,
o Encourage community support for marriage, and
o Prevent out-of-wedlock pregnancies. (Page 250) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
1. Partner with Third Party Administrators (TPAs) — Statistical data from this cross match pilot project is currently being analyzed to determine if continuing the cross match would be beneficial. 2. Employers SIDES messaging — Explain to employer the importance and benefits of responding timely through E-Response. A mailing campaign is in progress to target a designated group of employers. 3. Claimant messaging — Generate a detail mailer/message alert to claimant after first payment advising them of the requirement and method to properly report earnings and return to work. Include the penalty for failing to do so but emphasize the potential overpayment issue and progression. (Page 273) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 54

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; African American, Faith-Based, Hispanic, Vietnamese, Native Americans, extremely rural communities; new mothers and women with children; vulnerable and special needs populations; millennials; and Medicaid/CHIP-eligible consumers  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are the Aaron E. Henry Community Health Services Center, Boat People SOS – Gulf Coast, CATCH Kids Tupelo, Mercy Housing and Human Development, and the Mid-South Churches Cooperative Conference State Convention. They will partner with the Faith and community groups representing over 1,500 houses of worship, Mississippi’s gaming industry, Employers and groups of employees, Health Centers, and Head Start Sites.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Michael MinorPhone: (901) 826-8355/(662) 298-3584Email: pastorminor@thehillhernnado.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) - 09/03/2019

~~“My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving The “left behind” populations, such as low wage earners and hourly wage workers; as well as individuals who do not have health insurance because of a lack of affordable coverage options in their area.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Open Arms Healthcare Center. They will partner with the Southwest Mississippi River Region (SMRR) Community Advisory Group, Faith and community-based organizations, Small business owners, Chambers of Commerce, City Governance, and Community health clinics and primary care clinics in the SMRR.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Henry FullerPhone: (601) 957-7710Email: hfuller@mbk-inc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mississippi ABLE - 06/02/2019

~~“What is an ABLE account?ABLE accounts are savings accounts for individuals with disabilities which will not affect their public benefits.  These accounts can be used for daily transactions and/or long-term savings.  Income earned in the accounts is not taxed if spent on qualified disability-related expenses.  Contributions can be made to an account by anyone and may qualify for a state tax deduction.”

This page also has links for more information on ABLE

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Supported Employment - 05/23/2019

~~“DMH  believes  that  work  plays  a  critical  role  in  improving  quality  of  life  and  mental  health  outcomes  of  the  people  we  serve  as  part  of  their  recovery  journey.  In  January  2015,  DMH  provided  funding  to  develop  four  pilot  sites  to  offer    Supported   Employment   to   75   individuals   with   mental   illness.  The  sites  are  located  in  Community  Mental  Health  Center Regions 2, 7, 10 and 12. Supported employment, an evidenced-based  way  to  help  people  diagnosed  with  mental  illnesses  secure  and  keep  employment,  begins  with  the  idea  that  every  person  with  a  serious  mental  illness  is  capable  of  working competitively in the community. In F Y18, the DMH Supported    Employment    Pilot    Prog ram    assisted    257    individuals  on  their  road  to  recovery  by  helping  them  to  become employed in the openly competitive job market.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Mississippi Disability Resources and Advocacy Organizations - 05/03/2019

~~This page has “links to government agencies and disability rights organizations in Mississippi. They may be able assist you with:• disability advocacy• home health services• home care• nursing aide services• Medicaid• accessing other community resources to help people with disabilities.

Many of these organizations work to address the unique needs associated with different disabilities, including but not limited to physical, intellectual, and developmental disabilities, and mental illness. Others focus on issues such as access to housing and legal assistance based on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).If you live in Mississippi and are a person with a disability, learning about state-specific resources to support people with disabilities can help you advocate for yourself. If you are a friend, family member, or caregiver of a person with disabilities in Mississippi, these resources can help you in supporting your loved one."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Long Term Care 1915(c) Waiver Provider Orientation - 01/25/2019

~~“The Office of Long Term Care is responsible for ensuring that all providers of 1915(c) home and community based waiver services for the following waivers meet credentialing requirements as documented in the CMS approved waiver applications.• Elderly & Disabled Waiver• Assisted Living Waiver• Independent Living Waiver• Traumatic Brain Injury/Spinal Cord Injury WaiverAgencies may currently apply to enroll as providers of Personal Care services, In-Home Respite services or Adult Day Care services under the Elderly & Disabled (E&D) Waiver or Assisted Living services under the Assisted Living (AL) Waiver.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/21/2018

~~“The Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities is responsible for planning, development and supervision of an array of services for people in the state with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  The service delivery system is comprised of the State-Operated Programs, ID/DD Waiver program, and the IDD Community Support Program.  The ID/DD Waiver and Community Support Programs provide support to assist people to live successfully at home and in the community.  These services are provided by community mental health centers and other community service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Delta WDA provides Small Business Development, Entrepreneurial, and Self-Employment Training to area residents and WIOA customers in accordance with DOL’s TEGL 12-10 “Supporting Entrepreneurial and Self-Employment Training through the Workforce Investment System.” This program addresses the role the workforce investment system plays in support of entrepreneurial activities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) Program is fully integrated as an essential part of the WIN Job Center network.Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOP), funded through the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG), are included among the WIN Job Center partner staff. The WIN Job Center staff assists veterans, eligible spouses, and veterans with barriers to employment.  Veterans and eligible spouses are asked to complete an assessment form to determine if they have significant barriers to employment. The WIN Job Center staff provides initial core services and refers veterans/eligible spouses with barriers to the DVOP for enhanced services.Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are viable and effective partners in the WIN Job Center delivery system. They participate in employer outreach, job fairs, and other activities related to the JVSG guidelines. LVERs are key members on the MDES Business Services Team participating in business development activities, employer outreach efforts, and in developing jobs for veterans."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Strategic Plan – Mississippi Department of Mental Health - 11/20/2018

~~“Goal 1To increase access to community-based care and supports for adults and children with mental illness and/or substance use disorders through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered and recovery-oriented system of care

GOAL 2To increase access to community-based care and supports for people with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered system of care”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

House Bill 909 - Medical benefits for retired public employees and dependents under age sixty-five (65) years and not eligible for Medicare benefits. - 07/01/2017

“(d)  Medical benefits for retired employees and dependents under age sixty-five (65) years and not eligible for Medicare benefits.  For employees who retire before July 1, 2005, and for employees retiring due to work-related disability under the Public Employees' Retirement System, the same health insurance coverage as for all other active employees and their dependents shall be available to retired employees and all dependents under age sixty-five (65) years who are not eligible for Medicare benefits, the level of benefits to be the same level as for all other active participants.  For employees who retire on or after July 1, 2005, and not retiring due to work-related disability under the Public Employees' Retirement System, the same health insurance coverage as for all other active employees and their dependents shall be available to those retiring employees and all dependents under age sixty-five (65) years who are not eligible for Medicare benefits only if the retiring employees were participants in the State and School Employees Health Insurance Plan for four (4) years or more before their retirement, the level of benefits to be the same level as for all other active participants.  This section will apply to those employees who retire due to one hundred percent (100%) medical disability as well as those employees electing early retirement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement

MS HB 836 (including amendments to Miss. Code Ann. §43-30-1) - 07/01/2015

An act to require state agencies that provide services an support to persons with disabilities to consider, as their first option, competitive employment in an integrated setting for persons with disabilities; to require all state agencies to follow this policy for employment by coordinating all collaborating efforts among agencies; to authorize state agencies to adopt rules and regulations to implement the provisions of this act; to require the Disability Resource Commission to review measurable goals and objectives as submitting to it by each relevant state agency to ensure implementation of this act; to provide reporting requirements for state agencies; to amend Section 43-30-1, Mississippi Code of 1972, in conformity thereto; and for related purposes. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

SB 2034 Employment First Act - 07/01/2014

“AN ACT TO CREATE THE "EMPLOYMENT FIRST ACT"; TO REQUIRE THAT STATE AGENCIES THAT PROVIDE SERVICES AND SUPPORT TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES SHALL CONSIDER, AS THEIR FIRST OPTION, COMPETITIVE EMPLOYMENT IN AN INTEGRATED SETTING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES; TO REQUIRE ALL STATE AGENCIES TO FOLLOW THIS POLICY FOR EMPLOYMENT BY COORDINATING ALL COLLABORATING EFFORTS AMONG AGENCIES; TO AUTHORIZE STATE AGENCIES TO ADOPT RULES AND REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT THE ACT; TO ESTABLISH AN EMPLOYMENT FIRST OVERSIGHT COMMISSION WHICH SHALL REVIEW MEASURABLE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES AS SUBMITTED TO IT BY EACH RELEVANT STATE AGENCY TO ENSURE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ACT; TO PROVIDE REPORTING REQUIREMENTS; AND FOR RELATED PURPOSES.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Mississippi Concurrent Resolution No. 563

“State agencies that provide services and support to persons with disabilities shall coordinate efforts and collaborate within and among such agencies to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures and funding support competitive employment in integrated settings for persons with disabilities who are of working age....

All state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems in order to track progress toward full implementation of ‘Employment First’ and shall adopt measurable goals and objectives to promote assessment of progress in implementing this resolution.

This resolution "died on calendar" in April 2013”

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Mississippi Executive Order 1335 - 01/14/2014

“Whereas, my administration is committed to supporting policies under which agencies that provide services to persons with disabilities and/or provide employment, economic development, or other related services explore employment in an integrated setting as the first priority option for persons with disabilities who are of working age.  Now, Therefore, I, Phil Bryant, Governor of the State of Mississippi, pursuant to the Constitution and laws of the State of Mississippi, do hereby order as follows:

State agencies that provide services to persons with disabilities, and state agencies which provide employment, economic development, or other related services, shall coordinate efforts and collaborate to ensure that state programs, policies, and procedures support employment in integrated settings as the first priority option, to the extent feasible, for persons with disabilities who are of working age. The same state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems and adopt measureable goals and objectives to track progress toward the achievement of the goals of this Executive Order. The Mississippi Disability Resource Commission, Miss. Code Ann. § 43-30-1, is authorized to monitor implementation of this Executive Order.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Mississippi ABLE - 06/02/2019

~~“What is an ABLE account?ABLE accounts are savings accounts for individuals with disabilities which will not affect their public benefits.  These accounts can be used for daily transactions and/or long-term savings.  Income earned in the accounts is not taxed if spent on qualified disability-related expenses.  Contributions can be made to an account by anyone and may qualify for a state tax deduction.”

This page also has links for more information on ABLE

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Supported Employment - 05/23/2019

~~“DMH  believes  that  work  plays  a  critical  role  in  improving  quality  of  life  and  mental  health  outcomes  of  the  people  we  serve  as  part  of  their  recovery  journey.  In  January  2015,  DMH  provided  funding  to  develop  four  pilot  sites  to  offer    Supported   Employment   to   75   individuals   with   mental   illness.  The  sites  are  located  in  Community  Mental  Health  Center Regions 2, 7, 10 and 12. Supported employment, an evidenced-based  way  to  help  people  diagnosed  with  mental  illnesses  secure  and  keep  employment,  begins  with  the  idea  that  every  person  with  a  serious  mental  illness  is  capable  of  working competitively in the community. In F Y18, the DMH Supported    Employment    Pilot    Prog ram    assisted    257    individuals  on  their  road  to  recovery  by  helping  them  to  become employed in the openly competitive job market.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Mississippi Disability Resources and Advocacy Organizations - 05/03/2019

~~This page has “links to government agencies and disability rights organizations in Mississippi. They may be able assist you with:• disability advocacy• home health services• home care• nursing aide services• Medicaid• accessing other community resources to help people with disabilities.

