Missouri

States - Big Screen

The Show Me State is expanding its efforts to deliver competitive, integrated employment options for individuals with disabilities through innovative strategies that propel Missouri's model, "Close to Home, Far from Ordinary."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Missouri’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2016 to 2017
6,113,532
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
463,964
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
172,283
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
37.13%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
99.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
79,376.00%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 6,083,672 6,093,000 6,113,532
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 463,157 468,140 463,964
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 163,574 164,243 172,283
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,524,635 2,521,381 2,536,645
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.32% 35.08% 37.13%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.78% 79.16% 79,376.00%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.00% 4.50% 3.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.90% 22.30% 20.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.60% 12.60% 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 430,732 426,359 438,766
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 437,083 447,737 455,312
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 728,775 729,010 746,357
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 102,581 104,789 104,337
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,074 21,980 22,690
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,727 7,155 5,285
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,408 4,876 9,478
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 870 1,009 669
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 18,411 22,891 22,283
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 5,043 4,366 5,669

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,252 7,496 7,663
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.40% 5.60% 5.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 220,596 217,590 213,655

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,032 6,268 6,164
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 12,624 11,390 11,180
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 44,121 42,204 38,602
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.70% 14.90% 16.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.60% 1.00% 2.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.30% 1.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 832 500 1,196
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 712 684 645
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 10,345 7,417 5,450
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.03 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 4,647 7,474 7,016
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,634 2,629 2,948
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 35.00% 35.00% 42.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 27.03 43.21 48.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
8,301
8,600
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 50 58 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 836 919 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,816 1,778 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,264 2,405 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,579 2,697 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 756 743 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 35.20% 37.90% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,435 7,588 8,353
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 318,047 318,214 313,618
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 669 730 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 800 701 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $7,012,000 $5,578,000 $5,571,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $38,353,000 $42,056,000 $46,338,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $18,291,000 $20,445,000 $22,851,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 10.00% 9.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,644 4,027 4,470
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,352 3,744 4,076
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.40 9.90 9.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 57.65% 57.59% 57.36%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.92% 8.76% 8.58%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.66% 3.61% 3.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.58% 88.29% 87.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 31.03% 25.55% 28.50%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.49% 60.89% 59.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.79% 65.90% 64.29%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 28.46% 31.34% 31.17%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,683,499
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,704
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 129,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 245,601
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 372,429
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 220
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 335
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 555
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,055,603
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,245,518

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 95 90 83
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 98 91 85
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 7,487 5,785 5,343
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 237 11 269
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 7,724 5,796 5,612

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Division of Developmental Disabilities has a statewide employment initiative, Employment First, for working age citizens with disabilities. Employment services include job preparation, job discovery, and community employment in a competitive integrated work setting that may include ongoing supports. The Division of Behavioral Health provides employment services to individuals with mental illnesses, histories of substance abuse, and/or criminal backgrounds. Clinical and vocational employment services are integrated through state—wide partnerships to help individuals who are interested in employment participate in the competitive labor market with the appropriate level of supports and services to be successful. RSB will continue to partner and collaborate with DMH programs in the delivery of employment services. (Pages 232-233) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~MVR’s workforce development activities are designed to assist individuals with disabilities in obtaining, maintaining, or advancing in competitive integrated employment. These activities include assessments, vocational guidance and counseling, job preparation activities, which can include disability awareness, resume writing, interviewing skills. Additionally, MVR provides eligible individuals with training (OJT, apprenticeships, customized employment, funding for community colleges and universities). (Page 44) Title I

RSB has developed relationships with several employers across the state communicating directly with HR staff on employment needs, identifying customized employment opportunities, and providing disability/blindness awareness and sensitivity training. Outreach activities have resulted in competitive integrated employment outcomes and work experience opportunities, both paid and unpaid, for youth and students with disabilities and adult clients. (Page 45) Title I

• SE Services --    The nature of the service itself requires an individualized approach based on the needs of an eligible individual. SE services are ongoing support services, including customized employment, and other appropriate services needed to support an individual with a most significant disability to achieve and maintain competitive integrated employment. Services are provided by CRPs. MVR can provide up to 24 months of community-based job training. (Pages 188-189) Title IV

The supported employment program ensures that individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities, are afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re—enter competitive integrated employment, including supported or customized employment. RSB’s employment outcomes for supported employment is recorded at 1.5% of total closures for FFY 2015. Of the individuals that exited the program and received supported employment services during FFY 2015, 80 percent were successfully employed in competitive jobs. These individuals averaged $9.77 per hour and worked an average of 30 hours per week. (Page 249) Title IV

Rehabilitation Services for the Blind (RSB) offers assessment, job development, task analysis, and time—limited individual and group job coaching leading to supported employment through 12 formal contracts with supported employment service providers. Other services available to clients with a goal of supported employment are the same as those available to clients receiving services under Title I. The supported employment program ensures that individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities, are afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re—enter competitive integrated employment, including supported or customized employment. Extended services may be provided to youth with the most significant disabilities for a period not to exceed four years. (Page 262) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Missouri partners are committed to developing new career pathways for youth and adults with barriers to employment including individuals with disabilities. Missouri’s core partner program leaders regularly meet to collaborate on braiding services for work-based learning and education funding. Through sector strategy regional business meetings and partner engagement, Missouri will work with employers to identify opportunities and services available to assist in eliminating employment barriers. (Page 58) Title I

Missouri is committed to finding connections between core partners, mandatory partners, and other partners in each region. Missouri’s core and mandatory partners will collaborate to share resources to create environments to foster partnering at the local level as well as maintain resource allocations that keep existing partnerships at the local level. Specific examples include: As part of their services to individuals with disabilities, VR may provide funding for post-secondary training. As partners seek to co-enroll their customers, this will provide opportunity for leveraging of these resources through braiding of both educational dollars, as well as supportive services to ensure the customer’s success. VR also provides guidance and counseling to the job seekers, to insure that access to comparable services funding is achieved, whether through partner agencies or through Federal funding, such as the Pell grant. (Page 82) Title I

MVR is working closely with all of the WIOA partners in order to provide the best services possible for consumers. MVR initiated the creation of a braiding services team, comprised of
WIOA core partners and other entities that serve individuals with disabilities, to develop methods and strategies to support collaboration between partner agencies, promote greater understanding of the services provided by each agency, and discover methods to avoid duplication of services. Many teams, consisting of members from all of the partner programs, are meeting and developing methods to meet individuals’ needs. (Pages 205-206) Title IV

MVR initiated the creation of a braiding services team, comprised of WIOA core partners and other entities that serve individuals with disabilities, to develop methods and strategies to support collaboration between partner agencies, promote greater understanding of the services provided by each agency, and discover methods to avoid duplication of services. (Pages 208-209) Title IV
The Missouri workforce development system comprised of all core WIOA partners has developed a Memorandum of Understanding on the implementation of WIOA and creating the partnerships to begin developing common referrals, the braiding of services, and data sharing. These collaborative efforts will enhance access for individuals with disabilities and improve performance for all partners. Performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA are new to vocational rehabilitation and have not yet been measured. RSB met all required federal performance indicators during the past two years prior to WIOA. RSB will apply the same quality of service utilized in meeting those indicators to achieve the new performance measures and provide that level of quality while moving forward.  (Page 254) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~RSB has formal contract agreements with community rehabilitation providers to work with employers and assist clients with job search, job placement and customized employment opportunities. Other services include work-based learning experiences, task analysis, and job coaching when needed. RSB contracts with Alphapointe Association for the Blind for an eight-week Summer Transition Employment Program (STEP) providing competitive work experience to high school age youth. The goal is to provide each consumer with a foundation for the school-to-work transition, to enable each to practice personal independence through work and goal-setting experiences, and to afford an opportunity for community involvement. This program includes vocational exploration; identifying preferences, interests, and abilities with regard to work; and learning about work related behaviors and self-advocacy. Consumers participate in general orientation during the first week of the program. The remaining seven weeks they spend on the job. Short-term job coaching may be provided to assist in orienting the consumers to the particular job site. Consumers receive an hourly wage during their placement at a job site. Involvement in this program is intended to increase a consumer’s career awareness, build marketable vocational skills, and support a healthy self-image. (Pages 46-47) Title I

Missouri will improve the outcomes for out-of-school youth by ensuring the 14 elements allowed under WIOA are met through a braiding of partner resources which will best meet each individuals need. The 14 program elements will be available to OSY participants, and will be funded with WIOA title I youth funds or leveraged partner resources. An agreement will be established with the partner to offer the program element and ensure that the activity is connected and coordinated with the WIOA youth program. (Page 129) Title I

Each local MVR district office will also participate in pre-employment transition coordination with the local education agency to include attending IEP meetings when invited, using conference calls and video conferences, when necessary; working with local workforce development entities and employers to develop work opportunities for students with disabilities; coordinating pre-employment transition services with transition services provided in accordance with IDEA; and, when invited, attending person-centered planning meetings for youth receiving services under Title IX of the Social Security Act. To effectively coordinate these services, MVR:
• conducted statewide training to include guidance regarding IEP participation for all MVR staff that serve students in Missouri high schools;
• worked in partnership with the Parent Advocacy Coalition Educational Rights Center to develop a video introducing VR services that can be shown at IEP meetings;
• conducted cross training on services to youth with local job center staff and MVR staff in Kansas City and St. Louis, the two largest metropolitan areas of the state;
• invited special education personnel to train new MVR counselors on transition services within the IEP;
• provided cross training with local CILs to include information regarding benefits planning; and
• is currently working in collaboration with DMH’s Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD) to provide cross training with MVR counselors and DD support coordinators regarding their respective services. (Pages 168-169) Title IV

MVR has a policy that outlines transition activities and services including the timely development and approval of an individualized plan for employment (IPE) for each eligible student prior to leaving high school. MVR will provide for the development of the IPE as early as possible during the transition planning process, but, at least, by the time the eligible student leaves the school setting. The IPE will include specific transition services or pre-employment transition services and supports needed for an eligible student with a disability or a youth with a disability, including youth with the most significant disabilities, to achieve an employment outcome or projected post-school employment outcome. An IPE is required to be developed in consideration of the IEP of a student with a disability under IDEA or a student’s Section 504 services. (Page 170) Title IV

The Cooperative Work Experience Program (COOP) agreement is an interagency state and local program between the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (Special Education, MVR and Career Education); Rehabilitation Services for the Blind (RSB); and local school districts in the state of Missouri. The agreement is embedded in the state transition MOU and is available for all school districts. The purpose is to facilitate the coordination of transition services from school to post-secondary training and/or employment for students with disabilities who participate in special education programs and are eligible to receive vocational rehabilitation services. The MOU outlines roles and responsibilities among participating agencies and school districts in the development of off-campus work experience programs. Through these programs, students with disabilities who are receiving services through an IEP can earn high school credit in accordance with Missouri high school graduation requirements for the number of hours they work in a paid competitive, integrated employment setting. Additionally, MVR continues to work collaboratively with providers and local school districts to meet transition needs of students. (Page 186) Title IV

The DESE Graduation Handbook and DESE Transition Agreement include three work-based learning experiences for students with disabilities on an IEP and are coordinated with special education. Students receive high school credit. These three experiences are the COOP Program, employer-based transition training/Project Search for students with most significant disabilities, and unpaid internships. (Page 194) Title IV

Supported employment services are available not only to individuals after leaving their secondary education program, but to students whose IEP and IPE include these services as part of their transition plan and whose school district signs a cooperative work experience program agreement with RSB.  (Page 262) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Missouri partners are committed to developing new career pathways for youth and adults with barriers to employment including individuals with disabilities. Missouri’s core partner program leaders regularly meet to collaborate on braiding services for work-based learning and education funding. Through sector strategy regional business meetings and partner engagement, Missouri will work with employers to identify opportunities and services available to assist in eliminating employment barriers. (Page 58) Title I

• In addition to training services, the Title I & Title IV partners have work based programs such as on-the-job training and work experience which offer the customers the opportunity to combine education, training and employment services. VR & Rehabilitation Services for the Blind supports career pathways by providing a variety of services to students, youth and adults with disabilities. Additional services may include assistive technology, case-management, and post-employment support to provide job retention. (Page 70) Title I

Each workforce area has a Business Services Team plan that guides outreach and services to businesses. Business Services Teams are made up of staff whose mission is to connect employers to a skilled workforce. To ensure an integrated service model, teams now include business representatives from Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), along with other combined partners who touch businesses. At a minimum, the members of the teams include Business Representatives and other Job Center staff assigned to business services, OJT Marketing Specialists, Local Veterans Employment Representatives, and VR Business Outreach Specialists. The design and makeup of each team varies slightly from region to region and may include a variety of other partners who work with businesses, such as local economic developers, educational agencies, UMOS (Missouri’s167 provider), Rehabilitative Services for the Blind Outreach Specialists and Family Support Division (FSD) TANF Outreach Specialists. Additionally, the Kansas City and Vicinity Region employs Disability Program Navigators, which are also included on their business services team. (Page 77) Title I

Apprenticeship

Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation and Rehabilitation Services for the Blind may provide vocational rehabilitation services to potentially eligible students with disabilities and eligible individuals, including youth with disabilities, to assist in accessing programs leading to post secondary credentials. Services are designed to create opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, including registered apprenticeship training programs, leading to industry-recognized certificates, credentials, licenses, and post-secondary degrees. Services for eligible participants may include access to training programs, disability related accommodations, and support services necessary for the successful participation and completion of the training activity. (Page 83) Title I
SB has formal contract agreements with community rehabilitation providers to work with employers and assist clients with job search, job placement and customized employment opportunities. Other services include work based learning experiences, task analysis, and job coaching when needed. RSB contracts with Alphapointe Association for the Blind for an eight—week Summer Transition Employment Program (STEP) providing competitive work experience to high—school age youth. The goal is to provide each consumer with a foundation for the school—to—work transition, to enable each to practice personal independence through work and goal—setting experiences, and to afford an opportunity for community involvement. This program includes vocational exploration; identifying preferences, interests, and abilities with regard to work; and learning about work related behaviors and self—advocacy. Consumers participate in general orientation during the first week of the program. The remaining seven weeks they spend on the job. Short—term job coaching may be provided to assist in orienting the consumers to the particular job site. Consumers receive an hourly wage during their placement at a job site. Involvement in this program is intended to increase a consumer’s career awareness, build marketable vocational skills, and support a healthy self—image. (Pages 231-232) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Rehabilitation Services for the Blind is not in an order of selection. RSB projects that funding for the 2018 and 2019 FFY will meet the needs of all individuals who apply for services. Data sets include:
1. Recipients of Blind Pension (BP) and Supplemental Aid for the Blind (SAB);
2. Recipients of SSI/SSDI who also receive other benefits from the DSA;
3. Recipients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services for blind and visually impaired;
4. Recipients of Independent Living Rehabilitation/Independent Living for Older Blind;
5. Recipients of Prevention of Blindness services (Page 242) Title IV
 

Employer/ Business

~~Missouri has established a WIOA Employer Engagement Committee, made up of staff from all combined partner agencies, LWDB Directors, and the USDOL Office of Apprenticeship State Director. This committee has been established to provide guidance to regions, make recommendations to the WIOA State Steering Committee, and coordinate statewide meetings as needed to ensure continued partner collaboration. (Page 79) Title I

RSB works with employers through a variety of activities at the local level to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate the provision of VR services and transition services, including transition services for youth and pre—employment transition services. District offices engage in outreach activities meeting directly with employers to identify employment needs and educate employers about the services RSB can offer for existing and new employees. Each district office and the Prevention of Blindness program have a tonometer to screen for the early signs of glaucoma as a service to employers and to promote VR services. Outreach activities are extended to employer health fairs, job fairs, chamber of commerce events, and participating in local Workforce Development Boards. RSB has developed relationships with several employers across the state communicating directly with HR staff on employment needs, identify customized employment opportunities, and provide disability/blindness awareness and sensitivity training. Outreach activities have resulted in competitive integrated employment outcomes and work experience opportunities, both paid and unpaid, for youth and students with disabilities and adult clients. (Page 230) Title IV

Data Collection

Missouri VR will assess its performance based upon the WIOA common performance measures as well as agency goals and objectives. The VR executive leadership team along with district office management reviews performance data on a monthly basis to determine progress toward goals and opportunities for improvement. VR’s case services and financial services work in tandem evaluating performance data for short- and long-term decision making. In addition, VR’s statewide quality assurance team evaluates case management providing guidance on program performance. (Page 95) Title I

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

• Title IV: VR is actively participating with all local workforce boards and works closely with Missouri Job Centers to provide program accessibility, physical access to services, and assistive technology for people with disabilities. Strategy 2 -Create Sector Strategies (Page 69) Title I
Missouri has a committee to specifically focus on one-stop certification criteria. The committee has established the criteria for certification, including accessibility. This committee includes representatives from Vocational Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Services for the Blind and the Centers for Independent Living (CILs) who will assist with training and technical assistance to ensure accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials for individuals with disabilities. Accessibility criteria for certification includes the accessibility requirements contained with Section 188; policy review, adaptive technology equipment availability, emergency procedures, etc.
In order to better serve Missouri Job Center customers, the workforce partners are working with ODEP’s National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) for technical assistance. Training has been conducted by the VR, LEAD Center & DWSD with AJC staff. Through this collaboration, partners developed a statewide survey that was sent to gather information from job seekers on the social, environmental and physical accessibility of the Missouri Job Centers. Local areas are using this feedback as a guide to improve training and technical assistance for serving people with disabilities.
Each Workforce Development region has a dedicated Equal Opportunity officer, which comprises a statewide team, which includes VR staff. (Page 108) Title I

Vets

Through a statewide network of job centers and partner organizations, Missouri Division of Workforce Development coordinates and aligns their partnership with the Department of Employment Security, Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Services for the Blind and the Department of Social Services Family Support Division. Together the partners provide a robust menu of vital reemployment and support services, including access to skill-building training, National Certification and Career Connections for jobs seekers, targeted programs for veterans, youth and the unemployed, and cost-saving human resource assistance and financial incentives for businesses. The partners braid workforce, education, and training activities with support services to meet the needs of our job seekers and employers. With 32 full-service centers as well as numerous satellite and affiliate locations statewide, Missouri Job Centers are the central point for WIOA core and one-stop partner services. (Pages 42-43) Title I
The Veteran services are of utmost importance. Missouri Job Centers have priority services for veterans, which will be served before all other customers. A veteran can request to see the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) staff or Local Veteran Employment Representative (LVER) at any time in the process to receive specialized services. (Page 43) Title I
The Career Skills Program assists transitioning veterans by providing an internship with a Missouri employer, which allows the service member to gain valuable civilian work experience prior to exiting active duty. (Page 85) Title I
The Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) and Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVERs) are fully integrated into the Missouri Job Centers as detailed by the DVOP/LVER agreement with the Secretary (Veterans State Plan). The role of the DVOP staff will not be to supplant the Wagner-Peyser responsibilities for providing priority of service to veterans, but to assist veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to overcome their barriers or mitigate their barriers so the veteran is job ready through case management. Once the veteran is job ready the LVER will work with employers to create employment opportunities for the job ready veterans. DVOP/LVER will not be assigned duties that violate Title 38. DVOP will share case management for veterans enrolled in WIOA and other programs with the providers of those programs.
The Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) requires compliance with Title 38, Chapters 41 and 42, in that all service delivery points of the grantee will provide veterans’ priority of service in the provision of all labor-exchange services, and specifically when making referrals for job openings and training opportunities.
Local service delivery points are monitored to ensure that programs provide the required priority of service to veterans. Whenever necessary, corrective action plans will be developed and appropriate technical assistance concerning priority of service to veterans will be provided. The agreement reached between Veterans’ Employment and Training and the State will be the governing agreement for veterans’ services within the Missouri Job Centers where funding is used to provide services to the state’s veteran customers. (Pages 107-108) Title I
Show Me Heroes (SMH) is work-based learning activity that provides OJT to veterans. Transitional jobs are reserved for those chronically unemployed and provide real life work experience when it is greatly needed to be successful in the workplace. The Incumbent Worker training policy allows local Boards the flexibility to provide Incumbent Worker Training to employers when needed. (Page 123) Title I
MVR has a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Compensated Work Therapy Program (CWT). MVR and CWT are mutually committed to promoting and enhancing competitive employment opportunities for veterans, enabling every individual to reach his or her life’s potential. MVR and CWT work together in bringing enhanced employment opportunities to veterans with disabilities leading to greater individual and family economic stability and security. (Pages 166-167) Title IV

Mental Health

~~MVR has an MOU with DMH, the state agency responsible for providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities and mental health services, which covers DMH’s BH and DD divisions. The agreement outlines the collaboration on existing services, alignment of funding sources, information and data sharing, referrals and on-going development of services.
DMH’s BH and MVR work together to increase access to evidence-based supported employment, also known as Individual Placement and Support (IPS), for adults with serious mental illnesses who are interested in improving their work lives. Missouri has 21 Community Mental Health/Treatment Centers (CMHCs) participating in this implementation collaborative. Ongoing technical assistance and fidelity reviews to the evidence-based practice are provided by a state trainer and a team consisting of MVR and DMH employees. The partnership between DMH and MVR includes a training format, offered to interested CMHCs statewide, on adopting IPS and on improving existing employment activities within treatment services. DMH and MVR implemented IPS for youth with serious mental illnesses in four current sites. (Page 176) Title IV

MVR will provide supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities for up to 24 months and will extend, if necessary, should these services be needed to achieve an employment outcome. These services may include: job coaching, job supports (both on and off the job), guidance and counseling, retention services, resources for benefits counseling, information and referral, and employer consultation.

MVR will continue to work closely with the Missouri Department of Social Services MOHealthNet Division and the Department of Mental Health (DMH) Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DD) divisions to ensure that youth with the most significant disabilities are receiving extended services. (Page 202) Title IV

DMH BH and MVR have been working to increase access to evidence-based supported employment, also known as IPS, for adults with serious mental illnesses who are interested in improving their work lives. Missouri has 21 Community Mental Health/Treatment Centers participating in this implementation collaborative. DMH and MVR are implementing IPS for youth with serious mental illnesses in four current sites.

To assist in determining the quality and effectiveness of SE services, MVR surveys its consumers. The 2017 Customer Satisfaction Survey results indicated that 98 percent of SE clients, who left services both successfully and unsuccessfully, felt MVR staff were available when needed and treated them with respect. (Page 211) Title IV

RSB will continue to work closely with the Missouri Department of Social Services MOHealthNet Division and the Department of Mental Health (DMH) Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DD) divisions to ensure that youth with the most significant disabilities are receiving extended services. Services may include job monitoring and assessment of employment stability, establishment of peer and natural support environments, and coordination of specific services necessary to assist the individual to maintain employment. RSB will work closely with the DMH DD division utilizing home and community-based waivers to increase supported employment and extended services for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 250) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 11 - 20 of 79

Graduation Requirements for Students in Missouri Public Schools - 11/15/2018

~~“Off-Campus InstructionMany students who are juniors and seniors in high school can benefit from authentic school-directed and supervised paid or unpaid learning experiences through assignment to off-campus locations under cooperative arrangements with business and industry or other institutions. More about these services can be found on our website.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Division of Developmental Disabilities Employment First Policy - 03/01/2018

This policy establishes community integrated employment services and supports as the first service option and primary outcome for individuals (both youth and adults.) It also establishes employment planning (Career Planning) and supports as priorities to explore with all working adults who receive services in order to ensure that supports, services, and outcomes are consistent with what the person is seeking.

Each individual will be supported to pursue his or her own unique path to work, a career, and his or her contribution to/participation in community life. All individuals, regardless of the challenge of their disability, will be afforded an opportunity to pursue employment. Career planning, including job exploration and on-going person focused self discovery, is critical when assisting individuals in making informed choices about their future careers.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

About the Missouri Collaborative Work Initiative - 09/01/2017

“Beginning with the 2012-2013 academic year, the Office of Special Education, Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education initiated a new approach to addressing the achievement disparity between students with disabilities and students without disabilities. This initiative is the Collaborative Work. By invitation, Missouri districts may choose to participate.

 

The purpose of the Collaborative Work Grant is to improve learning for all students, especially students with disabilities, and improve teaching, by:

-establishing and implementing effective and efficient collaborative  teams,

-implementing with fidelity and a high degree of effectiveness a variety of teaching/learning practices which have been proven to have a high effect size on student outcomes,

-developing and administering common formative assessments to measure the effectiveness of teaching/learning practices as evidenced by student mastery of learning objectives, and

-using data‐based decision making to guide decisions about classroom teaching/learning practices.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Transition Timeline - 09/01/2017

“Toward successful transition: A checklist for the first 21 years.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Reverse Job Fair 2017 and Disability Employment Event - 08/10/2017

“The Third Annual Accommodation for Success Disability Employment Event took place on August 10, 2017, at the Forest Park Campus of St. Louis Community College. The event was organized to make it easier for area businesses to build diverse workforce. This year, the event included the first Reverse Job Fair in St. Louis.

 

Unlike most traditional job fairs, this innovative recruitment event focused on showcasing talents and professional interests of 80+ job candidates with disabilities. Participants met with potential employers in their booth spaces, demonstrating experience and skills in a variety of industries, while human resource professionals roamed the room, meeting the candidates they were interested in hiring. More than 116 recruiters representing 99 area companies were present. With 236 total registrants, not including job candidates, this year’s event was the largest yet.

 

Accommodation for Success event is a collaborative effort between the St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment (SLATE), regional job centers, and more than 20 of the region’s disability employment organizations. Workshops and resources on disability inclusion, etiquette, recruitment, and workplace culture were offered to registered businesses, prior to the reverse job fair.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB66, Payment of temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process - 07/05/2017

“Temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process until the employee reaches maximum medical improvement, unless such benefits are terminated by the employee’s return to work or are terminated as otherwise specified in this chapter.

 

The permanency of the employee’s disability under sections 287.170 to 287.200 shall not be established or adjudicated while the employee is participating in rehabilitation services.

 

Refusal of the employee to accept rehabilitation services or submit to a vocational rehabilitation assessment as deemed necessary by the employer shall result in a fifty percent reduction in all disability payments to an employee, including temporary partial disability benefits paid pursuant to section 287.180, for each week of the period of refusal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Missouri SB 43, Modifying the Missouri Human Rights Act - 06/30/2017

“AN ACT To repeal sections 213.010, 213.040, 213.050, 213.055, 213.065, 213.070, 213.075, 213.101, and 213.111, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof ten new sections relating to unlawful discriminatory practices.”

