Nevada

States - Big Screen

In the Silver State of Nevada, workers with disabilities don't have to take a gamble on their future when it comes to finding career success and employment opportunities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nevada’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
2,890,845
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.72%
Change from
2014 to 2015
203,190
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
83,559
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.56%
Change from
2014 to 2015
41.12%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.63%
Change from
2014 to 2015
74.80%

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 2,790,136 2,839,099 2,890,845
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 193,363 201,717 203,190
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 75,828 82,484 83,559
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,115,829 1,149,198 1,172,440
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.22% 40.89% 41.12%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 73.10% 74.33% 74.80%
Overall unemployment rate. 9.50% 7.80% 6.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.40% 19.10% 19.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.30% 14.70% 13.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 172,440 184,719 192,429
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 184,595 190,602 190,951
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 259,345 275,029 278,106
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 31,843 33,642 33,439
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 67,909 70,746 70,092
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,548 5,624 6,754
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 18,567 19,292 22,092
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,615 2,518 2,705
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 11,287 11,325 14,784
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 28,830 27,891 25,500

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,720 1,788 1,979
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.60% 4.60% 4.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 62,983 64,243 65,211

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,950 2,092 1,881
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 10,510 7,703 7,262
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 18,537 13,518 12,649
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.90% 15.50% 14.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 8.70% 8.40% 6.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20% 1.50% 1.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 2.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,202 1,158 813
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 172 201 184
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A 247

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,662 4,338 4,568
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 50 63 161
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 26 46 94
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00% 73.00% 58.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.94 1.65 3.25

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
1,527
1,665
1,649
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 165 154 105
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 172 222 234
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 403 394 383
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 359 436 436
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 282 303 344
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 146 156 147
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 25.30% 36.10% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 1,524 1,754
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 91,626 93,514
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 31 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 26 45 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,708,000 $3,617,000 $3,401,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $8,741,000 $9,182,000 $10,644,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $12,196,000 $13,428,000 $14,632,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $236,000 $250,000 $307,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 21.00% 18.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 28 30 23
Number of people served in facility based work. 918 1,053 1,140
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 754 859 879
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 16.60 15.40 14.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.90% 64.26% 63.83%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.20% 14.21% 14.45%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.60% 1.47% 1.49%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 91.30% 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.01% 21.39% 21.57%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.04% 56.05% 56.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 65.91% 69.77% 69.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.03% 34.66% 34.56%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 811,514
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,144
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 703
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 199,341
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 200,044
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 4
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 336
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,907
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,360,666

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 13 8 10
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 8 10
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 1,178 1,309
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 1,178 1,309

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

4.4.2   Operationalize employment first strategies, which include the strategy that employment services should be the first priority option for individuals with disabilities. Employment first is based on the premise that everyone can work.

4.4.3   Incorporate career readiness content into educational curriculum that links to postsecondary education. (Page 68)

  • Nevada transition conference
  • California State University, Northridge (CSUN)/assistive technology conference
  • The CSAVR fall and spring conferences
  • National Council of State Agencies for the Blind
  • Employment and disability forum
  • Program Evaluation and Quality Assurance Summit
  • BLAST (National Association of Blind Merchants and National Federation of the Blind)
  • Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)
  • National Association of Workforce Development Professionals (NAWDP)   (Page 271) 
Customized Employment

Vocational counseling and guidance provided by master’s degree-level rehabilitation counselors with expertise in working with individuals with disabilities to remove barriers to employment.

  • Services provided by VR’s business development team, including: direct recruitment and outreach services to employers regarding hiring individuals with disabilities and disability awareness, and developing recruitment and work readiness programs to meet employers’ hiring needs.
  • Vocational assessments, education and training, skills enhancement training, vocational counseling and guidance, job development and advocacy, transition services for students and youth transitioning to college or careers, customized employment, physical and mental restoration services, and post-employment services that are unique to VR and address the unique needs of individuals with disabilities.(Page 85)

The DSU has long–standing relationships with many workforce system partners, both internal and external, that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals, including youth, with the most significant disabilities. With the implementation of WIOA, new challenges and opportunities are presented to expand the services of supported and customized employment (SE, CE). The collective goal remains to achieve maximum success in assisting individuals with the most significant disabilities into successful integrated employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused on building more effective partnerships and relationships with similar entities throughout the state that support these efforts that expand integrated employment opportunities. (Page 255)

VR Transition Teams statewide are working strategically to develop expanded supported employment services to include customized employment for youth. In this endeavor, VR is working with Opportunity Village, Centers for Independent Living and individual, qualified job development providers to serve this unique and expanding population. VR has taken the lead in providing training for customized employment, including statewide in–service for VR staff and community partners with Denise Bissonette and Abbey Cooper, both nationally recognized supported employment professionals.

The DSU is not currently providing extended services for supported employment youth, as that need is being met statewide through the regional centers, the Division of Public and Behavioral Health and through natural supports. (Page 256)

The DSU and the NDE, Office of Special Education, Elementary and Secondary Education and school improvement programs have an inter-local contract, which contains provisions for the joint training of VR staff and special education personnel. Special education staff members have and will be participating in vocational rehabilitation training on customized employment, job development and placement of individuals with disabilities, and WIOA implications. Special Education staff were also invited to attend two professional presentations in FFY 2015 from Denise Bissonnette (author, trainer, keynote speaker) on career development, job development and workforce development, and from Abby Cooper (renowned leader from SDSU in defining employment practices for individuals with disabilities) on customized employment. (Page 272)

After reviewing the needs assessment and WIOA mandates, the DSU and NSRC focused on the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly the VR service needs of: 

  • Individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment and customized employment;
  • Minorities with disabilities in the Nevada workforce, especially the underserved groups of Hispanic and Asian individuals;
  • Individuals with disabilities that have been underserved, especially those with mental health disabilities;
  • Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system; and,
  • Transition students. (Page 282)

Entities that provide supported employment services, including the Independent Living program within ADSD, which provides customized employment services, a brochure for supported employment services, expanded communication and training services for VR staff and NSRC members and consumers who are eligible for supported employment services, and partners with the Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities to provide supported and customized employment job developer training. (Page 288)

In northern Nevada, the customized/supported employment program continues in collaboration with Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living and Sierra Regional Center (SRC). This initiative strives to serve co–enrolled clients and deliver supported employment services, specifically job carving and person–centered customized employment. Substantial funding was made available and distributed to support this effort. (Page 309)

Braiding/Blending Resources

The DSU works with Nevada’s Medicaid agency (ADSD) to leverage funds for supported employment services by braiding its funding with JDT Medicaid waivers to provide enhanced and expanded services together with agencies that provide JDT Medicaid waiver services, as described below.

The DSU has a contract with the three statewide regional centers, and conducts monthly meetings with staff at these regional centers. The DSU and regional centers collaborate on services for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities who are joint clients. In northern Nevada, the DSU has continued its relationship with High Sierra Industries for its Career Development Academy. In southern Nevada, the DSU developed a contract with Opportunity Village, Inc. for its Pathways to Work program. Both of these programs are with vendors of JDT waiver programs, and both leverage funding toward opportunities for competitive and integrated employment. (Page 260)

The DSU leverages funds for supported employment services by braiding its funding with JDT Medicaid waivers to provide enhanced and expanded services together with agencies that provide JDT Medicaid waiver services. The DSU also partners with the statewide regional centers and Division of Public and Behavioral Health to ensure warm handoffs for extended services. The DSU itself is not currently providing extended services, as that need is being met statewide through the regional centers, the Division of Public and Behavior Health and through natural supports. (Page 288) 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

The state of Nevada provides initial and continuing notices to make all registrants, applicants, and eligible applicants/registrants, applicants for employment, employees, and interested members of the public aware of the recipients’ obligations to operate its programs and activities in a nondiscriminatory manner. The state board has issued specific state compliance policies related to the communication of equal opportunity (EO), with which all grantees must comply. (Page 140)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

To reiterate, the DSU worked with CCSD to formulate a TPCA called JEEP (Job Exploration and Expectation Program), which was implemented in August 2015. There are six designated pilot schools where students participate in work rotations in various departments of the school with the final site being a site within the community. Participants rotate every nine weeks through the sites that they are interested in until they culminate into the community–based assessment experience. Part of this training includes activities under the pre–employment transition services (PETS) category to ensure WIOA compliance. Reflecting back on the initial collaborative efforts with the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disability, the DSU has evolved wherein customized employment is viewed as a standard service that is offered to the most severely disabled consumers. This philosophy is no longer part of a pilot; it is now standard practice with qualified job developers. (Page 252)

Other sources for supported employment services and supports include:

  • Increased supports as defined in WIOA, e.g., VR’s ability to provide long term supports for youth;
  • Social Security Administration work incentives, e.g., Plan for Achieving Self–Support (PASS) and Impairment Related Work Expenses (IRWE);
  • Diversion of jobs and day training/waiver funding for pre–vocational training; and,
  • Natural supports. (Page 255)
Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Education activities provided for WIOA Title I Youth include: tutoring; study skills training; evidence-based dropout prevention; alternative secondary school services and dropout recovery services; financial literacy; and, education offered concurrently with workforce preparation activities and training for specific occupations or occupational clusters. Youth programs also include summer employment opportunities that are directly linked to academic and occupational learning, paid and unpaid work experiences that incorporate academic and occupational education, occupational skills training, and entrepreneurial skills training. (Page 32)

In southern Nevada, VR collaborates with Goodwill of Southern Nevada for their “elite program” serving youth 17–21 by providing identification and work documents, work training programs, interview assistance, transportation, financial literacy and interview clothing. Statewide, Nevada VR collaborates with Child and Family Services within the State’s Health and Human Services Division. VR collaborates on referrals, shared services for assessments, training, employment and restoration. (Page 247)

Benefits
  • Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
  • Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
  • Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high–demand/high growth occupations.
  • Update inter-local contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
  • Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
  • Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 284)

Data is collected and verified though a variety of means and specific to the requirements of each program. Applicants provide information by entering it into the online application AccessNevada system, submitting hardcopy applications and statements, providing third party documentation, and/or providing information directly to a staff member. Some data is collected from third party sources primarily through interfaces, mailed inquiries and documented telephone calls, i.e., NOMADS interfaces directly with the Social Security Administration’s system for information on identity, benefits and disability status, and with DETR’s data systems for information on unemployment insurance (UI) benefits and quarterly wage data. Data on participation hours in the TANF NEON program and federally defined work activities is collected, audited and reported according to the TANF work verification plan, which is a 35 page document outlining the reporting requirements for TANF performance measures, including how hours of participation reporting and the related internal control mechanisms for accurate reporting assurances. (Page 107)

School to Work Transition

The annual Nevada Student Leadership Transition Summit (NSLTS) is a two–day summit geared toward increasing graduation rates, participants’ exposure to postsecondary options, available resources, and improvement of students’ understanding of the requirements for a successful transition to a world beyond high school. The 2014 NSLTS conference was attended by over 200 people, which included high school students, teachers, transition facilitators, young adult facilitators, young adult panelists, adult facilitators, and conference planners and coordinators. The DSU recently participated in the November 2015 NSLTS. Special education students, teachers, and counselors from 16 school districts across the state of Nevada attended this event to learn about services available to students after graduation from high school and how to become active participants in the transition process. They toured UNR, learned about disability services available on college campuses, were provided opportunities to network with other students with disabilities, and learned about resources they were receiving and what their goals were after high school. Young adult speakers with disabilities reflected upon their transition experiences and shared motivational stories on lessons learned as they moved from high school to adult life. The conference also included the parents of students with disabilities to help educate parents on services available to students in both high school and after high school. The DSU transition counselors presented in a breakout session about services available to students with disabilities and how BVR could assist them with the transition from school to work, or high school to postsecondary education and onto employment. (Page 250)

Data Collection

The state continues to lack a unified system for data collection and sharing, and a common intake system across core partners. There needs to be an improvement in coordination of service delivery across programs and partners, of which a statewide, unified system would address.

  • Shrinking state VR funding since 2008, and the inability to fully match federal sec. 110 Rehabilitation Act grant funds. (Page 45)

8.   The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures (including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, performance accountability measurement and reporting processes, and the incorporation of local input into such design and implementation to improve the coordination of services across one-stop partner programs). (Page 74)

Describe any/all data collection/reporting processes that are used for all programs and activities, including those present in the one-stop centers. 