Many of these organizations work to address the unique needs associated with different disabilities, including but not limited to physical, intellectual, and developmental disabilities, and mental illness. Others focus on issues such as access to housing and legal assistance based on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).If you live in Mississippi and are a person with a disability, learning about state-specific resources to support people with disabilities can help you advocate for yourself. If you are a friend, family member, or caregiver of a person with disabilities in Mississippi, these resources can help you in supporting your loved one."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/21/2018

~~“The Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities is responsible for planning, development and supervision of an array of services for people in the state with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  The service delivery system is comprised of the State-Operated Programs, ID/DD Waiver program, and the IDD Community Support Program.  The ID/DD Waiver and Community Support Programs provide support to assist people to live successfully at home and in the community.  These services are provided by community mental health centers and other community service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Delta WDA provides Small Business Development, Entrepreneurial, and Self-Employment Training to area residents and WIOA customers in accordance with DOL’s TEGL 12-10 “Supporting Entrepreneurial and Self-Employment Training through the Workforce Investment System.” This program addresses the role the workforce investment system plays in support of entrepreneurial activities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) Program is fully integrated as an essential part of the WIN Job Center network.Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOP), funded through the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG), are included among the WIN Job Center partner staff. The WIN Job Center staff assists veterans, eligible spouses, and veterans with barriers to employment.  Veterans and eligible spouses are asked to complete an assessment form to determine if they have significant barriers to employment. The WIN Job Center staff provides initial core services and refers veterans/eligible spouses with barriers to the DVOP for enhanced services.Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are viable and effective partners in the WIN Job Center delivery system. They participate in employer outreach, job fairs, and other activities related to the JVSG guidelines. LVERs are key members on the MDES Business Services Team participating in business development activities, employer outreach efforts, and in developing jobs for veterans."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Strategic Plan – Mississippi Department of Mental Health - 11/20/2018

~~“Goal 1To increase access to community-based care and supports for adults and children with mental illness and/or substance use disorders through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered and recovery-oriented system of care

GOAL 2To increase access to community-based care and supports for people with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered system of care”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Career Exploration & Employability Skills - 11/05/2018

~~“The Vocational Rehabilitation Transition Counselor and the classroom teacher work together to implement a curriculum that students with disabilities may participate in through services provided at community rehabilitation programs throughout the state. The proposed schedule can be adapted to meet the needs of the student and the teacher and can be based on each school’s calendar year.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mississippi Council on Developmental Disabilities (MSCDD) State Work Plan - 10/01/2017

“The Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) stipulates that State Councils’ investments (grants, programs, and/or projects) support at least one of the following nine Areas of Emphasis:

 

1. Child Care

2. Community Supports (Formal or Informal)

3. Education and Early Intervention

4. Employment

5. Health

6. Housing

7. Quality Assurance

8. Recreation

9. Transportation”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

DMH Begins Implementation of Conflict Free Case Management - 08/01/2017

“The Mississippi Department of Mental Health (DMH) has begun the implementation of conflict-free case management services for the Intellectual Disabilities/Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD) Waiver.  Conflict-free case management is required for all states by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services, and will result in the transfer of a number of DMH employees to other community providers as it is implemented at DMH programs throughout the state.

 

DMH believes the function of Support Coordination is within the mission of the agency.  IDD regional programs will continue to provide Support Coordination services and no longer provide other ID/DD Waiver services. This plan has been approved by the Mississippi Division of Medicaid and CMS. The first implementation of conflict-free case management began at Ellisville State School in August 2017 and will be taking place at other DMH regional programs by the end of 2018. A large number of employees affected by these transitions will continue to serve Mississippians who require support from the ID/DD Waiver. There will not be a change in the type or amount of service people currently enrolled in the program receive.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

DD Network News: A Collaborative Publication from MSCDD, DRMS, and IDS - 02/01/2018

“Welcome! Thank you for reading the first issue of DD News, a joint publication of the Mississippi Council on Developmental Disabilities (MSCDD), Disability Rights Mississippi (DRMS), and the Institute for Disability Studies (IDS) at The University of Southern Mississippi. All three agencies are funded by the federal Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to ensure that people with developmental disabilities receive services as required by the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act. You can learn more about the agencies by researching their websites, listed on the agency pages of this newsletter.

The collaboration among our three agencies continues to expand and increase to benefit people with disabilities in our state. The more closely our agencies work together on issues to create the change that ultimately improves the lives of people with developmental and other disabilities, the greater the impact for all of Mississippi. We continue to collaborate with self-advocates, families, and professionals as evidenced by some of the work highlighted in this edition.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AbilityWorks - 11/03/2017

“AbilityWorks is a network of community rehabilitation programs that provide vocational assessment, job training, and actual work experience for individuals with disabilities. This is possible through a wide array of contract and subcontract services provided to local business and industry.

 

There are 17 locations in a statewide AbilityWorks network of vocationally oriented community programs and is a division of the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation. AbilityWork’s mission to clients is “to improve the quality of life, employment opportunities, and integration of people with disabilities into the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Vocational Rehabilitation Transition Services - 07/01/2017

“The Transition Services Program works with eligible secondary school students with disabilities to enable them to transition from school to subsequent work environments. Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) works cooperatively with the Mississippi Department of Education and local school districts in planning and implementing a variety of programs designed to provide training and assistance for students with disabilities to support them in making the difficult transition from school to work.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mississippi Council on Developmental Disabilities - 08/13/2012

Employment Objectives:

• “Identify and promote at least one Best Practice Model for increasing community employment options for individuals with Developmental Disabilities.” • “Identify at least one barrier to increasing community development options for individuals with Developmental Disabilities.” • “Determine and advocate for at least one Policy Change to improve Community Employment options for individuals with Developmental Disabilities.” • “Collaborate with other stakeholders to facilitate the transition [of] up to 15 individuals from work activity centers into community employment of their choosing.” • “Partner with others to achieve successful community employment for at least 10 individuals with Developmental Disabilities in their respective communities.”   Intermediaries and collaborators for this goal include State protection and advocacy system, university centers, and State DD Agency.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MS Balancing Incentives Program - 10/01/2011

“The Balancing Incentive Program authorizes grants to States to increase access to non-institutional long-term services and supports (LTSS) … [to] transform their long-term care systems by:

lowering costs through improved systems performance & efficiency creating tools to help consumers with care planning & assessment [and] improving quality measurement & oversight.

It “also provides new ways to serve more people in home and community-based settings, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as required by the Olmstead decision.”

 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mississippi Department of Mental Health MOU with DRS

“SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH IDD: DMH has implemented an MOU with the Department of Rehabilitation Services that is providing supported employment for people with IDD. Three hundred employees from DMH, MDRS, and the Division of Medicaid received training in early 2016 regarding supported employment services. As of June 2016, 18 people had been employed. 41 people have been referred for supported employment services through MDRS.”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mississippi Client Assistance Program (MSCAP)

~~Client Assistance Program, or often referred to as CAP, is a state managed and federally funded program designed to advise and inform clients and client applicants in the state of Mississippi. CAP assists in providing information obtaining to available services and benefits under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as well as the services and benefits available to individuals under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). In addition to this, CAP may assist and advocate for clients and client applicants in relation to projects, programs, and services provided under the Rehabilitation Act. CAP is funded through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) of the US Department of Education.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Recommendations for Improving School Funding in Mississippi - 01/16/2017

~~“Recommendation #3c: Create a commission to study and make recommendations related to service-based (IEP-based) fundingWhile multiple-tiered weights based on diagnosis alone would represent a big step forward for Mississippi, EdBuild believes that an IEP-based model, which incorporates consideration of both diagnosis and services, could move the needle even further to improve the precision of special education funding throughout the state. Funding based on student IEPs would take most of the guesswork out of the financing of special education and would significantly increase the impartiality of funding for students with special needs.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

MS CDD Grants and Contracts - 07/01/2016

“MS Partnerships in Employment grant from the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) – Disability Rights Mississippi; $74,410

DRMS’s responsibility within MSPE is to maintain the Employment Workgroup and carrying out its activities.  This group focuses on policies, removing barriers, improving access to competitive employment, and system change efforts.

 

MS Partnerships in Employment grant from the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities – Institute for Disability Studies; $144,000

IDS’s responsibility within MSPE is the Stakeholder’s Group and carrying out its activities.  The activities include focusing on innovative strategies and best practices for systems improved for competitive employment.  IDS provides knowledge and awareness to MSPE with periodic information sessions presented to the Employment Workgroup and the Consortium while assisting in carrying out various training activities across the State.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Mississippi Balancing Incentives Program - 05/01/2012

“The Balancing Incentive Program authorizes grants to States to increase access to non-institutional long-term services and supports (LTSS) … [to] transform their long-term care systems by:  • lowering costs through improved systems performance & efficiency  • creating tools to help consumers with care planning & assessment [and]  • improving quality measurement & oversight.   It “also provides new ways to serve more people in home and community-based settings, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as required by the Olmstead decision.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MS Partnerships in Employment

“Mississippi Partnerships in Employment (MSPE) will build capacity across existing state systems for sustainable systems change to improve outcomes for youth and young adults with DD/ID seeking competitive employment in integrated settings. The consortium will develop and implement policies that support competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with DD/ID seeking competitive employment in integrated settings by removing systemic barriers; identifying and implementing strategies and best practices that improve employment outcomes; and enhancing statewide collaboration that facilitates transition from secondary to post-secondary outcomes. Mississippi’s Partnership includes the DD Council, the University of Southern Mississippi’s UCEDD, Disability Rights Mississippi, VR, Department of Education, the Department of Mental Health Bureau of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities, the Department of Employment Security, and self-advocates”.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MS Money Follows the Person

“Money Follows the Person is a federal initiative to help states enhance community living options for persons with disabilities and establish person-driven and sustainable long-term care systems. The program is for qualified residents of nursing homes and intermediate care facilities and for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ICF/IID) who want to explore community living options.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; African American, Faith-Based, Hispanic, Vietnamese, Native Americans, extremely rural communities; new mothers and women with children; vulnerable and special needs populations; millennials; and Medicaid/CHIP-eligible consumers  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are the Aaron E. Henry Community Health Services Center, Boat People SOS – Gulf Coast, CATCH Kids Tupelo, Mercy Housing and Human Development, and the Mid-South Churches Cooperative Conference State Convention. They will partner with the Faith and community groups representing over 1,500 houses of worship, Mississippi’s gaming industry, Employers and groups of employees, Health Centers, and Head Start Sites.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Michael MinorPhone: (901) 826-8355/(662) 298-3584Email: pastorminor@thehillhernnado.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) - 09/03/2019

~~“My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving The “left behind” populations, such as low wage earners and hourly wage workers; as well as individuals who do not have health insurance because of a lack of affordable coverage options in their area.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Open Arms Healthcare Center. They will partner with the Southwest Mississippi River Region (SMRR) Community Advisory Group, Faith and community-based organizations, Small business owners, Chambers of Commerce, City Governance, and Community health clinics and primary care clinics in the SMRR.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Henry FullerPhone: (601) 957-7710Email: hfuller@mbk-inc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mississippi DMH Web-Based Training

“The Department of Mental Health provides Web-Based Training through Relias Learning (formerly Essential Learning) for registered providers. Relias is a customized learning management system and staff development tool. This training website, developed for DMH staff, presents and tracks training requirements in an accessible and easy to use format.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Mississippi Department of Mental Health Findings Letter - 12/22/2011

We [United States Department of Justice] conclude that the State of Mississippi fails to provide services to qualified individuals with disabilities, including mental illness and developmental disabilities, in the most integrated settings appropriate to their needs, in violation of the ADA. This has led to the needless and prolonged institutionalization of adults and children with disabilities who could be served in more integrated settings in the community with adequate services and supports. Further, systemic failures in the State’s system place qualified individuals with disabilities at risk of unnecessary institutionalization now and going forward.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Long Term Care 1915(c) Waiver Provider Orientation - 01/25/2019

~~“The Office of Long Term Care is responsible for ensuring that all providers of 1915(c) home and community based waiver services for the following waivers meet credentialing requirements as documented in the CMS approved waiver applications.• Elderly & Disabled Waiver• Assisted Living Waiver• Independent Living Waiver• Traumatic Brain Injury/Spinal Cord Injury WaiverAgencies may currently apply to enroll as providers of Personal Care services, In-Home Respite services or Adult Day Care services under the Elderly & Disabled (E&D) Waiver or Assisted Living services under the Assisted Living (AL) Waiver.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1915(i) State plan Home and Community-Based Services Administration and Operation - 11/01/2018

~~“The state implements the optional 1915(i) State plan Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) benefit for elderly and disabled individuals as set forth below.1. Services. (Specify the state’s service title(s) for the HCBS defined under “Services” and listed in Attachment 4.19-B):Day Services - Adult, Prevocational Services, Supported Employment Services, and Supported Living”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Elderly and Disabled Waiver - 07/01/2017

“The Elderly and Disabled Waiver program is administered directly by the Home and Community Based Services division (HCBS).