 

It modifies the Missouri Human Rights Act. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

LEAD Partners with U.S. DOL’s Civil Rights Center, Office of Disability Employment Policy and Missouri State Equal Opportunity at 2017 WIOA National Convenings - 06/29/2017

“This spring, the U.S. Department of Labor (US DOL), in collaboration with its Education and Health and Human Services partners, hosted three Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) National Convenings. The convenings were held at different regional locations on the West Coast, East Coast, and in the Midwest, and had one agenda with closely aligned content. The purpose of the convenings was to provide support and information to state and local workforce development professionals and partners on effectively implementing WIOA. Six different tracks were offered at each convening, including the following key topic areas: Business Engagement, Financial/Grants Management, Integrated Services, One-Stop Operations, Performance Accountability, and Strategic Governance. In addition, this year marked the first time in which an additional session on civil rights and disability was offered at all three convenings.

 

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Civil Rights Center (CRC) and Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) partnered with Missouri’s State Equal Opportunity Officer (EOO) and the LEAD Center to offer a joint presentation on What You Need to Know about Section 188: Individuals with Disabilities. The U.S. DOL CRC took the lead in providing an overview of WIOA’s Section 188 Equal Opportunity Provisions. Section 188 prohibits discrimination against individuals in any WIOA Title I financially assisted program or activity, which includes job training for adults and youth, and other programs or activities provided to recipients at American Job Centers or through its partners.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Unsicker hosts town hall to discuss Disability Employment Project - 06/28/2017

“JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – State Rep. Sarah Unsicker D-Shrewsbury, will host a town hall meeting at Webster University on June 28 at 7:00 p.m. to have an open dialogue regarding the barriers to employment for citizens with disabilities and to begin developing possible solutions.

 

“There are a wide range of issues to take into consideration when working to improve employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities such as healthcare and Medicaid needs, state employment policy, employer education and transportation,” said Unsicker.

 

“During the hiring process, it is important that employers are aware of the many capabilities citizens with disabilities possess. My goal with this town hall is to provide the disability community with the opportunity to give feedback regarding these issues so we can work towards expanding employment opportunities for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Missouri Department of Social Services “Provider Bulletin” - 03/23/2017

~~“Career Planning Service DescriptionCareer planning is a person-centered, comprehensive employment planning and support service. It provides consultative, evaluative assistance for waiver program participants to enter into, or advance in, competitive employment or self-employment. It is a focused, time-limited service engaging a participant in self-discovery, identifying a career direction and developing a plan for achieving competitive, integrated employment at or above the state’s minimum wage. The outcome of this service is documentation of the participant’s stated career objective and a career plan used to guide individual employment support.Career planning includes:• Activities that are primarily directed at assisting an individual with identification of an employment goal; and• A plan to achieve this goal (e.g., job exploration, job shadowing, informational interviewing, assessment of interests, labor market research) that are associated with performing competitive work in community integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

SB66, Payment of temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process - 07/05/2017

“Temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process until the employee reaches maximum medical improvement, unless such benefits are terminated by the employee’s return to work or are terminated as otherwise specified in this chapter.

 

The permanency of the employee’s disability under sections 287.170 to 287.200 shall not be established or adjudicated while the employee is participating in rehabilitation services.

 

Refusal of the employee to accept rehabilitation services or submit to a vocational rehabilitation assessment as deemed necessary by the employer shall result in a fifty percent reduction in all disability payments to an employee, including temporary partial disability benefits paid pursuant to section 287.180, for each week of the period of refusal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Missouri SB 43, Modifying the Missouri Human Rights Act - 06/30/2017

“AN ACT To repeal sections 213.010, 213.040, 213.050, 213.055, 213.065, 213.070, 213.075, 213.101, and 213.111, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof ten new sections relating to unlawful discriminatory practices.”

 

It modifies the Missouri Human Rights Act. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Missouri SB 174 - 06/29/2015

"There is hereby created the 'Missouri Achieving a Better Life Experience [ABLE] Program'".

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

EXECUTIVE ORDER 19-16 - 09/09/2019

~~“1. The State of Missouri shall make best efforts to eliminate the disparity in the percentage of individuals with disabilities of working age in the population and the percentage of employees with disabilities in the State workforce, and set annual goals for continuing to increase the percentage of individuals with disabilities in the State workforce.

2. The Office of Administration shall, on an annual basis, collect data, based on voluntary self-disclosure, and report initial baseline numbers of state employees with disabilities. The Office of Administration shall report and evaluate the State's progress in increasing the percentage of employees with disabilities in the State workforce.

3. The Office of Administration, Division of Personnel, shall identify and designate a State Disability Employment Coordinator or Coordinators, who shall be responsible for advising all state agencies on disability policy and compliance with state and federal disability rights laws, collaborating with and supporting all state agencies concerning recruitment, hiring, and retention of employees with disabilities, and training of state employees and managers on disability-related issues.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 11 - 20 of 23

“Empowering through Employment” - 01/24/2017

~~“In October 2016, the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) launched the Empowering through Employment Initiative to assist the growing number of individuals who express an interest in community-based employment.  According to National Core Indicators, 51% of individuals receiving home and community-based services express an interest to work in the community; however, fewer than 25% had a goal in their annual plan to support this interest and only 3% of individuals on a monthly basis have services authorized to assist with their employment pathway. “

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Part B Compliance - 01/01/2017

~~“THE STATE COMPLIANCE PLAN FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION is being revised during the 2016-17 school year to reflect updates in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), provide clarification on a number of issues, and make substantive changes based on research and OSEP guidance. Proposed changes in both a summary chart and a mark-up of the proposed plan are posted on the DESE website at https://dese.mo.gov/special-education/state-plan-special-education  . The Public comment period ended on January 6, 2017. All comments received will be reviewed and a decision made to accept, accept with revisions, or reject the comment. A summary of the comments and decision will be posted on the website after January 24, 2017. The proposed plan will be presented to the State Board of Education during their February meeting.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Proposed Part B State Plan Changes for 2017 “Transition Services” - 01/01/2017

~~“A. beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is sixteen (16), or younger if determined appropriate by the IEP team, and updated annually thereafter appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based upon age appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment, and, where appropriate, independent living skills; the transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist the child in reaching those goals, andB. beginning not later than one year before the student reaches age eighteen (18), a statement that the child has been informed of his or her rights under Part B of IDEA and that those rights will transfer to the student upon reaching the age of majority. “ 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Equal Opportunity Demographics - 01/01/2017

~~“The Missouri Interagency Transition Team (MITT) established to increase collaboration at the state, regional and local levels with the shared vision of improving employment, independent living, and postsecondary outcomes for Missouri students with disabilities.• Show-Me Careers, a consortium of state agencies focused on supporting the seamless transition from school to inclusive employment or post-secondary education for youth and young adults ages 16-30 with intellectual and developmental disabilities.• A regional annual Accommodation for Success event in the St. Louis area to help businesses recruit and employ individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Greater Kansas City - Disability Mentoring Day - 10/26/2016

“Join us for the 12th anniversary of Kansas City Disability Mentoring Day Events. Disability Mentoring Day promotes employment opportunities for all job seekers and students with disabilities through information and career exploration. As a person pursuing employment, this event gives you an excellent opportunity to: • •Increase and enhance your job readiness skills • •Network with employers to learn about different types of careers • •Visit with service organizations, providers, and government agencies to learn how they can help you in your job search • •Learn how to advocate for yourself”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Governor’s Council on Disability Employment Position Paper - 05/01/2016

“The Governor’s Council on Disability (GCD) recognizes that employment is a life defining activity/event for each of us, disabled or not. Employment provides income, a sense of belonging, mental and tangible benefits to a human, and status. As such, it is the position of the Governor’s Council that employment policies, practices, and implementation be inclusive and competitive"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Elementary and Secondary Education IEP Transition Planning - 03/01/2016

As a result of new legislation within the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), Office of Special Education (OSE), and the Office of Adult Learning and Rehabilitation Services -Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) offer the following guidance. As districts develop Individual Education Programs (IEPs) and provide transition services/activities for students with the most significant disabilities, consider the following:

1.As a part of the IEP process through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), schools will continue to be responsible for providing transition services to include work based learning opportunities.

2. Schools are encouraged to continue to conduct extensive evaluations and transition assessments, as outlined in IDEA, and work in partnership with VR and/or the Hook Center at the University of Missouri to provide pre-employment transition services to help students progress toward competitive, integrated employment goals.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MO Division of Developmental Disabilities Individual Support Plan Guidelines - 07/01/2014

The Division of Developmental Disabilities requires that each individual eligible for Division Supports have an Individual Support Plan. Individuals, their families, providers and facilitators who write plans in cooperation with all individuals receiving supports from the Division shall use this guide. Individual support planning encourages a team approach to involve the individual and community networks in planning for the future. The process involves developing a vision for the future, while coordinating resources and supports to make the vision a reality.   The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Supports (CMS) outcome for “participant-centered support planning and delivery” clarifies: “Supports are planned and effectively implemented in accordance with each participant’s unique needs, expressed preferences and decisions concerning his/her life in the community.”   The Individual Support Plan is an investment in an individual’s life and is driven by the individual, what is important to them as designed through outcomes identified in the support plan.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Missouri Developmental Disabilities Council position on employment and sub-minimum wage

“In partnership with others, the MODDC will promote competitive, community based employment which we define as: jobs that occur in the community for at least minimum wage, at typical community businesses where employees with and without disabilities work in close proximity to each other, and have the same benefits, responsibilities and expectations.  The MODDC believes that all people who want to work can work with the right supports.  That all people have a responsibility to share their abilities, strengths and talents with others in the community, to make their community a better place.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Governor’s Council on Disability 2016 Annual Report

~~“EMPLOYMENT INITIATIVESGCD continues to provide support to the Business Leadership Network (BLN) which is an employer driven endeavor to promote best practices in disability employment. In Missouri, there are two regional locations: 1) St. Louis region—Greater St. Louis Business Leadership Network (STLBLN)—that covers Greater St. Louis region and eight of the Southern Illinois counties; and 2) Kansas City region—Greater Kansas City BLN (GKCBLN)—which covers the western Missouri and eastern Kansas area; and 3) Springfield BLN. Springfield is the newest BLN in the state and is currently building its infrastructure.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

Missouri Connections Career Development & Planning Program - 06/01/1971

 

“Missouri Connections is a comprehensive, online, career development and planning program that is provided free of charge to all Missouri citizens. Funded by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Missouri Division of Workforce Development, this program supports the career development efforts of schools, community organizations, and adult job seeker programs. Missouri Connections helps individuals learn about their talents, skills, and interests and makes the connection between planning for continued education and the work world.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Missouri Developmental Disabilities Council Asset Development and Financial Education Initiative

“Persons with disabilities have a higher percentage of people who live in poverty than any other minority group in the country.  Missouri ranks in the bottom third of all states in the understanding of financial supports that assist persons with disabilities in working their way out of poverty.  Benefits planning and employment are just two pieces in this puzzle, the other pieces are asset development and financial education, therefore, the Missouri DD Council is partnering with the TACE, Region 7/University of MO-School of Health Professionals to promote Asset Development and Financial Education for persons with disabilities in our state by offering a variety of opportunities to learn more about this important piece of the puzzle and help people with disabilities learn more about asset development and financial education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Missouri Interagency Transition Team

~~“The Missouri Interagency Transition Team (MITT) formed in 2007 by the Office of Special Education at the Missouri Department of Elementary & Secondary Education to increase interagency collaboration at the state, regional, and local levels. This state transition team has met quarterly to address data-driven goals for improvement and collaboration with the shared vision of improving employment, independent living, and postsecondary education outcomes for Missouri students with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Missouri VR Connection

VR specializes in employment and training services that can assist you in becoming employed. A VR counselor will determine your eligibility for services. To be eligible, you need to have a physical or mental impairment that causes problems with working and need VR services to be successfully employed. Once eligible, you will work with a counselor who will help you develop a plan for your rehabilitation. We will give you vocational information and guidance allowing you to make informed choices about your vocational plan.   VR offers a wide range of services that are individualized for your needs. You and your counselor decide which services will help you become employed. Some of the services that may be available are:    • Guidance and Counseling    • Job-Seeking Skills and Job Placement    • Vocational Training   VR also provides assistance with Transition Services, Supported Employment Services,Assistive Technology Services, and the Ticket to Work Program  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Missouri State Chapter of ASPE

APSE-MO is the Missouri State Chapter of APSE The Association of People Supporting Employment First, a national organization committed to improving and expanding integrated employment opportunities, services, and outcomes for people experiencing disabilities. APSE-MO invites individuals with disabilities, their families, employment providers, funders, employers and others to join with us in making community employment a reality for ALL people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Show Me Careers: Missouri's Transition-to-Employment Collaborative

 

“The Show-Me-Careers project targets youth ages 16-30 with I/DD who are transitioning from secondary or post-secondary educational settings to community employment. Show-Me-Careers is funded by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and is one of eight grants awarded to state consortiums aimed at improving existing state systems to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with I/DD.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Missouri State Employment Leadership Network

The Missouri DD Council is partnering with the Missouri Department of Mental Health, Division of Developmental Disabilities, in bringing the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) to Missouri.  This is a project started by the Institute for Community Inclusion out of Boston, Massachusetts.  SELN brings together state developmental disability agencies for sharing, educating and providing guidance on practices and policies around employment to its members. It is also an opportunity for the Division of Developmental Disabilities and other Missouri governmental agencies to evaluate their policies and procedures as they relate to assisting persons with developmental disabilities to become employed.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

MO Ticket to Work - 06/01/1999

The Ticket to Work and Work Incentive Act of 1999 established an employment program for people who want to go to work that receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  The program was designed to remove barriers that kept people with disabilities from choosing to work for fear of losing health care coverage.  The Ticket to Work program is voluntary, and it increases opportunities and choices for Social Security (SS) disability beneficiaries to obtain employment, vocational rehabilitation, and other support services from public and private providers, employers, or other organizations.  SS provides a ticket to disability benefits to use in obtaining services and jobs through Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation or from an approved Employment Network.  Though SS has the overall program authority, MAXIMUS, Inc. serves as the program manager.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Missouri SAMHSA EDI (FY 2011 & 2012)

Goal 1: To strengthen peer delivered services in Missouri by leveraging Medicaid billing for services provided by Certified Peer Specialists in Consumer Operated Services Programs (COSP).   Goal 2: To introduce and begin implementation of peer delivered Individual Placement and Supports –Supported Employment (SE) – in Consumer Operated Services Programs.   Overall conclusions: Through this project Missouri has greatly increased its value of peers. 103 have been trained specifically under this project, with more on the way.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

Missouri Assistive Technology Council

Missouri Assistive Technology strives to increase access to assistive technology for Missourians with all types of disabilities, of all ages. To the right are navigation links to the programs and initiatives of MoAT.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO VR Transition Brochure

“Transition is a process young adults with disabilities, like you, go through to prepare for whatever the future might hold – further education, specialized training, employment or other options you might choose on the road to increased independence… Career planning and transition services are designed to help you prepare for your future by exploring different jobs, identifying careers interesting to you, and developing an understanding of the skills and abilities necessary to be successful.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MO Skills to Pay the Bills

"Skills to Pay the Bills: Mastering Soft Skills for Workplace Success," is a curriculum developed by ODEP focused on teaching "soft" or workforce readiness skills to youth, including youth with disabilities. Created for youth development professionals as an introduction to workplace interpersonal and professional skills, the curriculum is targeted for youth ages 14 to 21 in both in-school and out-of-school environments. The basic structure of the program is comprised of modular, hands-on, engaging activities that focus on six key skill areas: communication, enthusiasm and attitude, teamwork, networking, problem solving and critical thinking, and professionalism.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MO Writing Quality Goals, Outcomes and Action Plans

 

An overview of how to effectively create a Career Plan, establish appropriate goals and desired outcomes, and initiate an Action Plan with Discovery and Fading Supports.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Missouri Developmental Disabilities Waiver Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The Missouri Department of Mental Health’s Division of Developmental Disabilities (Division of DD)administers four Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver programs for individuals with developmental disabilities.  The four waivers are the Comprehensive Waiver; Missouri Children with Developmental Disabilities Waiver   (MOCDD or Lopez Waiver);   Community   Support Waiver; and Partnership for Hope Waiver (PfH).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

Community Transitions Manual for Support Coordinators and Community Coordinators - 02/11/2019

~~“MFP EligibilityIndividuals who transition from a Habilitation Center or nursing home may be eligible for MFP. MFP is a demonstration grant that supports efforts to:• Provide Medicaid eligible individuals the choice of where they live and receive services;• Allow qualified individuals living in nursing facilities or Habilitation Centers to move to the community; and• Promote a system that is person-centered, based on needs, and ensures high-quality services in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Missouri Medicaid (MO HealthNet) Independent Living Waiver - 03/01/2017

“The Missouri Independent Living Waiver (ILW) provides home and community based services for adults who are physically disabled. With assistance via this program, individuals can continue to live independently in their homes, rather than require placement in a nursing homes. Benefits include home modifications, personal care services, such as assistance with bathing, grooming, mobility, toiletry, and eating, and specialized medical equipment and supplies.”

 

“As of 2017, a single individual is allowed up to 85% of the Federal Poverty Level, which mean an applicant cannot have a monthly income more than $856. For married couples, the monthly income cannot exceed $1,150. However, Missouri does allow applicants that have an income greater than the allowable amount to “spend-down” in order to become eligible.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Missouri HCBS Statewide Transition Plan - 07/25/2016

“Missouri administers 10 Home and Community-Based Waivers through the single State Medicaid agency, the Department of Social Services, MO HealthNet Division (MHD). The day-to-day operation of the waivers is through formal cooperative agreements with the Missouri Department of Mental Health (DMH) and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS). The Department of Health and Senior Services and the Department of Mental Health are the operational entities for the waivers. Missouri Medicaid Audit and Compliance (MMAC) is the unit within the Department of Social Services (DSS) charged with administering and maintaining Medicaid Title XIX audit and compliance initiatives, including utilization of Medicaid services and provider enrollment functions. MMAC will participate in the transition plan as described below.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO DoE ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 06/08/2015

The Missouri Department of Secondary and Elementary Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on June 29, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Missouri HCSB Transition Plan - 03/01/2014

In March 2014, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) published a final rule regarding changes to Home and Community Based Waiver Services (HCBS Waiver). The rule defines home and community based settings and person-centered planning requirements in Medicaid HCBS Waiver programs. The rule requires demonstration of how state’s HCBS Waiver programs comply with the federal HCBS rules.   Missouri’s draft transition plan incorporates all HCBS Waivers administered by Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS), Department of Mental Health (DMH), and Department of Social Services (DSS). The purpose of Missouri’s draft transition plan is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS Waiver services are integrated and have access to supports in the community, including:    • opportunities to seek employment,    • work in competitive integrated settings,    • engage in community life,    • and control personal resources.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO Partnership for Hope Waiver (0841.R00.00) - 10/01/2013

The purpose of the Partnership for Hope waiver is to prevent or delay of institutional services for individuals who require minimal services in order to continue living in the community. The waiver will offer prevention services to stabilize individuals primarily living with family members who provide significant support, but are not able to meet all of the individual's needs. Goals To increase access to waiver services for children and adults at the local level in participating counties.    Objectives The objectives of the waiver are: 1) to increase the capacity of the State to meet the needs of individuals at risk of institutionalization who require minimal supports to continue living in integrated community settings; 2) to partner with local County Boards through Intergovernmental Agreements in the administration and funding of waiver services; and 3) to implement preventive services in a timely manner in order that eligible participants may continue living in the community with their families.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO Div of Developmental Disabilities Community Support (0404.R03.00) - 07/01/2011

 

“Provides community employment, in home respite, job preparation, personal assistant, assistive technology, behavior analysis service, co-worker supports, communication skills instruction, community specialist services, counseling, crisis intervention, environmental accessibility adaptations-home mods, independent living skills development, job discovery, OT, out of home respite, person centered strategies consultation, PT, professional assessment and monitoring, specialized medical equipment and supplies (adaptive equipment), speech therapy, support broker, transportation for individuals w/ID Developmental Disabilities ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO MR Developmental Disabilities Comprehensive (0178.R06.00) - 07/01/2011

 

“Provides community employment, day service, group home, in home respite, individualized supported living, job preparation, personal assistant, assistive technology, behavior analysis service, communication skills instruction, community specialist services, community transition, counseling, crisis intervention, environmental accessibility adaptations, host home, job discovery, OT, out of home respite, PT, positive behavior support, professional assessment and monitoring, specialized medical equipment and supplies (adaptive equipment), speech therapy, support broker, transportation for individuals w/MR Developmental Disabilities ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The Show Me State is expanding its efforts to deliver competitive, integrated employment options for individuals with disabilities through innovative strategies that propel Missouri's model, "Close to Home, Far from Ordinary."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Missouri’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2016 to 2017
6,113,532
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
463,964
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
172,283
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
37.13%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
99.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
79,376.00%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 6,083,672 6,093,000 6,113,532
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 463,157 468,140 463,964
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 163,574 164,243 172,283
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,524,635 2,521,381 2,536,645
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.32% 35.08% 37.13%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.78% 79.16% 79,376.00%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.00% 4.50% 3.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.90% 22.30% 20.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.60% 12.60% 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 430,732 426,359 438,766
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 437,083 447,737 455,312
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 728,775 729,010 746,357
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 102,581 104,789 104,337
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,074 21,980 22,690
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,727 7,155 5,285
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,408 4,876 9,478
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 870 1,009 669
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 18,411 22,891 22,283
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 5,043 4,366 5,669

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,252 7,496 7,663
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.40% 5.60% 5.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 220,596 217,590 213,655

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,032 6,268 6,164
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 12,624 11,390 11,180
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 44,121 42,204 38,602
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.70% 14.90% 16.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.60% 1.00% 2.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.30% 1.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 832 500 1,196
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 712 684 645
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 10,345 7,417 5,450
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.03 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 4,647 7,474 7,016
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,634 2,629 2,948
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 35.00% 35.00% 42.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 27.03 43.21 48.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
8,301
8,600
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 50 58 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 836 919 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,816 1,778 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,264 2,405 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,579 2,697 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 756 743 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 35.20% 37.90% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,435 7,588 8,353
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 318,047 318,214 313,618
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 669 730 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 800 701 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $7,012,000 $5,578,000 $5,571,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $38,353,000 $42,056,000 $46,338,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $18,291,000 $20,445,000 $22,851,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 10.00% 9.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,644 4,027 4,470
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,352 3,744 4,076
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.40 9.90 9.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 57.65% 57.59% 57.36%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.92% 8.76% 8.58%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.66% 3.61% 3.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.58% 88.29% 87.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 31.03% 25.55% 28.50%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.49% 60.89% 59.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.79% 65.90% 64.29%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 28.46% 31.34% 31.17%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,683,499
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,704
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 129,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 245,601
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 372,429
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 220
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 335
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 555
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,055,603
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,245,518

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 95 90 83
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 98 91 85
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 7,487 5,785 5,343
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 237 11 269
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 7,724 5,796 5,612

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Division of Developmental Disabilities has a statewide employment initiative, Employment First, for working age citizens with disabilities. Employment services include job preparation, job discovery, and community employment in a competitive integrated work setting that may include ongoing supports. The Division of Behavioral Health provides employment services to individuals with mental illnesses, histories of substance abuse, and/or criminal backgrounds. Clinical and vocational employment services are integrated through state—wide partnerships to help individuals who are interested in employment participate in the competitive labor market with the appropriate level of supports and services to be successful. RSB will continue to partner and collaborate with DMH programs in the delivery of employment services. (Pages 232-233) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~MVR’s workforce development activities are designed to assist individuals with disabilities in obtaining, maintaining, or advancing in competitive integrated employment. These activities include assessments, vocational guidance and counseling, job preparation activities, which can include disability awareness, resume writing, interviewing skills. Additionally, MVR provides eligible individuals with training (OJT, apprenticeships, customized employment, funding for community colleges and universities). (Page 44) Title I

RSB has developed relationships with several employers across the state communicating directly with HR staff on employment needs, identifying customized employment opportunities, and providing disability/blindness awareness and sensitivity training. Outreach activities have resulted in competitive integrated employment outcomes and work experience opportunities, both paid and unpaid, for youth and students with disabilities and adult clients. (Page 45) Title I

• SE Services --    The nature of the service itself requires an individualized approach based on the needs of an eligible individual. SE services are ongoing support services, including customized employment, and other appropriate services needed to support an individual with a most significant disability to achieve and maintain competitive integrated employment. Services are provided by CRPs. MVR can provide up to 24 months of community-based job training. (Pages 188-189) Title IV

The supported employment program ensures that individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities, are afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re—enter competitive integrated employment, including supported or customized employment. RSB’s employment outcomes for supported employment is recorded at 1.5% of total closures for FFY 2015. Of the individuals that exited the program and received supported employment services during FFY 2015, 80 percent were successfully employed in competitive jobs. These individuals averaged $9.77 per hour and worked an average of 30 hours per week. (Page 249) Title IV

Rehabilitation Services for the Blind (RSB) offers assessment, job development, task analysis, and time—limited individual and group job coaching leading to supported employment through 12 formal contracts with supported employment service providers. Other services available to clients with a goal of supported employment are the same as those available to clients receiving services under Title I. The supported employment program ensures that individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities, are afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re—enter competitive integrated employment, including supported or customized employment. Extended services may be provided to youth with the most significant disabilities for a period not to exceed four years. (Page 262) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Missouri partners are committed to developing new career pathways for youth and adults with barriers to employment including individuals with disabilities. Missouri’s core partner program leaders regularly meet to collaborate on braiding services for work-based learning and education funding. Through sector strategy regional business meetings and partner engagement, Missouri will work with employers to identify opportunities and services available to assist in eliminating employment barriers. (Page 58) Title I

Missouri is committed to finding connections between core partners, mandatory partners, and other partners in each region. Missouri’s core and mandatory partners will collaborate to share resources to create environments to foster partnering at the local level as well as maintain resource allocations that keep existing partnerships at the local level. Specific examples include: As part of their services to individuals with disabilities, VR may provide funding for post-secondary training. As partners seek to co-enroll their customers, this will provide opportunity for leveraging of these resources through braiding of both educational dollars, as well as supportive services to ensure the customer’s success. VR also provides guidance and counseling to the job seekers, to insure that access to comparable services funding is achieved, whether through partner agencies or through Federal funding, such as the Pell grant. (Page 82) Title I

MVR is working closely with all of the WIOA partners in order to provide the best services possible for consumers. MVR initiated the creation of a braiding services team, comprised of
WIOA core partners and other entities that serve individuals with disabilities, to develop methods and strategies to support collaboration between partner agencies, promote greater understanding of the services provided by each agency, and discover methods to avoid duplication of services. Many teams, consisting of members from all of the partner programs, are meeting and developing methods to meet individuals’ needs. (Pages 205-206) Title IV