WIOA Title I: Adult, Dislocated Workers and Youth Programs

WIOA Title III: Wagner-Peyser Act of 1933 Programs

NJCOS, a partner of the America‘s One-Stop Operating System (AOSOS) consortium of states, is a one-stop management information system designed to meet the core business needs of state workforce investment systems. NJCOS allows data to be recorded and shared by state and local partner programs that comprise the Nevada JobConnect system. The system supports both customer self-service and mediated case management services, and contains all necessary components to meet the data-collection needs of all one-stop program partners under WIOA, labor exchange and Trade Adjustment Act (TAA) components to meet reporting requirements. (Page 105)

As the state administrator for Title I and the responsible entity for Titles III and IV of WIOA, DETR aligns its information technologies for the workforce system in Nevada with NDE, DHSS’s DWSS division, the state board, and the two local boards to establish efficient and effective interfaces across core WIOA programs, which include: Wagner-Peyser, unemployment insurance, vocational rehabilitation, youth and adult education and literacy, TANF employment and training. The efforts include integration into a common intake case management and reporting system that will reduce limitations on data collections; result in more complete data; provide partner accessibility to employment, education, training, and client support services information; enable data exchange; coordinate appropriate referrals for services according to customer needs; provide support for reporting responsibilities that are required by state and federal laws; provide evidence-based, data-driven and accountable workforce development data to workforce development stakeholders and policymakers; provide automatic and real-time data calculations; eliminate duplicative data entries; and, increase the state’s ability to successfully implement WIOA. (Page 131)

Describe how the state board will assist the governor in aligning technology and data systems across mandatory one-stop partner programs - including design and implementation of common intake, data collection, etc. - and how such alignment will improve service delivery to individuals, including unemployed individuals. 

A statewide workforce integrated accountability system will facilitate common intake and data collection across core programs and required one-stop partner programs, and will improve program services and reduce manual efforts and inefficiencies to benefit Nevada’s job seekers, employers, trainers, educators, and staff. Through the establishment of a common intake system wherein clients can apply across agencies for services, the Nevada workforce system will increase federal and state compliance and upgrade antiquated technologies through the modernization of the current workforce system. (Page 132)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

If FEMA is not involved in a natural disaster in Nevada Rapid Response team members including an unemployment insurance professional and JobConnect Center staff will either present a group orientation or provide a table at community events for staff to provide needed information where affected workers can come for one on one service. Other agencies and programs that may be typically represented are American Red Cross, Internal Revenue Service, Nevada Attorney General, Nevada State Department of Emergency Management, local law enforcement, Salvation Army, Small Business Administration, Social and Rehabilitation Services and other appropriate local service organizations the Rapid Response Coordinator may contact. One or more of the following may also be included to round out the needed services for a disaster situation: Chamber of Commerce, City Clerk and/or Administrator, City Mayor, Red Cross, Salvation Army and United Way may assist the affected workers and businesses affected by a disaster. Once these contacts are made, the information regarding the services available to assist those who have temporarily lost their jobs due to the disaster will be provided. A temporary office in the area may be set up to provide these services. Affected workers who have lost their jobs due to the disaster may be offered the following additional services: (Page 163)

1.8   Increase access to quality job development services.

1.9   Identify key employers.

1.10   Identify federal employment opportunities.

1.11   Support counselor continuing education training.

1.12   Increase the utilization and promotion of the state of Nevada’s 700–hour certification program list and schedule A.

1.13   Promote peer to peer support networks.

1.14   Develop an outreach plan for small businesses.

1.15   Adopt career planning using an evidence based person centered planning model. (Page 289)

Career Pathways
  • The development and dissemination of curricula, including curricula incorporating the essential components of reading instruction;
  • Developing content and models for integrating education and training and career pathways;
  • The provision of assistance to eligible providers in developing and implementing programs that achieve the objectives of this title and in measuring the progress of those programs in achieving such objectives, including meeting the State adjusted levels of performance; or
  • Other allowable activities that of statewide significance. (Page 230)
    • Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
    • Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
    • Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high–demand/high growth occupations.
    • Update inter-local contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
    • Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
    • Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 284 & 297)

One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

The local boards will utilize strategies developed in tandem with core, required and other partner programs to serve the needs of individuals, including those identified in sec. II(a)(1)(B) of WIOA. Coordination of activities to support the identified strategies will be outlined in the one-stop delivery system MOU and include both sector strategies and the implementation of career pathways.

A customer-centered approach will be at the forefront of each strategy and thorough assessments will be provided so that services can be tailored to the unique needs of the individual, and a holistic plan for employment can be developed that includes the need for supportive services and the identification of resources from entities outside the scope of this state plan. The coordination will be recorded in a common client reporting system. (Page 84)

The design of Nevada’s framework of local youth programs provides for an objective assessment of each youth participant, including a review of the academic and occupational skill levels and service needs, for the purpose of identifying appropriate services and career pathways for participants and informing the individual service strategy. A new assessment of a participant is not required if the state board determines that it is appropriate to use a recent (i.e., within the previous six months) assessment of the participant conducted as part of another education or training program.

IEL/CE programming will provide civics contextual English language acquisition instruction (ELA/Civics) in combination with integrated education and training activities (IET) through career pathways and opportunities provided by partnerships with business and industry and other educational institutions.

IEL/CE program delivery approaches include: 

  • Co-enrolling ELA/Civics students in an existing Integrated Education and Training program.
  • Integrating ELA/Civics instruction within an Integrated Education and Training program. 

Integrated EL/Civics focuses the program’s design and goals on preparing adults for employment in in-demand industries in coordination with local workforce system.

All applicants must include in the program narrative section the plans that lead toward full implementation of required integrated EL/civics activities for PY 2016-2017. Suggestions for integrated EL/civics planning may include identifying high wage/high-demand occupations, training and certificate programs with a high percentage of non-native English speakers in the location/zip code of the program area, and updated curricula and program framework to include contextualized instruction for occupational and employability skills. (Page 217)

Procedures will be developed by the Office of Workforce Innovation. Governor Sandoval issued Executive Order 2016-08 creating the Office of Workforce Innovation within the Office of the Governor. This office will participate in designing the strategy for the use of Governor’s Set-aside funds encapsulated in the following duties detailed in the executive order: 

  • Provide support to the Governor’s Workforce Development Board (’State Board’), industry sector councils, and the Office of the Governor in developing a strategy for the cooperation and collaboration among all stakeholders focused on workforce development;
  • Develop a career pathways strategy for Nevada in the fields of technology, advanced manufacturing, education, and health care; 

The design of Nevada’s framework of local youth programs provides for an objective assessment of each youth participant, including a review of the academic and occupational skill levels and service needs, for the purpose of identifying appropriate services and career pathways for participants and informing the individual service strategy. A new assessment of a participant is not required if the state board determines that it is appropriate to use a recent (i.e., within the previous six months) assessment of the participant conducted as part of another education or training program.

NOTE: For purposes of the literacy and numeracy gain performance measure (in effect until July 1, 2016), the prescribed suggested assessments are CASAS or an equivalent. Local boards must have written policy and procedures directing acceptable assessments and procedures. (Page 178)

Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 324)

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Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities “Position on Employment” - 04/29/2017

~~“Policy Recommendations:• Remove barriers that create disincentives for people with developmental disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment (employment includes supported employment, job training and job coaching) with competitive wages in the community. These barriers may include: transportation, flexible options for on the job supports, and continued or potential health care benefits.• Implement “Employment First” policies that transform the expectations of state agencies, service providers and people with developmental disabilities. Under “Employment First’, the expectation is that a person with a developmental or other disability can and wants to work, and a successful outcome is finding these individuals meaningful and gainful employment that meets their needs and interests by tailoring services to help them succeed in the workforce.• Fully fund the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that are significantly underfunded to meet the employment needs of individuals with severe disabilities who need VR services to obtain employment.” 

Systems
  • Other

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Cooperation, Collaboration, Coordination - 01/08/2016

The DWSS inter-local contract refers welfare recipients to VR programs for completion of vocational testing and assessment. The DSU has been collaborating with other reciprocal agencies in the delivery of service to individuals who need supportive services or assistance in activities of daily living. Working with the ADSD’s Independent Living program, and their recipient of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 funds, allows for greater community involvement and co-sharing of responsibilities and costs. As such, the DSU and the Independent Living program continue to utilize their interlocal agreement to collaboratively case manage and cost-share goods and services that meet a particular need for an individual who is a mutual client of both the Independent Living and VR programs.

 

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. 1 Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada HCBS Transition Plan - 07/09/2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new regulations in early 2014 that define the home and community based settings that will be allowable under HCBS. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS are fully integrated into the community in which they live. These individuals must be offered opportunities to seek employment and engage in community activities in the same manner as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Integrated Employment Research Report - 01/15/2015

The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment is responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training, and employment opportunities for people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (referred to throughout as I/DD), and for providing a report to the Governor... The Taskforce is also responsible for developing a three, five, and ten-year strategic plan (2015-2025) that will result in "creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Nevada Assembly Bill 488: Relating to the Administration of Government Departments - 07/01/2013

"AN ACT relating to governmental administration; consolidating the Health Division and the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department of Health and Human Services into the Division of Public and Behavioral Health of the Department; transferring the powers and duties concerning certain services to children with autism spectrum disorders from the Health Division to the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department; transferring the authority for developmental services in the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services to the Aging and Disability Services Division; … renaming the Commission on Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department the Commission on Behavioral Health; making the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department responsible for services for and other oversight relating to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; making various other changes to provisions relating to the organization of the divisions of the Department; and providing other matters properly relating thereto."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Executive Order - Establishing a Program for the Hiring of People with Disabilities into the State Workforce - 10/08/2013

By the power vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and the laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order that all state agencies made a concerted effort to include persons with disabilities into the "preliminary and final group of    candidates" considered for each appropriate opening within the agency. It orders all state agencies to make the hiring of persons with disabilities a priority, mandating that at least five percent of openings give persons with disabilities priority.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. 1 Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Integrated Employment Research Report - 01/15/2015

The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment is responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training, and employment opportunities for people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (referred to throughout as I/DD), and for providing a report to the Governor... The Taskforce is also responsible for developing a three, five, and ten-year strategic plan (2015-2025) that will result in "creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Vocational Rehabilitation: Employment Supports Job Development/Placement - 07/01/2014

This document provides the fee schedule for job placement and supported employment services for Nevada Vocational Rehabilitation as of July 2014.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Nevada’s Strategic Plan for Integration of Developmental Services and Early Intervention Services into the ADSD - 06/15/2014

The Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) represents Nevadans who are aged or have a disability, regardless of age, and assists the broader community that touches their lives. Through advocacy, counseling and a broad array of supportive services, ADSD strives to create an environment that enables all of the Nevadans they serve to be self-sufficient, independent and safe. In the 2013 Nevada Legislature, Assembly Bill (AB) 488 took integration a step further by transferring Developmental Services (DS) and Nevada Early Intervention Services (NEIS) to ADSD. Formerly DS was housed within Mental Health and Developmental Services (MHDS) and NEIS was housed within the Health Division. (Since then, Health and MHDS have also merged to become the Division of Public and Behavioral Health.) The benefits of integrating the services include a better ability to:

Promote community living for Nevadans with disabilities of all ages (across the lifespan) Create and enhance strategies to ensure the necessary services and supports Provide a responsive and effective service system that acknowledges unique needs Firmly establish no wrong door for services Expand outreach efforts Promote seamless service delivery including transitions across programs to obtain the full spectrum of care and better service coordination for participants with similar needs Improve access to information on community services and supports such as housing, employment, education, social participation, etc. Create a similar comprehensive community provider application and oversight process Strengthen basic infrastructure such as information technology (IT), fiscal and accountability
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Scope of Work Employment Supports Job Development/Placement, Community Based Assessment Site Development and Monitoring, Job Coaching, and Advocacy Services - 06/01/2014

This document describes the Scope of Work for Supported Employment services provided by the Nevada Vocational Rehabilitation Division. The services include, but are not limited to, Job Development/Placement, Community Based Assessment (CBA) Site Development, Community Based Assessment (CBA) Site Monitoring, job coaching, and advocacy.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Changing Nevada’s Employment Landscape Increasing Integrated Employment Outcomes for Nevadans with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities - 05/21/2014

~~“Work is a fundamental part of adult life, and the benefits of integrated employment for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) have been clearly demonstrated. It gives us a sense of purpose; shaping who we are and how we fit into our community. Nevadans with IDD must not be deprived of the opportunity to work within the general workforce and make a meaningful contribution. Individuals in the labor force have a positive financial impact on our economy, generating income that is ultimately returned in the form of tax revenues. There is literature filled with examples of the benefits and Return on Investment (ROI) when individuals with IDD are working and contributing vocationally in their community. Our state is becoming more diverse and Nevadans with IDD should be included in diversifying the workforce. This can be achieved through established supported employment practices. Improving employment outcomes for Nevadans with IDD at the state level requires a holistic approach that communicates a clear message, incorporates policy change, funding, capacity development, interagency partnerships, outcome measurement and service innovation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities: Position Statement on Integrated Employment - 05/21/2014

Work is a fundamental part of adult life, and the benefits of integrated employment for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) have been clearly demonstrated. It gives us a sense of purpose; shaping who we are and how we fit into our community. Nevadans with IDD must not be deprived of the opportunity to work within the general workforce and make a meaningful contribution. Individuals in the labor force have a positive financial impact on our economy, generating income that is ultimately returned in the form of tax revenues. There is literature filled with examples of the benefits and Return on Investment (ROI) when individuals with IDD are working and contributing vocationally in their community. Our state is becoming more diverse and Nevadans with IDD should be included in diversifying the workforce. This can be achieved through established supported employment practices. Improving employment outcomes for Nevadans with IDD at the state level requires a holistic approach that communicates a clear message, incorporates policy change, funding, capacity development, interagency partnerships, outcome measurement and service innovation.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NEVADA GOVERNOR’S COUNCIL ON DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES: Five Year State Plan - 10/01/2011

~~“ The purpose of the Councils, as defined by statute, is to engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family centered, consumer and family directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive, and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.The Councils utilize strategies such as training, educating policy makers and communities, coalition development, barrier elimination, and demonstration of new approaches to service to meet the mandated purpose. These strategies are incorporated into a five-year State Plan that includes, and is based on, a comprehensive review and analysis of services, supports, and other assistance in the State available to individuals with developmental disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Vocational Rehabilitation: Definition of Terms - 07/01/2006

This document provides an extensive list of service definitions for Vocational Rehabilitation in Nevada. It includes definitions for integrated employment, ongoing support services, competitive employment and supported employment, among many others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Section 15 – Vocational Rehabilitation Supported Employment Policy - 06/01/2006

This document outlines Vocational Rehabilitation’s policy on Supported Employment. It includes information on the referral and assessment process, the range of services available and Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Cooperation, Collaboration, Coordination - 01/08/2016

The DWSS inter-local contract refers welfare recipients to VR programs for completion of vocational testing and assessment. The DSU has been collaborating with other reciprocal agencies in the delivery of service to individuals who need supportive services or assistance in activities of daily living. Working with the ADSD’s Independent Living program, and their recipient of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 funds, allows for greater community involvement and co-sharing of responsibilities and costs. As such, the DSU and the Independent Living program continue to utilize their interlocal agreement to collaboratively case manage and cost-share goods and services that meet a particular need for an individual who is a mutual client of both the Independent Living and VR programs.