The Elderly and Disabled Waiver program provides home and community-based services to individuals age 21 years old and older who, but for the provision of such services, would require the level of care provided in a nursing facility. Beneficiaries of this waiver must qualify for Medicaid as Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries or meet the income and resource eligibility requirements for income level up to 300% of the SSI federal benefit rate and meet medical criteria of the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Public Notice for the Elderly and Disabled (E&D) Waiver renewal - 02/28/2017

~~“Pursuant to 42 C.F.R. Section 441.304(e)-(f), public notice is hereby given to the submission of the Elderly and Disabled (E&D) Waiver renewal. The Division of Medicaid, in the Office of the Governor, will submit this proposed waiver renewal to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for the E&D Waiver effective July 1, 2017.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Revised Statewide Transition Plan Summary 1915(c) and 1915(i) Home and Community Based (HCB) Programs - 11/28/2016

“ID/DD Waiver services provided in the participant’s private home or a relative’s home which is fully integrated with opportunities for full access to the greater community include: • Home and Community Supports, • Occupational Therapy, • Physical Therapy, • Speech Therapy, • Crisis Support, • Crisis Intervention, • In-Home Nursing Respite, • Supported Living, • Transition Assistance, • Support Coordination, • Supported Employment, and • Specialized Medical Supplies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mississippi HCBS Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

On Jan. 16, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule, effective March 17, 2014, which amends the requirements for qualities of home and community-based (HCB) settings. These requirements reflect CMS’s intent that individuals receive services and supports in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. The final rule requires the use of a person-centered planning process to develop a participant/beneficiary’s annual Plan for Services and Supports (PSS).

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MS Intellectual Disabilities/DD Waiver (0282.R04.00) - 07/01/2013

Provides day services-adults, prevocational, residential hab, respite, support coordination, supported employment, behavior support/intervention, home and community supports, specialized medical supplies, therapy services for individuals w/autism, DD, MR ages 0 - no max age  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mississippi ESEA Flexibility Request - 07/19/2012

“The Mississippi Department Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on July 19, 2012.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mississippi Medicaid State Plan

The Mississippi Medicaid State Plan (State Plan) is a detailed agreement between the State of Mississippi and the Federal Government that describes the nature and scope of Mississippi’s Medicaid Program. The State Plan is based on the federal requirements and regulations found in Title XIX of the Social Security Act. Changes to the State Plan, called State Plan Amendments (SPAs), must be approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) prior to implementation

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Mississippi Money Follows the Person Bridge to Independence

~~“Attention: Long Term Care ProvidersThe Mississippi Division of Medicaid’s (DOM) Bridge to Independence (B2I) program, funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), completed it’s final year as a demonstration project. Effective January 2019, the Medicaid Extender’s Act of 2019 provided for an extension of B2I services. All new B2I participants that transition under the extension  will receive a 365 day follow up.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

Mississippi "feels like coming home" for workers with disabilities who have found great jobs in their communities in the Magnolia State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Mississippi’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
-0.16%
Change from
2016 to 2017
2,984,100
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.46%
Change from
2016 to 2017
265,344
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.93%
Change from
2016 to 2017
73,203
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
27.59%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.7%
Change from
2016 to 2017
71.75%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 2,984,100
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 265,344
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 73,203
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,070,889
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 27.59%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 71.75%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 26.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 18.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 238,234
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 253,362
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 303,152
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 175,191
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 6,883
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,860
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,210
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 6,834
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 673

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,772
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 127,181

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,465
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 12,095
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 42,606
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 90.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 6
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 720
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 2,154
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 31,461

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,076
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 120
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 86
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 72.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,712
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 200,763
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $12,871,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $9,953,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 57.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 167
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 863
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 45.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.01%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.87%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 27.79%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 67.12%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 85.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 39.33%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 558,965
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,561
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 63,390
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 241,418
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 304,808
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 49
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 300
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 349
AbilityOne wages (products). $548,297
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,097,679

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 12
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,265
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,265

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Customized Employment

~~MDRS continues to identify current information from research, rehabilitation trends and professional resources. This information is provided to agency staff through a variety of methods, including training at the state, regional, and district levels. Most recently this training has been focused on Autism and customized employment. Additionally, this information is posted and available to staff on MDRS Connect, the agency intranet. (Page 180) Title II

The SE Program will continue to emphasize individual employment placements. Other models will remain an option for clients and may be utilized when feasible. However, when given a choice, clients prefer individual placements by an overwhelming majority. Individual placement is the preferred option of MDRS as well as the clients because it achieves integration in the work environment, it is competitive integrated employment, and it provides more opportunities for career pathways and better quality jobs with more benefits.
Person Centered Planning and Customized Employment as integral parts of service provision continue to be high priorities. These service approaches have been embraced by mental health providers, the DD Council, and other service providers in the state as accepted best practices for model service delivery. (Page 205) Title II

SE staff also participate in both practices in coordinating services for SE clients in the education system throughout the state. These practices have proven to be successful for clients because of the enhanced teamwork with other agencies. Under WIOA customized employment is included in the definition of supported employment and VR is including it as a VR service that the SE client can choose to include in his/her IPE. Therefore, VR is expanding customized employment training to the majority of its direct service staff. These service approaches will continue to be made available to clients during the intake process and will be utilized when deemed appropriate and when chosen by the client. (Page 206) Title II

Plans for improving community rehabilitation programs (private and agency-supported) include training staff to provide Pre-ETS, customized employment services, and on-the-job tryout services which facilitate the agency’s ability to achieve the changes in WIOA. (Page 211) Title II

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~8. Increase collaboration within the state's workforce system to improve services to unemployed workers with disabilities who are eligible for VR services by better leveraging services with other workforce development programs. (Page 209) Title II

21. Increase collaboration within the Workforce System to improve services to unemployed workers with disabilities who are eligible for VR services by better leveraging services with other workforce development programs.
22. Play stronger roles on state and local Workforce Boards to assure that VR consumers and other individuals with disabilities are better served by the One-Stop System. (Page 215) Title II

Leveraging Resources from Key Partners to Support SCSEP
Area Agencies on Aging work with community colleges to provide training to SCSEP participants at a reduced cost; many provide tuition waivers for SCSEP participants. Community colleges are an integral component of the WIOA programs offered through the WIN Job Centers. SCSEP participants are encouraged to dual enroll in WIOA with the WIN Job Centers for job search assistance and training classes. (Page 283) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~o MDHS - The Mississippi Department of Human Services administers the TANF program through several legacy applications, including MAVERICS and JAWS. MAVERICS supports case management data such as intake and eligibility information, and JAWS supports TANF Work Program data. These systems do not inherently support web services, but various enterprise solutions exist to allow a modern, intermediate application to interface with such systems. This intermediate application, developed in Java, would be able to implement and consume web services on behalf of the legacy application. In addition, MDHS is in the process of a multi-year system modernization effort that will reduce the agency's reliance on legacy applications for case management. (Page 96) Title I

In order to accomplish this, OVR relies on many cooperative agreements, memorandums of understanding and contracts with various agencies, organizations and groups.
The entities that OVR is actively involved with include, but is not limited to:
o Mississippi Department of Education for the coordination of transition services and local school districts to carry out transition and youth career services plus implement a Transition Specialist in participating local school districts; (Page 160) Title II

VRB works closely with the education system through the VR Transition and Youth Career Services Program. There are approximately 20 VRB Counselors throughout the state who work in preparing students with vision loss for entry into the world of work. They serve as informational resources for teachers and other educational staff as well as provide resources and information about blindness for parents and transitioning youth throughout development of the youth’s individualized plan for employment (IPE).
VRB Counselors work closely with parents, education staff, and community service providers to promote development of skills needed for students to become as independent as possible and competitive in terms of employment. In addition to training parents and students about the special education rights and responsibilities, VRB provides educational support by working with the VR Transition Team, school officials, and families to develop and implement the IPE. Goals developed in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) are included in the IPE to facilitate successful completion of those goals. (Page 163) Title II

Restructuring of the VR Transition and Youth Career Services Program has resulted in additional VR Counselors carrying transition and youth cases, which provides for more individualized services to both eligible and potentially eligible students in school. VR Counselors work with the students, parents, and school personnel as well as attend (IEP) meetings to help identify students that may be able to benefit from transition and youth career services.
Prior to making services available, the VR Counselor uses school documentation, health records, and other pertinent information as deemed appropriate for determining a student with a disability potentially eligible for pre-employment transition services and/or for determination of eligibility for the VR Transition program. (Page 164) Title II

Transition planning between MDRS and MDE ultimately helps with the successful development and implementation of both the IEP and the IPE.
MDRS through the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and Vocational Rehabilitation for the Blind have recently sent Request for Proposals for third party providers to provide Pre-ETS activities in accordance with the Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act. At this time, two proposals have been awarded contracts and additional Request for Proposals are being sought. (Page 164) Title II
It is also the intent of this agreement to serve as a mechanism for OVR/OVRB and MDE OSE to clearly specify the plans, policies and procedures for coordinating services to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities, including:
1. Consultation and technical assistance in the planning for the transition of students with disabilities;
2. Transition planning by OVR/OVRB and educational personnel that facilitates the development and implementation of a student’s individualized education plan (IEP);
3. Roles and responsibilities, including financial and programmatic responsibilities of each agency;
4. Procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities;
5. Assessment of students’ potential need for transition services and pre-employment transition services;
6. Coordination necessary and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by WIOA, with regard to students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment. (Page 166) Title II

The point of contact to businesses for any assistance and support needed to hire and maintain employment.
Business Development Representatives are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the job seekers on VR caseloads that will be deemed Job Ready match the skills that are needed by businesses, allowing VR counselors to spend more time with clients who require intensive IPE development and career counseling.
The main services provided by the Business Rep. include the following:
o Train employers regarding employment of individuals with disabilities, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act, work incentives, and laws related to employment opportunities;
o Provide consultation, technical assistance, and support to employers on workplace accommodations and assistive technology;
o Provide resources and support through collaboration with community partners and employers; and,
o Provide employer recruitment services, job matching, hiring, and retention of qualified individuals with disabilities. (Page 170) Title II