MVR initiated the creation of a braiding services team, comprised of WIOA core partners and other entities that serve individuals with disabilities, to develop methods and strategies to support collaboration between partner agencies, promote greater understanding of the services provided by each agency, and discover methods to avoid duplication of services. (Pages 208-209) Title IV
The Missouri workforce development system comprised of all core WIOA partners has developed a Memorandum of Understanding on the implementation of WIOA and creating the partnerships to begin developing common referrals, the braiding of services, and data sharing. These collaborative efforts will enhance access for individuals with disabilities and improve performance for all partners. Performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA are new to vocational rehabilitation and have not yet been measured. RSB met all required federal performance indicators during the past two years prior to WIOA. RSB will apply the same quality of service utilized in meeting those indicators to achieve the new performance measures and provide that level of quality while moving forward.  (Page 254) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~RSB has formal contract agreements with community rehabilitation providers to work with employers and assist clients with job search, job placement and customized employment opportunities. Other services include work-based learning experiences, task analysis, and job coaching when needed. RSB contracts with Alphapointe Association for the Blind for an eight-week Summer Transition Employment Program (STEP) providing competitive work experience to high school age youth. The goal is to provide each consumer with a foundation for the school-to-work transition, to enable each to practice personal independence through work and goal-setting experiences, and to afford an opportunity for community involvement. This program includes vocational exploration; identifying preferences, interests, and abilities with regard to work; and learning about work related behaviors and self-advocacy. Consumers participate in general orientation during the first week of the program. The remaining seven weeks they spend on the job. Short-term job coaching may be provided to assist in orienting the consumers to the particular job site. Consumers receive an hourly wage during their placement at a job site. Involvement in this program is intended to increase a consumer’s career awareness, build marketable vocational skills, and support a healthy self-image. (Pages 46-47) Title I

Missouri will improve the outcomes for out-of-school youth by ensuring the 14 elements allowed under WIOA are met through a braiding of partner resources which will best meet each individuals need. The 14 program elements will be available to OSY participants, and will be funded with WIOA title I youth funds or leveraged partner resources. An agreement will be established with the partner to offer the program element and ensure that the activity is connected and coordinated with the WIOA youth program. (Page 129) Title I

Each local MVR district office will also participate in pre-employment transition coordination with the local education agency to include attending IEP meetings when invited, using conference calls and video conferences, when necessary; working with local workforce development entities and employers to develop work opportunities for students with disabilities; coordinating pre-employment transition services with transition services provided in accordance with IDEA; and, when invited, attending person-centered planning meetings for youth receiving services under Title IX of the Social Security Act. To effectively coordinate these services, MVR:
• conducted statewide training to include guidance regarding IEP participation for all MVR staff that serve students in Missouri high schools;
• worked in partnership with the Parent Advocacy Coalition Educational Rights Center to develop a video introducing VR services that can be shown at IEP meetings;
• conducted cross training on services to youth with local job center staff and MVR staff in Kansas City and St. Louis, the two largest metropolitan areas of the state;
• invited special education personnel to train new MVR counselors on transition services within the IEP;
• provided cross training with local CILs to include information regarding benefits planning; and
• is currently working in collaboration with DMH’s Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD) to provide cross training with MVR counselors and DD support coordinators regarding their respective services. (Pages 168-169) Title IV

MVR has a policy that outlines transition activities and services including the timely development and approval of an individualized plan for employment (IPE) for each eligible student prior to leaving high school. MVR will provide for the development of the IPE as early as possible during the transition planning process, but, at least, by the time the eligible student leaves the school setting. The IPE will include specific transition services or pre-employment transition services and supports needed for an eligible student with a disability or a youth with a disability, including youth with the most significant disabilities, to achieve an employment outcome or projected post-school employment outcome. An IPE is required to be developed in consideration of the IEP of a student with a disability under IDEA or a student’s Section 504 services. (Page 170) Title IV

The Cooperative Work Experience Program (COOP) agreement is an interagency state and local program between the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (Special Education, MVR and Career Education); Rehabilitation Services for the Blind (RSB); and local school districts in the state of Missouri. The agreement is embedded in the state transition MOU and is available for all school districts. The purpose is to facilitate the coordination of transition services from school to post-secondary training and/or employment for students with disabilities who participate in special education programs and are eligible to receive vocational rehabilitation services. The MOU outlines roles and responsibilities among participating agencies and school districts in the development of off-campus work experience programs. Through these programs, students with disabilities who are receiving services through an IEP can earn high school credit in accordance with Missouri high school graduation requirements for the number of hours they work in a paid competitive, integrated employment setting. Additionally, MVR continues to work collaboratively with providers and local school districts to meet transition needs of students. (Page 186) Title IV

The DESE Graduation Handbook and DESE Transition Agreement include three work-based learning experiences for students with disabilities on an IEP and are coordinated with special education. Students receive high school credit. These three experiences are the COOP Program, employer-based transition training/Project Search for students with most significant disabilities, and unpaid internships. (Page 194) Title IV

Supported employment services are available not only to individuals after leaving their secondary education program, but to students whose IEP and IPE include these services as part of their transition plan and whose school district signs a cooperative work experience program agreement with RSB.  (Page 262) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Missouri partners are committed to developing new career pathways for youth and adults with barriers to employment including individuals with disabilities. Missouri’s core partner program leaders regularly meet to collaborate on braiding services for work-based learning and education funding. Through sector strategy regional business meetings and partner engagement, Missouri will work with employers to identify opportunities and services available to assist in eliminating employment barriers. (Page 58) Title I

• In addition to training services, the Title I & Title IV partners have work based programs such as on-the-job training and work experience which offer the customers the opportunity to combine education, training and employment services. VR & Rehabilitation Services for the Blind supports career pathways by providing a variety of services to students, youth and adults with disabilities. Additional services may include assistive technology, case-management, and post-employment support to provide job retention. (Page 70) Title I

Each workforce area has a Business Services Team plan that guides outreach and services to businesses. Business Services Teams are made up of staff whose mission is to connect employers to a skilled workforce. To ensure an integrated service model, teams now include business representatives from Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), along with other combined partners who touch businesses. At a minimum, the members of the teams include Business Representatives and other Job Center staff assigned to business services, OJT Marketing Specialists, Local Veterans Employment Representatives, and VR Business Outreach Specialists. The design and makeup of each team varies slightly from region to region and may include a variety of other partners who work with businesses, such as local economic developers, educational agencies, UMOS (Missouri’s167 provider), Rehabilitative Services for the Blind Outreach Specialists and Family Support Division (FSD) TANF Outreach Specialists. Additionally, the Kansas City and Vicinity Region employs Disability Program Navigators, which are also included on their business services team. (Page 77) Title I

Apprenticeship

Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation and Rehabilitation Services for the Blind may provide vocational rehabilitation services to potentially eligible students with disabilities and eligible individuals, including youth with disabilities, to assist in accessing programs leading to post secondary credentials. Services are designed to create opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, including registered apprenticeship training programs, leading to industry-recognized certificates, credentials, licenses, and post-secondary degrees. Services for eligible participants may include access to training programs, disability related accommodations, and support services necessary for the successful participation and completion of the training activity. (Page 83) Title I
SB has formal contract agreements with community rehabilitation providers to work with employers and assist clients with job search, job placement and customized employment opportunities. Other services include work based learning experiences, task analysis, and job coaching when needed. RSB contracts with Alphapointe Association for the Blind for an eight—week Summer Transition Employment Program (STEP) providing competitive work experience to high—school age youth. The goal is to provide each consumer with a foundation for the school—to—work transition, to enable each to practice personal independence through work and goal—setting experiences, and to afford an opportunity for community involvement. This program includes vocational exploration; identifying preferences, interests, and abilities with regard to work; and learning about work related behaviors and self—advocacy. Consumers participate in general orientation during the first week of the program. The remaining seven weeks they spend on the job. Short—term job coaching may be provided to assist in orienting the consumers to the particular job site. Consumers receive an hourly wage during their placement at a job site. Involvement in this program is intended to increase a consumer’s career awareness, build marketable vocational skills, and support a healthy self—image. (Pages 231-232) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Rehabilitation Services for the Blind is not in an order of selection. RSB projects that funding for the 2018 and 2019 FFY will meet the needs of all individuals who apply for services. Data sets include:
1. Recipients of Blind Pension (BP) and Supplemental Aid for the Blind (SAB);
2. Recipients of SSI/SSDI who also receive other benefits from the DSA;
3. Recipients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services for blind and visually impaired;
4. Recipients of Independent Living Rehabilitation/Independent Living for Older Blind;
5. Recipients of Prevention of Blindness services (Page 242) Title IV
 

Employer/ Business

~~Missouri has established a WIOA Employer Engagement Committee, made up of staff from all combined partner agencies, LWDB Directors, and the USDOL Office of Apprenticeship State Director. This committee has been established to provide guidance to regions, make recommendations to the WIOA State Steering Committee, and coordinate statewide meetings as needed to ensure continued partner collaboration. (Page 79) Title I

RSB works with employers through a variety of activities at the local level to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate the provision of VR services and transition services, including transition services for youth and pre—employment transition services. District offices engage in outreach activities meeting directly with employers to identify employment needs and educate employers about the services RSB can offer for existing and new employees. Each district office and the Prevention of Blindness program have a tonometer to screen for the early signs of glaucoma as a service to employers and to promote VR services. Outreach activities are extended to employer health fairs, job fairs, chamber of commerce events, and participating in local Workforce Development Boards. RSB has developed relationships with several employers across the state communicating directly with HR staff on employment needs, identify customized employment opportunities, and provide disability/blindness awareness and sensitivity training. Outreach activities have resulted in competitive integrated employment outcomes and work experience opportunities, both paid and unpaid, for youth and students with disabilities and adult clients. (Page 230) Title IV

Data Collection

Missouri VR will assess its performance based upon the WIOA common performance measures as well as agency goals and objectives. The VR executive leadership team along with district office management reviews performance data on a monthly basis to determine progress toward goals and opportunities for improvement. VR’s case services and financial services work in tandem evaluating performance data for short- and long-term decision making. In addition, VR’s statewide quality assurance team evaluates case management providing guidance on program performance. (Page 95) Title I

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

• Title IV: VR is actively participating with all local workforce boards and works closely with Missouri Job Centers to provide program accessibility, physical access to services, and assistive technology for people with disabilities. Strategy 2 -Create Sector Strategies (Page 69) Title I
Missouri has a committee to specifically focus on one-stop certification criteria. The committee has established the criteria for certification, including accessibility. This committee includes representatives from Vocational Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Services for the Blind and the Centers for Independent Living (CILs) who will assist with training and technical assistance to ensure accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials for individuals with disabilities. Accessibility criteria for certification includes the accessibility requirements contained with Section 188; policy review, adaptive technology equipment availability, emergency procedures, etc.
In order to better serve Missouri Job Center customers, the workforce partners are working with ODEP’s National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) for technical assistance. Training has been conducted by the VR, LEAD Center & DWSD with AJC staff. Through this collaboration, partners developed a statewide survey that was sent to gather information from job seekers on the social, environmental and physical accessibility of the Missouri Job Centers. Local areas are using this feedback as a guide to improve training and technical assistance for serving people with disabilities.
Each Workforce Development region has a dedicated Equal Opportunity officer, which comprises a statewide team, which includes VR staff. (Page 108) Title I

Vets

Through a statewide network of job centers and partner organizations, Missouri Division of Workforce Development coordinates and aligns their partnership with the Department of Employment Security, Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Services for the Blind and the Department of Social Services Family Support Division. Together the partners provide a robust menu of vital reemployment and support services, including access to skill-building training, National Certification and Career Connections for jobs seekers, targeted programs for veterans, youth and the unemployed, and cost-saving human resource assistance and financial incentives for businesses. The partners braid workforce, education, and training activities with support services to meet the needs of our job seekers and employers. With 32 full-service centers as well as numerous satellite and affiliate locations statewide, Missouri Job Centers are the central point for WIOA core and one-stop partner services. (Pages 42-43) Title I
The Veteran services are of utmost importance. Missouri Job Centers have priority services for veterans, which will be served before all other customers. A veteran can request to see the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) staff or Local Veteran Employment Representative (LVER) at any time in the process to receive specialized services. (Page 43) Title I
The Career Skills Program assists transitioning veterans by providing an internship with a Missouri employer, which allows the service member to gain valuable civilian work experience prior to exiting active duty. (Page 85) Title I
The Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) and Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVERs) are fully integrated into the Missouri Job Centers as detailed by the DVOP/LVER agreement with the Secretary (Veterans State Plan). The role of the DVOP staff will not be to supplant the Wagner-Peyser responsibilities for providing priority of service to veterans, but to assist veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to overcome their barriers or mitigate their barriers so the veteran is job ready through case management. Once the veteran is job ready the LVER will work with employers to create employment opportunities for the job ready veterans. DVOP/LVER will not be assigned duties that violate Title 38. DVOP will share case management for veterans enrolled in WIOA and other programs with the providers of those programs.
The Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) requires compliance with Title 38, Chapters 41 and 42, in that all service delivery points of the grantee will provide veterans’ priority of service in the provision of all labor-exchange services, and specifically when making referrals for job openings and training opportunities.
Local service delivery points are monitored to ensure that programs provide the required priority of service to veterans. Whenever necessary, corrective action plans will be developed and appropriate technical assistance concerning priority of service to veterans will be provided. The agreement reached between Veterans’ Employment and Training and the State will be the governing agreement for veterans’ services within the Missouri Job Centers where funding is used to provide services to the state’s veteran customers. (Pages 107-108) Title I
Show Me Heroes (SMH) is work-based learning activity that provides OJT to veterans. Transitional jobs are reserved for those chronically unemployed and provide real life work experience when it is greatly needed to be successful in the workplace. The Incumbent Worker training policy allows local Boards the flexibility to provide Incumbent Worker Training to employers when needed. (Page 123) Title I
MVR has a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Compensated Work Therapy Program (CWT). MVR and CWT are mutually committed to promoting and enhancing competitive employment opportunities for veterans, enabling every individual to reach his or her life’s potential. MVR and CWT work together in bringing enhanced employment opportunities to veterans with disabilities leading to greater individual and family economic stability and security. (Pages 166-167) Title IV

Mental Health

~~MVR has an MOU with DMH, the state agency responsible for providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities and mental health services, which covers DMH’s BH and DD divisions. The agreement outlines the collaboration on existing services, alignment of funding sources, information and data sharing, referrals and on-going development of services.
DMH’s BH and MVR work together to increase access to evidence-based supported employment, also known as Individual Placement and Support (IPS), for adults with serious mental illnesses who are interested in improving their work lives. Missouri has 21 Community Mental Health/Treatment Centers (CMHCs) participating in this implementation collaborative. Ongoing technical assistance and fidelity reviews to the evidence-based practice are provided by a state trainer and a team consisting of MVR and DMH employees. The partnership between DMH and MVR includes a training format, offered to interested CMHCs statewide, on adopting IPS and on improving existing employment activities within treatment services. DMH and MVR implemented IPS for youth with serious mental illnesses in four current sites. (Page 176) Title IV

MVR will provide supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities for up to 24 months and will extend, if necessary, should these services be needed to achieve an employment outcome. These services may include: job coaching, job supports (both on and off the job), guidance and counseling, retention services, resources for benefits counseling, information and referral, and employer consultation.

MVR will continue to work closely with the Missouri Department of Social Services MOHealthNet Division and the Department of Mental Health (DMH) Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DD) divisions to ensure that youth with the most significant disabilities are receiving extended services. (Page 202) Title IV

DMH BH and MVR have been working to increase access to evidence-based supported employment, also known as IPS, for adults with serious mental illnesses who are interested in improving their work lives. Missouri has 21 Community Mental Health/Treatment Centers participating in this implementation collaborative. DMH and MVR are implementing IPS for youth with serious mental illnesses in four current sites.

To assist in determining the quality and effectiveness of SE services, MVR surveys its consumers. The 2017 Customer Satisfaction Survey results indicated that 98 percent of SE clients, who left services both successfully and unsuccessfully, felt MVR staff were available when needed and treated them with respect. (Page 211) Title IV

RSB will continue to work closely with the Missouri Department of Social Services MOHealthNet Division and the Department of Mental Health (DMH) Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DD) divisions to ensure that youth with the most significant disabilities are receiving extended services. Services may include job monitoring and assessment of employment stability, establishment of peer and natural support environments, and coordination of specific services necessary to assist the individual to maintain employment. RSB will work closely with the DMH DD division utilizing home and community-based waivers to increase supported employment and extended services for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 250) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 11 - 20 of 79

Graduation Requirements for Students in Missouri Public Schools - 11/15/2018

~~“Off-Campus InstructionMany students who are juniors and seniors in high school can benefit from authentic school-directed and supervised paid or unpaid learning experiences through assignment to off-campus locations under cooperative arrangements with business and industry or other institutions. More about these services can be found on our website.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Division of Developmental Disabilities Employment First Policy - 03/01/2018

This policy establishes community integrated employment services and supports as the first service option and primary outcome for individuals (both youth and adults.) It also establishes employment planning (Career Planning) and supports as priorities to explore with all working adults who receive services in order to ensure that supports, services, and outcomes are consistent with what the person is seeking.

Each individual will be supported to pursue his or her own unique path to work, a career, and his or her contribution to/participation in community life. All individuals, regardless of the challenge of their disability, will be afforded an opportunity to pursue employment. Career planning, including job exploration and on-going person focused self discovery, is critical when assisting individuals in making informed choices about their future careers.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

About the Missouri Collaborative Work Initiative - 09/01/2017

“Beginning with the 2012-2013 academic year, the Office of Special Education, Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education initiated a new approach to addressing the achievement disparity between students with disabilities and students without disabilities. This initiative is the Collaborative Work. By invitation, Missouri districts may choose to participate.

 

The purpose of the Collaborative Work Grant is to improve learning for all students, especially students with disabilities, and improve teaching, by:

-establishing and implementing effective and efficient collaborative  teams,

-implementing with fidelity and a high degree of effectiveness a variety of teaching/learning practices which have been proven to have a high effect size on student outcomes,

-developing and administering common formative assessments to measure the effectiveness of teaching/learning practices as evidenced by student mastery of learning objectives, and

-using data‐based decision making to guide decisions about classroom teaching/learning practices.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Transition Timeline - 09/01/2017

“Toward successful transition: A checklist for the first 21 years.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Reverse Job Fair 2017 and Disability Employment Event - 08/10/2017

“The Third Annual Accommodation for Success Disability Employment Event took place on August 10, 2017, at the Forest Park Campus of St. Louis Community College. The event was organized to make it easier for area businesses to build diverse workforce. This year, the event included the first Reverse Job Fair in St. Louis.

 

Unlike most traditional job fairs, this innovative recruitment event focused on showcasing talents and professional interests of 80+ job candidates with disabilities. Participants met with potential employers in their booth spaces, demonstrating experience and skills in a variety of industries, while human resource professionals roamed the room, meeting the candidates they were interested in hiring. More than 116 recruiters representing 99 area companies were present. With 236 total registrants, not including job candidates, this year’s event was the largest yet.

 

Accommodation for Success event is a collaborative effort between the St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment (SLATE), regional job centers, and more than 20 of the region’s disability employment organizations. Workshops and resources on disability inclusion, etiquette, recruitment, and workplace culture were offered to registered businesses, prior to the reverse job fair.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB66, Payment of temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process - 07/05/2017

“Temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process until the employee reaches maximum medical improvement, unless such benefits are terminated by the employee’s return to work or are terminated as otherwise specified in this chapter.

 

The permanency of the employee’s disability under sections 287.170 to 287.200 shall not be established or adjudicated while the employee is participating in rehabilitation services.

 

Refusal of the employee to accept rehabilitation services or submit to a vocational rehabilitation assessment as deemed necessary by the employer shall result in a fifty percent reduction in all disability payments to an employee, including temporary partial disability benefits paid pursuant to section 287.180, for each week of the period of refusal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Missouri SB 43, Modifying the Missouri Human Rights Act - 06/30/2017

“AN ACT To repeal sections 213.010, 213.040, 213.050, 213.055, 213.065, 213.070, 213.075, 213.101, and 213.111, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof ten new sections relating to unlawful discriminatory practices.”

 

It modifies the Missouri Human Rights Act. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

LEAD Partners with U.S. DOL’s Civil Rights Center, Office of Disability Employment Policy and Missouri State Equal Opportunity at 2017 WIOA National Convenings - 06/29/2017

“This spring, the U.S. Department of Labor (US DOL), in collaboration with its Education and Health and Human Services partners, hosted three Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) National Convenings. The convenings were held at different regional locations on the West Coast, East Coast, and in the Midwest, and had one agenda with closely aligned content. The purpose of the convenings was to provide support and information to state and local workforce development professionals and partners on effectively implementing WIOA. Six different tracks were offered at each convening, including the following key topic areas: Business Engagement, Financial/Grants Management, Integrated Services, One-Stop Operations, Performance Accountability, and Strategic Governance. In addition, this year marked the first time in which an additional session on civil rights and disability was offered at all three convenings.

 

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Civil Rights Center (CRC) and Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) partnered with Missouri’s State Equal Opportunity Officer (EOO) and the LEAD Center to offer a joint presentation on What You Need to Know about Section 188: Individuals with Disabilities. The U.S. DOL CRC took the lead in providing an overview of WIOA’s Section 188 Equal Opportunity Provisions. Section 188 prohibits discrimination against individuals in any WIOA Title I financially assisted program or activity, which includes job training for adults and youth, and other programs or activities provided to recipients at American Job Centers or through its partners.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Unsicker hosts town hall to discuss Disability Employment Project - 06/28/2017

“JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – State Rep. Sarah Unsicker D-Shrewsbury, will host a town hall meeting at Webster University on June 28 at 7:00 p.m. to have an open dialogue regarding the barriers to employment for citizens with disabilities and to begin developing possible solutions.

 

“There are a wide range of issues to take into consideration when working to improve employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities such as healthcare and Medicaid needs, state employment policy, employer education and transportation,” said Unsicker.

 

“During the hiring process, it is important that employers are aware of the many capabilities citizens with disabilities possess. My goal with this town hall is to provide the disability community with the opportunity to give feedback regarding these issues so we can work towards expanding employment opportunities for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Missouri Department of Social Services “Provider Bulletin” - 03/23/2017

~~“Career Planning Service DescriptionCareer planning is a person-centered, comprehensive employment planning and support service. It provides consultative, evaluative assistance for waiver program participants to enter into, or advance in, competitive employment or self-employment. It is a focused, time-limited service engaging a participant in self-discovery, identifying a career direction and developing a plan for achieving competitive, integrated employment at or above the state’s minimum wage. The outcome of this service is documentation of the participant’s stated career objective and a career plan used to guide individual employment support.Career planning includes:• Activities that are primarily directed at assisting an individual with identification of an employment goal; and• A plan to achieve this goal (e.g., job exploration, job shadowing, informational interviewing, assessment of interests, labor market research) that are associated with performing competitive work in community integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

SB66, Payment of temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process - 07/05/2017

“Temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process until the employee reaches maximum medical improvement, unless such benefits are terminated by the employee’s return to work or are terminated as otherwise specified in this chapter.

 

The permanency of the employee’s disability under sections 287.170 to 287.200 shall not be established or adjudicated while the employee is participating in rehabilitation services.

 

Refusal of the employee to accept rehabilitation services or submit to a vocational rehabilitation assessment as deemed necessary by the employer shall result in a fifty percent reduction in all disability payments to an employee, including temporary partial disability benefits paid pursuant to section 287.180, for each week of the period of refusal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Missouri SB 43, Modifying the Missouri Human Rights Act - 06/30/2017

“AN ACT To repeal sections 213.010, 213.040, 213.050, 213.055, 213.065, 213.070, 213.075, 213.101, and 213.111, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof ten new sections relating to unlawful discriminatory practices.”

 

It modifies the Missouri Human Rights Act. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Missouri SB 174 - 06/29/2015

"There is hereby created the 'Missouri Achieving a Better Life Experience [ABLE] Program'".

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

EXECUTIVE ORDER 19-16 - 09/09/2019

~~“1. The State of Missouri shall make best efforts to eliminate the disparity in the percentage of individuals with disabilities of working age in the population and the percentage of employees with disabilities in the State workforce, and set annual goals for continuing to increase the percentage of individuals with disabilities in the State workforce.

2. The Office of Administration shall, on an annual basis, collect data, based on voluntary self-disclosure, and report initial baseline numbers of state employees with disabilities. The Office of Administration shall report and evaluate the State's progress in increasing the percentage of employees with disabilities in the State workforce.

3. The Office of Administration, Division of Personnel, shall identify and designate a State Disability Employment Coordinator or Coordinators, who shall be responsible for advising all state agencies on disability policy and compliance with state and federal disability rights laws, collaborating with and supporting all state agencies concerning recruitment, hiring, and retention of employees with disabilities, and training of state employees and managers on disability-related issues.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 11 - 20 of 23

“Empowering through Employment” - 01/24/2017

~~“In October 2016, the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) launched the Empowering through Employment Initiative to assist the growing number of individuals who express an interest in community-based employment.  According to National Core Indicators, 51% of individuals receiving home and community-based services express an interest to work in the community; however, fewer than 25% had a goal in their annual plan to support this interest and only 3% of individuals on a monthly basis have services authorized to assist with their employment pathway. “

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Part B Compliance - 01/01/2017

~~“THE STATE COMPLIANCE PLAN FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION is being revised during the 2016-17 school year to reflect updates in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), provide clarification on a number of issues, and make substantive changes based on research and OSEP guidance. Proposed changes in both a summary chart and a mark-up of the proposed plan are posted on the DESE website at https://dese.mo.gov/special-education/state-plan-special-education  . The Public comment period ended on January 6, 2017. All comments received will be reviewed and a decision made to accept, accept with revisions, or reject the comment. A summary of the comments and decision will be posted on the website after January 24, 2017. The proposed plan will be presented to the State Board of Education during their February meeting.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Proposed Part B State Plan Changes for 2017 “Transition Services” - 01/01/2017

~~“A. beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is sixteen (16), or younger if determined appropriate by the IEP team, and updated annually thereafter appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based upon age appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment, and, where appropriate, independent living skills; the transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist the child in reaching those goals, andB. beginning not later than one year before the student reaches age eighteen (18), a statement that the child has been informed of his or her rights under Part B of IDEA and that those rights will transfer to the student upon reaching the age of majority. “ 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Equal Opportunity Demographics - 01/01/2017

~~“The Missouri Interagency Transition Team (MITT) established to increase collaboration at the state, regional and local levels with the shared vision of improving employment, independent living, and postsecondary outcomes for Missouri students with disabilities.• Show-Me Careers, a consortium of state agencies focused on supporting the seamless transition from school to inclusive employment or post-secondary education for youth and young adults ages 16-30 with intellectual and developmental disabilities.• A regional annual Accommodation for Success event in the St. Louis area to help businesses recruit and employ individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Greater Kansas City - Disability Mentoring Day - 10/26/2016

“Join us for the 12th anniversary of Kansas City Disability Mentoring Day Events. Disability Mentoring Day promotes employment opportunities for all job seekers and students with disabilities through information and career exploration. As a person pursuing employment, this event gives you an excellent opportunity to: • •Increase and enhance your job readiness skills • •Network with employers to learn about different types of careers • •Visit with service organizations, providers, and government agencies to learn how they can help you in your job search • •Learn how to advocate for yourself”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Governor’s Council on Disability Employment Position Paper - 05/01/2016

“The Governor’s Council on Disability (GCD) recognizes that employment is a life defining activity/event for each of us, disabled or not. Employment provides income, a sense of belonging, mental and tangible benefits to a human, and status. As such, it is the position of the Governor’s Council that employment policies, practices, and implementation be inclusive and competitive"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Elementary and Secondary Education IEP Transition Planning - 03/01/2016

As a result of new legislation within the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), Office of Special Education (OSE), and the Office of Adult Learning and Rehabilitation Services -Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) offer the following guidance. As districts develop Individual Education Programs (IEPs) and provide transition services/activities for students with the most significant disabilities, consider the following:

1.As a part of the IEP process through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), schools will continue to be responsible for providing transition services to include work based learning opportunities.