 

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Nevada

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all

working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. The expectation is that people work!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada State Use Program "Preferred Purchase"

The Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (DETR), Rehabilitation Division manages Nevada’s State Use Program, Preferred Purchase, in support of workers with disabilities who simply want to be productive working citizens. We help individuals accomplish that goal while providing valuable benefits to government agencies that choose to utilize the services offered.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Nevada State Rehabilitation Council

“The mission of the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) is to help ensure that vocational rehabilitation programs (Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation and Bureau of Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired) are consumer oriented, consumer driven, and that the programs' services and resources result in employment outcomes for Nevadans with disabilities….

 The Council may assist you or others in the community in the following ways:  

1.       Help individuals with disabilities obtain services which may help them become employable.

2.       Put employers in contact with individuals with disabilities who may fill their staffing needs.

3.       Receive and relay client experiences about the state or the community vocational rehabilitation programs.

Receive and relay ideas about improving vocational rehabilitation services.

The Council has a minimum of 16 members as required by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended.”  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities “Position on Employment” - 04/29/2017

~~“Policy Recommendations:• Remove barriers that create disincentives for people with developmental disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment (employment includes supported employment, job training and job coaching) with competitive wages in the community. These barriers may include: transportation, flexible options for on the job supports, and continued or potential health care benefits.• Implement “Employment First” policies that transform the expectations of state agencies, service providers and people with developmental disabilities. Under “Employment First’, the expectation is that a person with a developmental or other disability can and wants to work, and a successful outcome is finding these individuals meaningful and gainful employment that meets their needs and interests by tailoring services to help them succeed in the workforce.• Fully fund the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that are significantly underfunded to meet the employment needs of individuals with severe disabilities who need VR services to obtain employment.” 

Systems
  • Other

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home Program - 05/30/2006

Through the Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home program, a new offering from the State of Nevada, eligible participants will be provided with the services, support, and assistance necessary to move back into a community setting, such as an apartment or family home.

In order to help eligible participants with the transition process, the program can pay for goods and services, such as furniture, appliances, moving expenses, and housing deposits. See the SERVICES tab for a full list of program benefits.

MFP also gives most participants the option of self-direction, allowing them to decide where they want to live and who will assist them upon returning to the community.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

"The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Learning Community : Improving Systems and Services for Individuals with IDD

~~The Employment Learning Community (ELC) assists states in improving systems and services to increase inclusive, competitive employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).The ELC has three key components:

• Delphi panel,• Communities of practice,• Technical assistance

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Nevada Ticket to Work

"If you are currently receiving SSI or SSDI benefits, the Ticket to Work program can help you find the job that is right for you, and you can safely explore your work options without losing your benefits until you have stabilized your job and earnings.

You can easily return to benefits if you have to stop working You can continue to receive healthcare benefits You will not receive a medical continuing disability review (CDR) while using your Ticket"
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

"Time to Pick the Fruit- It’s Ripe" Customized Employment: Presentation by the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities - 05/21/2014

This presentation given by the staff at the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities defines Employment First (EF) & Customized Employment (CE), elaborates upon the Nevada Collaborators, describes the philosophy, practices, and descendants of CE, and explains who can be served by the CE Project and what those job seekers can hope to achieve.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

"Customized Employment Project offers community members with disabilities hope" - 09/25/2013

The Customized Employment Project, a partnership between the Nevada Rehabilitation Division at the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), Sierra Regional Center at Developmental Services, and the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), is a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both. It is based on an individualized match between the strengths, conditions and interests of a job candidate and the identified business needs of an employer. Customized employment utilizes an individualized approach to employment planning and job development - one person at a time - one employer at a time.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Comprehensive System of Personnel Development - 02/28/2012

The Rehabilitation Division, as the DSU, has established procedures and activities setting forth the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development[MW1]  (CSPD), which will ensure an adequate supply of qualified Rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals for the operation of the Vocational Rehabilitation programs.

The CSPD is coordinated by the Administrator of the DSU with the participation of: the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC), Human Resources staff of the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), and staff of the Bureaus of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR) and Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired (BSBVI). DETR’s personnel records enable an annual analysis of the numbers and types of Rehabilitation personnel. Through the State of Nevada Personnel Department database, information on budgeted positions, duration of vacancy for each position and vacancy rates are available through a data warehouse system.

In addition, a personnel log is maintained at the agency level, delineating the location, type of position and date vacated in order to provide current tracking of vacancies including the status of each vacant position. This tracking mechanism has proved successful in reducing the vacancy rate and the amount of time that each position is vacant. All the sources of information are used to track and forecast the DSU’s personnel needs.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Emerging Practices from Vocational Rehabilitation

This summary document describes different initiatives and emerging practices in the state of Nevada that aim at improving employment outcomes for people with disabilities. The projects include CRAVE, Customized Employment, Voice, Career Development Academy, and the Pathways to Work.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NV Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation

This website contains information on the Job Development Training Series, “Creating Employment Opportunities.”  The modules in the series include: Introduction to Job Development and the Role of the Job Developer, Getting to Know Your Customer; The Employer as Partner; and Job Placement and Retention Services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

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Nevada HCBS Transition Plan - 07/09/2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new regulations in early 2014 that define the home and community based settings that will be allowable under HCBS. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS are fully integrated into the community in which they live. These individuals must be offered opportunities to seek employment and engage in community activities in the same manner as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NV HCBW for Persons w/ID and Related Conditions (0125.R06.00) - 10/01/2013

Provides day hab, prevocational, residential support, supported employment, behavioral consultation-training & intervention, counseling, career planning, non-medical transportation, nursing, nutrition counseling, residential support management for individuals w/ID ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver - 10/01/2013

The Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver program is authorized in ­1915(c) of the Social Security Act. The program permits a State to furnish an array of home and community-based services that assist Medicaid beneficiaries to live in the community and avoid institutionalization. The State has broad discretion to design its waiver program to address the needs of the waiver­s target population. Waiver services complement and/or supplement the services that are available to participants through the Medicaid.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program

"The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.

As required by the funding authorization, Nevada Medicaid (Division of Health Care Financing and Policy) is the lead agency for the BIP. The BIP team, however, is made up of a large number of cross-functional and cross-agency contributors who have been instrumental in moving the project toward its goals and objectives. Many of the projects and workgroups related to BIP have been collaborations between Nevada's Aging and Disability Services Division and Nevada Medicaid. In addition, many other state agencies and contractors have contributed in important ways."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid and CHIP state plans are agreements between Nevada and the federal government describing how we administer these programs. It gives an assurance that Nevada will abide by federal rules and may claim federal matching funds for program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are under way in the state.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Nevada Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Nevada as of 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

In the Silver State of Nevada, workers with disabilities don't have to take a gamble on their future when it comes to finding career success and employment opportunities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nevada’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
2,890,845
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.72%
Change from
2014 to 2015
203,190
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
83,559
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.56%
Change from
2014 to 2015
41.12%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.63%
Change from
2014 to 2015
74.80%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 2,790,136 2,839,099 2,890,845
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 193,363 201,717 203,190
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 75,828 82,484 83,559
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,115,829 1,149,198 1,172,440
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.22% 40.89% 41.12%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 73.10% 74.33% 74.80%
Overall unemployment rate. 9.50% 7.80% 6.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.40% 19.10% 19.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.30% 14.70% 13.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 172,440 184,719 192,429
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 184,595 190,602 190,951
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 259,345 275,029 278,106
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 31,843 33,642 33,439
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 67,909 70,746 70,092
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,548 5,624 6,754
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 18,567 19,292 22,092
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,615 2,518 2,705
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 11,287 11,325 14,784
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 28,830 27,891 25,500

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,720 1,788 1,979
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.60% 4.60% 4.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 62,983 64,243 65,211

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,950 2,092 1,881
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 10,510 7,703 7,262
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 18,537 13,518 12,649
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.90% 15.50% 14.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 8.70% 8.40% 6.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20% 1.50% 1.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 2.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,202 1,158 813
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 172 201 184
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A 247

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,662 4,338 4,568
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 50 63 161
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 26 46 94
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00% 73.00% 58.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.94 1.65 3.25

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
1,527
1,665
1,649
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 165 154 105
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 172 222 234
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 403 394 383
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 359 436 436
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 282 303 344
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 146 156 147
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 25.30% 36.10% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 1,524 1,754
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 91,626 93,514
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 31 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 26 45 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,708,000 $3,617,000 $3,401,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $8,741,000 $9,182,000 $10,644,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $12,196,000 $13,428,000 $14,632,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $236,000 $250,000 $307,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 21.00% 18.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 28 30 23
Number of people served in facility based work. 918 1,053 1,140
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 754 859 879
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 16.60 15.40 14.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.90% 64.26% 63.83%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.20% 14.21% 14.45%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.60% 1.47% 1.49%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 91.30% 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.01% 21.39% 21.57%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.04% 56.05% 56.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 65.91% 69.77% 69.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.03% 34.66% 34.56%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 811,514
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,144
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 703
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 199,341
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 200,044
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 4
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 336
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,907
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,360,666

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 13 8 10
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 8 10
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 1,178 1,309
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 1,178 1,309

 

WIOA Proflie

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

4.4.2   Operationalize employment first strategies, which include the strategy that employment services should be the first priority option for individuals with disabilities. Employment first is based on the premise that everyone can work.

4.4.3   Incorporate career readiness content into educational curriculum that links to postsecondary education. (Page 68)

  • Nevada transition conference
  • California State University, Northridge (CSUN)/assistive technology conference
  • The CSAVR fall and spring conferences
  • National Council of State Agencies for the Blind
  • Employment and disability forum
  • Program Evaluation and Quality Assurance Summit
  • BLAST (National Association of Blind Merchants and National Federation of the Blind)
  • Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)
  • National Association of Workforce Development Professionals (NAWDP)   (Page 271) 
Customized Employment

Vocational counseling and guidance provided by master’s degree-level rehabilitation counselors with expertise in working with individuals with disabilities to remove barriers to employment.

  • Services provided by VR’s business development team, including: direct recruitment and outreach services to employers regarding hiring individuals with disabilities and disability awareness, and developing recruitment and work readiness programs to meet employers’ hiring needs.
  • Vocational assessments, education and training, skills enhancement training, vocational counseling and guidance, job development and advocacy, transition services for students and youth transitioning to college or careers, customized employment, physical and mental restoration services, and post-employment services that are unique to VR and address the unique needs of individuals with disabilities.(Page 85)

The DSU has long–standing relationships with many workforce system partners, both internal and external, that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals, including youth, with the most significant disabilities. With the implementation of WIOA, new challenges and opportunities are presented to expand the services of supported and customized employment (SE, CE). The collective goal remains to achieve maximum success in assisting individuals with the most significant disabilities into successful integrated employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused on building more effective partnerships and relationships with similar entities throughout the state that support these efforts that expand integrated employment opportunities. (Page 255)

VR Transition Teams statewide are working strategically to develop expanded supported employment services to include customized employment for youth. In this endeavor, VR is working with Opportunity Village, Centers for Independent Living and individual, qualified job development providers to serve this unique and expanding population. VR has taken the lead in providing training for customized employment, including statewide in–service for VR staff and community partners with Denise Bissonette and Abbey Cooper, both nationally recognized supported employment professionals.