As appropriate, describe the procedures and activities to coordinate the designated State unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
MDRS pursues efforts to coordinate cross training with MDE that will address education and rehabilitation under the provision of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Training conferences on transition services have been held and co-sponsored by MDRS and MDE. Specifically, regional training conferences bring together all VR counselors with transition caseloads, other agency personnel involved with transition services, and transition specialists, teachers, and special education coordinators from MDE. VR strives to help MDE to meet the mandate the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004. (Page 181) Title II

VR assures that the individualized plan for employment (IPE) is also coordinated with the employment goal in the school’s individualized educational plan (IEP) and, where appropriate, the (ISP) individualized service plans of the long term care providers.
The VR Counselor servicing local school districts as well as the VR Supported Employment Counselors work together with schools district to ensure that students with disabilities that previously entered subminimum wage employment are provided information and services to assist in diverting these individuals into competitive integrated employment.
VR facilitates the opening of cases for beginning at age 14 if required. Pre-ETS services are provided to students with disabilities as early as age 14. If these individuals require VR Transition services as early as age 14, VR facilities this need by opening a VR case. This service provision will help strengthen VRs efforts to reach more students and strengthens the opportunity for successful employment outcomes. (Page 195) Title II

While local school districts are responsible for providing education and transition services to students with disabilities who are still in the secondary school system, under WIOA, VR is the state unit that is mandated to make available Pre-ETS begin at age fourteen (14) for all eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities with parental consent.
District Managers and counselors are responsible for developing cooperative working relationships with the local education agency staff in the districts, and other agencies working with youth. Letters were sent by the State Transition Program Coordinator to all the Special Education Directors and 504 Coordinators for each school district to discuss VR services for students with IEPs and 504 plans. The counselor is to follow-up with their Special Education Directors and 504 Coordinators at least annually to discuss the provision of outreach services for students with disabilities and to determine the need for potential referrals. (Page 195) Title II

MDRS and the local school district may enter into a Cooperative Agreement to jointly fund a Transition Assistant position to ensure a smoother transition of services between the school and OVR/OVRB. The Transition Assistant will provide services to selected secondary students with disabilities who are: (a) between the ages of fourteen (14) and twenty-one (21), (b) in transition from school to work and community, and (c) eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. The addition of school-based transition services are intended to add a component to the overall school and rehabilitation service continuum, not supplant existing employment-related or other services which are potentially appropriate for a particular student (any service the school is already responsible for providing). The Transition Assistant will not serve students who, with or without modifications, can benefit from existing school programs (career/technical and educational training programs etc.).  (Page 196) Title II

The OOS does not discriminate against any eligible individual on the basis of gender, age, race, creed, color, religion, national origin, citizenship, type of disability, duration of residence in Mississippi, public assistance status, source of referral, expected employment outcome, need for specific services, anticipate cost of services required, or income level of an individual or his/her family.
MDRS in consultation with the SRC will close the Priority Categories designated to be closed. Any individual currently under an approved IPE at the time his/her priority category is closed will continue to receive with his/her IPE, including the provision of Pre-employment transition services and Post-Employment Services. (Page 201) Title II

MDRS has determined that sufficient resources are currently available to provide VR services to all individuals with disabilities that apply, those determined eligible in all priority categories and those under an IPE. Due to the increase in service needs and the staff resources in 2017 and 2018 to provide the services, if the projected resources for funds and personnel change before the next state plan modification, MDRS will make a determination whether it may need to close one or more of its priority categories.
During FF2018, MDRS will be able to serve all eligible individuals in all three priority categories. The total projected available resources including the federal allotment, non-federal contributions, carryover, and program income for FY 2018 is $67,705,332. MDRS will conduct reviews periodically during the year to help validate the order and assess the impact of unforeseen circumstances. (Page 203) Title II

SE staff also participate in both practices in coordinating services for SE clients in the education system throughout the state. These practices have proven to be successful for clients because of the enhanced teamwork with other agencies. Under WIOA customized employment is included in the definition of supported employment and VR is including it as a VR service that the SE client can choose to include in his/her IPE. Therefore, VR is expanding customized employment training to the majority of its direct service staff. These service approaches will continue to be made available to clients during the intake process and will be utilized when deemed appropriate and when chosen by the client. (Page 206) Title II

Goal III: Implement a statewide model for more effectively serving high school youth and students with disabilities including individuals with visual and/or hearing impairments.
o A statewide training was conducted in 2016 that included all VR/VRB counselors and staff, and Special Education coordinators from schools throughout the state. This training assist VR in explaining the role of VR in serving students that have an IEP and 504 plan as well as serving students that are not receiving special education services. We are in hopes that we will continually see an increase in referrals for these students.
o In 2017, the updated formal Interagency Cooperative Agreement was developed with the Mississippi Department of Education. MDRS also updated our local school agreements.
o In 2016, the OVR Transition Manual designed to assist staff in the delivery of transition services. This manual is used as technical assistance for transition planning purposes. Training was held in each district statewide with counselors that are assigned to local schools/school districts.
o Annually, the OVR Transition Coordinator updates and maintains a list of all 504 coordinators and special education staff for each school district. The list is a document that can be accessed by all staff on the MDRS intranet - MDRS Connect. (Page 218) Title II

Continue the referral process between the VR Transition Counselor and the VR (SE) Supported Employment Counselor for students with disabilities ages 14-21 who have been determined to need long term ongoing support services. The VR Transition Counselor will take the referral from the MDE, determine eligibility, complete the assessment and discovery process and work with the SE Counselor to develop the IPE with the student, parents/guardians, and school. Once the IPE has been signed by all the required parties, then the student’s case will be transferred to the SE Counselor’s caseload. (Page 220) Title II
 

Career Pathways

~~In accordance with section 101(d) of WIOA, the Mississippi State Workforce Investment Board (SWIB) will establish and operate through a SWIB WIOA Board Committee, whose membership will meet WIOA state board composition requirements, to perform the following services for the Governor:
1. Development, implementation, and modification of the state plan.
2. Collaboration with educational boards (MBE, MCCB, IHL), partners, and service providers to review statewide policies, statewide programs, and recommendations on actions that should be taken by the state to align workforce development programs in a manner that supports a comprehensive and streamlined workforce development system, including the review and provision of comments on state plans.
3. Collaboration with educational boards (MBE, MCCB, IHL), partners, and service providers in the development and continuous improvement of the workforce development system in the state, including:
a. Identification of barriers and means for removing barriers to better coordinate, align, and avoid duplication among the programs and activities carried out through the system.
b. Development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skill adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.
c. Development of strategies for providing effective outreach to and improved access for individuals and employers who could benefit from services provided through the workforce development system. (Page 64) Title I

 (2) The SE Program will continue to emphasize individual employment placements. Other models will remain an option for clients and may be utilized when feasible. However, when given a choice, clients prefer individual placements by an overwhelming majority. Individual placement is the preferred option of MDRS as well as the clients because it achieves integration in the work environment, it is competitive integrated employment, and it provides more opportunities for career pathways and better quality jobs with more benefits. (Page 205) Title II
  

Apprenticeship
No disability specific information found regarding this element
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Local workforce development boards have the option to include additional Affiliate One-Stop Centers with any subset of Combined Plan Partners as long as they include at least two partners. Local workforce development boards also have the flexibility to include additional partners in Affiliate One-Stop Centers. While local workforce development boards ultimately decide the logistics of affiliate centers, the WIOA law specifically identifies the following approved federally funded partners: employment and training programs administered by the Social Security Administration, including Ticket to Work and the Self Sufficiency Program; employment and training programs carried out by the Small Business Administration; Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) programs; Client Assistance Program; and programs authorized under the National and Community Service Act of 1990.
Local workforce development boards are also responsible for ensuring that local activities and local sector targets are in line with state-level sector analysis. The Mississippi LifeTracks system will constantly update web-accessible reports that feature dashboard numbers, pathway analysis, and supply and demand analysis to ensure that economic developers in Mississippi have a near real-time picture of the labor market. Sector analysis revealed laborshed zones that transcend local workforce development area boundaries and allow local workforce development boards to serve as intermediaries to connect local employers and training providers to meet labor market demands. Employers will communicate labor demand in real time by posting job orders in Mississippi Works Labor Exchange. (Page 88) Title I

Business Development Representatives are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the job seekers on VR caseloads that will be deemed Job Ready match the skills that are needed by businesses, allowing VR counselors to spend more time with clients who require intensive IPE development and career counseling.
The main services provided by the Business Rep. include the following:
o Train employers regarding employment of individuals with disabilities, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act, work incentives, and laws related to employment opportunities;
o Provide consultation, technical assistance, and support to employers on workplace accommodations and assistive technology;
o Provide resources and support through collaboration with community partners and employers; and,
o Provide employer recruitment services, job matching, hiring, and retention of qualified individuals with disabilities.
MDRS also works with employers to help youth with disabilities and students with disabilities have more opportunities, explore career interests, acquire workplace skills, and enter into competitive integrated employment. (Page 170) Title II

457. Business Relations Specialist will providing information to VR staff the areas as follows:
          *the services BRS provide to employers,
          *training and information regarding work incentives,
          *job analysis and job matching,
          *career opportunities in the local area; and
458. Develop and implement on campus work experience training in order to provide students who cannot get into or opportunities for vocational training are not readily available in a community based setting.
459. Refer those consumers receiving SSI/SSDI cash benefits who are interested in earnings that will eliminate their reliance on SSA cash benefits for work incentives benefits analysis and counseling.
460. Coordinate and conduct the Annual Governor’s Job Fair for individuals with disabilities.
461. Summer Internship Program for high school students with blindness and visual impairments; and deafness and hard of hearing. (Page 213) Title II
GOAL II: Improve the VR Service Delivery System to Individuals with disabilities
Strategies (Plan of Action):
462. Designate staff in each MDRS districts to be responsible for conducting outreach and orientation sessions on a regular basis.
463. Provide input to assure appropriate inclusion of vocational rehabilitation activities in, public service announcements, and agency website and publications.
464. Update and distribute vocational rehabilitation brochures to appropriate referral sources.
465. Designate and train specific staff members in each district to handle referrals and provide information to the public.
466. Assure that all geographic areas of the state are covered with appropriate service delivery staff. (Page 213) Title II
 

Employer/ Business

~~The point of contact to businesses for any assistance and support needed to hire and maintain employment.
Business Development Representatives are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the job seekers on VR caseloads that will be deemed Job Ready match the skills that are needed by businesses, allowing VR counselors to spend more time with clients who require intensive IPE development and career counseling.
The main services provided by the Business Rep. include the following:
o Train employers regarding employment of individuals with disabilities, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act, work incentives, and laws related to employment opportunities;
o Provide consultation, technical assistance, and support to employers on workplace accommodations and assistive technology;
o Provide resources and support through collaboration with community partners and employers; and,
o Provide employer recruitment services, job matching, hiring, and retention of qualified individuals with disabilities. (Page 170) Title II
 

Data Collection
No disability specific information found regarding this element.
511