2. Schools are encouraged to continue to conduct extensive evaluations and transition assessments, as outlined in IDEA, and work in partnership with VR and/or the Hook Center at the University of Missouri to provide pre-employment transition services to help students progress toward competitive, integrated employment goals.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MO Division of Developmental Disabilities Individual Support Plan Guidelines - 07/01/2014

The Division of Developmental Disabilities requires that each individual eligible for Division Supports have an Individual Support Plan. Individuals, their families, providers and facilitators who write plans in cooperation with all individuals receiving supports from the Division shall use this guide. Individual support planning encourages a team approach to involve the individual and community networks in planning for the future. The process involves developing a vision for the future, while coordinating resources and supports to make the vision a reality.   The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Supports (CMS) outcome for “participant-centered support planning and delivery” clarifies: “Supports are planned and effectively implemented in accordance with each participant’s unique needs, expressed preferences and decisions concerning his/her life in the community.”   The Individual Support Plan is an investment in an individual’s life and is driven by the individual, what is important to them as designed through outcomes identified in the support plan.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Missouri Developmental Disabilities Council position on employment and sub-minimum wage

“In partnership with others, the MODDC will promote competitive, community based employment which we define as: jobs that occur in the community for at least minimum wage, at typical community businesses where employees with and without disabilities work in close proximity to each other, and have the same benefits, responsibilities and expectations.  The MODDC believes that all people who want to work can work with the right supports.  That all people have a responsibility to share their abilities, strengths and talents with others in the community, to make their community a better place.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Governor’s Council on Disability 2016 Annual Report

~~“EMPLOYMENT INITIATIVESGCD continues to provide support to the Business Leadership Network (BLN) which is an employer driven endeavor to promote best practices in disability employment. In Missouri, there are two regional locations: 1) St. Louis region—Greater St. Louis Business Leadership Network (STLBLN)—that covers Greater St. Louis region and eight of the Southern Illinois counties; and 2) Kansas City region—Greater Kansas City BLN (GKCBLN)—which covers the western Missouri and eastern Kansas area; and 3) Springfield BLN. Springfield is the newest BLN in the state and is currently building its infrastructure.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

Missouri Connections Career Development & Planning Program - 06/01/1971

 

“Missouri Connections is a comprehensive, online, career development and planning program that is provided free of charge to all Missouri citizens. Funded by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Missouri Division of Workforce Development, this program supports the career development efforts of schools, community organizations, and adult job seeker programs. Missouri Connections helps individuals learn about their talents, skills, and interests and makes the connection between planning for continued education and the work world.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Missouri Developmental Disabilities Council Asset Development and Financial Education Initiative

“Persons with disabilities have a higher percentage of people who live in poverty than any other minority group in the country.  Missouri ranks in the bottom third of all states in the understanding of financial supports that assist persons with disabilities in working their way out of poverty.  Benefits planning and employment are just two pieces in this puzzle, the other pieces are asset development and financial education, therefore, the Missouri DD Council is partnering with the TACE, Region 7/University of MO-School of Health Professionals to promote Asset Development and Financial Education for persons with disabilities in our state by offering a variety of opportunities to learn more about this important piece of the puzzle and help people with disabilities learn more about asset development and financial education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Missouri Interagency Transition Team

~~“The Missouri Interagency Transition Team (MITT) formed in 2007 by the Office of Special Education at the Missouri Department of Elementary & Secondary Education to increase interagency collaboration at the state, regional, and local levels. This state transition team has met quarterly to address data-driven goals for improvement and collaboration with the shared vision of improving employment, independent living, and postsecondary education outcomes for Missouri students with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Missouri VR Connection

VR specializes in employment and training services that can assist you in becoming employed. A VR counselor will determine your eligibility for services. To be eligible, you need to have a physical or mental impairment that causes problems with working and need VR services to be successfully employed. Once eligible, you will work with a counselor who will help you develop a plan for your rehabilitation. We will give you vocational information and guidance allowing you to make informed choices about your vocational plan.   VR offers a wide range of services that are individualized for your needs. You and your counselor decide which services will help you become employed. Some of the services that may be available are:    • Guidance and Counseling    • Job-Seeking Skills and Job Placement    • Vocational Training   VR also provides assistance with Transition Services, Supported Employment Services,Assistive Technology Services, and the Ticket to Work Program  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Missouri State Chapter of ASPE

APSE-MO is the Missouri State Chapter of APSE The Association of People Supporting Employment First, a national organization committed to improving and expanding integrated employment opportunities, services, and outcomes for people experiencing disabilities. APSE-MO invites individuals with disabilities, their families, employment providers, funders, employers and others to join with us in making community employment a reality for ALL people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Show Me Careers: Missouri's Transition-to-Employment Collaborative

 

“The Show-Me-Careers project targets youth ages 16-30 with I/DD who are transitioning from secondary or post-secondary educational settings to community employment. Show-Me-Careers is funded by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and is one of eight grants awarded to state consortiums aimed at improving existing state systems to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with I/DD.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Missouri State Employment Leadership Network

The Missouri DD Council is partnering with the Missouri Department of Mental Health, Division of Developmental Disabilities, in bringing the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) to Missouri.  This is a project started by the Institute for Community Inclusion out of Boston, Massachusetts.  SELN brings together state developmental disability agencies for sharing, educating and providing guidance on practices and policies around employment to its members. It is also an opportunity for the Division of Developmental Disabilities and other Missouri governmental agencies to evaluate their policies and procedures as they relate to assisting persons with developmental disabilities to become employed.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

MO Ticket to Work - 06/01/1999

The Ticket to Work and Work Incentive Act of 1999 established an employment program for people who want to go to work that receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  The program was designed to remove barriers that kept people with disabilities from choosing to work for fear of losing health care coverage.  The Ticket to Work program is voluntary, and it increases opportunities and choices for Social Security (SS) disability beneficiaries to obtain employment, vocational rehabilitation, and other support services from public and private providers, employers, or other organizations.  SS provides a ticket to disability benefits to use in obtaining services and jobs through Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation or from an approved Employment Network.  Though SS has the overall program authority, MAXIMUS, Inc. serves as the program manager.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Missouri SAMHSA EDI (FY 2011 & 2012)

Goal 1: To strengthen peer delivered services in Missouri by leveraging Medicaid billing for services provided by Certified Peer Specialists in Consumer Operated Services Programs (COSP).   Goal 2: To introduce and begin implementation of peer delivered Individual Placement and Supports –Supported Employment (SE) – in Consumer Operated Services Programs.   Overall conclusions: Through this project Missouri has greatly increased its value of peers. 103 have been trained specifically under this project, with more on the way.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

Missouri Assistive Technology Council

Missouri Assistive Technology strives to increase access to assistive technology for Missourians with all types of disabilities, of all ages. To the right are navigation links to the programs and initiatives of MoAT.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO VR Transition Brochure

“Transition is a process young adults with disabilities, like you, go through to prepare for whatever the future might hold – further education, specialized training, employment or other options you might choose on the road to increased independence… Career planning and transition services are designed to help you prepare for your future by exploring different jobs, identifying careers interesting to you, and developing an understanding of the skills and abilities necessary to be successful.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MO Skills to Pay the Bills

"Skills to Pay the Bills: Mastering Soft Skills for Workplace Success," is a curriculum developed by ODEP focused on teaching "soft" or workforce readiness skills to youth, including youth with disabilities. Created for youth development professionals as an introduction to workplace interpersonal and professional skills, the curriculum is targeted for youth ages 14 to 21 in both in-school and out-of-school environments. The basic structure of the program is comprised of modular, hands-on, engaging activities that focus on six key skill areas: communication, enthusiasm and attitude, teamwork, networking, problem solving and critical thinking, and professionalism.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MO Writing Quality Goals, Outcomes and Action Plans

 

An overview of how to effectively create a Career Plan, establish appropriate goals and desired outcomes, and initiate an Action Plan with Discovery and Fading Supports.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Missouri Developmental Disabilities Waiver Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The Missouri Department of Mental Health’s Division of Developmental Disabilities (Division of DD)administers four Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver programs for individuals with developmental disabilities.  The four waivers are the Comprehensive Waiver; Missouri Children with Developmental Disabilities Waiver   (MOCDD or Lopez Waiver);   Community   Support Waiver; and Partnership for Hope Waiver (PfH).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

Community Transitions Manual for Support Coordinators and Community Coordinators - 02/11/2019

~~“MFP EligibilityIndividuals who transition from a Habilitation Center or nursing home may be eligible for MFP. MFP is a demonstration grant that supports efforts to:• Provide Medicaid eligible individuals the choice of where they live and receive services;• Allow qualified individuals living in nursing facilities or Habilitation Centers to move to the community; and• Promote a system that is person-centered, based on needs, and ensures high-quality services in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Missouri Medicaid (MO HealthNet) Independent Living Waiver - 03/01/2017

“The Missouri Independent Living Waiver (ILW) provides home and community based services for adults who are physically disabled. With assistance via this program, individuals can continue to live independently in their homes, rather than require placement in a nursing homes. Benefits include home modifications, personal care services, such as assistance with bathing, grooming, mobility, toiletry, and eating, and specialized medical equipment and supplies.”

 

“As of 2017, a single individual is allowed up to 85% of the Federal Poverty Level, which mean an applicant cannot have a monthly income more than $856. For married couples, the monthly income cannot exceed $1,150. However, Missouri does allow applicants that have an income greater than the allowable amount to “spend-down” in order to become eligible.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Missouri HCBS Statewide Transition Plan - 07/25/2016

“Missouri administers 10 Home and Community-Based Waivers through the single State Medicaid agency, the Department of Social Services, MO HealthNet Division (MHD). The day-to-day operation of the waivers is through formal cooperative agreements with the Missouri Department of Mental Health (DMH) and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS). The Department of Health and Senior Services and the Department of Mental Health are the operational entities for the waivers. Missouri Medicaid Audit and Compliance (MMAC) is the unit within the Department of Social Services (DSS) charged with administering and maintaining Medicaid Title XIX audit and compliance initiatives, including utilization of Medicaid services and provider enrollment functions. MMAC will participate in the transition plan as described below.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO DoE ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 06/08/2015

The Missouri Department of Secondary and Elementary Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on June 29, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Missouri HCSB Transition Plan - 03/01/2014

In March 2014, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) published a final rule regarding changes to Home and Community Based Waiver Services (HCBS Waiver). The rule defines home and community based settings and person-centered planning requirements in Medicaid HCBS Waiver programs. The rule requires demonstration of how state’s HCBS Waiver programs comply with the federal HCBS rules.   Missouri’s draft transition plan incorporates all HCBS Waivers administered by Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS), Department of Mental Health (DMH), and Department of Social Services (DSS). The purpose of Missouri’s draft transition plan is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS Waiver services are integrated and have access to supports in the community, including:    • opportunities to seek employment,    • work in competitive integrated settings,    • engage in community life,    • and control personal resources.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO Partnership for Hope Waiver (0841.R00.00) - 10/01/2013

The purpose of the Partnership for Hope waiver is to prevent or delay of institutional services for individuals who require minimal services in order to continue living in the community. The waiver will offer prevention services to stabilize individuals primarily living with family members who provide significant support, but are not able to meet all of the individual's needs. Goals To increase access to waiver services for children and adults at the local level in participating counties.    Objectives The objectives of the waiver are: 1) to increase the capacity of the State to meet the needs of individuals at risk of institutionalization who require minimal supports to continue living in integrated community settings; 2) to partner with local County Boards through Intergovernmental Agreements in the administration and funding of waiver services; and 3) to implement preventive services in a timely manner in order that eligible participants may continue living in the community with their families.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO Div of Developmental Disabilities Community Support (0404.R03.00) - 07/01/2011

 

“Provides community employment, in home respite, job preparation, personal assistant, assistive technology, behavior analysis service, co-worker supports, communication skills instruction, community specialist services, counseling, crisis intervention, environmental accessibility adaptations-home mods, independent living skills development, job discovery, OT, out of home respite, person centered strategies consultation, PT, professional assessment and monitoring, specialized medical equipment and supplies (adaptive equipment), speech therapy, support broker, transportation for individuals w/ID Developmental Disabilities ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO MR Developmental Disabilities Comprehensive (0178.R06.00) - 07/01/2011

 

“Provides community employment, day service, group home, in home respite, individualized supported living, job preparation, personal assistant, assistive technology, behavior analysis service, communication skills instruction, community specialist services, community transition, counseling, crisis intervention, environmental accessibility adaptations, host home, job discovery, OT, out of home respite, PT, positive behavior support, professional assessment and monitoring, specialized medical equipment and supplies (adaptive equipment), speech therapy, support broker, transportation for individuals w/MR Developmental Disabilities ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The Show Me State is expanding its efforts to deliver competitive, integrated employment options for individuals with disabilities through innovative strategies that propel Missouri's model, "Close to Home, Far from Ordinary."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Missouri’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2016 to 2017
6,113,532
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
463,964
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
172,283
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
37.13%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
99.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
79,376.00%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 6,083,672 6,093,000 6,113,532
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 463,157 468,140 463,964
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 163,574 164,243 172,283
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,524,635 2,521,381 2,536,645
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.32% 35.08% 37.13%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.78% 79.16% 79,376.00%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.00% 4.50% 3.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.90% 22.30% 20.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.60% 12.60% 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 430,732 426,359 438,766
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 437,083 447,737 455,312
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 728,775 729,010 746,357
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 102,581 104,789 104,337
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,074 21,980 22,690
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,727 7,155 5,285
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,408 4,876 9,478
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 870 1,009 669
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 18,411 22,891 22,283
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 5,043 4,366 5,669

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,252 7,496 7,663
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.40% 5.60% 5.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 220,596 217,590 213,655

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,032 6,268 6,164
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 12,624 11,390 11,180
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 44,121 42,204 38,602
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.70% 14.90% 16.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.60% 1.00% 2.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.30% 1.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 832 500 1,196
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 712 684 645
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 10,345 7,417 5,450
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.03 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 4,647 7,474 7,016
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,634 2,629 2,948
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 35.00% 35.00% 42.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 27.03 43.21 48.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
8,301
8,600
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 50 58 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 836 919 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,816 1,778 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,264 2,405 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,579 2,697 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 756 743 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 35.20% 37.90% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,435 7,588 8,353
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 318,047 318,214 313,618
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 669 730 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 800 701 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $7,012,000 $5,578,000 $5,571,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $38,353,000 $42,056,000 $46,338,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $18,291,000 $20,445,000 $22,851,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 10.00% 9.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,644 4,027 4,470
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,352 3,744 4,076
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.40 9.90 9.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 57.65% 57.59% 57.36%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.92% 8.76% 8.58%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.66% 3.61% 3.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.58% 88.29% 87.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 31.03% 25.55% 28.50%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.49% 60.89% 59.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.79% 65.90% 64.29%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 28.46% 31.34% 31.17%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,683,499
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,704
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 129,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 245,601
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 372,429
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 220
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 335
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 555
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,055,603
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,245,518

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 95 90 83
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 98 91 85
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 7,487 5,785 5,343
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 237 11 269
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 7,724 5,796 5,612

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Division of Developmental Disabilities has a statewide employment initiative, Employment First, for working age citizens with disabilities. Employment services include job preparation, job discovery, and community employment in a competitive integrated work setting that may include ongoing supports. The Division of Behavioral Health provides employment services to individuals with mental illnesses, histories of substance abuse, and/or criminal backgrounds. Clinical and vocational employment services are integrated through state—wide partnerships to help individuals who are interested in employment participate in the competitive labor market with the appropriate level of supports and services to be successful. RSB will continue to partner and collaborate with DMH programs in the delivery of employment services. (Pages 232-233) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~MVR’s workforce development activities are designed to assist individuals with disabilities in obtaining, maintaining, or advancing in competitive integrated employment. These activities include assessments, vocational guidance and counseling, job preparation activities, which can include disability awareness, resume writing, interviewing skills. Additionally, MVR provides eligible individuals with training (OJT, apprenticeships, customized employment, funding for community colleges and universities). (Page 44) Title I

RSB has developed relationships with several employers across the state communicating directly with HR staff on employment needs, identifying customized employment opportunities, and providing disability/blindness awareness and sensitivity training. Outreach activities have resulted in competitive integrated employment outcomes and work experience opportunities, both paid and unpaid, for youth and students with disabilities and adult clients. (Page 45) Title I

• SE Services --    The nature of the service itself requires an individualized approach based on the needs of an eligible individual. SE services are ongoing support services, including customized employment, and other appropriate services needed to support an individual with a most significant disability to achieve and maintain competitive integrated employment. Services are provided by CRPs. MVR can provide up to 24 months of community-based job training. (Pages 188-189) Title IV

The supported employment program ensures that individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities, are afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re—enter competitive integrated employment, including supported or customized employment. RSB’s employment outcomes for supported employment is recorded at 1.5% of total closures for FFY 2015. Of the individuals that exited the program and received supported employment services during FFY 2015, 80 percent were successfully employed in competitive jobs. These individuals averaged $9.77 per hour and worked an average of 30 hours per week. (Page 249) Title IV

Rehabilitation Services for the Blind (RSB) offers assessment, job development, task analysis, and time—limited individual and group job coaching leading to supported employment through 12 formal contracts with supported employment service providers. Other services available to clients with a goal of supported employment are the same as those available to clients receiving services under Title I. The supported employment program ensures that individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities, are afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re—enter competitive integrated employment, including supported or customized employment. Extended services may be provided to youth with the most significant disabilities for a period not to exceed four years. (Page 262) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Missouri partners are committed to developing new career pathways for youth and adults with barriers to employment including individuals with disabilities. Missouri’s core partner program leaders regularly meet to collaborate on braiding services for work-based learning and education funding. Through sector strategy regional business meetings and partner engagement, Missouri will work with employers to identify opportunities and services available to assist in eliminating employment barriers. (Page 58) Title I

Missouri is committed to finding connections between core partners, mandatory partners, and other partners in each region. Missouri’s core and mandatory partners will collaborate to share resources to create environments to foster partnering at the local level as well as maintain resource allocations that keep existing partnerships at the local level. Specific examples include: As part of their services to individuals with disabilities, VR may provide funding for post-secondary training. As partners seek to co-enroll their customers, this will provide opportunity for leveraging of these resources through braiding of both educational dollars, as well as supportive services to ensure the customer’s success. VR also provides guidance and counseling to the job seekers, to insure that access to comparable services funding is achieved, whether through partner agencies or through Federal funding, such as the Pell grant. (Page 82) Title I

MVR is working closely with all of the WIOA partners in order to provide the best services possible for consumers. MVR initiated the creation of a braiding services team, comprised of
WIOA core partners and other entities that serve individuals with disabilities, to develop methods and strategies to support collaboration between partner agencies, promote greater understanding of the services provided by each agency, and discover methods to avoid duplication of services. Many teams, consisting of members from all of the partner programs, are meeting and developing methods to meet individuals’ needs. (Pages 205-206) Title IV

MVR initiated the creation of a braiding services team, comprised of WIOA core partners and other entities that serve individuals with disabilities, to develop methods and strategies to support collaboration between partner agencies, promote greater understanding of the services provided by each agency, and discover methods to avoid duplication of services. (Pages 208-209) Title IV
The Missouri workforce development system comprised of all core WIOA partners has developed a Memorandum of Understanding on the implementation of WIOA and creating the partnerships to begin developing common referrals, the braiding of services, and data sharing. These collaborative efforts will enhance access for individuals with disabilities and improve performance for all partners. Performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA are new to vocational rehabilitation and have not yet been measured. RSB met all required federal performance indicators during the past two years prior to WIOA. RSB will apply the same quality of service utilized in meeting those indicators to achieve the new performance measures and provide that level of quality while moving forward.  (Page 254) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~RSB has formal contract agreements with community rehabilitation providers to work with employers and assist clients with job search, job placement and customized employment opportunities. Other services include work-based learning experiences, task analysis, and job coaching when needed. RSB contracts with Alphapointe Association for the Blind for an eight-week Summer Transition Employment Program (STEP) providing competitive work experience to high school age youth. The goal is to provide each consumer with a foundation for the school-to-work transition, to enable each to practice personal independence through work and goal-setting experiences, and to afford an opportunity for community involvement. This program includes vocational exploration; identifying preferences, interests, and abilities with regard to work; and learning about work related behaviors and self-advocacy. Consumers participate in general orientation during the first week of the program. The remaining seven weeks they spend on the job. Short-term job coaching may be provided to assist in orienting the consumers to the particular job site. Consumers receive an hourly wage during their placement at a job site. Involvement in this program is intended to increase a consumer’s career awareness, build marketable vocational skills, and support a healthy self-image. (Pages 46-47) Title I

Missouri will improve the outcomes for out-of-school youth by ensuring the 14 elements allowed under WIOA are met through a braiding of partner resources which will best meet each individuals need. The 14 program elements will be available to OSY participants, and will be funded with WIOA title I youth funds or leveraged partner resources. An agreement will be established with the partner to offer the program element and ensure that the activity is connected and coordinated with the WIOA youth program. (Page 129) Title I

Each local MVR district office will also participate in pre-employment transition coordination with the local education agency to include attending IEP meetings when invited, using conference calls and video conferences, when necessary; working with local workforce development entities and employers to develop work opportunities for students with disabilities; coordinating pre-employment transition services with transition services provided in accordance with IDEA; and, when invited, attending person-centered planning meetings for youth receiving services under Title IX of the Social Security Act. To effectively coordinate these services, MVR:
• conducted statewide training to include guidance regarding IEP participation for all MVR staff that serve students in Missouri high schools;
• worked in partnership with the Parent Advocacy Coalition Educational Rights Center to develop a video introducing VR services that can be shown at IEP meetings;
• conducted cross training on services to youth with local job center staff and MVR staff in Kansas City and St. Louis, the two largest metropolitan areas of the state;
• invited special education personnel to train new MVR counselors on transition services within the IEP;
• provided cross training with local CILs to include information regarding benefits planning; and
• is currently working in collaboration with DMH’s Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD) to provide cross training with MVR counselors and DD support coordinators regarding their respective services. (Pages 168-169) Title IV

MVR has a policy that outlines transition activities and services including the timely development and approval of an individualized plan for employment (IPE) for each eligible student prior to leaving high school. MVR will provide for the development of the IPE as early as possible during the transition planning process, but, at least, by the time the eligible student leaves the school setting. The IPE will include specific transition services or pre-employment transition services and supports needed for an eligible student with a disability or a youth with a disability, including youth with the most significant disabilities, to achieve an employment outcome or projected post-school employment outcome. An IPE is required to be developed in consideration of the IEP of a student with a disability under IDEA or a student’s Section 504 services. (Page 170) Title IV

The Cooperative Work Experience Program (COOP) agreement is an interagency state and local program between the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (Special Education, MVR and Career Education); Rehabilitation Services for the Blind (RSB); and local school districts in the state of Missouri. The agreement is embedded in the state transition MOU and is available for all school districts. The purpose is to facilitate the coordination of transition services from school to post-secondary training and/or employment for students with disabilities who participate in special education programs and are eligible to receive vocational rehabilitation services. The MOU outlines roles and responsibilities among participating agencies and school districts in the development of off-campus work experience programs. Through these programs, students with disabilities who are receiving services through an IEP can earn high school credit in accordance with Missouri high school graduation requirements for the number of hours they work in a paid competitive, integrated employment setting. Additionally, MVR continues to work collaboratively with providers and local school districts to meet transition needs of students. (Page 186) Title IV

The DESE Graduation Handbook and DESE Transition Agreement include three work-based learning experiences for students with disabilities on an IEP and are coordinated with special education. Students receive high school credit. These three experiences are the COOP Program, employer-based transition training/Project Search for students with most significant disabilities, and unpaid internships. (Page 194) Title IV

Supported employment services are available not only to individuals after leaving their secondary education program, but to students whose IEP and IPE include these services as part of their transition plan and whose school district signs a cooperative work experience program agreement with RSB.  (Page 262) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Missouri partners are committed to developing new career pathways for youth and adults with barriers to employment including individuals with disabilities. Missouri’s core partner program leaders regularly meet to collaborate on braiding services for work-based learning and education funding. Through sector strategy regional business meetings and partner engagement, Missouri will work with employers to identify opportunities and services available to assist in eliminating employment barriers. (Page 58) Title I

• In addition to training services, the Title I & Title IV partners have work based programs such as on-the-job training and work experience which offer the customers the opportunity to combine education, training and employment services. VR & Rehabilitation Services for the Blind supports career pathways by providing a variety of services to students, youth and adults with disabilities. Additional services may include assistive technology, case-management, and post-employment support to provide job retention. (Page 70) Title I