The DSU is not currently providing extended services for supported employment youth, as that need is being met statewide through the regional centers, the Division of Public and Behavioral Health and through natural supports. (Page 256)

The DSU and the NDE, Office of Special Education, Elementary and Secondary Education and school improvement programs have an inter-local contract, which contains provisions for the joint training of VR staff and special education personnel. Special education staff members have and will be participating in vocational rehabilitation training on customized employment, job development and placement of individuals with disabilities, and WIOA implications. Special Education staff were also invited to attend two professional presentations in FFY 2015 from Denise Bissonnette (author, trainer, keynote speaker) on career development, job development and workforce development, and from Abby Cooper (renowned leader from SDSU in defining employment practices for individuals with disabilities) on customized employment. (Page 272)

After reviewing the needs assessment and WIOA mandates, the DSU and NSRC focused on the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly the VR service needs of: 

  • Individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment and customized employment;
  • Minorities with disabilities in the Nevada workforce, especially the underserved groups of Hispanic and Asian individuals;
  • Individuals with disabilities that have been underserved, especially those with mental health disabilities;
  • Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system; and,
  • Transition students. (Page 282)

Entities that provide supported employment services, including the Independent Living program within ADSD, which provides customized employment services, a brochure for supported employment services, expanded communication and training services for VR staff and NSRC members and consumers who are eligible for supported employment services, and partners with the Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities to provide supported and customized employment job developer training. (Page 288)

In northern Nevada, the customized/supported employment program continues in collaboration with Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living and Sierra Regional Center (SRC). This initiative strives to serve co–enrolled clients and deliver supported employment services, specifically job carving and person–centered customized employment. Substantial funding was made available and distributed to support this effort. (Page 309)

Braiding/Blending Resources

The DSU works with Nevada’s Medicaid agency (ADSD) to leverage funds for supported employment services by braiding its funding with JDT Medicaid waivers to provide enhanced and expanded services together with agencies that provide JDT Medicaid waiver services, as described below.

The DSU has a contract with the three statewide regional centers, and conducts monthly meetings with staff at these regional centers. The DSU and regional centers collaborate on services for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities who are joint clients. In northern Nevada, the DSU has continued its relationship with High Sierra Industries for its Career Development Academy. In southern Nevada, the DSU developed a contract with Opportunity Village, Inc. for its Pathways to Work program. Both of these programs are with vendors of JDT waiver programs, and both leverage funding toward opportunities for competitive and integrated employment. (Page 260)

The DSU leverages funds for supported employment services by braiding its funding with JDT Medicaid waivers to provide enhanced and expanded services together with agencies that provide JDT Medicaid waiver services. The DSU also partners with the statewide regional centers and Division of Public and Behavioral Health to ensure warm handoffs for extended services. The DSU itself is not currently providing extended services, as that need is being met statewide through the regional centers, the Division of Public and Behavior Health and through natural supports. (Page 288) 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

The state of Nevada provides initial and continuing notices to make all registrants, applicants, and eligible applicants/registrants, applicants for employment, employees, and interested members of the public aware of the recipients’ obligations to operate its programs and activities in a nondiscriminatory manner. The state board has issued specific state compliance policies related to the communication of equal opportunity (EO), with which all grantees must comply. (Page 140)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

To reiterate, the DSU worked with CCSD to formulate a TPCA called JEEP (Job Exploration and Expectation Program), which was implemented in August 2015. There are six designated pilot schools where students participate in work rotations in various departments of the school with the final site being a site within the community. Participants rotate every nine weeks through the sites that they are interested in until they culminate into the community–based assessment experience. Part of this training includes activities under the pre–employment transition services (PETS) category to ensure WIOA compliance. Reflecting back on the initial collaborative efforts with the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disability, the DSU has evolved wherein customized employment is viewed as a standard service that is offered to the most severely disabled consumers. This philosophy is no longer part of a pilot; it is now standard practice with qualified job developers. (Page 252)

Other sources for supported employment services and supports include:

  • Increased supports as defined in WIOA, e.g., VR’s ability to provide long term supports for youth;
  • Social Security Administration work incentives, e.g., Plan for Achieving Self–Support (PASS) and Impairment Related Work Expenses (IRWE);
  • Diversion of jobs and day training/waiver funding for pre–vocational training; and,
  • Natural supports. (Page 255)
Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Education activities provided for WIOA Title I Youth include: tutoring; study skills training; evidence-based dropout prevention; alternative secondary school services and dropout recovery services; financial literacy; and, education offered concurrently with workforce preparation activities and training for specific occupations or occupational clusters. Youth programs also include summer employment opportunities that are directly linked to academic and occupational learning, paid and unpaid work experiences that incorporate academic and occupational education, occupational skills training, and entrepreneurial skills training. (Page 32)

In southern Nevada, VR collaborates with Goodwill of Southern Nevada for their “elite program” serving youth 17–21 by providing identification and work documents, work training programs, interview assistance, transportation, financial literacy and interview clothing. Statewide, Nevada VR collaborates with Child and Family Services within the State’s Health and Human Services Division. VR collaborates on referrals, shared services for assessments, training, employment and restoration. (Page 247)

Benefits
  • Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
  • Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
  • Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high–demand/high growth occupations.
  • Update inter-local contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
  • Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
  • Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 284)

Data is collected and verified though a variety of means and specific to the requirements of each program. Applicants provide information by entering it into the online application AccessNevada system, submitting hardcopy applications and statements, providing third party documentation, and/or providing information directly to a staff member. Some data is collected from third party sources primarily through interfaces, mailed inquiries and documented telephone calls, i.e., NOMADS interfaces directly with the Social Security Administration’s system for information on identity, benefits and disability status, and with DETR’s data systems for information on unemployment insurance (UI) benefits and quarterly wage data. Data on participation hours in the TANF NEON program and federally defined work activities is collected, audited and reported according to the TANF work verification plan, which is a 35 page document outlining the reporting requirements for TANF performance measures, including how hours of participation reporting and the related internal control mechanisms for accurate reporting assurances. (Page 107)

School to Work Transition

The annual Nevada Student Leadership Transition Summit (NSLTS) is a two–day summit geared toward increasing graduation rates, participants’ exposure to postsecondary options, available resources, and improvement of students’ understanding of the requirements for a successful transition to a world beyond high school. The 2014 NSLTS conference was attended by over 200 people, which included high school students, teachers, transition facilitators, young adult facilitators, young adult panelists, adult facilitators, and conference planners and coordinators. The DSU recently participated in the November 2015 NSLTS. Special education students, teachers, and counselors from 16 school districts across the state of Nevada attended this event to learn about services available to students after graduation from high school and how to become active participants in the transition process. They toured UNR, learned about disability services available on college campuses, were provided opportunities to network with other students with disabilities, and learned about resources they were receiving and what their goals were after high school. Young adult speakers with disabilities reflected upon their transition experiences and shared motivational stories on lessons learned as they moved from high school to adult life. The conference also included the parents of students with disabilities to help educate parents on services available to students in both high school and after high school. The DSU transition counselors presented in a breakout session about services available to students with disabilities and how BVR could assist them with the transition from school to work, or high school to postsecondary education and onto employment. (Page 250)

Data Collection

The state continues to lack a unified system for data collection and sharing, and a common intake system across core partners. There needs to be an improvement in coordination of service delivery across programs and partners, of which a statewide, unified system would address.

  • Shrinking state VR funding since 2008, and the inability to fully match federal sec. 110 Rehabilitation Act grant funds. (Page 45)

8.   The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures (including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, performance accountability measurement and reporting processes, and the incorporation of local input into such design and implementation to improve the coordination of services across one-stop partner programs). (Page 74)

Describe any/all data collection/reporting processes that are used for all programs and activities, including those present in the one-stop centers. 

WIOA Title I: Adult, Dislocated Workers and Youth Programs

WIOA Title III: Wagner-Peyser Act of 1933 Programs

NJCOS, a partner of the America‘s One-Stop Operating System (AOSOS) consortium of states, is a one-stop management information system designed to meet the core business needs of state workforce investment systems. NJCOS allows data to be recorded and shared by state and local partner programs that comprise the Nevada JobConnect system. The system supports both customer self-service and mediated case management services, and contains all necessary components to meet the data-collection needs of all one-stop program partners under WIOA, labor exchange and Trade Adjustment Act (TAA) components to meet reporting requirements. (Page 105)

As the state administrator for Title I and the responsible entity for Titles III and IV of WIOA, DETR aligns its information technologies for the workforce system in Nevada with NDE, DHSS’s DWSS division, the state board, and the two local boards to establish efficient and effective interfaces across core WIOA programs, which include: Wagner-Peyser, unemployment insurance, vocational rehabilitation, youth and adult education and literacy, TANF employment and training. The efforts include integration into a common intake case management and reporting system that will reduce limitations on data collections; result in more complete data; provide partner accessibility to employment, education, training, and client support services information; enable data exchange; coordinate appropriate referrals for services according to customer needs; provide support for reporting responsibilities that are required by state and federal laws; provide evidence-based, data-driven and accountable workforce development data to workforce development stakeholders and policymakers; provide automatic and real-time data calculations; eliminate duplicative data entries; and, increase the state’s ability to successfully implement WIOA. (Page 131)

Describe how the state board will assist the governor in aligning technology and data systems across mandatory one-stop partner programs - including design and implementation of common intake, data collection, etc. - and how such alignment will improve service delivery to individuals, including unemployed individuals. 

A statewide workforce integrated accountability system will facilitate common intake and data collection across core programs and required one-stop partner programs, and will improve program services and reduce manual efforts and inefficiencies to benefit Nevada’s job seekers, employers, trainers, educators, and staff. Through the establishment of a common intake system wherein clients can apply across agencies for services, the Nevada workforce system will increase federal and state compliance and upgrade antiquated technologies through the modernization of the current workforce system. (Page 132)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

If FEMA is not involved in a natural disaster in Nevada Rapid Response team members including an unemployment insurance professional and JobConnect Center staff will either present a group orientation or provide a table at community events for staff to provide needed information where affected workers can come for one on one service. Other agencies and programs that may be typically represented are American Red Cross, Internal Revenue Service, Nevada Attorney General, Nevada State Department of Emergency Management, local law enforcement, Salvation Army, Small Business Administration, Social and Rehabilitation Services and other appropriate local service organizations the Rapid Response Coordinator may contact. One or more of the following may also be included to round out the needed services for a disaster situation: Chamber of Commerce, City Clerk and/or Administrator, City Mayor, Red Cross, Salvation Army and United Way may assist the affected workers and businesses affected by a disaster. Once these contacts are made, the information regarding the services available to assist those who have temporarily lost their jobs due to the disaster will be provided. A temporary office in the area may be set up to provide these services. Affected workers who have lost their jobs due to the disaster may be offered the following additional services: (Page 163)

1.8   Increase access to quality job development services.

1.9   Identify key employers.

1.10   Identify federal employment opportunities.

1.11   Support counselor continuing education training.

1.12   Increase the utilization and promotion of the state of Nevada’s 700–hour certification program list and schedule A.

1.13   Promote peer to peer support networks.

1.14   Develop an outreach plan for small businesses.

1.15   Adopt career planning using an evidence based person centered planning model. (Page 289)

Career Pathways
  • The development and dissemination of curricula, including curricula incorporating the essential components of reading instruction;
  • Developing content and models for integrating education and training and career pathways;
  • The provision of assistance to eligible providers in developing and implementing programs that achieve the objectives of this title and in measuring the progress of those programs in achieving such objectives, including meeting the State adjusted levels of performance; or
  • Other allowable activities that of statewide significance. (Page 230)
    • Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
    • Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
    • Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high–demand/high growth occupations.
    • Update inter-local contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
    • Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
    • Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 284 & 297)

One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

The local boards will utilize strategies developed in tandem with core, required and other partner programs to serve the needs of individuals, including those identified in sec. II(a)(1)(B) of WIOA. Coordination of activities to support the identified strategies will be outlined in the one-stop delivery system MOU and include both sector strategies and the implementation of career pathways.

A customer-centered approach will be at the forefront of each strategy and thorough assessments will be provided so that services can be tailored to the unique needs of the individual, and a holistic plan for employment can be developed that includes the need for supportive services and the identification of resources from entities outside the scope of this state plan. The coordination will be recorded in a common client reporting system. (Page 84)

The design of Nevada’s framework of local youth programs provides for an objective assessment of each youth participant, including a review of the academic and occupational skill levels and service needs, for the purpose of identifying appropriate services and career pathways for participants and informing the individual service strategy. A new assessment of a participant is not required if the state board determines that it is appropriate to use a recent (i.e., within the previous six months) assessment of the participant conducted as part of another education or training program.

IEL/CE programming will provide civics contextual English language acquisition instruction (ELA/Civics) in combination with integrated education and training activities (IET) through career pathways and opportunities provided by partnerships with business and industry and other educational institutions.

IEL/CE program delivery approaches include: 

  • Co-enrolling ELA/Civics students in an existing Integrated Education and Training program.
  • Integrating ELA/Civics instruction within an Integrated Education and Training program. 

Integrated EL/Civics focuses the program’s design and goals on preparing adults for employment in in-demand industries in coordination with local workforce system.