~~The scope of services between MDRS and MDE are described in (d)2. The scope of services between MDRS and the local school districts are intended to serve as a mechanism for OVR/OVRB and the local school districts to clearly specify the plans, policies and procedures for coordinating services to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities, including:
0. Responsibilities of MDRS/OVR
1. Responsibilities of School District
2. Referral Process
3. Joint Development of IEPs and IPEs; and
4. Coordination necessary and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by WIOA, with regard to students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment
This Memorandum of Agreement for Transition Planning for Secondary Students with Disabilities between is made and entered into by and between the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services, hereafter referred to as “MDRS,” for and on behalf of its Offices of Vocational Rehabilitation and Vocational Rehabilitation for the Blind, hereafter referred to as “OVR/OVRB,” and the Mississippi Department of Education, for and on behalf of its Office of Special Education, hereafter referred to as “MDE OSE.”
A formal interagency agreement is mandated under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 34 CFR 300.154, and section 101(a) (11) (D) of the Rehabilitation Act and its implementing regulations at 34 CFR 361.22 (b). Additional references used in this document include Sections 113 and 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the Final Regulations: State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program; State Supported Employment Services Program; Limitations on Use of Subminimum Wage.This agreement is designed to improve the cooperative and collaborative efforts between the OVR/OVRB, and MDE OSE to coordinate the receipt of pre-employment transition services, transition services and other vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to students with disabilities who are eligible for special education services under the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA), students who have a 504 plan, and other students with disabilities who are eligible or potentially eligible for services through OVR/OVRB, in order to facilitate their smooth transition from school to post-school employment-related activities and competitive, integrated employment. (Page 165-166) Title I

It is also the intent of this agreement to serve as a mechanism for OVR/OVRB and MDE OSE to clearly specify the plans, policies and procedures for coordinating services to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities, including:
1. Consultation and technical assistance in the planning for the transition of students with disabilities;
2. Transition planning by OVR/OVRB and educational personnel that facilitates the development and implementation of a student’s individualized education plan (IEP);
3. Roles and responsibilities, including financial and programmatic responsibilities of each agency;
4. Procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities;
5. Assessment of students’ potential need for transition services and pre-employment transition services;
6. Coordination necessary and documentation requirements set forth in section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, as added by WIOA, with regard to students with disabilities who are seeking subminimum wage employment.; and an
7. Assurance that the MDE OSE will not enter into an arrangement with an entity holding a special wage certificate under section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act for the purpose of operating a program under which a youth with a disability is engaged in work at a subminimum wage.
Additional considerations include grievance procedure to resolve disputes between OVR/OVRB and the MDE OSE, as appropriate, as well as procedures to resolve disputes between an individual with a disability and the entities specified above, and information about the Client Assistance Program. (Pages 166- 167) Title II
 

 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
No disability specific information found regarding this element.
Vets
The WIOA services that MDES administers will address the workforce and training needs of every eligible individual. Through Wagner-Peyser services, MDES provides job search, referral, and placement services to all eligible Mississippi workers. MDES funds adult training programs administered by local workforce development boards based on the needs of each local workforce development area. To serve dislocated workers, MDES coordinates Rapid Response services that assist employers and employees affected by layoffs or plant closures. MDES serves youth through specially trained Youth Providers who connect youth to targeted youth programs, other eligible core programs, and education and training opportunities based on the specific needs of the individual. In addition, there are two employment outreach groups: Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) and Disabled Veteran Outreach Specialists (DVOP). To fill job openings, LVER staff work directly with businesses, and DVOP staff work directly with unemployed or underemployed veterans. (Page 75) Title I o Referral of qualified veterans to new job openings, especially Federal Contractor job orders, prior to all non-veteran job referral activity. o Veteran placement at the top of WIOA waiting lists (ITAs and OJT) for limited training funds. MDES management will monitor priority of service by reviewing quarterly performance reports, manager reports, and MS Works reports. MDES management will monitor priority of service in covered programs at two levels. Workforce Investment Network (WIN) Job Centers will continue to use established protocol of identifying targeted groups. At the state level, management will continue to analyze performance reports, manager reports, and MS Works reports. WIN Job Center services are made available and provided to eligible veterans, transitioning service members, VA VR & E Chapter 31 veterans, Native American Veterans, other groups targeted for special consideration, and veterans with significant barriers to employment through outreach activities performed by Disabled Veteran Outreach Specialists (DVOPs). MDES will continue to encourage non-DOL program partners to focus on providing priority of service to targeted groups for special consideration. (Page 106) Title II In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes: A. HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG MDES plans to assign and utilize DVOP Specialists and other agency employees trained in case management to metropolitan WIN Job Centers throughout the state where the need of intensive services is greatest. DVOP Specialists will provide intensive services, through the case management framework, and facilitate placements to meet the employment needs of veterans, prioritizing services to special disabled veterans, other disabled veterans, and other categories of veterans in accordance with priorities determined by the Secretary of Labor. The DVOP Specialist, Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC), will continue to work with the Veterans Affairs’ Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment (VR & E) program. DVOP specialists will provide intensive services through the case management approach, including completion of an assessment and a written employability development plan. LVER staff trained in networking will be assigned and utilized within workforce areas. LVER staff will conduct outreach to employers within the workforce area to assist veterans in gaining employment, including conducting seminars for employers and, in conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups; and facilitate employment, training, and placement services furnished to veterans served by the WIN Job Centers. MDES plans to fill grant-funded vacancies expeditiously despite State budget problems, hiring freezes and furloughs. MDES plans to identify projected losses and retirements early when possible. Applicants will be given the following order of priority: qualified service-connected disabled veterans; qualified eligible veterans; and qualified eligible persons. Also, veteran (non-JVSG) staff in the agency may be considered for assignment to the program. (Page 259) Title II LVER Staff In accordance with Veterans’ Program Letter 07-10, 03-14 or most recent guidance, MDES Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVER) will conduct outreach to employers in the area to assist veterans in gaining employment, including conducting seminars for employers and, in conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups, and facilitating employment, training, and placement services furnished to veterans within WIN Job Centers. The LVERs will work with the local area management team to coordinate and conduct employer outreach activities. LVERs will advocate for all veterans served by the WIN Job Centers with business, industry, and other community-based organizations by participating in appropriate activities such as: o Planning and participating in job and career fairs; o Conducting employer outreach; o Educating all WIN Job Center staff and partners with current employment initiatives and programs for veterans; o Conducting job searches and workshops, and establishing job search groups, in conjunction with employers; o Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; o Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans; o Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and o Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. (Page 260) Title IV DVOP specialists and LVERs are an essential part of and fully integrated into the WIN Job Center network. They are included among the WIN Job Center partner staff, which consists of all staff employed by programs or activities operated by job center partners that provide job-driven online and/or in-person workforce development or related support services as part of the workforce development system. Other WIN Job Center partner staff members include staff of WIOA, WP, and other network partner programs. LVER staff will continue to be viable and effective in the WIN Job Center delivery system, e.g., facilitating and participating in employer marketing services, employer job fairs, etc. LVER staff will continue to be considered key players and team participants in business development activities and employer marketing efforts, developing jobs for WIN Job Centers, marketing veteran services to employers, assisting employers at job fairs and facilitating employer recruitments. Veterans with significant barriers to employment are referred to or assigned to the DVOP after initial core services. All of these activities translate into a fully integrated system with positive benefits and productivity for the WIN Job Centers and also subsequently result in the development of seamless employment opportunities for veterans. (Page 261) Title II
Mental Health

~~The entities that OVR is actively involved with include, but is not limited to:
o Mississippi Department of Education for the coordination of transition services and local school districts to carry out transition and youth career services plus implement a Transition Specialist in participating local school districts;
o Hinds Community College for the Deaf Services Program;
o Division of Medicaid to provide seamless, non-duplicated services to individuals who are eligible for both Medicaid and VR services and for maximum utilization of resources between the two agencies;
o Department of Mental Health (DMH) Planning and Advisory Council as federally mandated for advice and support. DMH to cover the costs for therapeutic medical services offered at secondary alcohol and drug treatment centers that have been approved by DMH;
o Department of Mental Health -Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to continue enhancing, expanding, and developing methods to support eligible persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities who express a desire for competitive integrated employment; establish a state-level work group to address system, policy and funding issues that impede the continuous provision of employment services by MDRS and DMH; engage MDRS staff and DMH providers and stakeholders at the local level in collaboration and cooperation in the accomplishment of the vision and desired outcomes; identify and disseminate best practices including training and funding strategies; and, provide individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities with quality employment services that lead to competitive integrated employment in a non-duplicated and seamless manner; ( Page 160-161) Title II

MDRS administers the Supported Employment (SE) Program as specified in Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act and amended in WIOA. VR works extensively with other state agencies, private non-profit entities, employers, family members, and consumer groups to ensure quality SE services are provided to all eligible individuals throughout all phases of the SE service delivery system.
MDRS- VR has entered into formal cooperative agreements with the Mississippi Division of Medicaid (Medicaid) and Department of Mental Health, Bureau for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, with respect to delivery of VR services, including extended services, for individuals with the most significant disabilities eligible for home and community-based services.
In addition to these formal agreements, MDRS collaborates on a more informal basis with public and private entities to ensure a comprehensive program of services is provided to SE eligible individuals.
Collaborative partners include local mental health facilities, Medicaid’s Bridge to Independence Program to help people move from qualified institutions to homes in the community, local school districts, businesses and industries, local projects funded by the DD Council, workforce development one-stop career centers, advocacy groups, and other relevant third parties as well as parents of SE eligible individuals. (Page 168) Title II

Collaborative partners include local mental health facilities, Medicaid’s Bridge to Independence Program to help people move from qualified institutions to homes in the community, local school districts, businesses and industries, local projects funded by the Mississippi Council on Development Disabilities (DD Council), workforce development one-stop career centers, advocacy groups, and other relevant third parties as well as parents of individuals with the most significant disabilities.
MDRS also has in place with the Mississippi Partnership for Employment a Memorandum of Understanding that includes the following partners:
1) DD Council;
2) The University of Southern Mississippi Institute for Disability Studies;
3) Disability Rights of Mississippi;
4) Mississippi Department of Education;
5) DMH;
6) Mississippi Department of Employment Security (the administering authority for the state’s workforce development system); and
7) Two self-advocates
The partnership’s intent is to build capacity across existing state systems to improve outcomes for youth and young adults with developmental disabilities including intellectual disabilities seeking competitive employment in integrated settings. (Page 172) Title II

SE staff members continue to make every effort to identify and facilitate natural supports that occur in the workplace in order to maximize utilization of funds. These natural supports do not replace the one-on-one intensive support provided to clients by the SE Counselors. However, when properly identified and utilized, these natural supports do result in decreased direct service costs and increased quality of support.
(2) The SE Program will continue to emphasize individual employment placements. Other models will remain an option for clients and may be utilized when feasible. However, when given a choice, clients prefer individual placements by an overwhelming majority. Individual placement is the preferred option of MDRS as well as the clients because it achieves integration in the work environment, it is competitive integrated employment, and it provides more opportunities for career pathways and better quality jobs with more benefits.
Person Centered Planning and Customized Employment as integral parts of service provision continue to be high priorities. These service approaches have been embraced by mental health providers, the DD Council, and other service providers in the state as accepted best practices for model service delivery. (Page 205) Title II

Cooperative arrangements will continue to be developed with other provider agencies and organizations, both public and private, to expand the SE Program to unserved and underserved populations. The focus of these arrangements is on promoting and enabling SE Counselors and service provider personnel from other agencies to work as teams to share expertise, provide technical support in specific disability areas, and conduct joint training.
With the interagency agreement and referral process that has been developed with the Department of Mental Health and the Division of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, we will continue to work with this agency in serving individuals who are eligible for the waiver as extended service providers. (Page 206) Title II