Each workforce area has a Business Services Team plan that guides outreach and services to businesses. Business Services Teams are made up of staff whose mission is to connect employers to a skilled workforce. To ensure an integrated service model, teams now include business representatives from Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), along with other combined partners who touch businesses. At a minimum, the members of the teams include Business Representatives and other Job Center staff assigned to business services, OJT Marketing Specialists, Local Veterans Employment Representatives, and VR Business Outreach Specialists. The design and makeup of each team varies slightly from region to region and may include a variety of other partners who work with businesses, such as local economic developers, educational agencies, UMOS (Missouri’s167 provider), Rehabilitative Services for the Blind Outreach Specialists and Family Support Division (FSD) TANF Outreach Specialists. Additionally, the Kansas City and Vicinity Region employs Disability Program Navigators, which are also included on their business services team. (Page 77) Title I

Apprenticeship

Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation and Rehabilitation Services for the Blind may provide vocational rehabilitation services to potentially eligible students with disabilities and eligible individuals, including youth with disabilities, to assist in accessing programs leading to post secondary credentials. Services are designed to create opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, including registered apprenticeship training programs, leading to industry-recognized certificates, credentials, licenses, and post-secondary degrees. Services for eligible participants may include access to training programs, disability related accommodations, and support services necessary for the successful participation and completion of the training activity. (Page 83) Title I
SB has formal contract agreements with community rehabilitation providers to work with employers and assist clients with job search, job placement and customized employment opportunities. Other services include work based learning experiences, task analysis, and job coaching when needed. RSB contracts with Alphapointe Association for the Blind for an eight—week Summer Transition Employment Program (STEP) providing competitive work experience to high—school age youth. The goal is to provide each consumer with a foundation for the school—to—work transition, to enable each to practice personal independence through work and goal—setting experiences, and to afford an opportunity for community involvement. This program includes vocational exploration; identifying preferences, interests, and abilities with regard to work; and learning about work related behaviors and self—advocacy. Consumers participate in general orientation during the first week of the program. The remaining seven weeks they spend on the job. Short—term job coaching may be provided to assist in orienting the consumers to the particular job site. Consumers receive an hourly wage during their placement at a job site. Involvement in this program is intended to increase a consumer’s career awareness, build marketable vocational skills, and support a healthy self—image. (Pages 231-232) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Rehabilitation Services for the Blind is not in an order of selection. RSB projects that funding for the 2018 and 2019 FFY will meet the needs of all individuals who apply for services. Data sets include:
1. Recipients of Blind Pension (BP) and Supplemental Aid for the Blind (SAB);
2. Recipients of SSI/SSDI who also receive other benefits from the DSA;
3. Recipients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services for blind and visually impaired;
4. Recipients of Independent Living Rehabilitation/Independent Living for Older Blind;
5. Recipients of Prevention of Blindness services (Page 242) Title IV
 

Employer/ Business

~~Missouri has established a WIOA Employer Engagement Committee, made up of staff from all combined partner agencies, LWDB Directors, and the USDOL Office of Apprenticeship State Director. This committee has been established to provide guidance to regions, make recommendations to the WIOA State Steering Committee, and coordinate statewide meetings as needed to ensure continued partner collaboration. (Page 79) Title I

RSB works with employers through a variety of activities at the local level to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate the provision of VR services and transition services, including transition services for youth and pre—employment transition services. District offices engage in outreach activities meeting directly with employers to identify employment needs and educate employers about the services RSB can offer for existing and new employees. Each district office and the Prevention of Blindness program have a tonometer to screen for the early signs of glaucoma as a service to employers and to promote VR services. Outreach activities are extended to employer health fairs, job fairs, chamber of commerce events, and participating in local Workforce Development Boards. RSB has developed relationships with several employers across the state communicating directly with HR staff on employment needs, identify customized employment opportunities, and provide disability/blindness awareness and sensitivity training. Outreach activities have resulted in competitive integrated employment outcomes and work experience opportunities, both paid and unpaid, for youth and students with disabilities and adult clients. (Page 230) Title IV

Data Collection

Missouri VR will assess its performance based upon the WIOA common performance measures as well as agency goals and objectives. The VR executive leadership team along with district office management reviews performance data on a monthly basis to determine progress toward goals and opportunities for improvement. VR’s case services and financial services work in tandem evaluating performance data for short- and long-term decision making. In addition, VR’s statewide quality assurance team evaluates case management providing guidance on program performance. (Page 95) Title I

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

• Title IV: VR is actively participating with all local workforce boards and works closely with Missouri Job Centers to provide program accessibility, physical access to services, and assistive technology for people with disabilities. Strategy 2 -Create Sector Strategies (Page 69) Title I
Missouri has a committee to specifically focus on one-stop certification criteria. The committee has established the criteria for certification, including accessibility. This committee includes representatives from Vocational Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Services for the Blind and the Centers for Independent Living (CILs) who will assist with training and technical assistance to ensure accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials for individuals with disabilities. Accessibility criteria for certification includes the accessibility requirements contained with Section 188; policy review, adaptive technology equipment availability, emergency procedures, etc.
In order to better serve Missouri Job Center customers, the workforce partners are working with ODEP’s National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) for technical assistance. Training has been conducted by the VR, LEAD Center & DWSD with AJC staff. Through this collaboration, partners developed a statewide survey that was sent to gather information from job seekers on the social, environmental and physical accessibility of the Missouri Job Centers. Local areas are using this feedback as a guide to improve training and technical assistance for serving people with disabilities.
Each Workforce Development region has a dedicated Equal Opportunity officer, which comprises a statewide team, which includes VR staff. (Page 108) Title I

Vets

Through a statewide network of job centers and partner organizations, Missouri Division of Workforce Development coordinates and aligns their partnership with the Department of Employment Security, Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Services for the Blind and the Department of Social Services Family Support Division. Together the partners provide a robust menu of vital reemployment and support services, including access to skill-building training, National Certification and Career Connections for jobs seekers, targeted programs for veterans, youth and the unemployed, and cost-saving human resource assistance and financial incentives for businesses. The partners braid workforce, education, and training activities with support services to meet the needs of our job seekers and employers. With 32 full-service centers as well as numerous satellite and affiliate locations statewide, Missouri Job Centers are the central point for WIOA core and one-stop partner services. (Pages 42-43) Title I
The Veteran services are of utmost importance. Missouri Job Centers have priority services for veterans, which will be served before all other customers. A veteran can request to see the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) staff or Local Veteran Employment Representative (LVER) at any time in the process to receive specialized services. (Page 43) Title I
The Career Skills Program assists transitioning veterans by providing an internship with a Missouri employer, which allows the service member to gain valuable civilian work experience prior to exiting active duty. (Page 85) Title I
The Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) and Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVERs) are fully integrated into the Missouri Job Centers as detailed by the DVOP/LVER agreement with the Secretary (Veterans State Plan). The role of the DVOP staff will not be to supplant the Wagner-Peyser responsibilities for providing priority of service to veterans, but to assist veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to overcome their barriers or mitigate their barriers so the veteran is job ready through case management. Once the veteran is job ready the LVER will work with employers to create employment opportunities for the job ready veterans. DVOP/LVER will not be assigned duties that violate Title 38. DVOP will share case management for veterans enrolled in WIOA and other programs with the providers of those programs.
The Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) requires compliance with Title 38, Chapters 41 and 42, in that all service delivery points of the grantee will provide veterans’ priority of service in the provision of all labor-exchange services, and specifically when making referrals for job openings and training opportunities.
Local service delivery points are monitored to ensure that programs provide the required priority of service to veterans. Whenever necessary, corrective action plans will be developed and appropriate technical assistance concerning priority of service to veterans will be provided. The agreement reached between Veterans’ Employment and Training and the State will be the governing agreement for veterans’ services within the Missouri Job Centers where funding is used to provide services to the state’s veteran customers. (Pages 107-108) Title I
Show Me Heroes (SMH) is work-based learning activity that provides OJT to veterans. Transitional jobs are reserved for those chronically unemployed and provide real life work experience when it is greatly needed to be successful in the workplace. The Incumbent Worker training policy allows local Boards the flexibility to provide Incumbent Worker Training to employers when needed. (Page 123) Title I
MVR has a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Compensated Work Therapy Program (CWT). MVR and CWT are mutually committed to promoting and enhancing competitive employment opportunities for veterans, enabling every individual to reach his or her life’s potential. MVR and CWT work together in bringing enhanced employment opportunities to veterans with disabilities leading to greater individual and family economic stability and security. (Pages 166-167) Title IV

Mental Health

~~MVR has an MOU with DMH, the state agency responsible for providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities and mental health services, which covers DMH’s BH and DD divisions. The agreement outlines the collaboration on existing services, alignment of funding sources, information and data sharing, referrals and on-going development of services.
DMH’s BH and MVR work together to increase access to evidence-based supported employment, also known as Individual Placement and Support (IPS), for adults with serious mental illnesses who are interested in improving their work lives. Missouri has 21 Community Mental Health/Treatment Centers (CMHCs) participating in this implementation collaborative. Ongoing technical assistance and fidelity reviews to the evidence-based practice are provided by a state trainer and a team consisting of MVR and DMH employees. The partnership between DMH and MVR includes a training format, offered to interested CMHCs statewide, on adopting IPS and on improving existing employment activities within treatment services. DMH and MVR implemented IPS for youth with serious mental illnesses in four current sites. (Page 176) Title IV

MVR will provide supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities for up to 24 months and will extend, if necessary, should these services be needed to achieve an employment outcome. These services may include: job coaching, job supports (both on and off the job), guidance and counseling, retention services, resources for benefits counseling, information and referral, and employer consultation.

MVR will continue to work closely with the Missouri Department of Social Services MOHealthNet Division and the Department of Mental Health (DMH) Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DD) divisions to ensure that youth with the most significant disabilities are receiving extended services. (Page 202) Title IV

DMH BH and MVR have been working to increase access to evidence-based supported employment, also known as IPS, for adults with serious mental illnesses who are interested in improving their work lives. Missouri has 21 Community Mental Health/Treatment Centers participating in this implementation collaborative. DMH and MVR are implementing IPS for youth with serious mental illnesses in four current sites.

To assist in determining the quality and effectiveness of SE services, MVR surveys its consumers. The 2017 Customer Satisfaction Survey results indicated that 98 percent of SE clients, who left services both successfully and unsuccessfully, felt MVR staff were available when needed and treated them with respect. (Page 211) Title IV

RSB will continue to work closely with the Missouri Department of Social Services MOHealthNet Division and the Department of Mental Health (DMH) Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DD) divisions to ensure that youth with the most significant disabilities are receiving extended services. Services may include job monitoring and assessment of employment stability, establishment of peer and natural support environments, and coordination of specific services necessary to assist the individual to maintain employment. RSB will work closely with the DMH DD division utilizing home and community-based waivers to increase supported employment and extended services for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 250) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 11 - 20 of 79

Graduation Requirements for Students in Missouri Public Schools - 11/15/2018

~~“Off-Campus InstructionMany students who are juniors and seniors in high school can benefit from authentic school-directed and supervised paid or unpaid learning experiences through assignment to off-campus locations under cooperative arrangements with business and industry or other institutions. More about these services can be found on our website.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Division of Developmental Disabilities Employment First Policy - 03/01/2018

This policy establishes community integrated employment services and supports as the first service option and primary outcome for individuals (both youth and adults.) It also establishes employment planning (Career Planning) and supports as priorities to explore with all working adults who receive services in order to ensure that supports, services, and outcomes are consistent with what the person is seeking.

Each individual will be supported to pursue his or her own unique path to work, a career, and his or her contribution to/participation in community life. All individuals, regardless of the challenge of their disability, will be afforded an opportunity to pursue employment. Career planning, including job exploration and on-going person focused self discovery, is critical when assisting individuals in making informed choices about their future careers.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

About the Missouri Collaborative Work Initiative - 09/01/2017

“Beginning with the 2012-2013 academic year, the Office of Special Education, Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education initiated a new approach to addressing the achievement disparity between students with disabilities and students without disabilities. This initiative is the Collaborative Work. By invitation, Missouri districts may choose to participate.

 

The purpose of the Collaborative Work Grant is to improve learning for all students, especially students with disabilities, and improve teaching, by:

-establishing and implementing effective and efficient collaborative  teams,

-implementing with fidelity and a high degree of effectiveness a variety of teaching/learning practices which have been proven to have a high effect size on student outcomes,

-developing and administering common formative assessments to measure the effectiveness of teaching/learning practices as evidenced by student mastery of learning objectives, and

-using data‐based decision making to guide decisions about classroom teaching/learning practices.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Transition Timeline - 09/01/2017

“Toward successful transition: A checklist for the first 21 years.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Reverse Job Fair 2017 and Disability Employment Event - 08/10/2017

“The Third Annual Accommodation for Success Disability Employment Event took place on August 10, 2017, at the Forest Park Campus of St. Louis Community College. The event was organized to make it easier for area businesses to build diverse workforce. This year, the event included the first Reverse Job Fair in St. Louis.

 

Unlike most traditional job fairs, this innovative recruitment event focused on showcasing talents and professional interests of 80+ job candidates with disabilities. Participants met with potential employers in their booth spaces, demonstrating experience and skills in a variety of industries, while human resource professionals roamed the room, meeting the candidates they were interested in hiring. More than 116 recruiters representing 99 area companies were present. With 236 total registrants, not including job candidates, this year’s event was the largest yet.

 

Accommodation for Success event is a collaborative effort between the St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment (SLATE), regional job centers, and more than 20 of the region’s disability employment organizations. Workshops and resources on disability inclusion, etiquette, recruitment, and workplace culture were offered to registered businesses, prior to the reverse job fair.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB66, Payment of temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process - 07/05/2017

“Temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process until the employee reaches maximum medical improvement, unless such benefits are terminated by the employee’s return to work or are terminated as otherwise specified in this chapter.

 

The permanency of the employee’s disability under sections 287.170 to 287.200 shall not be established or adjudicated while the employee is participating in rehabilitation services.

 

Refusal of the employee to accept rehabilitation services or submit to a vocational rehabilitation assessment as deemed necessary by the employer shall result in a fifty percent reduction in all disability payments to an employee, including temporary partial disability benefits paid pursuant to section 287.180, for each week of the period of refusal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Missouri SB 43, Modifying the Missouri Human Rights Act - 06/30/2017

“AN ACT To repeal sections 213.010, 213.040, 213.050, 213.055, 213.065, 213.070, 213.075, 213.101, and 213.111, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof ten new sections relating to unlawful discriminatory practices.”

 

It modifies the Missouri Human Rights Act. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

LEAD Partners with U.S. DOL’s Civil Rights Center, Office of Disability Employment Policy and Missouri State Equal Opportunity at 2017 WIOA National Convenings - 06/29/2017

“This spring, the U.S. Department of Labor (US DOL), in collaboration with its Education and Health and Human Services partners, hosted three Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) National Convenings. The convenings were held at different regional locations on the West Coast, East Coast, and in the Midwest, and had one agenda with closely aligned content. The purpose of the convenings was to provide support and information to state and local workforce development professionals and partners on effectively implementing WIOA. Six different tracks were offered at each convening, including the following key topic areas: Business Engagement, Financial/Grants Management, Integrated Services, One-Stop Operations, Performance Accountability, and Strategic Governance. In addition, this year marked the first time in which an additional session on civil rights and disability was offered at all three convenings.

 

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Civil Rights Center (CRC) and Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) partnered with Missouri’s State Equal Opportunity Officer (EOO) and the LEAD Center to offer a joint presentation on What You Need to Know about Section 188: Individuals with Disabilities. The U.S. DOL CRC took the lead in providing an overview of WIOA’s Section 188 Equal Opportunity Provisions. Section 188 prohibits discrimination against individuals in any WIOA Title I financially assisted program or activity, which includes job training for adults and youth, and other programs or activities provided to recipients at American Job Centers or through its partners.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Unsicker hosts town hall to discuss Disability Employment Project - 06/28/2017

“JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – State Rep. Sarah Unsicker D-Shrewsbury, will host a town hall meeting at Webster University on June 28 at 7:00 p.m. to have an open dialogue regarding the barriers to employment for citizens with disabilities and to begin developing possible solutions.

 

“There are a wide range of issues to take into consideration when working to improve employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities such as healthcare and Medicaid needs, state employment policy, employer education and transportation,” said Unsicker.

 

“During the hiring process, it is important that employers are aware of the many capabilities citizens with disabilities possess. My goal with this town hall is to provide the disability community with the opportunity to give feedback regarding these issues so we can work towards expanding employment opportunities for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Missouri Department of Social Services “Provider Bulletin” - 03/23/2017

~~“Career Planning Service DescriptionCareer planning is a person-centered, comprehensive employment planning and support service. It provides consultative, evaluative assistance for waiver program participants to enter into, or advance in, competitive employment or self-employment. It is a focused, time-limited service engaging a participant in self-discovery, identifying a career direction and developing a plan for achieving competitive, integrated employment at or above the state’s minimum wage. The outcome of this service is documentation of the participant’s stated career objective and a career plan used to guide individual employment support.Career planning includes:• Activities that are primarily directed at assisting an individual with identification of an employment goal; and• A plan to achieve this goal (e.g., job exploration, job shadowing, informational interviewing, assessment of interests, labor market research) that are associated with performing competitive work in community integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

SB66, Payment of temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process - 07/05/2017

“Temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process until the employee reaches maximum medical improvement, unless such benefits are terminated by the employee’s return to work or are terminated as otherwise specified in this chapter.

 

The permanency of the employee’s disability under sections 287.170 to 287.200 shall not be established or adjudicated while the employee is participating in rehabilitation services.

 

Refusal of the employee to accept rehabilitation services or submit to a vocational rehabilitation assessment as deemed necessary by the employer shall result in a fifty percent reduction in all disability payments to an employee, including temporary partial disability benefits paid pursuant to section 287.180, for each week of the period of refusal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Missouri SB 43, Modifying the Missouri Human Rights Act - 06/30/2017

“AN ACT To repeal sections 213.010, 213.040, 213.050, 213.055, 213.065, 213.070, 213.075, 213.101, and 213.111, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof ten new sections relating to unlawful discriminatory practices.”

 

It modifies the Missouri Human Rights Act. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Missouri SB 174 - 06/29/2015

"There is hereby created the 'Missouri Achieving a Better Life Experience [ABLE] Program'".

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

EXECUTIVE ORDER 19-16 - 09/09/2019

~~“1. The State of Missouri shall make best efforts to eliminate the disparity in the percentage of individuals with disabilities of working age in the population and the percentage of employees with disabilities in the State workforce, and set annual goals for continuing to increase the percentage of individuals with disabilities in the State workforce.

2. The Office of Administration shall, on an annual basis, collect data, based on voluntary self-disclosure, and report initial baseline numbers of state employees with disabilities. The Office of Administration shall report and evaluate the State's progress in increasing the percentage of employees with disabilities in the State workforce.

3. The Office of Administration, Division of Personnel, shall identify and designate a State Disability Employment Coordinator or Coordinators, who shall be responsible for advising all state agencies on disability policy and compliance with state and federal disability rights laws, collaborating with and supporting all state agencies concerning recruitment, hiring, and retention of employees with disabilities, and training of state employees and managers on disability-related issues.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 11 - 20 of 23

“Empowering through Employment” - 01/24/2017

~~“In October 2016, the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) launched the Empowering through Employment Initiative to assist the growing number of individuals who express an interest in community-based employment.  According to National Core Indicators, 51% of individuals receiving home and community-based services express an interest to work in the community; however, fewer than 25% had a goal in their annual plan to support this interest and only 3% of individuals on a monthly basis have services authorized to assist with their employment pathway. “

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Part B Compliance - 01/01/2017

~~“THE STATE COMPLIANCE PLAN FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION is being revised during the 2016-17 school year to reflect updates in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), provide clarification on a number of issues, and make substantive changes based on research and OSEP guidance. Proposed changes in both a summary chart and a mark-up of the proposed plan are posted on the DESE website at https://dese.mo.gov/special-education/state-plan-special-education  . The Public comment period ended on January 6, 2017. All comments received will be reviewed and a decision made to accept, accept with revisions, or reject the comment. A summary of the comments and decision will be posted on the website after January 24, 2017. The proposed plan will be presented to the State Board of Education during their February meeting.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Proposed Part B State Plan Changes for 2017 “Transition Services” - 01/01/2017

~~“A. beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is sixteen (16), or younger if determined appropriate by the IEP team, and updated annually thereafter appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based upon age appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment, and, where appropriate, independent living skills; the transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist the child in reaching those goals, andB. beginning not later than one year before the student reaches age eighteen (18), a statement that the child has been informed of his or her rights under Part B of IDEA and that those rights will transfer to the student upon reaching the age of majority. “ 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Equal Opportunity Demographics - 01/01/2017

~~“The Missouri Interagency Transition Team (MITT) established to increase collaboration at the state, regional and local levels with the shared vision of improving employment, independent living, and postsecondary outcomes for Missouri students with disabilities.• Show-Me Careers, a consortium of state agencies focused on supporting the seamless transition from school to inclusive employment or post-secondary education for youth and young adults ages 16-30 with intellectual and developmental disabilities.• A regional annual Accommodation for Success event in the St. Louis area to help businesses recruit and employ individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Greater Kansas City - Disability Mentoring Day - 10/26/2016

“Join us for the 12th anniversary of Kansas City Disability Mentoring Day Events. Disability Mentoring Day promotes employment opportunities for all job seekers and students with disabilities through information and career exploration. As a person pursuing employment, this event gives you an excellent opportunity to: • •Increase and enhance your job readiness skills • •Network with employers to learn about different types of careers • •Visit with service organizations, providers, and government agencies to learn how they can help you in your job search • •Learn how to advocate for yourself”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Governor’s Council on Disability Employment Position Paper - 05/01/2016

“The Governor’s Council on Disability (GCD) recognizes that employment is a life defining activity/event for each of us, disabled or not. Employment provides income, a sense of belonging, mental and tangible benefits to a human, and status. As such, it is the position of the Governor’s Council that employment policies, practices, and implementation be inclusive and competitive"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Elementary and Secondary Education IEP Transition Planning - 03/01/2016

As a result of new legislation within the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), Office of Special Education (OSE), and the Office of Adult Learning and Rehabilitation Services -Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) offer the following guidance. As districts develop Individual Education Programs (IEPs) and provide transition services/activities for students with the most significant disabilities, consider the following:

1.As a part of the IEP process through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), schools will continue to be responsible for providing transition services to include work based learning opportunities.

2. Schools are encouraged to continue to conduct extensive evaluations and transition assessments, as outlined in IDEA, and work in partnership with VR and/or the Hook Center at the University of Missouri to provide pre-employment transition services to help students progress toward competitive, integrated employment goals.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MO Division of Developmental Disabilities Individual Support Plan Guidelines - 07/01/2014

The Division of Developmental Disabilities requires that each individual eligible for Division Supports have an Individual Support Plan. Individuals, their families, providers and facilitators who write plans in cooperation with all individuals receiving supports from the Division shall use this guide. Individual support planning encourages a team approach to involve the individual and community networks in planning for the future. The process involves developing a vision for the future, while coordinating resources and supports to make the vision a reality.   The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Supports (CMS) outcome for “participant-centered support planning and delivery” clarifies: “Supports are planned and effectively implemented in accordance with each participant’s unique needs, expressed preferences and decisions concerning his/her life in the community.”   The Individual Support Plan is an investment in an individual’s life and is driven by the individual, what is important to them as designed through outcomes identified in the support plan.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Missouri Developmental Disabilities Council position on employment and sub-minimum wage

“In partnership with others, the MODDC will promote competitive, community based employment which we define as: jobs that occur in the community for at least minimum wage, at typical community businesses where employees with and without disabilities work in close proximity to each other, and have the same benefits, responsibilities and expectations.  The MODDC believes that all people who want to work can work with the right supports.  That all people have a responsibility to share their abilities, strengths and talents with others in the community, to make their community a better place.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Governor’s Council on Disability 2016 Annual Report

~~“EMPLOYMENT INITIATIVESGCD continues to provide support to the Business Leadership Network (BLN) which is an employer driven endeavor to promote best practices in disability employment. In Missouri, there are two regional locations: 1) St. Louis region—Greater St. Louis Business Leadership Network (STLBLN)—that covers Greater St. Louis region and eight of the Southern Illinois counties; and 2) Kansas City region—Greater Kansas City BLN (GKCBLN)—which covers the western Missouri and eastern Kansas area; and 3) Springfield BLN. Springfield is the newest BLN in the state and is currently building its infrastructure.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

Missouri Connections Career Development & Planning Program - 06/01/1971

 

“Missouri Connections is a comprehensive, online, career development and planning program that is provided free of charge to all Missouri citizens. Funded by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Missouri Division of Workforce Development, this program supports the career development efforts of schools, community organizations, and adult job seeker programs. Missouri Connections helps individuals learn about their talents, skills, and interests and makes the connection between planning for continued education and the work world.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Missouri Developmental Disabilities Council Asset Development and Financial Education Initiative

“Persons with disabilities have a higher percentage of people who live in poverty than any other minority group in the country.  Missouri ranks in the bottom third of all states in the understanding of financial supports that assist persons with disabilities in working their way out of poverty.  Benefits planning and employment are just two pieces in this puzzle, the other pieces are asset development and financial education, therefore, the Missouri DD Council is partnering with the TACE, Region 7/University of MO-School of Health Professionals to promote Asset Development and Financial Education for persons with disabilities in our state by offering a variety of opportunities to learn more about this important piece of the puzzle and help people with disabilities learn more about asset development and financial education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Missouri Interagency Transition Team

~~“The Missouri Interagency Transition Team (MITT) formed in 2007 by the Office of Special Education at the Missouri Department of Elementary & Secondary Education to increase interagency collaboration at the state, regional, and local levels. This state transition team has met quarterly to address data-driven goals for improvement and collaboration with the shared vision of improving employment, independent living, and postsecondary education outcomes for Missouri students with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Missouri VR Connection

VR specializes in employment and training services that can assist you in becoming employed. A VR counselor will determine your eligibility for services. To be eligible, you need to have a physical or mental impairment that causes problems with working and need VR services to be successfully employed. Once eligible, you will work with a counselor who will help you develop a plan for your rehabilitation. We will give you vocational information and guidance allowing you to make informed choices about your vocational plan.   VR offers a wide range of services that are individualized for your needs. You and your counselor decide which services will help you become employed. Some of the services that may be available are:    • Guidance and Counseling    • Job-Seeking Skills and Job Placement    • Vocational Training   VR also provides assistance with Transition Services, Supported Employment Services,Assistive Technology Services, and the Ticket to Work Program  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Missouri State Chapter of ASPE

APSE-MO is the Missouri State Chapter of APSE The Association of People Supporting Employment First, a national organization committed to improving and expanding integrated employment opportunities, services, and outcomes for people experiencing disabilities. APSE-MO invites individuals with disabilities, their families, employment providers, funders, employers and others to join with us in making community employment a reality for ALL people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Show Me Careers: Missouri's Transition-to-Employment Collaborative