All applicants must include in the program narrative section the plans that lead toward full implementation of required integrated EL/civics activities for PY 2016-2017. Suggestions for integrated EL/civics planning may include identifying high wage/high-demand occupations, training and certificate programs with a high percentage of non-native English speakers in the location/zip code of the program area, and updated curricula and program framework to include contextualized instruction for occupational and employability skills. (Page 217)

Procedures will be developed by the Office of Workforce Innovation. Governor Sandoval issued Executive Order 2016-08 creating the Office of Workforce Innovation within the Office of the Governor. This office will participate in designing the strategy for the use of Governor’s Set-aside funds encapsulated in the following duties detailed in the executive order: 

  • Provide support to the Governor’s Workforce Development Board (’State Board’), industry sector councils, and the Office of the Governor in developing a strategy for the cooperation and collaboration among all stakeholders focused on workforce development;
  • Develop a career pathways strategy for Nevada in the fields of technology, advanced manufacturing, education, and health care; 

The design of Nevada’s framework of local youth programs provides for an objective assessment of each youth participant, including a review of the academic and occupational skill levels and service needs, for the purpose of identifying appropriate services and career pathways for participants and informing the individual service strategy. A new assessment of a participant is not required if the state board determines that it is appropriate to use a recent (i.e., within the previous six months) assessment of the participant conducted as part of another education or training program.

NOTE: For purposes of the literacy and numeracy gain performance measure (in effect until July 1, 2016), the prescribed suggested assessments are CASAS or an equivalent. Local boards must have written policy and procedures directing acceptable assessments and procedures. (Page 178)

Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 324)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 41

Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities “Position on Employment” - 04/29/2017

~~“Policy Recommendations:• Remove barriers that create disincentives for people with developmental disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment (employment includes supported employment, job training and job coaching) with competitive wages in the community. These barriers may include: transportation, flexible options for on the job supports, and continued or potential health care benefits.• Implement “Employment First” policies that transform the expectations of state agencies, service providers and people with developmental disabilities. Under “Employment First’, the expectation is that a person with a developmental or other disability can and wants to work, and a successful outcome is finding these individuals meaningful and gainful employment that meets their needs and interests by tailoring services to help them succeed in the workforce.• Fully fund the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that are significantly underfunded to meet the employment needs of individuals with severe disabilities who need VR services to obtain employment.” 

Systems
  • Other

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Cooperation, Collaboration, Coordination - 01/08/2016

The DWSS inter-local contract refers welfare recipients to VR programs for completion of vocational testing and assessment. The DSU has been collaborating with other reciprocal agencies in the delivery of service to individuals who need supportive services or assistance in activities of daily living. Working with the ADSD’s Independent Living program, and their recipient of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 funds, allows for greater community involvement and co-sharing of responsibilities and costs. As such, the DSU and the Independent Living program continue to utilize their interlocal agreement to collaboratively case manage and cost-share goods and services that meet a particular need for an individual who is a mutual client of both the Independent Living and VR programs.

 

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. 1 Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada HCBS Transition Plan - 07/09/2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new regulations in early 2014 that define the home and community based settings that will be allowable under HCBS. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS are fully integrated into the community in which they live. These individuals must be offered opportunities to seek employment and engage in community activities in the same manner as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Integrated Employment Research Report - 01/15/2015

The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment is responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training, and employment opportunities for people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (referred to throughout as I/DD), and for providing a report to the Governor... The Taskforce is also responsible for developing a three, five, and ten-year strategic plan (2015-2025) that will result in "creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Nevada Assembly Bill 488: Relating to the Administration of Government Departments - 07/01/2013

"AN ACT relating to governmental administration; consolidating the Health Division and the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department of Health and Human Services into the Division of Public and Behavioral Health of the Department; transferring the powers and duties concerning certain services to children with autism spectrum disorders from the Health Division to the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department; transferring the authority for developmental services in the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services to the Aging and Disability Services Division; … renaming the Commission on Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department the Commission on Behavioral Health; making the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department responsible for services for and other oversight relating to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; making various other changes to provisions relating to the organization of the divisions of the Department; and providing other matters properly relating thereto."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Executive Order - Establishing a Program for the Hiring of People with Disabilities into the State Workforce - 10/08/2013

By the power vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and the laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order that all state agencies made a concerted effort to include persons with disabilities into the "preliminary and final group of    candidates" considered for each appropriate opening within the agency. It orders all state agencies to make the hiring of persons with disabilities a priority, mandating that at least five percent of openings give persons with disabilities priority.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. 1 Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Integrated Employment Research Report - 01/15/2015

The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment is responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training, and employment opportunities for people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (referred to throughout as I/DD), and for providing a report to the Governor... The Taskforce is also responsible for developing a three, five, and ten-year strategic plan (2015-2025) that will result in "creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Vocational Rehabilitation: Employment Supports Job Development/Placement - 07/01/2014

This document provides the fee schedule for job placement and supported employment services for Nevada Vocational Rehabilitation as of July 2014.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Nevada’s Strategic Plan for Integration of Developmental Services and Early Intervention Services into the ADSD - 06/15/2014

The Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) represents Nevadans who are aged or have a disability, regardless of age, and assists the broader community that touches their lives. Through advocacy, counseling and a broad array of supportive services, ADSD strives to create an environment that enables all of the Nevadans they serve to be self-sufficient, independent and safe. In the 2013 Nevada Legislature, Assembly Bill (AB) 488 took integration a step further by transferring Developmental Services (DS) and Nevada Early Intervention Services (NEIS) to ADSD. Formerly DS was housed within Mental Health and Developmental Services (MHDS) and NEIS was housed within the Health Division. (Since then, Health and MHDS have also merged to become the Division of Public and Behavioral Health.) The benefits of integrating the services include a better ability to:

Promote community living for Nevadans with disabilities of all ages (across the lifespan) Create and enhance strategies to ensure the necessary services and supports Provide a responsive and effective service system that acknowledges unique needs Firmly establish no wrong door for services Expand outreach efforts Promote seamless service delivery including transitions across programs to obtain the full spectrum of care and better service coordination for participants with similar needs Improve access to information on community services and supports such as housing, employment, education, social participation, etc. Create a similar comprehensive community provider application and oversight process Strengthen basic infrastructure such as information technology (IT), fiscal and accountability
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Scope of Work Employment Supports Job Development/Placement, Community Based Assessment Site Development and Monitoring, Job Coaching, and Advocacy Services - 06/01/2014

This document describes the Scope of Work for Supported Employment services provided by the Nevada Vocational Rehabilitation Division. The services include, but are not limited to, Job Development/Placement, Community Based Assessment (CBA) Site Development, Community Based Assessment (CBA) Site Monitoring, job coaching, and advocacy.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Changing Nevada’s Employment Landscape Increasing Integrated Employment Outcomes for Nevadans with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities - 05/21/2014

~~“Work is a fundamental part of adult life, and the benefits of integrated employment for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) have been clearly demonstrated. It gives us a sense of purpose; shaping who we are and how we fit into our community. Nevadans with IDD must not be deprived of the opportunity to work within the general workforce and make a meaningful contribution. Individuals in the labor force have a positive financial impact on our economy, generating income that is ultimately returned in the form of tax revenues. There is literature filled with examples of the benefits and Return on Investment (ROI) when individuals with IDD are working and contributing vocationally in their community. Our state is becoming more diverse and Nevadans with IDD should be included in diversifying the workforce. This can be achieved through established supported employment practices. Improving employment outcomes for Nevadans with IDD at the state level requires a holistic approach that communicates a clear message, incorporates policy change, funding, capacity development, interagency partnerships, outcome measurement and service innovation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities: Position Statement on Integrated Employment - 05/21/2014

Work is a fundamental part of adult life, and the benefits of integrated employment for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) have been clearly demonstrated. It gives us a sense of purpose; shaping who we are and how we fit into our community. Nevadans with IDD must not be deprived of the opportunity to work within the general workforce and make a meaningful contribution. Individuals in the labor force have a positive financial impact on our economy, generating income that is ultimately returned in the form of tax revenues. There is literature filled with examples of the benefits and Return on Investment (ROI) when individuals with IDD are working and contributing vocationally in their community. Our state is becoming more diverse and Nevadans with IDD should be included in diversifying the workforce. This can be achieved through established supported employment practices. Improving employment outcomes for Nevadans with IDD at the state level requires a holistic approach that communicates a clear message, incorporates policy change, funding, capacity development, interagency partnerships, outcome measurement and service innovation.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NEVADA GOVERNOR’S COUNCIL ON DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES: Five Year State Plan - 10/01/2011

~~“ The purpose of the Councils, as defined by statute, is to engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family centered, consumer and family directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive, and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.The Councils utilize strategies such as training, educating policy makers and communities, coalition development, barrier elimination, and demonstration of new approaches to service to meet the mandated purpose. These strategies are incorporated into a five-year State Plan that includes, and is based on, a comprehensive review and analysis of services, supports, and other assistance in the State available to individuals with developmental disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Vocational Rehabilitation: Definition of Terms - 07/01/2006

This document provides an extensive list of service definitions for Vocational Rehabilitation in Nevada. It includes definitions for integrated employment, ongoing support services, competitive employment and supported employment, among many others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Section 15 – Vocational Rehabilitation Supported Employment Policy - 06/01/2006

This document outlines Vocational Rehabilitation’s policy on Supported Employment. It includes information on the referral and assessment process, the range of services available and Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Cooperation, Collaboration, Coordination - 01/08/2016

The DWSS inter-local contract refers welfare recipients to VR programs for completion of vocational testing and assessment. The DSU has been collaborating with other reciprocal agencies in the delivery of service to individuals who need supportive services or assistance in activities of daily living. Working with the ADSD’s Independent Living program, and their recipient of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 funds, allows for greater community involvement and co-sharing of responsibilities and costs. As such, the DSU and the Independent Living program continue to utilize their interlocal agreement to collaboratively case manage and cost-share goods and services that meet a particular need for an individual who is a mutual client of both the Independent Living and VR programs.

 

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Nevada

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all

working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. The expectation is that people work!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada State Use Program "Preferred Purchase"

The Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (DETR), Rehabilitation Division manages Nevada’s State Use Program, Preferred Purchase, in support of workers with disabilities who simply want to be productive working citizens. We help individuals accomplish that goal while providing valuable benefits to government agencies that choose to utilize the services offered.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Nevada State Rehabilitation Council

“The mission of the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) is to help ensure that vocational rehabilitation programs (Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation and Bureau of Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired) are consumer oriented, consumer driven, and that the programs' services and resources result in employment outcomes for Nevadans with disabilities….

 The Council may assist you or others in the community in the following ways:  

1.       Help individuals with disabilities obtain services which may help them become employable.

2.       Put employers in contact with individuals with disabilities who may fill their staffing needs.

3.       Receive and relay client experiences about the state or the community vocational rehabilitation programs.

Receive and relay ideas about improving vocational rehabilitation services.

The Council has a minimum of 16 members as required by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended.”  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities “Position on Employment” - 04/29/2017

~~“Policy Recommendations:• Remove barriers that create disincentives for people with developmental disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment (employment includes supported employment, job training and job coaching) with competitive wages in the community. These barriers may include: transportation, flexible options for on the job supports, and continued or potential health care benefits.• Implement “Employment First” policies that transform the expectations of state agencies, service providers and people with developmental disabilities. Under “Employment First’, the expectation is that a person with a developmental or other disability can and wants to work, and a successful outcome is finding these individuals meaningful and gainful employment that meets their needs and interests by tailoring services to help them succeed in the workforce.• Fully fund the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that are significantly underfunded to meet the employment needs of individuals with severe disabilities who need VR services to obtain employment.” 

Systems
  • Other

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home Program - 05/30/2006

Through the Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home program, a new offering from the State of Nevada, eligible participants will be provided with the services, support, and assistance necessary to move back into a community setting, such as an apartment or family home.

In order to help eligible participants with the transition process, the program can pay for goods and services, such as furniture, appliances, moving expenses, and housing deposits. See the SERVICES tab for a full list of program benefits.

MFP also gives most participants the option of self-direction, allowing them to decide where they want to live and who will assist them upon returning to the community.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

"The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Learning Community : Improving Systems and Services for Individuals with IDD

~~The Employment Learning Community (ELC) assists states in improving systems and services to increase inclusive, competitive employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).The ELC has three key components:

• Delphi panel,• Communities of practice,• Technical assistance

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Nevada Ticket to Work

"If you are currently receiving SSI or SSDI benefits, the Ticket to Work program can help you find the job that is right for you, and you can safely explore your work options without losing your benefits until you have stabilized your job and earnings.

You can easily return to benefits if you have to stop working You can continue to receive healthcare benefits You will not receive a medical continuing disability review (CDR) while using your Ticket"
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

"Time to Pick the Fruit- It’s Ripe" Customized Employment: Presentation by the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities - 05/21/2014

This presentation given by the staff at the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities defines Employment First (EF) & Customized Employment (CE), elaborates upon the Nevada Collaborators, describes the philosophy, practices, and descendants of CE, and explains who can be served by the CE Project and what those job seekers can hope to achieve.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

"Customized Employment Project offers community members with disabilities hope" - 09/25/2013

The Customized Employment Project, a partnership between the Nevada Rehabilitation Division at the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), Sierra Regional Center at Developmental Services, and the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), is a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both. It is based on an individualized match between the strengths, conditions and interests of a job candidate and the identified business needs of an employer. Customized employment utilizes an individualized approach to employment planning and job development - one person at a time - one employer at a time.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Comprehensive System of Personnel Development - 02/28/2012

The Rehabilitation Division, as the DSU, has established procedures and activities setting forth the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development[MW1]  (CSPD), which will ensure an adequate supply of qualified Rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals for the operation of the Vocational Rehabilitation programs.