MDRS maintains formal agreements with the MDE and DMH as well as other public and private entities, which identify areas of collaboration to ensure a comprehensive program of services to SE eligible individuals. Staff members collaborate intensively with local mental health centers, school districts, SE businesses and industries, the DD Council, parents, advocacy groups and other relevant third parties.
The service approach for SE eligible clients emulates the nationally accepted "best practices" models of SE service delivery which include individual job placement, mobile crews, and temporary employment placement (TEP) for individuals with chronic mental illness. Central to each of these approaches is an emphasis on person centered planning and facilitation of natural supports. Individualized job development is conducted by SE staff based on job matching assessment information and client’s informed choice. SE clients are assisted with employment planning and placement by VTIs and job skills training is provided at the job site either by job coaches or through natural supports.
To fulfill the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended by WIOA, regarding transitional employment for individuals with chronic mental illness, MDRS utilizes the TEP model. This model involves placement in a series of temporary jobs that lead to permanent employment as an outcome. This service approach is implemented through coordination with local mental health centers. (Page 224) Title IV

Mississippi will coordinate services, where available, with public and private entities (i.e., Mississippi Departments of Rehabilitation Services, Employment Security and Mental Health, and the Mississippi Community College Board, etc.) to allow TANF families with barriers (i.e., little or no work experience, domestic violence, limited English proficiency, learning disabilities, mental, physical disabilities and/or substance abuse) an opportunity to gain access to services and resources needed to obtain the highest level of self-sufficiency within the constraints of the TANF time-limits. Special screening and referral procedures will be used to identify and refer the individual for the appropriate service. Mississippi will deny benefits to individuals who fail to comply with the activities provided by these entities. (Page 237) Title IV

Job Search and Job Readiness - Job search and job readiness assistance is defined as the act of seeking or obtaining employment, preparation to seek or obtain employment, including life skills training, and substance abuse treatment, mental health treatment, or rehabilitation activities for those who are otherwise employable.
Such treatment or therapy must be determined to be necessary and certified by a qualified medical, substance abuse or mental health professional. A qualified professional is defined as any individual who is licensed or certified. Job search and job readiness assistance activities are supervised daily by the case manager and/or job readiness trainer. (Page 239) Title IV

The MDHS will create a referral process to the Department of Child Protection Services (DCPS) to contact state and local law enforcement, the education system, and counseling services for recipients requiring assistance with statutory rape, domestic violence issues, mental health concerns, and drug/alcohol treatment. The counselors and educators can focus on problems that may be an underlying problem other than statutory rape. Individuals referred will complete an assessment, discuss educational barriers, and receive life skill strategies. MDHS established the Healthy Marriage Initiative, using Federal TANF funds, to promote the well-being of children in Mississippi by encouraging the involvement of mothers and fathers in their lives. The initiative will:
o Encourage stable family formation and healthy marriages,
o Promote responsible fathering,
o Increase paternity and child support objectives,
o Encourage community support for marriage, and
o Prevent out-of-wedlock pregnancies. (Page 250) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
1. Partner with Third Party Administrators (TPAs) — Statistical data from this cross match pilot project is currently being analyzed to determine if continuing the cross match would be beneficial. 2. Employers SIDES messaging — Explain to employer the importance and benefits of responding timely through E-Response. A mailing campaign is in progress to target a designated group of employers. 3. Claimant messaging — Generate a detail mailer/message alert to claimant after first payment advising them of the requirement and method to properly report earnings and return to work. Include the penalty for failing to do so but emphasize the potential overpayment issue and progression. (Page 273) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 54

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; African American, Faith-Based, Hispanic, Vietnamese, Native Americans, extremely rural communities; new mothers and women with children; vulnerable and special needs populations; millennials; and Medicaid/CHIP-eligible consumers  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are the Aaron E. Henry Community Health Services Center, Boat People SOS – Gulf Coast, CATCH Kids Tupelo, Mercy Housing and Human Development, and the Mid-South Churches Cooperative Conference State Convention. They will partner with the Faith and community groups representing over 1,500 houses of worship, Mississippi’s gaming industry, Employers and groups of employees, Health Centers, and Head Start Sites.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Michael MinorPhone: (901) 826-8355/(662) 298-3584Email: pastorminor@thehillhernnado.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) - 09/03/2019

~~“My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving The “left behind” populations, such as low wage earners and hourly wage workers; as well as individuals who do not have health insurance because of a lack of affordable coverage options in their area.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Open Arms Healthcare Center. They will partner with the Southwest Mississippi River Region (SMRR) Community Advisory Group, Faith and community-based organizations, Small business owners, Chambers of Commerce, City Governance, and Community health clinics and primary care clinics in the SMRR.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Henry FullerPhone: (601) 957-7710Email: hfuller@mbk-inc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mississippi ABLE - 06/02/2019

~~“What is an ABLE account?ABLE accounts are savings accounts for individuals with disabilities which will not affect their public benefits.  These accounts can be used for daily transactions and/or long-term savings.  Income earned in the accounts is not taxed if spent on qualified disability-related expenses.  Contributions can be made to an account by anyone and may qualify for a state tax deduction.”

This page also has links for more information on ABLE

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Supported Employment - 05/23/2019

~~“DMH  believes  that  work  plays  a  critical  role  in  improving  quality  of  life  and  mental  health  outcomes  of  the  people  we  serve  as  part  of  their  recovery  journey.  In  January  2015,  DMH  provided  funding  to  develop  four  pilot  sites  to  offer    Supported   Employment   to   75   individuals   with   mental   illness.  The  sites  are  located  in  Community  Mental  Health  Center Regions 2, 7, 10 and 12. Supported employment, an evidenced-based  way  to  help  people  diagnosed  with  mental  illnesses  secure  and  keep  employment,  begins  with  the  idea  that  every  person  with  a  serious  mental  illness  is  capable  of  working competitively in the community. In F Y18, the DMH Supported    Employment    Pilot    Prog ram    assisted    257    individuals  on  their  road  to  recovery  by  helping  them  to  become employed in the openly competitive job market.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Mississippi Disability Resources and Advocacy Organizations - 05/03/2019

~~This page has “links to government agencies and disability rights organizations in Mississippi. They may be able assist you with:• disability advocacy• home health services• home care• nursing aide services• Medicaid• accessing other community resources to help people with disabilities.

Many of these organizations work to address the unique needs associated with different disabilities, including but not limited to physical, intellectual, and developmental disabilities, and mental illness. Others focus on issues such as access to housing and legal assistance based on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).If you live in Mississippi and are a person with a disability, learning about state-specific resources to support people with disabilities can help you advocate for yourself. If you are a friend, family member, or caregiver of a person with disabilities in Mississippi, these resources can help you in supporting your loved one."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Long Term Care 1915(c) Waiver Provider Orientation - 01/25/2019

~~“The Office of Long Term Care is responsible for ensuring that all providers of 1915(c) home and community based waiver services for the following waivers meet credentialing requirements as documented in the CMS approved waiver applications.• Elderly & Disabled Waiver• Assisted Living Waiver• Independent Living Waiver• Traumatic Brain Injury/Spinal Cord Injury WaiverAgencies may currently apply to enroll as providers of Personal Care services, In-Home Respite services or Adult Day Care services under the Elderly & Disabled (E&D) Waiver or Assisted Living services under the Assisted Living (AL) Waiver.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/21/2018

~~“The Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities is responsible for planning, development and supervision of an array of services for people in the state with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  The service delivery system is comprised of the State-Operated Programs, ID/DD Waiver program, and the IDD Community Support Program.  The ID/DD Waiver and Community Support Programs provide support to assist people to live successfully at home and in the community.  These services are provided by community mental health centers and other community service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Delta WDA provides Small Business Development, Entrepreneurial, and Self-Employment Training to area residents and WIOA customers in accordance with DOL’s TEGL 12-10 “Supporting Entrepreneurial and Self-Employment Training through the Workforce Investment System.” This program addresses the role the workforce investment system plays in support of entrepreneurial activities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) Program is fully integrated as an essential part of the WIN Job Center network.Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOP), funded through the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG), are included among the WIN Job Center partner staff. The WIN Job Center staff assists veterans, eligible spouses, and veterans with barriers to employment.  Veterans and eligible spouses are asked to complete an assessment form to determine if they have significant barriers to employment. The WIN Job Center staff provides initial core services and refers veterans/eligible spouses with barriers to the DVOP for enhanced services.Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are viable and effective partners in the WIN Job Center delivery system. They participate in employer outreach, job fairs, and other activities related to the JVSG guidelines. LVERs are key members on the MDES Business Services Team participating in business development activities, employer outreach efforts, and in developing jobs for veterans."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Strategic Plan – Mississippi Department of Mental Health - 11/20/2018

~~“Goal 1To increase access to community-based care and supports for adults and children with mental illness and/or substance use disorders through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered and recovery-oriented system of care

GOAL 2To increase access to community-based care and supports for people with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered system of care”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

House Bill 909 - Medical benefits for retired public employees and dependents under age sixty-five (65) years and not eligible for Medicare benefits. - 07/01/2017

“(d)  Medical benefits for retired employees and dependents under age sixty-five (65) years and not eligible for Medicare benefits.  For employees who retire before July 1, 2005, and for employees retiring due to work-related disability under the Public Employees' Retirement System, the same health insurance coverage as for all other active employees and their dependents shall be available to retired employees and all dependents under age sixty-five (65) years who are not eligible for Medicare benefits, the level of benefits to be the same level as for all other active participants.  For employees who retire on or after July 1, 2005, and not retiring due to work-related disability under the Public Employees' Retirement System, the same health insurance coverage as for all other active employees and their dependents shall be available to those retiring employees and all dependents under age sixty-five (65) years who are not eligible for Medicare benefits only if the retiring employees were participants in the State and School Employees Health Insurance Plan for four (4) years or more before their retirement, the level of benefits to be the same level as for all other active participants.  This section will apply to those employees who retire due to one hundred percent (100%) medical disability as well as those employees electing early retirement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement

MS HB 836 (including amendments to Miss. Code Ann. §43-30-1) - 07/01/2015

An act to require state agencies that provide services an support to persons with disabilities to consider, as their first option, competitive employment in an integrated setting for persons with disabilities; to require all state agencies to follow this policy for employment by coordinating all collaborating efforts among agencies; to authorize state agencies to adopt rules and regulations to implement the provisions of this act; to require the Disability Resource Commission to review measurable goals and objectives as submitting to it by each relevant state agency to ensure implementation of this act; to provide reporting requirements for state agencies; to amend Section 43-30-1, Mississippi Code of 1972, in conformity thereto; and for related purposes. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

SB 2034 Employment First Act - 07/01/2014

“AN ACT TO CREATE THE "EMPLOYMENT FIRST ACT"; TO REQUIRE THAT STATE AGENCIES THAT PROVIDE SERVICES AND SUPPORT TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES SHALL CONSIDER, AS THEIR FIRST OPTION, COMPETITIVE EMPLOYMENT IN AN INTEGRATED SETTING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES; TO REQUIRE ALL STATE AGENCIES TO FOLLOW THIS POLICY FOR EMPLOYMENT BY COORDINATING ALL COLLABORATING EFFORTS AMONG AGENCIES; TO AUTHORIZE STATE AGENCIES TO ADOPT RULES AND REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT THE ACT; TO ESTABLISH AN EMPLOYMENT FIRST OVERSIGHT COMMISSION WHICH SHALL REVIEW MEASURABLE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES AS SUBMITTED TO IT BY EACH RELEVANT STATE AGENCY TO ENSURE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ACT; TO PROVIDE REPORTING REQUIREMENTS; AND FOR RELATED PURPOSES.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Mississippi Concurrent Resolution No. 563

“State agencies that provide services and support to persons with disabilities shall coordinate efforts and collaborate within and among such agencies to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures and funding support competitive employment in integrated settings for persons with disabilities who are of working age....