 

“The Show-Me-Careers project targets youth ages 16-30 with I/DD who are transitioning from secondary or post-secondary educational settings to community employment. Show-Me-Careers is funded by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and is one of eight grants awarded to state consortiums aimed at improving existing state systems to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with I/DD.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Missouri State Employment Leadership Network

The Missouri DD Council is partnering with the Missouri Department of Mental Health, Division of Developmental Disabilities, in bringing the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) to Missouri.  This is a project started by the Institute for Community Inclusion out of Boston, Massachusetts.  SELN brings together state developmental disability agencies for sharing, educating and providing guidance on practices and policies around employment to its members. It is also an opportunity for the Division of Developmental Disabilities and other Missouri governmental agencies to evaluate their policies and procedures as they relate to assisting persons with developmental disabilities to become employed.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

MO Ticket to Work - 06/01/1999

The Ticket to Work and Work Incentive Act of 1999 established an employment program for people who want to go to work that receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  The program was designed to remove barriers that kept people with disabilities from choosing to work for fear of losing health care coverage.  The Ticket to Work program is voluntary, and it increases opportunities and choices for Social Security (SS) disability beneficiaries to obtain employment, vocational rehabilitation, and other support services from public and private providers, employers, or other organizations.  SS provides a ticket to disability benefits to use in obtaining services and jobs through Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation or from an approved Employment Network.  Though SS has the overall program authority, MAXIMUS, Inc. serves as the program manager.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Missouri SAMHSA EDI (FY 2011 & 2012)

Goal 1: To strengthen peer delivered services in Missouri by leveraging Medicaid billing for services provided by Certified Peer Specialists in Consumer Operated Services Programs (COSP).   Goal 2: To introduce and begin implementation of peer delivered Individual Placement and Supports –Supported Employment (SE) – in Consumer Operated Services Programs.   Overall conclusions: Through this project Missouri has greatly increased its value of peers. 103 have been trained specifically under this project, with more on the way.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

Missouri Assistive Technology Council

Missouri Assistive Technology strives to increase access to assistive technology for Missourians with all types of disabilities, of all ages. To the right are navigation links to the programs and initiatives of MoAT.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO VR Transition Brochure

“Transition is a process young adults with disabilities, like you, go through to prepare for whatever the future might hold – further education, specialized training, employment or other options you might choose on the road to increased independence… Career planning and transition services are designed to help you prepare for your future by exploring different jobs, identifying careers interesting to you, and developing an understanding of the skills and abilities necessary to be successful.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MO Skills to Pay the Bills

"Skills to Pay the Bills: Mastering Soft Skills for Workplace Success," is a curriculum developed by ODEP focused on teaching "soft" or workforce readiness skills to youth, including youth with disabilities. Created for youth development professionals as an introduction to workplace interpersonal and professional skills, the curriculum is targeted for youth ages 14 to 21 in both in-school and out-of-school environments. The basic structure of the program is comprised of modular, hands-on, engaging activities that focus on six key skill areas: communication, enthusiasm and attitude, teamwork, networking, problem solving and critical thinking, and professionalism.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MO Writing Quality Goals, Outcomes and Action Plans

 

An overview of how to effectively create a Career Plan, establish appropriate goals and desired outcomes, and initiate an Action Plan with Discovery and Fading Supports.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

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Missouri Developmental Disabilities Waiver Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The Missouri Department of Mental Health’s Division of Developmental Disabilities (Division of DD)administers four Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver programs for individuals with developmental disabilities.  The four waivers are the Comprehensive Waiver; Missouri Children with Developmental Disabilities Waiver   (MOCDD or Lopez Waiver);   Community   Support Waiver; and Partnership for Hope Waiver (PfH).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

Community Transitions Manual for Support Coordinators and Community Coordinators - 02/11/2019

~~“MFP EligibilityIndividuals who transition from a Habilitation Center or nursing home may be eligible for MFP. MFP is a demonstration grant that supports efforts to:• Provide Medicaid eligible individuals the choice of where they live and receive services;• Allow qualified individuals living in nursing facilities or Habilitation Centers to move to the community; and• Promote a system that is person-centered, based on needs, and ensures high-quality services in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Missouri Medicaid (MO HealthNet) Independent Living Waiver - 03/01/2017

“The Missouri Independent Living Waiver (ILW) provides home and community based services for adults who are physically disabled. With assistance via this program, individuals can continue to live independently in their homes, rather than require placement in a nursing homes. Benefits include home modifications, personal care services, such as assistance with bathing, grooming, mobility, toiletry, and eating, and specialized medical equipment and supplies.”

 

“As of 2017, a single individual is allowed up to 85% of the Federal Poverty Level, which mean an applicant cannot have a monthly income more than $856. For married couples, the monthly income cannot exceed $1,150. However, Missouri does allow applicants that have an income greater than the allowable amount to “spend-down” in order to become eligible.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Missouri HCBS Statewide Transition Plan - 07/25/2016

“Missouri administers 10 Home and Community-Based Waivers through the single State Medicaid agency, the Department of Social Services, MO HealthNet Division (MHD). The day-to-day operation of the waivers is through formal cooperative agreements with the Missouri Department of Mental Health (DMH) and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS). The Department of Health and Senior Services and the Department of Mental Health are the operational entities for the waivers. Missouri Medicaid Audit and Compliance (MMAC) is the unit within the Department of Social Services (DSS) charged with administering and maintaining Medicaid Title XIX audit and compliance initiatives, including utilization of Medicaid services and provider enrollment functions. MMAC will participate in the transition plan as described below.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO DoE ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 06/08/2015

The Missouri Department of Secondary and Elementary Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on June 29, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Missouri HCSB Transition Plan - 03/01/2014

In March 2014, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) published a final rule regarding changes to Home and Community Based Waiver Services (HCBS Waiver). The rule defines home and community based settings and person-centered planning requirements in Medicaid HCBS Waiver programs. The rule requires demonstration of how state’s HCBS Waiver programs comply with the federal HCBS rules.   Missouri’s draft transition plan incorporates all HCBS Waivers administered by Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS), Department of Mental Health (DMH), and Department of Social Services (DSS). The purpose of Missouri’s draft transition plan is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS Waiver services are integrated and have access to supports in the community, including:    • opportunities to seek employment,    • work in competitive integrated settings,    • engage in community life,    • and control personal resources.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO Partnership for Hope Waiver (0841.R00.00) - 10/01/2013

The purpose of the Partnership for Hope waiver is to prevent or delay of institutional services for individuals who require minimal services in order to continue living in the community. The waiver will offer prevention services to stabilize individuals primarily living with family members who provide significant support, but are not able to meet all of the individual's needs. Goals To increase access to waiver services for children and adults at the local level in participating counties.    Objectives The objectives of the waiver are: 1) to increase the capacity of the State to meet the needs of individuals at risk of institutionalization who require minimal supports to continue living in integrated community settings; 2) to partner with local County Boards through Intergovernmental Agreements in the administration and funding of waiver services; and 3) to implement preventive services in a timely manner in order that eligible participants may continue living in the community with their families.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO Div of Developmental Disabilities Community Support (0404.R03.00) - 07/01/2011

 

“Provides community employment, in home respite, job preparation, personal assistant, assistive technology, behavior analysis service, co-worker supports, communication skills instruction, community specialist services, counseling, crisis intervention, environmental accessibility adaptations-home mods, independent living skills development, job discovery, OT, out of home respite, person centered strategies consultation, PT, professional assessment and monitoring, specialized medical equipment and supplies (adaptive equipment), speech therapy, support broker, transportation for individuals w/ID Developmental Disabilities ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO MR Developmental Disabilities Comprehensive (0178.R06.00) - 07/01/2011

 

“Provides community employment, day service, group home, in home respite, individualized supported living, job preparation, personal assistant, assistive technology, behavior analysis service, communication skills instruction, community specialist services, community transition, counseling, crisis intervention, environmental accessibility adaptations, host home, job discovery, OT, out of home respite, PT, positive behavior support, professional assessment and monitoring, specialized medical equipment and supplies (adaptive equipment), speech therapy, support broker, transportation for individuals w/MR Developmental Disabilities ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The Show Me State is expanding its efforts to deliver competitive, integrated employment options for individuals with disabilities through innovative strategies that propel Missouri's model, "Close to Home, Far from Ordinary."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Missouri’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2016 to 2017
6,113,532
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
463,964
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
172,283
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
37.13%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
99.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
79,376.00%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 6,113,532
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 463,964
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 172,283
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,536,645
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 37.13%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79,376.00%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 438,766
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 455,312
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 746,357
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 104,337
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 22,690
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,285
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 9,478
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 669
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 22,283
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 5,669

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,663
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 213,655

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,164
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 11,180
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 38,602
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 16.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,196
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 645
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 5,450
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 7,016
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2,948
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 42.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 48.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 8,353
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 313,618
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $5,571,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $46,338,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $22,851,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 9.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,470
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,076
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 9.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 57.36%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.58%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 87.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 28.50%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.29%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 31.17%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,683,499
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,704
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 129,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 245,601
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 372,429
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 220
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 335
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 555
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,055,603
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,245,518

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 83
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 85
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 5,343
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 269
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 5,612

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Division of Developmental Disabilities has a statewide employment initiative, Employment First, for working age citizens with disabilities. Employment services include job preparation, job discovery, and community employment in a competitive integrated work setting that may include ongoing supports. The Division of Behavioral Health provides employment services to individuals with mental illnesses, histories of substance abuse, and/or criminal backgrounds. Clinical and vocational employment services are integrated through state—wide partnerships to help individuals who are interested in employment participate in the competitive labor market with the appropriate level of supports and services to be successful. RSB will continue to partner and collaborate with DMH programs in the delivery of employment services. (Pages 232-233) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~MVR’s workforce development activities are designed to assist individuals with disabilities in obtaining, maintaining, or advancing in competitive integrated employment. These activities include assessments, vocational guidance and counseling, job preparation activities, which can include disability awareness, resume writing, interviewing skills. Additionally, MVR provides eligible individuals with training (OJT, apprenticeships, customized employment, funding for community colleges and universities). (Page 44) Title I

RSB has developed relationships with several employers across the state communicating directly with HR staff on employment needs, identifying customized employment opportunities, and providing disability/blindness awareness and sensitivity training. Outreach activities have resulted in competitive integrated employment outcomes and work experience opportunities, both paid and unpaid, for youth and students with disabilities and adult clients. (Page 45) Title I

• SE Services --    The nature of the service itself requires an individualized approach based on the needs of an eligible individual. SE services are ongoing support services, including customized employment, and other appropriate services needed to support an individual with a most significant disability to achieve and maintain competitive integrated employment. Services are provided by CRPs. MVR can provide up to 24 months of community-based job training. (Pages 188-189) Title IV

The supported employment program ensures that individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities, are afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re—enter competitive integrated employment, including supported or customized employment. RSB’s employment outcomes for supported employment is recorded at 1.5% of total closures for FFY 2015. Of the individuals that exited the program and received supported employment services during FFY 2015, 80 percent were successfully employed in competitive jobs. These individuals averaged $9.77 per hour and worked an average of 30 hours per week. (Page 249) Title IV

Rehabilitation Services for the Blind (RSB) offers assessment, job development, task analysis, and time—limited individual and group job coaching leading to supported employment through 12 formal contracts with supported employment service providers. Other services available to clients with a goal of supported employment are the same as those available to clients receiving services under Title I. The supported employment program ensures that individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities, are afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re—enter competitive integrated employment, including supported or customized employment. Extended services may be provided to youth with the most significant disabilities for a period not to exceed four years. (Page 262) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Missouri partners are committed to developing new career pathways for youth and adults with barriers to employment including individuals with disabilities. Missouri’s core partner program leaders regularly meet to collaborate on braiding services for work-based learning and education funding. Through sector strategy regional business meetings and partner engagement, Missouri will work with employers to identify opportunities and services available to assist in eliminating employment barriers. (Page 58) Title I

Missouri is committed to finding connections between core partners, mandatory partners, and other partners in each region. Missouri’s core and mandatory partners will collaborate to share resources to create environments to foster partnering at the local level as well as maintain resource allocations that keep existing partnerships at the local level. Specific examples include: As part of their services to individuals with disabilities, VR may provide funding for post-secondary training. As partners seek to co-enroll their customers, this will provide opportunity for leveraging of these resources through braiding of both educational dollars, as well as supportive services to ensure the customer’s success. VR also provides guidance and counseling to the job seekers, to insure that access to comparable services funding is achieved, whether through partner agencies or through Federal funding, such as the Pell grant. (Page 82) Title I

MVR is working closely with all of the WIOA partners in order to provide the best services possible for consumers. MVR initiated the creation of a braiding services team, comprised of
WIOA core partners and other entities that serve individuals with disabilities, to develop methods and strategies to support collaboration between partner agencies, promote greater understanding of the services provided by each agency, and discover methods to avoid duplication of services. Many teams, consisting of members from all of the partner programs, are meeting and developing methods to meet individuals’ needs. (Pages 205-206) Title IV

MVR initiated the creation of a braiding services team, comprised of WIOA core partners and other entities that serve individuals with disabilities, to develop methods and strategies to support collaboration between partner agencies, promote greater understanding of the services provided by each agency, and discover methods to avoid duplication of services. (Pages 208-209) Title IV
The Missouri workforce development system comprised of all core WIOA partners has developed a Memorandum of Understanding on the implementation of WIOA and creating the partnerships to begin developing common referrals, the braiding of services, and data sharing. These collaborative efforts will enhance access for individuals with disabilities and improve performance for all partners. Performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA are new to vocational rehabilitation and have not yet been measured. RSB met all required federal performance indicators during the past two years prior to WIOA. RSB will apply the same quality of service utilized in meeting those indicators to achieve the new performance measures and provide that level of quality while moving forward.  (Page 254) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~RSB has formal contract agreements with community rehabilitation providers to work with employers and assist clients with job search, job placement and customized employment opportunities. Other services include work-based learning experiences, task analysis, and job coaching when needed. RSB contracts with Alphapointe Association for the Blind for an eight-week Summer Transition Employment Program (STEP) providing competitive work experience to high school age youth. The goal is to provide each consumer with a foundation for the school-to-work transition, to enable each to practice personal independence through work and goal-setting experiences, and to afford an opportunity for community involvement. This program includes vocational exploration; identifying preferences, interests, and abilities with regard to work; and learning about work related behaviors and self-advocacy. Consumers participate in general orientation during the first week of the program. The remaining seven weeks they spend on the job. Short-term job coaching may be provided to assist in orienting the consumers to the particular job site. Consumers receive an hourly wage during their placement at a job site. Involvement in this program is intended to increase a consumer’s career awareness, build marketable vocational skills, and support a healthy self-image. (Pages 46-47) Title I

Missouri will improve the outcomes for out-of-school youth by ensuring the 14 elements allowed under WIOA are met through a braiding of partner resources which will best meet each individuals need. The 14 program elements will be available to OSY participants, and will be funded with WIOA title I youth funds or leveraged partner resources. An agreement will be established with the partner to offer the program element and ensure that the activity is connected and coordinated with the WIOA youth program. (Page 129) Title I

Each local MVR district office will also participate in pre-employment transition coordination with the local education agency to include attending IEP meetings when invited, using conference calls and video conferences, when necessary; working with local workforce development entities and employers to develop work opportunities for students with disabilities; coordinating pre-employment transition services with transition services provided in accordance with IDEA; and, when invited, attending person-centered planning meetings for youth receiving services under Title IX of the Social Security Act. To effectively coordinate these services, MVR:
• conducted statewide training to include guidance regarding IEP participation for all MVR staff that serve students in Missouri high schools;
• worked in partnership with the Parent Advocacy Coalition Educational Rights Center to develop a video introducing VR services that can be shown at IEP meetings;
• conducted cross training on services to youth with local job center staff and MVR staff in Kansas City and St. Louis, the two largest metropolitan areas of the state;
• invited special education personnel to train new MVR counselors on transition services within the IEP;
• provided cross training with local CILs to include information regarding benefits planning; and
• is currently working in collaboration with DMH’s Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD) to provide cross training with MVR counselors and DD support coordinators regarding their respective services. (Pages 168-169) Title IV

MVR has a policy that outlines transition activities and services including the timely development and approval of an individualized plan for employment (IPE) for each eligible student prior to leaving high school. MVR will provide for the development of the IPE as early as possible during the transition planning process, but, at least, by the time the eligible student leaves the school setting. The IPE will include specific transition services or pre-employment transition services and supports needed for an eligible student with a disability or a youth with a disability, including youth with the most significant disabilities, to achieve an employment outcome or projected post-school employment outcome. An IPE is required to be developed in consideration of the IEP of a student with a disability under IDEA or a student’s Section 504 services. (Page 170) Title IV

The Cooperative Work Experience Program (COOP) agreement is an interagency state and local program between the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (Special Education, MVR and Career Education); Rehabilitation Services for the Blind (RSB); and local school districts in the state of Missouri. The agreement is embedded in the state transition MOU and is available for all school districts. The purpose is to facilitate the coordination of transition services from school to post-secondary training and/or employment for students with disabilities who participate in special education programs and are eligible to receive vocational rehabilitation services. The MOU outlines roles and responsibilities among participating agencies and school districts in the development of off-campus work experience programs. Through these programs, students with disabilities who are receiving services through an IEP can earn high school credit in accordance with Missouri high school graduation requirements for the number of hours they work in a paid competitive, integrated employment setting. Additionally, MVR continues to work collaboratively with providers and local school districts to meet transition needs of students. (Page 186) Title IV

The DESE Graduation Handbook and DESE Transition Agreement include three work-based learning experiences for students with disabilities on an IEP and are coordinated with special education. Students receive high school credit. These three experiences are the COOP Program, employer-based transition training/Project Search for students with most significant disabilities, and unpaid internships. (Page 194) Title IV

Supported employment services are available not only to individuals after leaving their secondary education program, but to students whose IEP and IPE include these services as part of their transition plan and whose school district signs a cooperative work experience program agreement with RSB.  (Page 262) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Missouri partners are committed to developing new career pathways for youth and adults with barriers to employment including individuals with disabilities. Missouri’s core partner program leaders regularly meet to collaborate on braiding services for work-based learning and education funding. Through sector strategy regional business meetings and partner engagement, Missouri will work with employers to identify opportunities and services available to assist in eliminating employment barriers. (Page 58) Title I

• In addition to training services, the Title I & Title IV partners have work based programs such as on-the-job training and work experience which offer the customers the opportunity to combine education, training and employment services. VR & Rehabilitation Services for the Blind supports career pathways by providing a variety of services to students, youth and adults with disabilities. Additional services may include assistive technology, case-management, and post-employment support to provide job retention. (Page 70) Title I

Each workforce area has a Business Services Team plan that guides outreach and services to businesses. Business Services Teams are made up of staff whose mission is to connect employers to a skilled workforce. To ensure an integrated service model, teams now include business representatives from Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), along with other combined partners who touch businesses. At a minimum, the members of the teams include Business Representatives and other Job Center staff assigned to business services, OJT Marketing Specialists, Local Veterans Employment Representatives, and VR Business Outreach Specialists. The design and makeup of each team varies slightly from region to region and may include a variety of other partners who work with businesses, such as local economic developers, educational agencies, UMOS (Missouri’s167 provider), Rehabilitative Services for the Blind Outreach Specialists and Family Support Division (FSD) TANF Outreach Specialists. Additionally, the Kansas City and Vicinity Region employs Disability Program Navigators, which are also included on their business services team. (Page 77) Title I

Apprenticeship

Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation and Rehabilitation Services for the Blind may provide vocational rehabilitation services to potentially eligible students with disabilities and eligible individuals, including youth with disabilities, to assist in accessing programs leading to post secondary credentials. Services are designed to create opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, including registered apprenticeship training programs, leading to industry-recognized certificates, credentials, licenses, and post-secondary degrees. Services for eligible participants may include access to training programs, disability related accommodations, and support services necessary for the successful participation and completion of the training activity. (Page 83) Title I
SB has formal contract agreements with community rehabilitation providers to work with employers and assist clients with job search, job placement and customized employment opportunities. Other services include work based learning experiences, task analysis, and job coaching when needed. RSB contracts with Alphapointe Association for the Blind for an eight—week Summer Transition Employment Program (STEP) providing competitive work experience to high—school age youth. The goal is to provide each consumer with a foundation for the school—to—work transition, to enable each to practice personal independence through work and goal—setting experiences, and to afford an opportunity for community involvement. This program includes vocational exploration; identifying preferences, interests, and abilities with regard to work; and learning about work related behaviors and self—advocacy. Consumers participate in general orientation during the first week of the program. The remaining seven weeks they spend on the job. Short—term job coaching may be provided to assist in orienting the consumers to the particular job site. Consumers receive an hourly wage during their placement at a job site. Involvement in this program is intended to increase a consumer’s career awareness, build marketable vocational skills, and support a healthy self—image. (Pages 231-232) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Rehabilitation Services for the Blind is not in an order of selection. RSB projects that funding for the 2018 and 2019 FFY will meet the needs of all individuals who apply for services. Data sets include:
1. Recipients of Blind Pension (BP) and Supplemental Aid for the Blind (SAB);
2. Recipients of SSI/SSDI who also receive other benefits from the DSA;
3. Recipients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services for blind and visually impaired;
4. Recipients of Independent Living Rehabilitation/Independent Living for Older Blind;
5. Recipients of Prevention of Blindness services (Page 242) Title IV
 

Employer/ Business

~~Missouri has established a WIOA Employer Engagement Committee, made up of staff from all combined partner agencies, LWDB Directors, and the USDOL Office of Apprenticeship State Director. This committee has been established to provide guidance to regions, make recommendations to the WIOA State Steering Committee, and coordinate statewide meetings as needed to ensure continued partner collaboration. (Page 79) Title I

RSB works with employers through a variety of activities at the local level to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate the provision of VR services and transition services, including transition services for youth and pre—employment transition services. District offices engage in outreach activities meeting directly with employers to identify employment needs and educate employers about the services RSB can offer for existing and new employees. Each district office and the Prevention of Blindness program have a tonometer to screen for the early signs of glaucoma as a service to employers and to promote VR services. Outreach activities are extended to employer health fairs, job fairs, chamber of commerce events, and participating in local Workforce Development Boards. RSB has developed relationships with several employers across the state communicating directly with HR staff on employment needs, identify customized employment opportunities, and provide disability/blindness awareness and sensitivity training. Outreach activities have resulted in competitive integrated employment outcomes and work experience opportunities, both paid and unpaid, for youth and students with disabilities and adult clients. (Page 230) Title IV

Data Collection

Missouri VR will assess its performance based upon the WIOA common performance measures as well as agency goals and objectives. The VR executive leadership team along with district office management reviews performance data on a monthly basis to determine progress toward goals and opportunities for improvement. VR’s case services and financial services work in tandem evaluating performance data for short- and long-term decision making. In addition, VR’s statewide quality assurance team evaluates case management providing guidance on program performance. (Page 95) Title I

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

• Title IV: VR is actively participating with all local workforce boards and works closely with Missouri Job Centers to provide program accessibility, physical access to services, and assistive technology for people with disabilities. Strategy 2 -Create Sector Strategies (Page 69) Title I
Missouri has a committee to specifically focus on one-stop certification criteria. The committee has established the criteria for certification, including accessibility. This committee includes representatives from Vocational Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Services for the Blind and the Centers for Independent Living (CILs) who will assist with training and technical assistance to ensure accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials for individuals with disabilities. Accessibility criteria for certification includes the accessibility requirements contained with Section 188; policy review, adaptive technology equipment availability, emergency procedures, etc.
In order to better serve Missouri Job Center customers, the workforce partners are working with ODEP’s National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) for technical assistance. Training has been conducted by the VR, LEAD Center & DWSD with AJC staff. Through this collaboration, partners developed a statewide survey that was sent to gather information from job seekers on the social, environmental and physical accessibility of the Missouri Job Centers. Local areas are using this feedback as a guide to improve training and technical assistance for serving people with disabilities.
Each Workforce Development region has a dedicated Equal Opportunity officer, which comprises a statewide team, which includes VR staff. (Page 108) Title I

Vets

Through a statewide network of job centers and partner organizations, Missouri Division of Workforce Development coordinates and aligns their partnership with the Department of Employment Security, Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Services for the Blind and the Department of Social Services Family Support Division. Together the partners provide a robust menu of vital reemployment and support services, including access to skill-building training, National Certification and Career Connections for jobs seekers, targeted programs for veterans, youth and the unemployed, and cost-saving human resource assistance and financial incentives for businesses. The partners braid workforce, education, and training activities with support services to meet the needs of our job seekers and employers. With 32 full-service centers as well as numerous satellite and affiliate locations statewide, Missouri Job Centers are the central point for WIOA core and one-stop partner services. (Pages 42-43) Title I
The Veteran services are of utmost importance. Missouri Job Centers have priority services for veterans, which will be served before all other customers. A veteran can request to see the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) staff or Local Veteran Employment Representative (LVER) at any time in the process to receive specialized services. (Page 43) Title I
The Career Skills Program assists transitioning veterans by providing an internship with a Missouri employer, which allows the service member to gain valuable civilian work experience prior to exiting active duty. (Page 85) Title I
The Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) and Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVERs) are fully integrated into the Missouri Job Centers as detailed by the DVOP/LVER agreement with the Secretary (Veterans State Plan). The role of the DVOP staff will not be to supplant the Wagner-Peyser responsibilities for providing priority of service to veterans, but to assist veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to overcome their barriers or mitigate their barriers so the veteran is job ready through case management. Once the veteran is job ready the LVER will work with employers to create employment opportunities for the job ready veterans. DVOP/LVER will not be assigned duties that violate Title 38. DVOP will share case management for veterans enrolled in WIOA and other programs with the providers of those programs.
The Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) requires compliance with Title 38, Chapters 41 and 42, in that all service delivery points of the grantee will provide veterans’ priority of service in the provision of all labor-exchange services, and specifically when making referrals for job openings and training opportunities.
Local service delivery points are monitored to ensure that programs provide the required priority of service to veterans. Whenever necessary, corrective action plans will be developed and appropriate technical assistance concerning priority of service to veterans will be provided. The agreement reached between Veterans’ Employment and Training and the State will be the governing agreement for veterans’ services within the Missouri Job Centers where funding is used to provide services to the state’s veteran customers. (Pages 107-108) Title I
Show Me Heroes (SMH) is work-based learning activity that provides OJT to veterans. Transitional jobs are reserved for those chronically unemployed and provide real life work experience when it is greatly needed to be successful in the workplace. The Incumbent Worker training policy allows local Boards the flexibility to provide Incumbent Worker Training to employers when needed. (Page 123) Title I
MVR has a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Compensated Work Therapy Program (CWT). MVR and CWT are mutually committed to promoting and enhancing competitive employment opportunities for veterans, enabling every individual to reach his or her life’s potential. MVR and CWT work together in bringing enhanced employment opportunities to veterans with disabilities leading to greater individual and family economic stability and security. (Pages 166-167) Title IV

Mental Health

~~MVR has an MOU with DMH, the state agency responsible for providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities and mental health services, which covers DMH’s BH and DD divisions. The agreement outlines the collaboration on existing services, alignment of funding sources, information and data sharing, referrals and on-going development of services.
DMH’s BH and MVR work together to increase access to evidence-based supported employment, also known as Individual Placement and Support (IPS), for adults with serious mental illnesses who are interested in improving their work lives. Missouri has 21 Community Mental Health/Treatment Centers (CMHCs) participating in this implementation collaborative. Ongoing technical assistance and fidelity reviews to the evidence-based practice are provided by a state trainer and a team consisting of MVR and DMH employees. The partnership between DMH and MVR includes a training format, offered to interested CMHCs statewide, on adopting IPS and on improving existing employment activities within treatment services. DMH and MVR implemented IPS for youth with serious mental illnesses in four current sites. (Page 176) Title IV

MVR will provide supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities for up to 24 months and will extend, if necessary, should these services be needed to achieve an employment outcome. These services may include: job coaching, job supports (both on and off the job), guidance and counseling, retention services, resources for benefits counseling, information and referral, and employer consultation.