The CSPD is coordinated by the Administrator of the DSU with the participation of: the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC), Human Resources staff of the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), and staff of the Bureaus of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR) and Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired (BSBVI). DETR’s personnel records enable an annual analysis of the numbers and types of Rehabilitation personnel. Through the State of Nevada Personnel Department database, information on budgeted positions, duration of vacancy for each position and vacancy rates are available through a data warehouse system.

In addition, a personnel log is maintained at the agency level, delineating the location, type of position and date vacated in order to provide current tracking of vacancies including the status of each vacant position. This tracking mechanism has proved successful in reducing the vacancy rate and the amount of time that each position is vacant. All the sources of information are used to track and forecast the DSU’s personnel needs.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Emerging Practices from Vocational Rehabilitation

This summary document describes different initiatives and emerging practices in the state of Nevada that aim at improving employment outcomes for people with disabilities. The projects include CRAVE, Customized Employment, Voice, Career Development Academy, and the Pathways to Work.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NV Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation

This website contains information on the Job Development Training Series, “Creating Employment Opportunities.”  The modules in the series include: Introduction to Job Development and the Role of the Job Developer, Getting to Know Your Customer; The Employer as Partner; and Job Placement and Retention Services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Nevada HCBS Transition Plan - 07/09/2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new regulations in early 2014 that define the home and community based settings that will be allowable under HCBS. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS are fully integrated into the community in which they live. These individuals must be offered opportunities to seek employment and engage in community activities in the same manner as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NV HCBW for Persons w/ID and Related Conditions (0125.R06.00) - 10/01/2013

Provides day hab, prevocational, residential support, supported employment, behavioral consultation-training & intervention, counseling, career planning, non-medical transportation, nursing, nutrition counseling, residential support management for individuals w/ID ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver - 10/01/2013

The Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver program is authorized in ­1915(c) of the Social Security Act. The program permits a State to furnish an array of home and community-based services that assist Medicaid beneficiaries to live in the community and avoid institutionalization. The State has broad discretion to design its waiver program to address the needs of the waiver­s target population. Waiver services complement and/or supplement the services that are available to participants through the Medicaid.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program

"The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.

As required by the funding authorization, Nevada Medicaid (Division of Health Care Financing and Policy) is the lead agency for the BIP. The BIP team, however, is made up of a large number of cross-functional and cross-agency contributors who have been instrumental in moving the project toward its goals and objectives. Many of the projects and workgroups related to BIP have been collaborations between Nevada's Aging and Disability Services Division and Nevada Medicaid. In addition, many other state agencies and contractors have contributed in important ways."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid and CHIP state plans are agreements between Nevada and the federal government describing how we administer these programs. It gives an assurance that Nevada will abide by federal rules and may claim federal matching funds for program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are under way in the state.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Nevada Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Nevada as of 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

In the Silver State of Nevada, workers with disabilities don't have to take a gamble on their future when it comes to finding career success and employment opportunities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nevada’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
2,890,845
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.72%
Change from
2014 to 2015
203,190
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
83,559
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.56%
Change from
2014 to 2015
41.12%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.63%
Change from
2014 to 2015
74.80%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 2,790,136 2,839,099 2,890,845
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 193,363 201,717 203,190
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 75,828 82,484 83,559
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,115,829 1,149,198 1,172,440
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.22% 40.89% 41.12%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 73.10% 74.33% 74.80%
Overall unemployment rate. 9.50% 7.80% 6.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.40% 19.10% 19.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.30% 14.70% 13.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 172,440 184,719 192,429
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 184,595 190,602 190,951
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 259,345 275,029 278,106
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 31,843 33,642 33,439
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 67,909 70,746 70,092
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,548 5,624 6,754
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 18,567 19,292 22,092
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,615 2,518 2,705
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 11,287 11,325 14,784
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 28,830 27,891 25,500

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,720 1,788 1,979
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.60% 4.60% 4.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 62,983 64,243 65,211

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,950 2,092 1,881
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 10,510 7,703 7,262
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 18,537 13,518 12,649
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.90% 15.50% 14.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 8.70% 8.40% 6.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20% 1.50% 1.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 2.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,202 1,158 813
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 172 201 184
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A 247

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,662 4,338 4,568
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 50 63 161
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 26 46 94
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 52.00% 73.00% 58.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.94 1.65 3.25

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
1,527
1,665
1,649
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 165 154 105
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 172 222 234
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 403 394 383
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 359 436 436
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 282 303 344
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 146 156 147
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 25.30% 36.10% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 1,524 1,754
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 91,626 93,514
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 31 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 26 45 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,708,000 $3,617,000 $3,401,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $8,741,000 $9,182,000 $10,644,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $12,196,000 $13,428,000 $14,632,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $236,000 $250,000 $307,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 21.00% 18.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 28 30 23
Number of people served in facility based work. 918 1,053 1,140
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 754 859 879
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 16.60 15.40 14.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.90% 64.26% 63.83%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.20% 14.21% 14.45%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.60% 1.47% 1.49%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 91.30% 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.01% 21.39% 21.57%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.04% 56.05% 56.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 65.91% 69.77% 69.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.03% 34.66% 34.56%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 811,514
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,144
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 703
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 199,341
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 200,044
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 4
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 336
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,907
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,360,666

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 13 8 10
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 8 10
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 1,178 1,309
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 1,178 1,309

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

4.4.2   Operationalize employment first strategies, which include the strategy that employment services should be the first priority option for individuals with disabilities. Employment first is based on the premise that everyone can work.

4.4.3   Incorporate career readiness content into educational curriculum that links to postsecondary education. (Page 68)

  • Nevada transition conference
  • California State University, Northridge (CSUN)/assistive technology conference
  • The CSAVR fall and spring conferences
  • National Council of State Agencies for the Blind
  • Employment and disability forum
  • Program Evaluation and Quality Assurance Summit
  • BLAST (National Association of Blind Merchants and National Federation of the Blind)
  • Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)
  • National Association of Workforce Development Professionals (NAWDP)   (Page 271) 
Customized Employment

Vocational counseling and guidance provided by master’s degree-level rehabilitation counselors with expertise in working with individuals with disabilities to remove barriers to employment.

  • Services provided by VR’s business development team, including: direct recruitment and outreach services to employers regarding hiring individuals with disabilities and disability awareness, and developing recruitment and work readiness programs to meet employers’ hiring needs.
  • Vocational assessments, education and training, skills enhancement training, vocational counseling and guidance, job development and advocacy, transition services for students and youth transitioning to college or careers, customized employment, physical and mental restoration services, and post-employment services that are unique to VR and address the unique needs of individuals with disabilities.(Page 85)

The DSU has long–standing relationships with many workforce system partners, both internal and external, that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals, including youth, with the most significant disabilities. With the implementation of WIOA, new challenges and opportunities are presented to expand the services of supported and customized employment (SE, CE). The collective goal remains to achieve maximum success in assisting individuals with the most significant disabilities into successful integrated employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused on building more effective partnerships and relationships with similar entities throughout the state that support these efforts that expand integrated employment opportunities. (Page 255)

VR Transition Teams statewide are working strategically to develop expanded supported employment services to include customized employment for youth. In this endeavor, VR is working with Opportunity Village, Centers for Independent Living and individual, qualified job development providers to serve this unique and expanding population. VR has taken the lead in providing training for customized employment, including statewide in–service for VR staff and community partners with Denise Bissonette and Abbey Cooper, both nationally recognized supported employment professionals.

The DSU is not currently providing extended services for supported employment youth, as that need is being met statewide through the regional centers, the Division of Public and Behavioral Health and through natural supports. (Page 256)

The DSU and the NDE, Office of Special Education, Elementary and Secondary Education and school improvement programs have an inter-local contract, which contains provisions for the joint training of VR staff and special education personnel. Special education staff members have and will be participating in vocational rehabilitation training on customized employment, job development and placement of individuals with disabilities, and WIOA implications. Special Education staff were also invited to attend two professional presentations in FFY 2015 from Denise Bissonnette (author, trainer, keynote speaker) on career development, job development and workforce development, and from Abby Cooper (renowned leader from SDSU in defining employment practices for individuals with disabilities) on customized employment. (Page 272)

After reviewing the needs assessment and WIOA mandates, the DSU and NSRC focused on the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly the VR service needs of: 

  • Individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment and customized employment;
  • Minorities with disabilities in the Nevada workforce, especially the underserved groups of Hispanic and Asian individuals;
  • Individuals with disabilities that have been underserved, especially those with mental health disabilities;
  • Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system; and,
  • Transition students. (Page 282)

Entities that provide supported employment services, including the Independent Living program within ADSD, which provides customized employment services, a brochure for supported employment services, expanded communication and training services for VR staff and NSRC members and consumers who are eligible for supported employment services, and partners with the Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities to provide supported and customized employment job developer training. (Page 288)

In northern Nevada, the customized/supported employment program continues in collaboration with Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living and Sierra Regional Center (SRC). This initiative strives to serve co–enrolled clients and deliver supported employment services, specifically job carving and person–centered customized employment. Substantial funding was made available and distributed to support this effort. (Page 309)

Braiding/Blending Resources

The DSU works with Nevada’s Medicaid agency (ADSD) to leverage funds for supported employment services by braiding its funding with JDT Medicaid waivers to provide enhanced and expanded services together with agencies that provide JDT Medicaid waiver services, as described below.

The DSU has a contract with the three statewide regional centers, and conducts monthly meetings with staff at these regional centers. The DSU and regional centers collaborate on services for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities who are joint clients. In northern Nevada, the DSU has continued its relationship with High Sierra Industries for its Career Development Academy. In southern Nevada, the DSU developed a contract with Opportunity Village, Inc. for its Pathways to Work program. Both of these programs are with vendors of JDT waiver programs, and both leverage funding toward opportunities for competitive and integrated employment. (Page 260)

The DSU leverages funds for supported employment services by braiding its funding with JDT Medicaid waivers to provide enhanced and expanded services together with agencies that provide JDT Medicaid waiver services. The DSU also partners with the statewide regional centers and Division of Public and Behavioral Health to ensure warm handoffs for extended services. The DSU itself is not currently providing extended services, as that need is being met statewide through the regional centers, the Division of Public and Behavior Health and through natural supports. (Page 288) 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

The state of Nevada provides initial and continuing notices to make all registrants, applicants, and eligible applicants/registrants, applicants for employment, employees, and interested members of the public aware of the recipients’ obligations to operate its programs and activities in a nondiscriminatory manner. The state board has issued specific state compliance policies related to the communication of equal opportunity (EO), with which all grantees must comply. (Page 140)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

To reiterate, the DSU worked with CCSD to formulate a TPCA called JEEP (Job Exploration and Expectation Program), which was implemented in August 2015. There are six designated pilot schools where students participate in work rotations in various departments of the school with the final site being a site within the community. Participants rotate every nine weeks through the sites that they are interested in until they culminate into the community–based assessment experience. Part of this training includes activities under the pre–employment transition services (PETS) category to ensure WIOA compliance. Reflecting back on the initial collaborative efforts with the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disability, the DSU has evolved wherein customized employment is viewed as a standard service that is offered to the most severely disabled consumers. This philosophy is no longer part of a pilot; it is now standard practice with qualified job developers. (Page 252)

Other sources for supported employment services and supports include:

  • Increased supports as defined in WIOA, e.g., VR’s ability to provide long term supports for youth;
  • Social Security Administration work incentives, e.g., Plan for Achieving Self–Support (PASS) and Impairment Related Work Expenses (IRWE);
  • Diversion of jobs and day training/waiver funding for pre–vocational training; and,
  • Natural supports. (Page 255)
Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Education activities provided for WIOA Title I Youth include: tutoring; study skills training; evidence-based dropout prevention; alternative secondary school services and dropout recovery services; financial literacy; and, education offered concurrently with workforce preparation activities and training for specific occupations or occupational clusters. Youth programs also include summer employment opportunities that are directly linked to academic and occupational learning, paid and unpaid work experiences that incorporate academic and occupational education, occupational skills training, and entrepreneurial skills training. (Page 32)

In southern Nevada, VR collaborates with Goodwill of Southern Nevada for their “elite program” serving youth 17–21 by providing identification and work documents, work training programs, interview assistance, transportation, financial literacy and interview clothing. Statewide, Nevada VR collaborates with Child and Family Services within the State’s Health and Human Services Division. VR collaborates on referrals, shared services for assessments, training, employment and restoration. (Page 247)

Benefits
  • Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
  • Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
  • Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high–demand/high growth occupations.
  • Update inter-local contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
  • Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
  • Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 284)

Data is collected and verified though a variety of means and specific to the requirements of each program. Applicants provide information by entering it into the online application AccessNevada system, submitting hardcopy applications and statements, providing third party documentation, and/or providing information directly to a staff member. Some data is collected from third party sources primarily through interfaces, mailed inquiries and documented telephone calls, i.e., NOMADS interfaces directly with the Social Security Administration’s system for information on identity, benefits and disability status, and with DETR’s data systems for information on unemployment insurance (UI) benefits and quarterly wage data. Data on participation hours in the TANF NEON program and federally defined work activities is collected, audited and reported according to the TANF work verification plan, which is a 35 page document outlining the reporting requirements for TANF performance measures, including how hours of participation reporting and the related internal control mechanisms for accurate reporting assurances. (Page 107)

School to Work Transition

The annual Nevada Student Leadership Transition Summit (NSLTS) is a two–day summit geared toward increasing graduation rates, participants’ exposure to postsecondary options, available resources, and improvement of students’ understanding of the requirements for a successful transition to a world beyond high school. The 2014 NSLTS conference was attended by over 200 people, which included high school students, teachers, transition facilitators, young adult facilitators, young adult panelists, adult facilitators, and conference planners and coordinators. The DSU recently participated in the November 2015 NSLTS. Special education students, teachers, and counselors from 16 school districts across the state of Nevada attended this event to learn about services available to students after graduation from high school and how to become active participants in the transition process. They toured UNR, learned about disability services available on college campuses, were provided opportunities to network with other students with disabilities, and learned about resources they were receiving and what their goals were after high school. Young adult speakers with disabilities reflected upon their transition experiences and shared motivational stories on lessons learned as they moved from high school to adult life. The conference also included the parents of students with disabilities to help educate parents on services available to students in both high school and after high school. The DSU transition counselors presented in a breakout session about services available to students with disabilities and how BVR could assist them with the transition from school to work, or high school to postsecondary education and onto employment. (Page 250)

Data Collection

The state continues to lack a unified system for data collection and sharing, and a common intake system across core partners. There needs to be an improvement in coordination of service delivery across programs and partners, of which a statewide, unified system would address.