All state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems in order to track progress toward full implementation of ‘Employment First’ and shall adopt measurable goals and objectives to promote assessment of progress in implementing this resolution.

This resolution "died on calendar" in April 2013”

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Mississippi Executive Order 1335 - 01/14/2014

“Whereas, my administration is committed to supporting policies under which agencies that provide services to persons with disabilities and/or provide employment, economic development, or other related services explore employment in an integrated setting as the first priority option for persons with disabilities who are of working age.  Now, Therefore, I, Phil Bryant, Governor of the State of Mississippi, pursuant to the Constitution and laws of the State of Mississippi, do hereby order as follows:

State agencies that provide services to persons with disabilities, and state agencies which provide employment, economic development, or other related services, shall coordinate efforts and collaborate to ensure that state programs, policies, and procedures support employment in integrated settings as the first priority option, to the extent feasible, for persons with disabilities who are of working age. The same state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems and adopt measureable goals and objectives to track progress toward the achievement of the goals of this Executive Order. The Mississippi Disability Resource Commission, Miss. Code Ann. § 43-30-1, is authorized to monitor implementation of this Executive Order.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Mississippi ABLE - 06/02/2019

~~“What is an ABLE account?ABLE accounts are savings accounts for individuals with disabilities which will not affect their public benefits.  These accounts can be used for daily transactions and/or long-term savings.  Income earned in the accounts is not taxed if spent on qualified disability-related expenses.  Contributions can be made to an account by anyone and may qualify for a state tax deduction.”

This page also has links for more information on ABLE

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Supported Employment - 05/23/2019

~~“DMH  believes  that  work  plays  a  critical  role  in  improving  quality  of  life  and  mental  health  outcomes  of  the  people  we  serve  as  part  of  their  recovery  journey.  In  January  2015,  DMH  provided  funding  to  develop  four  pilot  sites  to  offer    Supported   Employment   to   75   individuals   with   mental   illness.  The  sites  are  located  in  Community  Mental  Health  Center Regions 2, 7, 10 and 12. Supported employment, an evidenced-based  way  to  help  people  diagnosed  with  mental  illnesses  secure  and  keep  employment,  begins  with  the  idea  that  every  person  with  a  serious  mental  illness  is  capable  of  working competitively in the community. In F Y18, the DMH Supported    Employment    Pilot    Prog ram    assisted    257    individuals  on  their  road  to  recovery  by  helping  them  to  become employed in the openly competitive job market.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Mississippi Disability Resources and Advocacy Organizations - 05/03/2019

~~This page has “links to government agencies and disability rights organizations in Mississippi. They may be able assist you with:• disability advocacy• home health services• home care• nursing aide services• Medicaid• accessing other community resources to help people with disabilities.

Many of these organizations work to address the unique needs associated with different disabilities, including but not limited to physical, intellectual, and developmental disabilities, and mental illness. Others focus on issues such as access to housing and legal assistance based on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).If you live in Mississippi and are a person with a disability, learning about state-specific resources to support people with disabilities can help you advocate for yourself. If you are a friend, family member, or caregiver of a person with disabilities in Mississippi, these resources can help you in supporting your loved one."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/21/2018

~~“The Bureau of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities is responsible for planning, development and supervision of an array of services for people in the state with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  The service delivery system is comprised of the State-Operated Programs, ID/DD Waiver program, and the IDD Community Support Program.  The ID/DD Waiver and Community Support Programs provide support to assist people to live successfully at home and in the community.  These services are provided by community mental health centers and other community service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Delta WDA provides Small Business Development, Entrepreneurial, and Self-Employment Training to area residents and WIOA customers in accordance with DOL’s TEGL 12-10 “Supporting Entrepreneurial and Self-Employment Training through the Workforce Investment System.” This program addresses the role the workforce investment system plays in support of entrepreneurial activities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in Mississippi 2017 Annual Report - 12/20/2018

~~“The Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) Program is fully integrated as an essential part of the WIN Job Center network.Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOP), funded through the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG), are included among the WIN Job Center partner staff. The WIN Job Center staff assists veterans, eligible spouses, and veterans with barriers to employment.  Veterans and eligible spouses are asked to complete an assessment form to determine if they have significant barriers to employment. The WIN Job Center staff provides initial core services and refers veterans/eligible spouses with barriers to the DVOP for enhanced services.Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) are viable and effective partners in the WIN Job Center delivery system. They participate in employer outreach, job fairs, and other activities related to the JVSG guidelines. LVERs are key members on the MDES Business Services Team participating in business development activities, employer outreach efforts, and in developing jobs for veterans."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Strategic Plan – Mississippi Department of Mental Health - 11/20/2018

~~“Goal 1To increase access to community-based care and supports for adults and children with mental illness and/or substance use disorders through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered and recovery-oriented system of care

GOAL 2To increase access to community-based care and supports for people with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities through a network of service providers that are committed to a person-centered system of care”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Career Exploration & Employability Skills - 11/05/2018

~~“The Vocational Rehabilitation Transition Counselor and the classroom teacher work together to implement a curriculum that students with disabilities may participate in through services provided at community rehabilitation programs throughout the state. The proposed schedule can be adapted to meet the needs of the student and the teacher and can be based on each school’s calendar year.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mississippi Council on Developmental Disabilities (MSCDD) State Work Plan - 10/01/2017

“The Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) stipulates that State Councils’ investments (grants, programs, and/or projects) support at least one of the following nine Areas of Emphasis:

 

1. Child Care

2. Community Supports (Formal or Informal)

3. Education and Early Intervention

4. Employment

5. Health

6. Housing

7. Quality Assurance

8. Recreation

9. Transportation”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

DMH Begins Implementation of Conflict Free Case Management - 08/01/2017

“The Mississippi Department of Mental Health (DMH) has begun the implementation of conflict-free case management services for the Intellectual Disabilities/Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD) Waiver.  Conflict-free case management is required for all states by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services, and will result in the transfer of a number of DMH employees to other community providers as it is implemented at DMH programs throughout the state.

 

DMH believes the function of Support Coordination is within the mission of the agency.  IDD regional programs will continue to provide Support Coordination services and no longer provide other ID/DD Waiver services. This plan has been approved by the Mississippi Division of Medicaid and CMS. The first implementation of conflict-free case management began at Ellisville State School in August 2017 and will be taking place at other DMH regional programs by the end of 2018. A large number of employees affected by these transitions will continue to serve Mississippians who require support from the ID/DD Waiver. There will not be a change in the type or amount of service people currently enrolled in the program receive.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

DD Network News: A Collaborative Publication from MSCDD, DRMS, and IDS - 02/01/2018

“Welcome! Thank you for reading the first issue of DD News, a joint publication of the Mississippi Council on Developmental Disabilities (MSCDD), Disability Rights Mississippi (DRMS), and the Institute for Disability Studies (IDS) at The University of Southern Mississippi. All three agencies are funded by the federal Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to ensure that people with developmental disabilities receive services as required by the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act. You can learn more about the agencies by researching their websites, listed on the agency pages of this newsletter.

The collaboration among our three agencies continues to expand and increase to benefit people with disabilities in our state. The more closely our agencies work together on issues to create the change that ultimately improves the lives of people with developmental and other disabilities, the greater the impact for all of Mississippi. We continue to collaborate with self-advocates, families, and professionals as evidenced by some of the work highlighted in this edition.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AbilityWorks - 11/03/2017

“AbilityWorks is a network of community rehabilitation programs that provide vocational assessment, job training, and actual work experience for individuals with disabilities. This is possible through a wide array of contract and subcontract services provided to local business and industry.

 

There are 17 locations in a statewide AbilityWorks network of vocationally oriented community programs and is a division of the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation. AbilityWork’s mission to clients is “to improve the quality of life, employment opportunities, and integration of people with disabilities into the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Vocational Rehabilitation Transition Services - 07/01/2017

“The Transition Services Program works with eligible secondary school students with disabilities to enable them to transition from school to subsequent work environments. Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) works cooperatively with the Mississippi Department of Education and local school districts in planning and implementing a variety of programs designed to provide training and assistance for students with disabilities to support them in making the difficult transition from school to work.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mississippi Council on Developmental Disabilities - 08/13/2012

Employment Objectives:

• “Identify and promote at least one Best Practice Model for increasing community employment options for individuals with Developmental Disabilities.” • “Identify at least one barrier to increasing community development options for individuals with Developmental Disabilities.” • “Determine and advocate for at least one Policy Change to improve Community Employment options for individuals with Developmental Disabilities.” • “Collaborate with other stakeholders to facilitate the transition [of] up to 15 individuals from work activity centers into community employment of their choosing.” • “Partner with others to achieve successful community employment for at least 10 individuals with Developmental Disabilities in their respective communities.”   Intermediaries and collaborators for this goal include State protection and advocacy system, university centers, and State DD Agency.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MS Balancing Incentives Program - 10/01/2011

“The Balancing Incentive Program authorizes grants to States to increase access to non-institutional long-term services and supports (LTSS) … [to] transform their long-term care systems by:

lowering costs through improved systems performance & efficiency creating tools to help consumers with care planning & assessment [and] improving quality measurement & oversight.

It “also provides new ways to serve more people in home and community-based settings, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as required by the Olmstead decision.”

 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mississippi Department of Mental Health MOU with DRS

“SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH IDD: DMH has implemented an MOU with the Department of Rehabilitation Services that is providing supported employment for people with IDD. Three hundred employees from DMH, MDRS, and the Division of Medicaid received training in early 2016 regarding supported employment services. As of June 2016, 18 people had been employed. 41 people have been referred for supported employment services through MDRS.”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mississippi Client Assistance Program (MSCAP)

~~Client Assistance Program, or often referred to as CAP, is a state managed and federally funded program designed to advise and inform clients and client applicants in the state of Mississippi. CAP assists in providing information obtaining to available services and benefits under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as well as the services and benefits available to individuals under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). In addition to this, CAP may assist and advocate for clients and client applicants in relation to projects, programs, and services provided under the Rehabilitation Act. CAP is funded through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) of the US Department of Education.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Recommendations for Improving School Funding in Mississippi - 01/16/2017

~~“Recommendation #3c: Create a commission to study and make recommendations related to service-based (IEP-based) fundingWhile multiple-tiered weights based on diagnosis alone would represent a big step forward for Mississippi, EdBuild believes that an IEP-based model, which incorporates consideration of both diagnosis and services, could move the needle even further to improve the precision of special education funding throughout the state. Funding based on student IEPs would take most of the guesswork out of the financing of special education and would significantly increase the impartiality of funding for students with special needs.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

MS CDD Grants and Contracts - 07/01/2016

“MS Partnerships in Employment grant from the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) – Disability Rights Mississippi; $74,410

DRMS’s responsibility within MSPE is to maintain the Employment Workgroup and carrying out its activities.  This group focuses on policies, removing barriers, improving access to competitive employment, and system change efforts.