MVR will continue to work closely with the Missouri Department of Social Services MOHealthNet Division and the Department of Mental Health (DMH) Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DD) divisions to ensure that youth with the most significant disabilities are receiving extended services. (Page 202) Title IV

DMH BH and MVR have been working to increase access to evidence-based supported employment, also known as IPS, for adults with serious mental illnesses who are interested in improving their work lives. Missouri has 21 Community Mental Health/Treatment Centers participating in this implementation collaborative. DMH and MVR are implementing IPS for youth with serious mental illnesses in four current sites.

To assist in determining the quality and effectiveness of SE services, MVR surveys its consumers. The 2017 Customer Satisfaction Survey results indicated that 98 percent of SE clients, who left services both successfully and unsuccessfully, felt MVR staff were available when needed and treated them with respect. (Page 211) Title IV

RSB will continue to work closely with the Missouri Department of Social Services MOHealthNet Division and the Department of Mental Health (DMH) Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DD) divisions to ensure that youth with the most significant disabilities are receiving extended services. Services may include job monitoring and assessment of employment stability, establishment of peer and natural support environments, and coordination of specific services necessary to assist the individual to maintain employment. RSB will work closely with the DMH DD division utilizing home and community-based waivers to increase supported employment and extended services for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 250) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 11 - 20 of 79

Graduation Requirements for Students in Missouri Public Schools - 11/15/2018

~~“Off-Campus InstructionMany students who are juniors and seniors in high school can benefit from authentic school-directed and supervised paid or unpaid learning experiences through assignment to off-campus locations under cooperative arrangements with business and industry or other institutions. More about these services can be found on our website.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Division of Developmental Disabilities Employment First Policy - 03/01/2018

This policy establishes community integrated employment services and supports as the first service option and primary outcome for individuals (both youth and adults.) It also establishes employment planning (Career Planning) and supports as priorities to explore with all working adults who receive services in order to ensure that supports, services, and outcomes are consistent with what the person is seeking.

Each individual will be supported to pursue his or her own unique path to work, a career, and his or her contribution to/participation in community life. All individuals, regardless of the challenge of their disability, will be afforded an opportunity to pursue employment. Career planning, including job exploration and on-going person focused self discovery, is critical when assisting individuals in making informed choices about their future careers.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

About the Missouri Collaborative Work Initiative - 09/01/2017

“Beginning with the 2012-2013 academic year, the Office of Special Education, Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education initiated a new approach to addressing the achievement disparity between students with disabilities and students without disabilities. This initiative is the Collaborative Work. By invitation, Missouri districts may choose to participate.

 

The purpose of the Collaborative Work Grant is to improve learning for all students, especially students with disabilities, and improve teaching, by:

-establishing and implementing effective and efficient collaborative  teams,

-implementing with fidelity and a high degree of effectiveness a variety of teaching/learning practices which have been proven to have a high effect size on student outcomes,

-developing and administering common formative assessments to measure the effectiveness of teaching/learning practices as evidenced by student mastery of learning objectives, and

-using data‐based decision making to guide decisions about classroom teaching/learning practices.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Transition Timeline - 09/01/2017

“Toward successful transition: A checklist for the first 21 years.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Reverse Job Fair 2017 and Disability Employment Event - 08/10/2017

“The Third Annual Accommodation for Success Disability Employment Event took place on August 10, 2017, at the Forest Park Campus of St. Louis Community College. The event was organized to make it easier for area businesses to build diverse workforce. This year, the event included the first Reverse Job Fair in St. Louis.

 

Unlike most traditional job fairs, this innovative recruitment event focused on showcasing talents and professional interests of 80+ job candidates with disabilities. Participants met with potential employers in their booth spaces, demonstrating experience and skills in a variety of industries, while human resource professionals roamed the room, meeting the candidates they were interested in hiring. More than 116 recruiters representing 99 area companies were present. With 236 total registrants, not including job candidates, this year’s event was the largest yet.

 

Accommodation for Success event is a collaborative effort between the St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment (SLATE), regional job centers, and more than 20 of the region’s disability employment organizations. Workshops and resources on disability inclusion, etiquette, recruitment, and workplace culture were offered to registered businesses, prior to the reverse job fair.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB66, Payment of temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process - 07/05/2017

“Temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process until the employee reaches maximum medical improvement, unless such benefits are terminated by the employee’s return to work or are terminated as otherwise specified in this chapter.

 

The permanency of the employee’s disability under sections 287.170 to 287.200 shall not be established or adjudicated while the employee is participating in rehabilitation services.

 

Refusal of the employee to accept rehabilitation services or submit to a vocational rehabilitation assessment as deemed necessary by the employer shall result in a fifty percent reduction in all disability payments to an employee, including temporary partial disability benefits paid pursuant to section 287.180, for each week of the period of refusal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Missouri SB 43, Modifying the Missouri Human Rights Act - 06/30/2017

“AN ACT To repeal sections 213.010, 213.040, 213.050, 213.055, 213.065, 213.070, 213.075, 213.101, and 213.111, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof ten new sections relating to unlawful discriminatory practices.”

 

It modifies the Missouri Human Rights Act. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

LEAD Partners with U.S. DOL’s Civil Rights Center, Office of Disability Employment Policy and Missouri State Equal Opportunity at 2017 WIOA National Convenings - 06/29/2017

“This spring, the U.S. Department of Labor (US DOL), in collaboration with its Education and Health and Human Services partners, hosted three Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) National Convenings. The convenings were held at different regional locations on the West Coast, East Coast, and in the Midwest, and had one agenda with closely aligned content. The purpose of the convenings was to provide support and information to state and local workforce development professionals and partners on effectively implementing WIOA. Six different tracks were offered at each convening, including the following key topic areas: Business Engagement, Financial/Grants Management, Integrated Services, One-Stop Operations, Performance Accountability, and Strategic Governance. In addition, this year marked the first time in which an additional session on civil rights and disability was offered at all three convenings.

 

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Civil Rights Center (CRC) and Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) partnered with Missouri’s State Equal Opportunity Officer (EOO) and the LEAD Center to offer a joint presentation on What You Need to Know about Section 188: Individuals with Disabilities. The U.S. DOL CRC took the lead in providing an overview of WIOA’s Section 188 Equal Opportunity Provisions. Section 188 prohibits discrimination against individuals in any WIOA Title I financially assisted program or activity, which includes job training for adults and youth, and other programs or activities provided to recipients at American Job Centers or through its partners.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Unsicker hosts town hall to discuss Disability Employment Project - 06/28/2017

“JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – State Rep. Sarah Unsicker D-Shrewsbury, will host a town hall meeting at Webster University on June 28 at 7:00 p.m. to have an open dialogue regarding the barriers to employment for citizens with disabilities and to begin developing possible solutions.

 

“There are a wide range of issues to take into consideration when working to improve employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities such as healthcare and Medicaid needs, state employment policy, employer education and transportation,” said Unsicker.

 

“During the hiring process, it is important that employers are aware of the many capabilities citizens with disabilities possess. My goal with this town hall is to provide the disability community with the opportunity to give feedback regarding these issues so we can work towards expanding employment opportunities for people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Missouri Department of Social Services “Provider Bulletin” - 03/23/2017

~~“Career Planning Service DescriptionCareer planning is a person-centered, comprehensive employment planning and support service. It provides consultative, evaluative assistance for waiver program participants to enter into, or advance in, competitive employment or self-employment. It is a focused, time-limited service engaging a participant in self-discovery, identifying a career direction and developing a plan for achieving competitive, integrated employment at or above the state’s minimum wage. The outcome of this service is documentation of the participant’s stated career objective and a career plan used to guide individual employment support.Career planning includes:• Activities that are primarily directed at assisting an individual with identification of an employment goal; and• A plan to achieve this goal (e.g., job exploration, job shadowing, informational interviewing, assessment of interests, labor market research) that are associated with performing competitive work in community integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

SB66, Payment of temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process - 07/05/2017

“Temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process until the employee reaches maximum medical improvement, unless such benefits are terminated by the employee’s return to work or are terminated as otherwise specified in this chapter.

 

The permanency of the employee’s disability under sections 287.170 to 287.200 shall not be established or adjudicated while the employee is participating in rehabilitation services.

 

Refusal of the employee to accept rehabilitation services or submit to a vocational rehabilitation assessment as deemed necessary by the employer shall result in a fifty percent reduction in all disability payments to an employee, including temporary partial disability benefits paid pursuant to section 287.180, for each week of the period of refusal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Missouri SB 43, Modifying the Missouri Human Rights Act - 06/30/2017

“AN ACT To repeal sections 213.010, 213.040, 213.050, 213.055, 213.065, 213.070, 213.075, 213.101, and 213.111, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof ten new sections relating to unlawful discriminatory practices.”

 

It modifies the Missouri Human Rights Act. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Missouri SB 174 - 06/29/2015

"There is hereby created the 'Missouri Achieving a Better Life Experience [ABLE] Program'".

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

EXECUTIVE ORDER 19-16 - 09/09/2019

~~“1. The State of Missouri shall make best efforts to eliminate the disparity in the percentage of individuals with disabilities of working age in the population and the percentage of employees with disabilities in the State workforce, and set annual goals for continuing to increase the percentage of individuals with disabilities in the State workforce.

2. The Office of Administration shall, on an annual basis, collect data, based on voluntary self-disclosure, and report initial baseline numbers of state employees with disabilities. The Office of Administration shall report and evaluate the State's progress in increasing the percentage of employees with disabilities in the State workforce.

3. The Office of Administration, Division of Personnel, shall identify and designate a State Disability Employment Coordinator or Coordinators, who shall be responsible for advising all state agencies on disability policy and compliance with state and federal disability rights laws, collaborating with and supporting all state agencies concerning recruitment, hiring, and retention of employees with disabilities, and training of state employees and managers on disability-related issues.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing
Displaying 11 - 20 of 23

“Empowering through Employment” - 01/24/2017

~~“In October 2016, the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) launched the Empowering through Employment Initiative to assist the growing number of individuals who express an interest in community-based employment.  According to National Core Indicators, 51% of individuals receiving home and community-based services express an interest to work in the community; however, fewer than 25% had a goal in their annual plan to support this interest and only 3% of individuals on a monthly basis have services authorized to assist with their employment pathway. “

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Part B Compliance - 01/01/2017

~~“THE STATE COMPLIANCE PLAN FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION is being revised during the 2016-17 school year to reflect updates in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), provide clarification on a number of issues, and make substantive changes based on research and OSEP guidance. Proposed changes in both a summary chart and a mark-up of the proposed plan are posted on the DESE website at https://dese.mo.gov/special-education/state-plan-special-education  . The Public comment period ended on January 6, 2017. All comments received will be reviewed and a decision made to accept, accept with revisions, or reject the comment. A summary of the comments and decision will be posted on the website after January 24, 2017. The proposed plan will be presented to the State Board of Education during their February meeting.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Proposed Part B State Plan Changes for 2017 “Transition Services” - 01/01/2017

~~“A. beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is sixteen (16), or younger if determined appropriate by the IEP team, and updated annually thereafter appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based upon age appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment, and, where appropriate, independent living skills; the transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist the child in reaching those goals, andB. beginning not later than one year before the student reaches age eighteen (18), a statement that the child has been informed of his or her rights under Part B of IDEA and that those rights will transfer to the student upon reaching the age of majority. “ 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Equal Opportunity Demographics - 01/01/2017

~~“The Missouri Interagency Transition Team (MITT) established to increase collaboration at the state, regional and local levels with the shared vision of improving employment, independent living, and postsecondary outcomes for Missouri students with disabilities.• Show-Me Careers, a consortium of state agencies focused on supporting the seamless transition from school to inclusive employment or post-secondary education for youth and young adults ages 16-30 with intellectual and developmental disabilities.• A regional annual Accommodation for Success event in the St. Louis area to help businesses recruit and employ individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Greater Kansas City - Disability Mentoring Day - 10/26/2016

“Join us for the 12th anniversary of Kansas City Disability Mentoring Day Events. Disability Mentoring Day promotes employment opportunities for all job seekers and students with disabilities through information and career exploration. As a person pursuing employment, this event gives you an excellent opportunity to: • •Increase and enhance your job readiness skills • •Network with employers to learn about different types of careers • •Visit with service organizations, providers, and government agencies to learn how they can help you in your job search • •Learn how to advocate for yourself”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Governor’s Council on Disability Employment Position Paper - 05/01/2016

“The Governor’s Council on Disability (GCD) recognizes that employment is a life defining activity/event for each of us, disabled or not. Employment provides income, a sense of belonging, mental and tangible benefits to a human, and status. As such, it is the position of the Governor’s Council that employment policies, practices, and implementation be inclusive and competitive"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Elementary and Secondary Education IEP Transition Planning - 03/01/2016

As a result of new legislation within the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), Office of Special Education (OSE), and the Office of Adult Learning and Rehabilitation Services -Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) offer the following guidance. As districts develop Individual Education Programs (IEPs) and provide transition services/activities for students with the most significant disabilities, consider the following:

1.As a part of the IEP process through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), schools will continue to be responsible for providing transition services to include work based learning opportunities.

2. Schools are encouraged to continue to conduct extensive evaluations and transition assessments, as outlined in IDEA, and work in partnership with VR and/or the Hook Center at the University of Missouri to provide pre-employment transition services to help students progress toward competitive, integrated employment goals.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MO Division of Developmental Disabilities Individual Support Plan Guidelines - 07/01/2014

The Division of Developmental Disabilities requires that each individual eligible for Division Supports have an Individual Support Plan. Individuals, their families, providers and facilitators who write plans in cooperation with all individuals receiving supports from the Division shall use this guide. Individual support planning encourages a team approach to involve the individual and community networks in planning for the future. The process involves developing a vision for the future, while coordinating resources and supports to make the vision a reality.   The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Supports (CMS) outcome for “participant-centered support planning and delivery” clarifies: “Supports are planned and effectively implemented in accordance with each participant’s unique needs, expressed preferences and decisions concerning his/her life in the community.”   The Individual Support Plan is an investment in an individual’s life and is driven by the individual, what is important to them as designed through outcomes identified in the support plan.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Missouri Developmental Disabilities Council position on employment and sub-minimum wage

“In partnership with others, the MODDC will promote competitive, community based employment which we define as: jobs that occur in the community for at least minimum wage, at typical community businesses where employees with and without disabilities work in close proximity to each other, and have the same benefits, responsibilities and expectations.  The MODDC believes that all people who want to work can work with the right supports.  That all people have a responsibility to share their abilities, strengths and talents with others in the community, to make their community a better place.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Governor’s Council on Disability 2016 Annual Report

~~“EMPLOYMENT INITIATIVESGCD continues to provide support to the Business Leadership Network (BLN) which is an employer driven endeavor to promote best practices in disability employment. In Missouri, there are two regional locations: 1) St. Louis region—Greater St. Louis Business Leadership Network (STLBLN)—that covers Greater St. Louis region and eight of the Southern Illinois counties; and 2) Kansas City region—Greater Kansas City BLN (GKCBLN)—which covers the western Missouri and eastern Kansas area; and 3) Springfield BLN. Springfield is the newest BLN in the state and is currently building its infrastructure.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

Missouri Connections Career Development & Planning Program - 06/01/1971

 

“Missouri Connections is a comprehensive, online, career development and planning program that is provided free of charge to all Missouri citizens. Funded by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Missouri Division of Workforce Development, this program supports the career development efforts of schools, community organizations, and adult job seeker programs. Missouri Connections helps individuals learn about their talents, skills, and interests and makes the connection between planning for continued education and the work world.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Missouri Developmental Disabilities Council Asset Development and Financial Education Initiative

“Persons with disabilities have a higher percentage of people who live in poverty than any other minority group in the country.  Missouri ranks in the bottom third of all states in the understanding of financial supports that assist persons with disabilities in working their way out of poverty.  Benefits planning and employment are just two pieces in this puzzle, the other pieces are asset development and financial education, therefore, the Missouri DD Council is partnering with the TACE, Region 7/University of MO-School of Health Professionals to promote Asset Development and Financial Education for persons with disabilities in our state by offering a variety of opportunities to learn more about this important piece of the puzzle and help people with disabilities learn more about asset development and financial education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Missouri Interagency Transition Team

~~“The Missouri Interagency Transition Team (MITT) formed in 2007 by the Office of Special Education at the Missouri Department of Elementary & Secondary Education to increase interagency collaboration at the state, regional, and local levels. This state transition team has met quarterly to address data-driven goals for improvement and collaboration with the shared vision of improving employment, independent living, and postsecondary education outcomes for Missouri students with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Missouri VR Connection

VR specializes in employment and training services that can assist you in becoming employed. A VR counselor will determine your eligibility for services. To be eligible, you need to have a physical or mental impairment that causes problems with working and need VR services to be successfully employed. Once eligible, you will work with a counselor who will help you develop a plan for your rehabilitation. We will give you vocational information and guidance allowing you to make informed choices about your vocational plan.   VR offers a wide range of services that are individualized for your needs. You and your counselor decide which services will help you become employed. Some of the services that may be available are:    • Guidance and Counseling    • Job-Seeking Skills and Job Placement    • Vocational Training   VR also provides assistance with Transition Services, Supported Employment Services,Assistive Technology Services, and the Ticket to Work Program  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Missouri State Chapter of ASPE

APSE-MO is the Missouri State Chapter of APSE The Association of People Supporting Employment First, a national organization committed to improving and expanding integrated employment opportunities, services, and outcomes for people experiencing disabilities. APSE-MO invites individuals with disabilities, their families, employment providers, funders, employers and others to join with us in making community employment a reality for ALL people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Show Me Careers: Missouri's Transition-to-Employment Collaborative

 

“The Show-Me-Careers project targets youth ages 16-30 with I/DD who are transitioning from secondary or post-secondary educational settings to community employment. Show-Me-Careers is funded by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and is one of eight grants awarded to state consortiums aimed at improving existing state systems to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with I/DD.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Missouri State Employment Leadership Network

The Missouri DD Council is partnering with the Missouri Department of Mental Health, Division of Developmental Disabilities, in bringing the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) to Missouri.  This is a project started by the Institute for Community Inclusion out of Boston, Massachusetts.  SELN brings together state developmental disability agencies for sharing, educating and providing guidance on practices and policies around employment to its members. It is also an opportunity for the Division of Developmental Disabilities and other Missouri governmental agencies to evaluate their policies and procedures as they relate to assisting persons with developmental disabilities to become employed.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

MO Ticket to Work - 06/01/1999

The Ticket to Work and Work Incentive Act of 1999 established an employment program for people who want to go to work that receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  The program was designed to remove barriers that kept people with disabilities from choosing to work for fear of losing health care coverage.  The Ticket to Work program is voluntary, and it increases opportunities and choices for Social Security (SS) disability beneficiaries to obtain employment, vocational rehabilitation, and other support services from public and private providers, employers, or other organizations.  SS provides a ticket to disability benefits to use in obtaining services and jobs through Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation or from an approved Employment Network.  Though SS has the overall program authority, MAXIMUS, Inc. serves as the program manager.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Missouri SAMHSA EDI (FY 2011 & 2012)

Goal 1: To strengthen peer delivered services in Missouri by leveraging Medicaid billing for services provided by Certified Peer Specialists in Consumer Operated Services Programs (COSP).   Goal 2: To introduce and begin implementation of peer delivered Individual Placement and Supports –Supported Employment (SE) – in Consumer Operated Services Programs.   Overall conclusions: Through this project Missouri has greatly increased its value of peers. 103 have been trained specifically under this project, with more on the way.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

Missouri Assistive Technology Council

Missouri Assistive Technology strives to increase access to assistive technology for Missourians with all types of disabilities, of all ages. To the right are navigation links to the programs and initiatives of MoAT.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO VR Transition Brochure

“Transition is a process young adults with disabilities, like you, go through to prepare for whatever the future might hold – further education, specialized training, employment or other options you might choose on the road to increased independence… Career planning and transition services are designed to help you prepare for your future by exploring different jobs, identifying careers interesting to you, and developing an understanding of the skills and abilities necessary to be successful.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MO Skills to Pay the Bills

"Skills to Pay the Bills: Mastering Soft Skills for Workplace Success," is a curriculum developed by ODEP focused on teaching "soft" or workforce readiness skills to youth, including youth with disabilities. Created for youth development professionals as an introduction to workplace interpersonal and professional skills, the curriculum is targeted for youth ages 14 to 21 in both in-school and out-of-school environments. The basic structure of the program is comprised of modular, hands-on, engaging activities that focus on six key skill areas: communication, enthusiasm and attitude, teamwork, networking, problem solving and critical thinking, and professionalism.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MO Writing Quality Goals, Outcomes and Action Plans

 

An overview of how to effectively create a Career Plan, establish appropriate goals and desired outcomes, and initiate an Action Plan with Discovery and Fading Supports.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Missouri Developmental Disabilities Waiver Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The Missouri Department of Mental Health’s Division of Developmental Disabilities (Division of DD)administers four Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver programs for individuals with developmental disabilities.  The four waivers are the Comprehensive Waiver; Missouri Children with Developmental Disabilities Waiver   (MOCDD or Lopez Waiver);   Community   Support Waiver; and Partnership for Hope Waiver (PfH).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

Community Transitions Manual for Support Coordinators and Community Coordinators - 02/11/2019

~~“MFP EligibilityIndividuals who transition from a Habilitation Center or nursing home may be eligible for MFP. MFP is a demonstration grant that supports efforts to:• Provide Medicaid eligible individuals the choice of where they live and receive services;• Allow qualified individuals living in nursing facilities or Habilitation Centers to move to the community; and• Promote a system that is person-centered, based on needs, and ensures high-quality services in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Missouri Medicaid (MO HealthNet) Independent Living Waiver - 03/01/2017

“The Missouri Independent Living Waiver (ILW) provides home and community based services for adults who are physically disabled. With assistance via this program, individuals can continue to live independently in their homes, rather than require placement in a nursing homes. Benefits include home modifications, personal care services, such as assistance with bathing, grooming, mobility, toiletry, and eating, and specialized medical equipment and supplies.”

 

“As of 2017, a single individual is allowed up to 85% of the Federal Poverty Level, which mean an applicant cannot have a monthly income more than $856. For married couples, the monthly income cannot exceed $1,150. However, Missouri does allow applicants that have an income greater than the allowable amount to “spend-down” in order to become eligible.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Missouri HCBS Statewide Transition Plan - 07/25/2016

“Missouri administers 10 Home and Community-Based Waivers through the single State Medicaid agency, the Department of Social Services, MO HealthNet Division (MHD). The day-to-day operation of the waivers is through formal cooperative agreements with the Missouri Department of Mental Health (DMH) and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS). The Department of Health and Senior Services and the Department of Mental Health are the operational entities for the waivers. Missouri Medicaid Audit and Compliance (MMAC) is the unit within the Department of Social Services (DSS) charged with administering and maintaining Medicaid Title XIX audit and compliance initiatives, including utilization of Medicaid services and provider enrollment functions. MMAC will participate in the transition plan as described below.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO DoE ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 06/08/2015

The Missouri Department of Secondary and Elementary Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on June 29, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Missouri HCSB Transition Plan - 03/01/2014

In March 2014, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) published a final rule regarding changes to Home and Community Based Waiver Services (HCBS Waiver). The rule defines home and community based settings and person-centered planning requirements in Medicaid HCBS Waiver programs. The rule requires demonstration of how state’s HCBS Waiver programs comply with the federal HCBS rules.   Missouri’s draft transition plan incorporates all HCBS Waivers administered by Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS), Department of Mental Health (DMH), and Department of Social Services (DSS). The purpose of Missouri’s draft transition plan is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS Waiver services are integrated and have access to supports in the community, including:    • opportunities to seek employment,    • work in competitive integrated settings,    • engage in community life,    • and control personal resources.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO Partnership for Hope Waiver (0841.R00.00) - 10/01/2013

The purpose of the Partnership for Hope waiver is to prevent or delay of institutional services for individuals who require minimal services in order to continue living in the community. The waiver will offer prevention services to stabilize individuals primarily living with family members who provide significant support, but are not able to meet all of the individual's needs. Goals To increase access to waiver services for children and adults at the local level in participating counties.    Objectives The objectives of the waiver are: 1) to increase the capacity of the State to meet the needs of individuals at risk of institutionalization who require minimal supports to continue living in integrated community settings; 2) to partner with local County Boards through Intergovernmental Agreements in the administration and funding of waiver services; and 3) to implement preventive services in a timely manner in order that eligible participants may continue living in the community with their families.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO Div of Developmental Disabilities Community Support (0404.R03.00) - 07/01/2011

 

“Provides community employment, in home respite, job preparation, personal assistant, assistive technology, behavior analysis service, co-worker supports, communication skills instruction, community specialist services, counseling, crisis intervention, environmental accessibility adaptations-home mods, independent living skills development, job discovery, OT, out of home respite, person centered strategies consultation, PT, professional assessment and monitoring, specialized medical equipment and supplies (adaptive equipment), speech therapy, support broker, transportation for individuals w/ID Developmental Disabilities ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MO MR Developmental Disabilities Comprehensive (0178.R06.00) - 07/01/2011

 

“Provides community employment, day service, group home, in home respite, individualized supported living, job preparation, personal assistant, assistive technology, behavior analysis service, communication skills instruction, community specialist services, community transition, counseling, crisis intervention, environmental accessibility adaptations, host home, job discovery, OT, out of home respite, PT, positive behavior support, professional assessment and monitoring, specialized medical equipment and supplies (adaptive equipment), speech therapy, support broker, transportation for individuals w/MR Developmental Disabilities ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

The Show Me State is expanding its efforts to deliver competitive, integrated employment options for individuals with disabilities through innovative strategies that propel Missouri's model, "Close to Home, Far from Ordinary."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Missouri’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2016 to 2017
6,113,532
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
463,964
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
172,283
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
37.13%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
99.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
79,376.00%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 6,113,532
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 463,964
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 172,283
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,536,645
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 37.13%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79,376.00%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 438,766
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 455,312
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 746,357
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 104,337
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 22,690
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,285
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 9,478
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 669
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 22,283
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 5,669

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,663
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 213,655

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,164
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 11,180
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 38,602
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 16.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,196
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 645
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 5,450
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 7,016
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2,948
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 42.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 48.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 8,353
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 313,618
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $5,571,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $46,338,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $22,851,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 9.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,470
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,076
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 9.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 57.36%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.58%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 87.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 28.50%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.29%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 31.17%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,683,499
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,704
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 129,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 245,601
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 372,429
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 220
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 335
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 555
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,055,603
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,245,518

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 83
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 85
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 5,343
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 269
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 5,612

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Division of Developmental Disabilities has a statewide employment initiative, Employment First, for working age citizens with disabilities. Employment services include job preparation, job discovery, and community employment in a competitive integrated work setting that may include ongoing supports. The Division of Behavioral Health provides employment services to individuals with mental illnesses, histories of substance abuse, and/or criminal backgrounds. Clinical and vocational employment services are integrated through state—wide partnerships to help individuals who are interested in employment participate in the competitive labor market with the appropriate level of supports and services to be successful. RSB will continue to partner and collaborate with DMH programs in the delivery of employment services. (Pages 232-233) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~MVR’s workforce development activities are designed to assist individuals with disabilities in obtaining, maintaining, or advancing in competitive integrated employment. These activities include assessments, vocational guidance and counseling, job preparation activities, which can include disability awareness, resume writing, interviewing skills. Additionally, MVR provides eligible individuals with training (OJT, apprenticeships, customized employment, funding for community colleges and universities). (Page 44) Title I

RSB has developed relationships with several employers across the state communicating directly with HR staff on employment needs, identifying customized employment opportunities, and providing disability/blindness awareness and sensitivity training. Outreach activities have resulted in competitive integrated employment outcomes and work experience opportunities, both paid and unpaid, for youth and students with disabilities and adult clients. (Page 45) Title I

• SE Services --    The nature of the service itself requires an individualized approach based on the needs of an eligible individual. SE services are ongoing support services, including customized employment, and other appropriate services needed to support an individual with a most significant disability to achieve and maintain competitive integrated employment. Services are provided by CRPs. MVR can provide up to 24 months of community-based job training. (Pages 188-189) Title IV

The supported employment program ensures that individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities, are afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re—enter competitive integrated employment, including supported or customized employment. RSB’s employment outcomes for supported employment is recorded at 1.5% of total closures for FFY 2015. Of the individuals that exited the program and received supported employment services during FFY 2015, 80 percent were successfully employed in competitive jobs. These individuals averaged $9.77 per hour and worked an average of 30 hours per week. (Page 249) Title IV

Rehabilitation Services for the Blind (RSB) offers assessment, job development, task analysis, and time—limited individual and group job coaching leading to supported employment through 12 formal contracts with supported employment service providers. Other services available to clients with a goal of supported employment are the same as those available to clients receiving services under Title I. The supported employment program ensures that individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities, are afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or re—enter competitive integrated employment, including supported or customized employment. Extended services may be provided to youth with the most significant disabilities for a period not to exceed four years. (Page 262) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Missouri partners are committed to developing new career pathways for youth and adults with barriers to employment including individuals with disabilities. Missouri’s core partner program leaders regularly meet to collaborate on braiding services for work-based learning and education funding. Through sector strategy regional business meetings and partner engagement, Missouri will work with employers to identify opportunities and services available to assist in eliminating employment barriers. (Page 58) Title I

Missouri is committed to finding connections between core partners, mandatory partners, and other partners in each region. Missouri’s core and mandatory partners will collaborate to share resources to create environments to foster partnering at the local level as well as maintain resource allocations that keep existing partnerships at the local level. Specific examples include: As part of their services to individuals with disabilities, VR may provide funding for post-secondary training. As partners seek to co-enroll their customers, this will provide opportunity for leveraging of these resources through braiding of both educational dollars, as well as supportive services to ensure the customer’s success. VR also provides guidance and counseling to the job seekers, to insure that access to comparable services funding is achieved, whether through partner agencies or through Federal funding, such as the Pell grant. (Page 82) Title I

MVR is working closely with all of the WIOA partners in order to provide the best services possible for consumers. MVR initiated the creation of a braiding services team, comprised of
WIOA core partners and other entities that serve individuals with disabilities, to develop methods and strategies to support collaboration between partner agencies, promote greater understanding of the services provided by each agency, and discover methods to avoid duplication of services. Many teams, consisting of members from all of the partner programs, are meeting and developing methods to meet individuals’ needs. (Pages 205-206) Title IV

MVR initiated the creation of a braiding services team, comprised of WIOA core partners and other entities that serve individuals with disabilities, to develop methods and strategies to support collaboration between partner agencies, promote greater understanding of the services provided by each agency, and discover methods to avoid duplication of services. (Pages 208-209) Title IV
The Missouri workforce development system comprised of all core WIOA partners has developed a Memorandum of Understanding on the implementation of WIOA and creating the partnerships to begin developing common referrals, the braiding of services, and data sharing. These collaborative efforts will enhance access for individuals with disabilities and improve performance for all partners. Performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA are new to vocational rehabilitation and have not yet been measured. RSB met all required federal performance indicators during the past two years prior to WIOA. RSB will apply the same quality of service utilized in meeting those indicators to achieve the new performance measures and provide that level of quality while moving forward.  (Page 254) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~RSB has formal contract agreements with community rehabilitation providers to work with employers and assist clients with job search, job placement and customized employment opportunities. Other services include work-based learning experiences, task analysis, and job coaching when needed. RSB contracts with Alphapointe Association for the Blind for an eight-week Summer Transition Employment Program (STEP) providing competitive work experience to high school age youth. The goal is to provide each consumer with a foundation for the school-to-work transition, to enable each to practice personal independence through work and goal-setting experiences, and to afford an opportunity for community involvement. This program includes vocational exploration; identifying preferences, interests, and abilities with regard to work; and learning about work related behaviors and self-advocacy. Consumers participate in general orientation during the first week of the program. The remaining seven weeks they spend on the job. Short-term job coaching may be provided to assist in orienting the consumers to the particular job site. Consumers receive an hourly wage during their placement at a job site. Involvement in this program is intended to increase a consumer’s career awareness, build marketable vocational skills, and support a healthy self-image. (Pages 46-47) Title I

Missouri will improve the outcomes for out-of-school youth by ensuring the 14 elements allowed under WIOA are met through a braiding of partner resources which will best meet each individuals need. The 14 program elements will be available to OSY participants, and will be funded with WIOA title I youth funds or leveraged partner resources. An agreement will be established with the partner to offer the program element and ensure that the activity is connected and coordinated with the WIOA youth program. (Page 129) Title I

Each local MVR district office will also participate in pre-employment transition coordination with the local education agency to include attending IEP meetings when invited, using conference calls and video conferences, when necessary; working with local workforce development entities and employers to develop work opportunities for students with disabilities; coordinating pre-employment transition services with transition services provided in accordance with IDEA; and, when invited, attending person-centered planning meetings for youth receiving services under Title IX of the Social Security Act. To effectively coordinate these services, MVR:
• conducted statewide training to include guidance regarding IEP participation for all MVR staff that serve students in Missouri high schools;
• worked in partnership with the Parent Advocacy Coalition Educational Rights Center to develop a video introducing VR services that can be shown at IEP meetings;
• conducted cross training on services to youth with local job center staff and MVR staff in Kansas City and St. Louis, the two largest metropolitan areas of the state;
• invited special education personnel to train new MVR counselors on transition services within the IEP;
• provided cross training with local CILs to include information regarding benefits planning; and
• is currently working in collaboration with DMH’s Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD) to provide cross training with MVR counselors and DD support coordinators regarding their respective services. (Pages 168-169) Title IV

MVR has a policy that outlines transition activities and services including the timely development and approval of an individualized plan for employment (IPE) for each eligible student prior to leaving high school. MVR will provide for the development of the IPE as early as possible during the transition planning process, but, at least, by the time the eligible student leaves the school setting. The IPE will include specific transition services or pre-employment transition services and supports needed for an eligible student with a disability or a youth with a disability, including youth with the most significant disabilities, to achieve an employment outcome or projected post-school employment outcome. An IPE is required to be developed in consideration of the IEP of a student with a disability under IDEA or a student’s Section 504 services. (Page 170) Title IV

The Cooperative Work Experience Program (COOP) agreement is an interagency state and local program between the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (Special Education, MVR and Career Education); Rehabilitation Services for the Blind (RSB); and local school districts in the state of Missouri. The agreement is embedded in the state transition MOU and is available for all school districts. The purpose is to facilitate the coordination of transition services from school to post-secondary training and/or employment for students with disabilities who participate in special education programs and are eligible to receive vocational rehabilitation services. The MOU outlines roles and responsibilities among participating agencies and school districts in the development of off-campus work experience programs. Through these programs, students with disabilities who are receiving services through an IEP can earn high school credit in accordance with Missouri high school graduation requirements for the number of hours they work in a paid competitive, integrated employment setting. Additionally, MVR continues to work collaboratively with providers and local school districts to meet transition needs of students. (Page 186) Title IV

The DESE Graduation Handbook and DESE Transition Agreement include three work-based learning experiences for students with disabilities on an IEP and are coordinated with special education. Students receive high school credit. These three experiences are the COOP Program, employer-based transition training/Project Search for students with most significant disabilities, and unpaid internships. (Page 194) Title IV

Supported employment services are available not only to individuals after leaving their secondary education program, but to students whose IEP and IPE include these services as part of their transition plan and whose school district signs a cooperative work experience program agreement with RSB.  (Page 262) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Missouri partners are committed to developing new career pathways for youth and adults with barriers to employment including individuals with disabilities. Missouri’s core partner program leaders regularly meet to collaborate on braiding services for work-based learning and education funding. Through sector strategy regional business meetings and partner engagement, Missouri will work with employers to identify opportunities and services available to assist in eliminating employment barriers. (Page 58) Title I

• In addition to training services, the Title I & Title IV partners have work based programs such as on-the-job training and work experience which offer the customers the opportunity to combine education, training and employment services. VR & Rehabilitation Services for the Blind supports career pathways by providing a variety of services to students, youth and adults with disabilities. Additional services may include assistive technology, case-management, and post-employment support to provide job retention. (Page 70) Title I

Each workforce area has a Business Services Team plan that guides outreach and services to businesses. Business Services Teams are made up of staff whose mission is to connect employers to a skilled workforce. To ensure an integrated service model, teams now include business representatives from Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), along with other combined partners who touch businesses. At a minimum, the members of the teams include Business Representatives and other Job Center staff assigned to business services, OJT Marketing Specialists, Local Veterans Employment Representatives, and VR Business Outreach Specialists. The design and makeup of each team varies slightly from region to region and may include a variety of other partners who work with businesses, such as local economic developers, educational agencies, UMOS (Missouri’s167 provider), Rehabilitative Services for the Blind Outreach Specialists and Family Support Division (FSD) TANF Outreach Specialists. Additionally, the Kansas City and Vicinity Region employs Disability Program Navigators, which are also included on their business services team. (Page 77) Title I

Apprenticeship

Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation and Rehabilitation Services for the Blind may provide vocational rehabilitation services to potentially eligible students with disabilities and eligible individuals, including youth with disabilities, to assist in accessing programs leading to post secondary credentials. Services are designed to create opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, including registered apprenticeship training programs, leading to industry-recognized certificates, credentials, licenses, and post-secondary degrees. Services for eligible participants may include access to training programs, disability related accommodations, and support services necessary for the successful participation and completion of the training activity. (Page 83) Title I
SB has formal contract agreements with community rehabilitation providers to work with employers and assist clients with job search, job placement and customized employment opportunities. Other services include work based learning experiences, task analysis, and job coaching when needed. RSB contracts with Alphapointe Association for the Blind for an eight—week Summer Transition Employment Program (STEP) providing competitive work experience to high—school age youth. The goal is to provide each consumer with a foundation for the school—to—work transition, to enable each to practice personal independence through work and goal—setting experiences, and to afford an opportunity for community involvement. This program includes vocational exploration; identifying preferences, interests, and abilities with regard to work; and learning about work related behaviors and self—advocacy. Consumers participate in general orientation during the first week of the program. The remaining seven weeks they spend on the job. Short—term job coaching may be provided to assist in orienting the consumers to the particular job site. Consumers receive an hourly wage during their placement at a job site. Involvement in this program is intended to increase a consumer’s career awareness, build marketable vocational skills, and support a healthy self—image. (Pages 231-232) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Rehabilitation Services for the Blind is not in an order of selection. RSB projects that funding for the 2018 and 2019 FFY will meet the needs of all individuals who apply for services. Data sets include:
1. Recipients of Blind Pension (BP) and Supplemental Aid for the Blind (SAB);
2. Recipients of SSI/SSDI who also receive other benefits from the DSA;
3. Recipients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services for blind and visually impaired;
4. Recipients of Independent Living Rehabilitation/Independent Living for Older Blind;
5. Recipients of Prevention of Blindness services (Page 242) Title IV
 

Employer/ Business

~~Missouri has established a WIOA Employer Engagement Committee, made up of staff from all combined partner agencies, LWDB Directors, and the USDOL Office of Apprenticeship State Director. This committee has been established to provide guidance to regions, make recommendations to the WIOA State Steering Committee, and coordinate statewide meetings as needed to ensure continued partner collaboration. (Page 79) Title I

RSB works with employers through a variety of activities at the local level to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate the provision of VR services and transition services, including transition services for youth and pre—employment transition services. District offices engage in outreach activities meeting directly with employers to identify employment needs and educate employers about the services RSB can offer for existing and new employees. Each district office and the Prevention of Blindness program have a tonometer to screen for the early signs of glaucoma as a service to employers and to promote VR services. Outreach activities are extended to employer health fairs, job fairs, chamber of commerce events, and participating in local Workforce Development Boards. RSB has developed relationships with several employers across the state communicating directly with HR staff on employment needs, identify customized employment opportunities, and provide disability/blindness awareness and sensitivity training. Outreach activities have resulted in competitive integrated employment outcomes and work experience opportunities, both paid and unpaid, for youth and students with disabilities and adult clients. (Page 230) Title IV

Data Collection

Missouri VR will assess its performance based upon the WIOA common performance measures as well as agency goals and objectives. The VR executive leadership team along with district office management reviews performance data on a monthly basis to determine progress toward goals and opportunities for improvement. VR’s case services and financial services work in tandem evaluating performance data for short- and long-term decision making. In addition, VR’s statewide quality assurance team evaluates case management providing guidance on program performance. (Page 95) Title I

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

• Title IV: VR is actively participating with all local workforce boards and works closely with Missouri Job Centers to provide program accessibility, physical access to services, and assistive technology for people with disabilities. Strategy 2 -Create Sector Strategies (Page 69) Title I
Missouri has a committee to specifically focus on one-stop certification criteria. The committee has established the criteria for certification, including accessibility. This committee includes representatives from Vocational Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Services for the Blind and the Centers for Independent Living (CILs) who will assist with training and technical assistance to ensure accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials for individuals with disabilities. Accessibility criteria for certification includes the accessibility requirements contained with Section 188; policy review, adaptive technology equipment availability, emergency procedures, etc.
In order to better serve Missouri Job Center customers, the workforce partners are working with ODEP’s National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) for technical assistance. Training has been conducted by the VR, LEAD Center & DWSD with AJC staff. Through this collaboration, partners developed a statewide survey that was sent to gather information from job seekers on the social, environmental and physical accessibility of the Missouri Job Centers. Local areas are using this feedback as a guide to improve training and technical assistance for serving people with disabilities.
Each Workforce Development region has a dedicated Equal Opportunity officer, which comprises a statewide team, which includes VR staff. (Page 108) Title I

Vets

Through a statewide network of job centers and partner organizations, Missouri Division of Workforce Development coordinates and aligns their partnership with the Department of Employment Security, Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Services for the Blind and the Department of Social Services Family Support Division. Together the partners provide a robust menu of vital reemployment and support services, including access to skill-building training, National Certification and Career Connections for jobs seekers, targeted programs for veterans, youth and the unemployed, and cost-saving human resource assistance and financial incentives for businesses. The partners braid workforce, education, and training activities with support services to meet the needs of our job seekers and employers. With 32 full-service centers as well as numerous satellite and affiliate locations statewide, Missouri Job Centers are the central point for WIOA core and one-stop partner services. (Pages 42-43) Title I
The Veteran services are of utmost importance. Missouri Job Centers have priority services for veterans, which will be served before all other customers. A veteran can request to see the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) staff or Local Veteran Employment Representative (LVER) at any time in the process to receive specialized services. (Page 43) Title I
The Career Skills Program assists transitioning veterans by providing an internship with a Missouri employer, which allows the service member to gain valuable civilian work experience prior to exiting active duty. (Page 85) Title I
The Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) and Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVERs) are fully integrated into the Missouri Job Centers as detailed by the DVOP/LVER agreement with the Secretary (Veterans State Plan). The role of the DVOP staff will not be to supplant the Wagner-Peyser responsibilities for providing priority of service to veterans, but to assist veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to overcome their barriers or mitigate their barriers so the veteran is job ready through case management. Once the veteran is job ready the LVER will work with employers to create employment opportunities for the job ready veterans. DVOP/LVER will not be assigned duties that violate Title 38. DVOP will share case management for veterans enrolled in WIOA and other programs with the providers of those programs.
The Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) requires compliance with Title 38, Chapters 41 and 42, in that all service delivery points of the grantee will provide veterans’ priority of service in the provision of all labor-exchange services, and specifically when making referrals for job openings and training opportunities.
Local service delivery points are monitored to ensure that programs provide the required priority of service to veterans. Whenever necessary, corrective action plans will be developed and appropriate technical assistance concerning priority of service to veterans will be provided. The agreement reached between Veterans’ Employment and Training and the State will be the governing agreement for veterans’ services within the Missouri Job Centers where funding is used to provide services to the state’s veteran customers. (Pages 107-108) Title I
Show Me Heroes (SMH) is work-based learning activity that provides OJT to veterans. Transitional jobs are reserved for those chronically unemployed and provide real life work experience when it is greatly needed to be successful in the workplace. The Incumbent Worker training policy allows local Boards the flexibility to provide Incumbent Worker Training to employers when needed. (Page 123) Title I
MVR has a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Compensated Work Therapy Program (CWT). MVR and CWT are mutually committed to promoting and enhancing competitive employment opportunities for veterans, enabling every individual to reach his or her life’s potential. MVR and CWT work together in bringing enhanced employment opportunities to veterans with disabilities leading to greater individual and family economic stability and security. (Pages 166-167) Title IV

Mental Health

~~MVR has an MOU with DMH, the state agency responsible for providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities and mental health services, which covers DMH’s BH and DD divisions. The agreement outlines the collaboration on existing services, alignment of funding sources, information and data sharing, referrals and on-going development of services.
DMH’s BH and MVR work together to increase access to evidence-based supported employment, also known as Individual Placement and Support (IPS), for adults with serious mental illnesses who are interested in improving their work lives. Missouri has 21 Community Mental Health/Treatment Centers (CMHCs) participating in this implementation collaborative. Ongoing technical assistance and fidelity reviews to the evidence-based practice are provided by a state trainer and a team consisting of MVR and DMH employees. The partnership between DMH and MVR includes a training format, offered to interested CMHCs statewide, on adopting IPS and on improving existing employment activities within treatment services. DMH and MVR implemented IPS for youth with serious mental illnesses in four current sites. (Page 176) Title IV

MVR will provide supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities for up to 24 months and will extend, if necessary, should these services be needed to achieve an employment outcome. These services may include: job coaching, job supports (both on and off the job), guidance and counseling, retention services, resources for benefits counseling, information and referral, and employer consultation.

MVR will continue to work closely with the Missouri Department of Social Services MOHealthNet Division and the Department of Mental Health (DMH) Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DD) divisions to ensure that youth with the most significant disabilities are receiving extended services. (Page 202) Title IV

DMH BH and MVR have been working to increase access to evidence-based supported employment, also known as IPS, for adults with serious mental illnesses who are interested in improving their work lives. Missouri has 21 Community Mental Health/Treatment Centers participating in this implementation collaborative. DMH and MVR are implementing IPS for youth with serious mental illnesses in four current sites.

To assist in determining the quality and effectiveness of SE services, MVR surveys its consumers. The 2017 Customer Satisfaction Survey results indicated that 98 percent of SE clients, who left services both successfully and unsuccessfully, felt MVR staff were available when needed and treated them with respect. (Page 211) Title IV

RSB will continue to work closely with the Missouri Department of Social Services MOHealthNet Division and the Department of Mental Health (DMH) Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DD) divisions to ensure that youth with the most significant disabilities are receiving extended services. Services may include job monitoring and assessment of employment stability, establishment of peer and natural support environments, and coordination of specific services necessary to assist the individual to maintain employment. RSB will work closely with the DMH DD division utilizing home and community-based waivers to increase supported employment and extended services for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 250) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 11 - 20 of 79

Graduation Requirements for Students in Missouri Public Schools - 11/15/2018

~~“Off-Campus InstructionMany students who are juniors and seniors in high school can benefit from authentic school-directed and supervised paid or unpaid learning experiences through assignment to off-campus locations under cooperative arrangements with business and industry or other institutions. More about these services can be found on our website.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Division of Developmental Disabilities Employment First Policy - 03/01/2018

This policy establishes community integrated employment services and supports as the first service option and primary outcome for individuals (both youth and adults.) It also establishes employment planning (Career Planning) and supports as priorities to explore with all working adults who receive services in order to ensure that supports, services, and outcomes are consistent with what the person is seeking.

Each individual will be supported to pursue his or her own unique path to work, a career, and his or her contribution to/participation in community life. All individuals, regardless of the challenge of their disability, will be afforded an opportunity to pursue employment. Career planning, including job exploration and on-going person focused self discovery, is critical when assisting individuals in making informed choices about their future careers.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

About the Missouri Collaborative Work Initiative - 09/01/2017

“Beginning with the 2012-2013 academic year, the Office of Special Education, Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education initiated a new approach to addressing the achievement disparity between students with disabilities and students without disabilities. This initiative is the Collaborative Work. By invitation, Missouri districts may choose to participate.

 

The purpose of the Collaborative Work Grant is to improve learning for all students, especially students with disabilities, and improve teaching, by:

-establishing and implementing effective and efficient collaborative  teams,

-implementing with fidelity and a high degree of effectiveness a variety of teaching/learning practices which have been proven to have a high effect size on student outcomes,

-developing and administering common formative assessments to measure the effectiveness of teaching/learning practices as evidenced by student mastery of learning objectives, and

-using data‐based decision making to guide decisions about classroom teaching/learning practices.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Transition Timeline - 09/01/2017

“Toward successful transition: A checklist for the first 21 years.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Reverse Job Fair 2017 and Disability Employment Event - 08/10/2017

“The Third Annual Accommodation for Success Disability Employment Event took place on August 10, 2017, at the Forest Park Campus of St. Louis Community College. The event was organized to make it easier for area businesses to build diverse workforce. This year, the event included the first Reverse Job Fair in St. Louis.

 

Unlike most traditional job fairs, this innovative recruitment event focused on showcasing talents and professional interests of 80+ job candidates with disabilities. Participants met with potential employers in their booth spaces, demonstrating experience and skills in a variety of industries, while human resource professionals roamed the room, meeting the candidates they were interested in hiring. More than 116 recruiters representing 99 area companies were present. With 236 total registrants, not including job candidates, this year’s event was the largest yet.

 

Accommodation for Success event is a collaborative effort between the St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment (SLATE), regional job centers, and more than 20 of the region’s disability employment organizations. Workshops and resources on disability inclusion, etiquette, recruitment, and workplace culture were offered to registered businesses, prior to the reverse job fair.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SB66, Payment of temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process - 07/05/2017

“Temporary total disability or temporary partial disability benefits shall be paid throughout the rehabilitative process until the employee reaches maximum medical improvement, unless such benefits are terminated by the employee’s return to work or are terminated as otherwise specified in this chapter.

 

The permanency of the employee’s disability under sections 287.170 to 287.200 shall not be established or adjudicated while the employee is participating in rehabilitation services.

 

Refusal of the employee to accept rehabilitation services or submit to a vocational rehabilitation assessment as deemed necessary by the employer shall result in a fifty percent reduction in all disability payments to an employee, including temporary partial disability benefits paid pursuant to section 287.180, for each week of the period of refusal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Missouri SB 43, Modifying the Missouri Human Rights Act - 06/30/2017

“AN ACT To repeal sections 213.010, 213.040, 213.050, 213.055, 213.065, 213.070, 213.075, 213.101, and 213.111, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof ten new sections relating to unlawful discriminatory practices.”

 

It modifies the Missouri Human Rights Act. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

LEAD Partners with U.S. DOL’s Civil Rights Center, Office of Disability Employment Policy and Missouri State Equal Opportunity at 2017 WIOA National Convenings - 06/29/2017

“This spring, the U.S. Department of Labor (US DOL), in collaboration with its Education and Health and Human Services partners, hosted three Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) National Convenings. The convenings were held at different regional locations on the West Coast, East Coast, and in the Midwest, and had one agenda with closely aligned content. The purpose of the convenings was to provide support and information to state and local workforce development professionals and partners on effectively implementing WIOA. Six different tracks were offered at each convening, including the following key topic areas: Business Engagement, Financial/Grants Management, Integrated Services, One-Stop Operations, Performance Accountability, and Strategic Governance. In addition, this year marked the first time in which an additional session on civil rights and disability was offered at all three convenings.

 

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Civil Rights Center (CRC) and Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) partnered with Missouri’s State Equal Opportunity Officer (EOO) and the LEAD Center to offer a j