 

MS Partnerships in Employment grant from the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities – Institute for Disability Studies; $144,000

IDS’s responsibility within MSPE is the Stakeholder’s Group and carrying out its activities.  The activities include focusing on innovative strategies and best practices for systems improved for competitive employment.  IDS provides knowledge and awareness to MSPE with periodic information sessions presented to the Employment Workgroup and the Consortium while assisting in carrying out various training activities across the State.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Mississippi Balancing Incentives Program - 05/01/2012

“The Balancing Incentive Program authorizes grants to States to increase access to non-institutional long-term services and supports (LTSS) … [to] transform their long-term care systems by:  • lowering costs through improved systems performance & efficiency  • creating tools to help consumers with care planning & assessment [and]  • improving quality measurement & oversight.   It “also provides new ways to serve more people in home and community-based settings, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as required by the Olmstead decision.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MS Partnerships in Employment

“Mississippi Partnerships in Employment (MSPE) will build capacity across existing state systems for sustainable systems change to improve outcomes for youth and young adults with DD/ID seeking competitive employment in integrated settings. The consortium will develop and implement policies that support competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with DD/ID seeking competitive employment in integrated settings by removing systemic barriers; identifying and implementing strategies and best practices that improve employment outcomes; and enhancing statewide collaboration that facilitates transition from secondary to post-secondary outcomes. Mississippi’s Partnership includes the DD Council, the University of Southern Mississippi’s UCEDD, Disability Rights Mississippi, VR, Department of Education, the Department of Mental Health Bureau of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities, the Department of Employment Security, and self-advocates”.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MS Money Follows the Person

“Money Follows the Person is a federal initiative to help states enhance community living options for persons with disabilities and establish person-driven and sustainable long-term care systems. The program is for qualified residents of nursing homes and intermediate care facilities and for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ICF/IID) who want to explore community living options.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation - 09/03/2019

~~“Oak Hill Regional Community Development Corporation was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; African American, Faith-Based, Hispanic, Vietnamese, Native Americans, extremely rural communities; new mothers and women with children; vulnerable and special needs populations; millennials; and Medicaid/CHIP-eligible consumers  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are the Aaron E. Henry Community Health Services Center, Boat People SOS – Gulf Coast, CATCH Kids Tupelo, Mercy Housing and Human Development, and the Mid-South Churches Cooperative Conference State Convention. They will partner with the Faith and community groups representing over 1,500 houses of worship, Mississippi’s gaming industry, Employers and groups of employees, Health Centers, and Head Start Sites.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Michael MinorPhone: (901) 826-8355/(662) 298-3584Email: pastorminor@thehillhernnado.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) - 09/03/2019

~~“My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. (MBK) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving The “left behind” populations, such as low wage earners and hourly wage workers; as well as individuals who do not have health insurance because of a lack of affordable coverage options in their area.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is Open Arms Healthcare Center. They will partner with the Southwest Mississippi River Region (SMRR) Community Advisory Group, Faith and community-based organizations, Small business owners, Chambers of Commerce, City Governance, and Community health clinics and primary care clinics in the SMRR.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Henry FullerPhone: (601) 957-7710Email: hfuller@mbk-inc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Mississippi DMH Web-Based Training

“The Department of Mental Health provides Web-Based Training through Relias Learning (formerly Essential Learning) for registered providers. Relias is a customized learning management system and staff development tool. This training website, developed for DMH staff, presents and tracks training requirements in an accessible and easy to use format.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Mississippi Department of Mental Health Findings Letter - 12/22/2011

We [United States Department of Justice] conclude that the State of Mississippi fails to provide services to qualified individuals with disabilities, including mental illness and developmental disabilities, in the most integrated settings appropriate to their needs, in violation of the ADA. This has led to the needless and prolonged institutionalization of adults and children with disabilities who could be served in more integrated settings in the community with adequate services and supports. Further, systemic failures in the State’s system place qualified individuals with disabilities at risk of unnecessary institutionalization now and going forward.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Long Term Care 1915(c) Waiver Provider Orientation - 01/25/2019

~~“The Office of Long Term Care is responsible for ensuring that all providers of 1915(c) home and community based waiver services for the following waivers meet credentialing requirements as documented in the CMS approved waiver applications.• Elderly & Disabled Waiver• Assisted Living Waiver• Independent Living Waiver• Traumatic Brain Injury/Spinal Cord Injury WaiverAgencies may currently apply to enroll as providers of Personal Care services, In-Home Respite services or Adult Day Care services under the Elderly & Disabled (E&D) Waiver or Assisted Living services under the Assisted Living (AL) Waiver.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1915(i) State plan Home and Community-Based Services Administration and Operation - 11/01/2018

~~“The state implements the optional 1915(i) State plan Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) benefit for elderly and disabled individuals as set forth below.1. Services. (Specify the state’s service title(s) for the HCBS defined under “Services” and listed in Attachment 4.19-B):Day Services - Adult, Prevocational Services, Supported Employment Services, and Supported Living”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Elderly and Disabled Waiver - 07/01/2017

“The Elderly and Disabled Waiver program is administered directly by the Home and Community Based Services division (HCBS).

The Elderly and Disabled Waiver program provides home and community-based services to individuals age 21 years old and older who, but for the provision of such services, would require the level of care provided in a nursing facility. Beneficiaries of this waiver must qualify for Medicaid as Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries or meet the income and resource eligibility requirements for income level up to 300% of the SSI federal benefit rate and meet medical criteria of the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Public Notice for the Elderly and Disabled (E&D) Waiver renewal - 02/28/2017

~~“Pursuant to 42 C.F.R. Section 441.304(e)-(f), public notice is hereby given to the submission of the Elderly and Disabled (E&D) Waiver renewal. The Division of Medicaid, in the Office of the Governor, will submit this proposed waiver renewal to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for the E&D Waiver effective July 1, 2017.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Revised Statewide Transition Plan Summary 1915(c) and 1915(i) Home and Community Based (HCB) Programs - 11/28/2016

“ID/DD Waiver services provided in the participant’s private home or a relative’s home which is fully integrated with opportunities for full access to the greater community include: • Home and Community Supports, • Occupational Therapy, • Physical Therapy, • Speech Therapy, • Crisis Support, • Crisis Intervention, • In-Home Nursing Respite, • Supported Living, • Transition Assistance, • Support Coordination, • Supported Employment, and • Specialized Medical Supplies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mississippi HCBS Transition Plan - 03/17/2014

On Jan. 16, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule, effective March 17, 2014, which amends the requirements for qualities of home and community-based (HCB) settings. These requirements reflect CMS’s intent that individuals receive services and supports in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. The final rule requires the use of a person-centered planning process to develop a participant/beneficiary’s annual Plan for Services and Supports (PSS).

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MS Intellectual Disabilities/DD Waiver (0282.R04.00) - 07/01/2013

Provides day services-adults, prevocational, residential hab, respite, support coordination, supported employment, behavior support/intervention, home and community supports, specialized medical supplies, therapy services for individuals w/autism, DD, MR ages 0 - no max age  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mississippi ESEA Flexibility Request - 07/19/2012

“The Mississippi Department Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on July 19, 2012.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Mississippi Medicaid State Plan

The Mississippi Medicaid State Plan (State Plan) is a detailed agreement between the State of Mississippi and the Federal Government that describes the nature and scope of Mississippi’s Medicaid Program. The State Plan is based on the federal requirements and regulations found in Title XIX of the Social Security Act. Changes to the State Plan, called State Plan Amendments (SPAs), must be approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) prior to implementation

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Mississippi Money Follows the Person Bridge to Independence

~~“Attention: Long Term Care ProvidersThe Mississippi Division of Medicaid’s (DOM) Bridge to Independence (B2I) program, funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), completed it’s final year as a demonstration project. Effective January 2019, the Medicaid Extender’s Act of 2019 provided for an extension of B2I services. All new B2I participants that transition under the extension  will receive a 365 day follow up.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

Mississippi "feels like coming home" for workers with disabilities who have found great jobs in their communities in the Magnolia State.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Mississippi’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
-0.16%
Change from
2016 to 2017
2,984,100
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.46%
Change from
2016 to 2017
265,344
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.93%
Change from
2016 to 2017
73,203
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
27.59%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.7%
Change from
2016 to 2017
71.75%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 2,984,100
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 265,344
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 73,203
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,070,889
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 27.59%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 71.75%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 26.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 18.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 238,234
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 253,362
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 303,152
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 175,191
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 6,883
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,860
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,210
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 6,834
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 673

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,772
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 127,181

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,465
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 12,095
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 42,606
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 90.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 6
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 720
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 2,154
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 31,461

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,076
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 120
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 86
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 72.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,712
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 200,763
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $12,871,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $9,953,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 57.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 167
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 863
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 45.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.01%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.87%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 27.79%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 67.12%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 85.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 39.33%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 558,965
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,561
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 63,390
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 241,418
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 304,808
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 49
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 300
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 349
AbilityOne wages (products). $548,297
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,097,679

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 12
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,265
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,265

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Customized Employment

~~MDRS continues to identify current information from research, rehabilitation trends and professional resources. This information is provided to agency staff through a variety of methods, including training at the state, regional, and district levels. Most recently this training has been focused on Autism and customized employment. Additionally, this information is posted and available to staff on MDRS Connect, the agency intranet. (Page 180) Title II

The SE Program will continue to emphasize individual employment placements. Other models will remain an option for clients and may be utilized when feasible. However, when given a choice, clients prefer individual placements by an overwhelming majority. Individual placement is the preferred option of MDRS as well as the clients because it achieves integration in the work environment, it is competitive integrated employment, and it provides more opportunities for career pathways and better quality jobs with more benefits.
Person Centered Planning and Customized Employment as integral parts of service provision continue to be high priorities. These service approaches have been embraced by mental health providers, the DD Council, and other service providers in the state as accepted best practices for model service delivery. (Page 205) Title II

SE staff also participate in both practices in coordinating services for SE clients in the education system throughout the state. These practices have proven to be successful for clients because of the enhanced teamwork with other agencies. Under WIOA customized employment is included in the definition of supported employment and VR is including it as a VR service that the SE client can choose to include in his/her IPE. Therefore, VR is expanding customized employment training to the majority of its direct service staff. These service approaches will continue to be made available to clients during the intake process and will be utilized when deemed appropriate and when chosen by the client. (Page 206) Title II

Plans for improving community rehabilitation programs (private and agency-supported) include training staff to provide Pre-ETS, customized employment services, and on-the-job tryout services which facilitate the agency’s ability to achieve the changes in WIOA. (Page 211) Title II

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~8. Increase collaboration within the state's workforce system to improve services to unemployed workers with disabilities who are eligible for VR services by better leveraging services with other workforce development programs. (Page 209) Title II

21. Increase collaboration within the Workforce System to improve services to unemployed workers with disabilities who are eligible for VR services by better leveraging services with other workforce development programs.
22. Play stronger roles on state and local Workforce Boards to assure that VR consumers and other individuals with disabilities are better served by the One-Stop System. (Page 215) Title II

Leveraging Resources from Key Partners to Support SCSEP
Area Agencies on Aging work with community colleges to provide training to SCSEP participants at a reduced cost; many provide tuition waivers for SCSEP participants. Community colleges are an integral component of the WIOA programs offered through the WIN Job Centers. SCSEP participants are encouraged to dual enroll in WIOA with the WIN Job Centers for job search assistance and training classes. (Page 283) Title IV
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~o MDHS - The Mississippi Department of Human Services administers the TANF program through several legacy applications, including MAVERICS and JAWS. MAVERICS supports case management data such as intake and eligibility information, and JAWS supports TANF Work Program data. These systems do not inherently support web services, but various enterprise solutions exist to allow a modern, intermediate application to interface with such systems. This intermediate application, developed in Java, would be able to implement and consume web services on behalf of the legacy application. In addition, MDHS is in the process of a multi-year system modernization effort that will reduce the agency's reliance on legacy applica