  • Shrinking state VR funding since 2008, and the inability to fully match federal sec. 110 Rehabilitation Act grant funds. (Page 45)

8.   The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures (including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, performance accountability measurement and reporting processes, and the incorporation of local input into such design and implementation to improve the coordination of services across one-stop partner programs). (Page 74)

Describe any/all data collection/reporting processes that are used for all programs and activities, including those present in the one-stop centers. 

WIOA Title I: Adult, Dislocated Workers and Youth Programs

WIOA Title III: Wagner-Peyser Act of 1933 Programs

NJCOS, a partner of the America‘s One-Stop Operating System (AOSOS) consortium of states, is a one-stop management information system designed to meet the core business needs of state workforce investment systems. NJCOS allows data to be recorded and shared by state and local partner programs that comprise the Nevada JobConnect system. The system supports both customer self-service and mediated case management services, and contains all necessary components to meet the data-collection needs of all one-stop program partners under WIOA, labor exchange and Trade Adjustment Act (TAA) components to meet reporting requirements. (Page 105)

As the state administrator for Title I and the responsible entity for Titles III and IV of WIOA, DETR aligns its information technologies for the workforce system in Nevada with NDE, DHSS’s DWSS division, the state board, and the two local boards to establish efficient and effective interfaces across core WIOA programs, which include: Wagner-Peyser, unemployment insurance, vocational rehabilitation, youth and adult education and literacy, TANF employment and training. The efforts include integration into a common intake case management and reporting system that will reduce limitations on data collections; result in more complete data; provide partner accessibility to employment, education, training, and client support services information; enable data exchange; coordinate appropriate referrals for services according to customer needs; provide support for reporting responsibilities that are required by state and federal laws; provide evidence-based, data-driven and accountable workforce development data to workforce development stakeholders and policymakers; provide automatic and real-time data calculations; eliminate duplicative data entries; and, increase the state’s ability to successfully implement WIOA. (Page 131)

Describe how the state board will assist the governor in aligning technology and data systems across mandatory one-stop partner programs - including design and implementation of common intake, data collection, etc. - and how such alignment will improve service delivery to individuals, including unemployed individuals. 

A statewide workforce integrated accountability system will facilitate common intake and data collection across core programs and required one-stop partner programs, and will improve program services and reduce manual efforts and inefficiencies to benefit Nevada’s job seekers, employers, trainers, educators, and staff. Through the establishment of a common intake system wherein clients can apply across agencies for services, the Nevada workforce system will increase federal and state compliance and upgrade antiquated technologies through the modernization of the current workforce system. (Page 132)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

If FEMA is not involved in a natural disaster in Nevada Rapid Response team members including an unemployment insurance professional and JobConnect Center staff will either present a group orientation or provide a table at community events for staff to provide needed information where affected workers can come for one on one service. Other agencies and programs that may be typically represented are American Red Cross, Internal Revenue Service, Nevada Attorney General, Nevada State Department of Emergency Management, local law enforcement, Salvation Army, Small Business Administration, Social and Rehabilitation Services and other appropriate local service organizations the Rapid Response Coordinator may contact. One or more of the following may also be included to round out the needed services for a disaster situation: Chamber of Commerce, City Clerk and/or Administrator, City Mayor, Red Cross, Salvation Army and United Way may assist the affected workers and businesses affected by a disaster. Once these contacts are made, the information regarding the services available to assist those who have temporarily lost their jobs due to the disaster will be provided. A temporary office in the area may be set up to provide these services. Affected workers who have lost their jobs due to the disaster may be offered the following additional services: (Page 163)

1.8   Increase access to quality job development services.

1.9   Identify key employers.

1.10   Identify federal employment opportunities.

1.11   Support counselor continuing education training.

1.12   Increase the utilization and promotion of the state of Nevada’s 700–hour certification program list and schedule A.

1.13   Promote peer to peer support networks.

1.14   Develop an outreach plan for small businesses.

1.15   Adopt career planning using an evidence based person centered planning model. (Page 289)

Career Pathways
  • The development and dissemination of curricula, including curricula incorporating the essential components of reading instruction;
  • Developing content and models for integrating education and training and career pathways;
  • The provision of assistance to eligible providers in developing and implementing programs that achieve the objectives of this title and in measuring the progress of those programs in achieving such objectives, including meeting the State adjusted levels of performance; or
  • Other allowable activities that of statewide significance. (Page 230)
    • Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
    • Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
    • Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high–demand/high growth occupations.
    • Update inter-local contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
    • Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
    • Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 284 & 297)

One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

The local boards will utilize strategies developed in tandem with core, required and other partner programs to serve the needs of individuals, including those identified in sec. II(a)(1)(B) of WIOA. Coordination of activities to support the identified strategies will be outlined in the one-stop delivery system MOU and include both sector strategies and the implementation of career pathways.

A customer-centered approach will be at the forefront of each strategy and thorough assessments will be provided so that services can be tailored to the unique needs of the individual, and a holistic plan for employment can be developed that includes the need for supportive services and the identification of resources from entities outside the scope of this state plan. The coordination will be recorded in a common client reporting system. (Page 84)

The design of Nevada’s framework of local youth programs provides for an objective assessment of each youth participant, including a review of the academic and occupational skill levels and service needs, for the purpose of identifying appropriate services and career pathways for participants and informing the individual service strategy. A new assessment of a participant is not required if the state board determines that it is appropriate to use a recent (i.e., within the previous six months) assessment of the participant conducted as part of another education or training program.

IEL/CE programming will provide civics contextual English language acquisition instruction (ELA/Civics) in combination with integrated education and training activities (IET) through career pathways and opportunities provided by partnerships with business and industry and other educational institutions.

IEL/CE program delivery approaches include: 

  • Co-enrolling ELA/Civics students in an existing Integrated Education and Training program.
  • Integrating ELA/Civics instruction within an Integrated Education and Training program. 

Integrated EL/Civics focuses the program’s design and goals on preparing adults for employment in in-demand industries in coordination with local workforce system.

All applicants must include in the program narrative section the plans that lead toward full implementation of required integrated EL/civics activities for PY 2016-2017. Suggestions for integrated EL/civics planning may include identifying high wage/high-demand occupations, training and certificate programs with a high percentage of non-native English speakers in the location/zip code of the program area, and updated curricula and program framework to include contextualized instruction for occupational and employability skills. (Page 217)

Procedures will be developed by the Office of Workforce Innovation. Governor Sandoval issued Executive Order 2016-08 creating the Office of Workforce Innovation within the Office of the Governor. This office will participate in designing the strategy for the use of Governor’s Set-aside funds encapsulated in the following duties detailed in the executive order: 

  • Provide support to the Governor’s Workforce Development Board (’State Board’), industry sector councils, and the Office of the Governor in developing a strategy for the cooperation and collaboration among all stakeholders focused on workforce development;
  • Develop a career pathways strategy for Nevada in the fields of technology, advanced manufacturing, education, and health care; 

The design of Nevada’s framework of local youth programs provides for an objective assessment of each youth participant, including a review of the academic and occupational skill levels and service needs, for the purpose of identifying appropriate services and career pathways for participants and informing the individual service strategy. A new assessment of a participant is not required if the state board determines that it is appropriate to use a recent (i.e., within the previous six months) assessment of the participant conducted as part of another education or training program.

NOTE: For purposes of the literacy and numeracy gain performance measure (in effect until July 1, 2016), the prescribed suggested assessments are CASAS or an equivalent. Local boards must have written policy and procedures directing acceptable assessments and procedures. (Page 178)

Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 324)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 41

Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities “Position on Employment” - 04/29/2017

~~“Policy Recommendations:• Remove barriers that create disincentives for people with developmental disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment (employment includes supported employment, job training and job coaching) with competitive wages in the community. These barriers may include: transportation, flexible options for on the job supports, and continued or potential health care benefits.• Implement “Employment First” policies that transform the expectations of state agencies, service providers and people with developmental disabilities. Under “Employment First’, the expectation is that a person with a developmental or other disability can and wants to work, and a successful outcome is finding these individuals meaningful and gainful employment that meets their needs and interests by tailoring services to help them succeed in the workforce.• Fully fund the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that are significantly underfunded to meet the employment needs of individuals with severe disabilities who need VR services to obtain employment.” 

Systems
  • Other

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Cooperation, Collaboration, Coordination - 01/08/2016

The DWSS inter-local contract refers welfare recipients to VR programs for completion of vocational testing and assessment. The DSU has been collaborating with other reciprocal agencies in the delivery of service to individuals who need supportive services or assistance in activities of daily living. Working with the ADSD’s Independent Living program, and their recipient of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 funds, allows for greater community involvement and co-sharing of responsibilities and costs. As such, the DSU and the Independent Living program continue to utilize their interlocal agreement to collaboratively case manage and cost-share goods and services that meet a particular need for an individual who is a mutual client of both the Independent Living and VR programs.

 

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. 1 Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada HCBS Transition Plan - 07/09/2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new regulations in early 2014 that define the home and community based settings that will be allowable under HCBS. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS are fully integrated into the community in which they live. These individuals must be offered opportunities to seek employment and engage in community activities in the same manner as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Integrated Employment Research Report - 01/15/2015

The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment is responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training, and employment opportunities for people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (referred to throughout as I/DD), and for providing a report to the Governor... The Taskforce is also responsible for developing a three, five, and ten-year strategic plan (2015-2025) that will result in "creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Nevada Assembly Bill 488: Relating to the Administration of Government Departments - 07/01/2013

"AN ACT relating to governmental administration; consolidating the Health Division and the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department of Health and Human Services into the Division of Public and Behavioral Health of the Department; transferring the powers and duties concerning certain services to children with autism spectrum disorders from the Health Division to the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department; transferring the authority for developmental services in the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services to the Aging and Disability Services Division; … renaming the Commission on Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department the Commission on Behavioral Health; making the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department responsible for services for and other oversight relating to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; making various other changes to provisions relating to the organization of the divisions of the Department; and providing other matters properly relating thereto."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Executive Order - Establishing a Program for the Hiring of People with Disabilities into the State Workforce - 10/08/2013

By the power vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and the laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order that all state agencies made a concerted effort to include persons with disabilities into the "preliminary and final group of    candidates" considered for each appropriate opening within the agency. It orders all state agencies to make the hiring of persons with disabilities a priority, mandating that at least five percent of openings give persons with disabilities priority.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. 1 Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Integrated Employment Research Report - 01/15/2015

The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment is responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training, and employment opportunities for people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (referred to throughout as I/DD), and for providing a report to the Governor... The Taskforce is also responsible for developing a three, five, and ten-year strategic plan (2015-2025) that will result in "creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Vocational Rehabilitation: Employment Supports Job Development/Placement - 07/01/2014

This document provides the fee schedule for job placement and supported employment services for Nevada Vocational Rehabilitation as of July 2014.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Nevada’s Strategic Plan for Integration of Developmental Services and Early Intervention Services into the ADSD - 06/15/2014

The Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) represents Nevadans who are aged or have a disability, regardless of age, and assists the broader community that touches their lives. Through advocacy, counseling and a broad array of supportive services, ADSD strives to create an environment that enables all of the Nevadans they serve to be self-sufficient, independent and safe. In the 2013 Nevada Legislature, Assembly Bill (AB) 488 took integration a step further by transferring Developmental Services (DS) and Nevada Early Intervention Services (NEIS) to ADSD. Formerly DS was housed within Mental Health and Developmental Services (MHDS) and NEIS was housed within the Health Division. (Since then, Health and MHDS have also merged to become the Division of Public and Behavioral Health.) The benefits of integrating the services include a better ability to:

Promote community living for Nevadans with disabilities of all ages (across the lifespan) Create and enhance strategies to ensure the necessary services and supports Provide a responsive and effective service system that acknowledges unique needs Firmly establish no wrong door for services Expand outreach efforts Promote seamless service delivery including transitions across programs to obtain the full spectrum of care and better service coordination for participants with similar needs Improve access to information on community services and supports such as housing, employment, education, social participation, etc. Create a similar comprehensive community provider application and oversight process Strengthen basic infrastructure such as information technology (IT), fiscal and accountability
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Scope of Work Employment Supports Job Development/Placement, Community Based Assessment Site Development and Monitoring, Job Coaching, and Advocacy Services - 06/01/2014

This document describes the Scope of Work for Supported Employment services provided by the Nevada Vocational Rehabilitation Division. The services include, but are not limited to, Job Development/Placement, Community Based Assessment (CBA) Site Development, Community Based Assessment (CBA) Site Monitoring, job coaching, and advocacy.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Changing Nevada’s Employment Landscape Increasing Integrated Employment Outcomes for Nevadans with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities - 05/21/2014

~~“Work is a fundamental part of adult life, and the benefits of integrated employment for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) have been clearly demonstrated. It gives us a sense of purpose; shaping who we are and how we fit into our community. Nevadans with IDD must not be deprived of the opportunity to work within the general workforce and make a meaningful contribution. Individuals in the labor force have a positive financial impact on our economy, generating income that is ultimately returned in the form of tax revenues. There is literature filled with examples of the benefits and Return on Investment (ROI) when individuals with IDD are working and contributing vocationally in their community. Our state is becoming more diverse and Nevadans with IDD should be included in diversifying the workforce. This can be achieved through established supported employment practices. Improving employment outcomes for Nevadans with IDD at the state level requires a holistic approach that communicates a clear message, incorporates policy change, funding, capacity development, interagency partnerships, outcome measurement and service innovation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities: Position Statement on Integrated Employment - 05/21/2014

Work is a fundamental part of adult life, and the benefits of integrated employment for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) have been clearly demonstrated. It gives us a sense of purpose; shaping who we are and how we fit into our community. Nevadans with IDD must not be deprived of the opportunity to work within the general workforce and make a meaningful contribution. Individuals in the labor force have a positive financial impact on our economy, generating income that is ultimately returned in the form of tax revenues. There is literature filled with examples of the benefits and Return on Investment (ROI) when individuals with IDD are working and contributing vocationally in their community. Our state is becoming more diverse and Nevadans with IDD should be included in diversifying the workforce. This can be achieved through established supported employment practices. Improving employment outcomes for Nevadans with IDD at the state level requires a holistic approach that communicates a clear message, incorporates policy change, funding, capacity development, interagency partnerships, outcome measurement and service innovation.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NEVADA GOVERNOR’S COUNCIL ON DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES: Five Year State Plan - 10/01/2011

~~“ The purpose of the Councils, as defined by statute, is to engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family centered, consumer and family directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive, and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.The Councils utilize strategies such as training, educating policy makers and communities, coalition development, barrier elimination, and demonstration of new approaches to service to meet the mandated purpose. These strategies are incorporated into a five-year State Plan that includes, and is based on, a comprehensive review and analysis of services, supports, and other assistance in the State available to individuals with developmental disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Vocational Rehabilitation: Definition of Terms - 07/01/2006

This document provides an extensive list of service definitions for Vocational Rehabilitation in Nevada. It includes definitions for integrated employment, ongoing support services, competitive employment and supported employment, among many others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Section 15 – Vocational Rehabilitation Supported Employment Policy - 06/01/2006

This document outlines Vocational Rehabilitation’s policy on Supported Employment. It includes information on the referral and assessment process, the range of services available and Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Cooperation, Collaboration, Coordination - 01/08/2016

The DWSS inter-local contract refers welfare recipients to VR programs for completion of vocational testing and assessment. The DSU has been collaborating with other reciprocal agencies in the delivery of service to individuals who need supportive services or assistance in activities of daily living. Working with the ADSD’s Independent Living program, and their recipient of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 funds, allows for greater community involvement and co-sharing of responsibilities and costs. As such, the DSU and the Independent Living program continue to utilize their interlocal agreement to collaboratively case manage and cost-share goods and services that meet a particular need for an individual who is a mutual client of both the Independent Living and VR programs.

 

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Nevada

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all

working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. The expectation is that people work!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada State Use Program "Preferred Purchase"

The Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (DETR), Rehabilitation Division manages Nevada’s State Use Program, Preferred Purchase, in support of workers with disabilities who simply want to be productive working citizens. We help individuals accomplish that goal while providing valuable benefits to government agencies that choose to utilize the services offered.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Nevada State Rehabilitation Council

“The mission of the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) is to help ensure that vocational rehabilitation programs (Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation and Bureau of Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired) are consumer oriented, consumer driven, and that the programs' services and resources result in employment outcomes for Nevadans with disabilities….

 The Council may assist you or others in the community in the following ways:  

1.       Help individuals with disabilities obtain services which may help them become employable.

2.       Put employers in contact with individuals with disabilities who may fill their staffing needs.

3.       Receive and relay client experiences about the state or the community vocational rehabilitation programs.

Receive and relay ideas about improving vocational rehabilitation services.

The Council has a minimum of 16 members as required by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended.”  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities “Position on Employment” - 04/29/2017

~~“Policy Recommendations:• Remove barriers that create disincentives for people with developmental disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment (employment includes supported employment, job training and job coaching) with competitive wages in the community. These barriers may include: transportation, flexible options for on the job supports, and continued or potential health care benefits.• Implement “Employment First” policies that transform the expectations of state agencies, service providers and people with developmental disabilities. Under “Employment First’, the expectation is that a person with a developmental or other disability can and wants to work, and a successful outcome is finding these individuals meaningful and gainful employment that meets their needs and interests by tailoring services to help them succeed in the workforce.• Fully fund the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that are significantly underfunded to meet the employment needs of individuals with severe disabilities who need VR services to obtain employment.” 

Systems
  • Other

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home Program - 05/30/2006

Through the Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home program, a new offering from the State of Nevada, eligible participants will be provided with the services, support, and assistance necessary to move back into a community setting, such as an apartment or family home.

In order to help eligible participants with the transition process, the program can pay for goods and services, such as furniture, appliances, moving expenses, and housing deposits. See the SERVICES tab for a full list of program benefits.

MFP also gives most participants the option of self-direction, allowing them to decide where they want to live and who will assist them upon returning to the community.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

"The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Learning Community : Improving Systems and Services for Individuals with IDD

~~The Employment Learning Community (ELC) assists states in improving systems and services to increase inclusive, competitive employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).The ELC has three key components:

• Delphi panel,• Communities of practice,• Technical assistance

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Nevada Ticket to Work

"If you are currently receiving SSI or SSDI benefits, the Ticket to Work program can help you find the job that is right for you, and you can safely explore your work options without losing your benefits until you have stabilized your job and earnings.

You can easily return to benefits if you have to stop working You can continue to receive healthcare benefits You will not receive a medical continuing disability review (CDR) while using your Ticket"
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

"Time to Pick the Fruit- It’s Ripe" Customized Employment: Presentation by the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities - 05/21/2014

This presentation given by the staff at the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities defines Employment First (EF) & Customized Employment (CE), elaborates upon the Nevada Collaborators, describes the philosophy, practices, and descendants of CE, and explains who can be served by the CE Project and what those job seekers can hope to achieve.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

"Customized Employment Project offers community members with disabilities hope" - 09/25/2013

The Customized Employment Project, a partnership between the Nevada Rehabilitation Division at the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), Sierra Regional Center at Developmental Services, and the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), is a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both. It is based on an individualized match between the strengths, conditions and interests of a job candidate and the identified business needs of an employer. Customized employment utilizes an individualized approach to employment planning and job development - one person at a time - one employer at a time.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Comprehensive System of Personnel Development - 02/28/2012

The Rehabilitation Division, as the DSU, has established procedures and activities setting forth the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development[MW1]  (CSPD), which will ensure an adequate supply of qualified Rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals for the operation of the Vocational Rehabilitation programs.

The CSPD is coordinated by the Administrator of the DSU with the participation of: the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC), Human Resources staff of the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), and staff of the Bureaus of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR) and Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired (BSBVI). DETR’s personnel records enable an annual analysis of the numbers and types of Rehabilitation personnel. Through the State of Nevada Personnel Department database, information on budgeted positions, duration of vacancy for each position and vacancy rates are available through a data warehouse system.

In addition, a personnel log is maintained at the agency level, delineating the location, type of position and date vacated in order to provide current tracking of vacancies including the status of each vacant position. This tracking mechanism has proved successful in reducing the vacancy rate and the amount of time that each position is vacant. All the sources of information are used to track and forecast the DSU’s personnel needs.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Emerging Practices from Vocational Rehabilitation

This summary document describes different initiatives and emerging practices in the state of Nevada that aim at improving employment outcomes for people with disabilities. The projects include CRAVE, Customized Employment, Voice, Career Development Academy, and the Pathways to Work.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NV Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation

This website contains information on the Job Development Training Series, “Creating Employment Opportunities.”  The modules in the series include: Introduction to Job Development and the Role of the Job Developer, Getting to Know Your Customer; The Employer as Partner; and Job Placement and Retention Services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Nevada HCBS Transition Plan - 07/09/2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new regulations in early 2014 that define the home and community based settings that will be allowable under HCBS. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS are fully integrated into the community in which they live. These individuals must be offered opportunities to seek employment and engage in community activities in the same manner as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NV HCBW for Persons w/ID and Related Conditions (0125.R06.00) - 10/01/2013

Provides day hab, prevocational, residential support, supported employment, behavioral consultation-training & intervention, counseling, career planning, non-medical transportation, nursing, nutrition counseling, residential support management for individuals w/ID ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver - 10/01/2013

The Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver program is authorized in ­1915(c) of the Social Security Act. The program permits a State to furnish an array of home and community-based services that assist Medicaid beneficiaries to live in the community and avoid institutionalization. The State has broad discretion to design its waiver program to address the needs of the waiver­s target population. Waiver services complement and/or supplement the services that are available to participants through the Medicaid.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program

"The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.

As required by the funding authorization, Nevada Medicaid (Division of Health Care Financing and Policy) is the lead agency for the BIP. The BIP team, however, is made up of a large number of cross-functional and cross-agency contributors who have been instrumental in moving the project toward its goals and objectives. Many of the projects and workgroups related to BIP have been collaborations between Nevada's Aging and Disability Services Division and Nevada Medicaid. In addition, many other state agencies and contractors have contributed in important ways."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid and CHIP state plans are agreements between Nevada and the federal government describing how we administer these programs. It gives an assurance that Nevada will abide by federal rules and may claim federal matching funds for program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are under way in the state.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Nevada Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Nevada as of 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

In the Silver State of Nevada, workers with disabilities don't have to take a gamble on their future when it comes to finding career success and employment opportunities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nevada’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
2,890,845
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.72%
Change from
2014 to 2015
203,190
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
83,559
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.56%
Change from
2014 to 2015
41.12%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.63%
Change from
2014 to 2015
74.80%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 2,890,845
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 203,190
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 83,559
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,172,440
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.12%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.80%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 192,429
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 190,951
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 278,106
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 33,439
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 70,092
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 6,754
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 22,092
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,705
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 14,784
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 25,500

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,979
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 65,211

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,881
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 7,262
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 12,649
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 14.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 2.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 813
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 184
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 247

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,568
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 161
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 94
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 3.25

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
1,649
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 105
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 234
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 383
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 436
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 344
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 147
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,754
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 93,514
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,401,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $10,644,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $14,632,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $307,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 23
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,140
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 879
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 14.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.83%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.45%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.49%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 21.57%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 56.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 69.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.56%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 811,514
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,144
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 703
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 199,341
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 200,044
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 4
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 336
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,907
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,360,666

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 10
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 10
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,309
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,309

 

WIOA Proflie

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

4.4.2   Operationalize employment first strategies, which include the strategy that employment services should be the first priority option for individuals with disabilities. Employment first is based on the premise that everyone can work.

4.4.3   Incorporate career readiness content into educational curriculum that links to postsecondary education. (Page 68)

  • Nevada transition conference
  • California State University, Northridge (CSUN)/assistive technology conference
  • The CSAVR fall and spring conferences
  • National Council of State Agencies for the Blind
  • Employment and disability forum
  • Program Evaluation and Quality Assurance Summit
  • BLAST (National Association of Blind Merchants and National Federation of the Blind)
  • Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)
  • National Association of Workforce Development Professionals (NAWDP)   (Page 271) 
Customized Employment

Vocational counseling and guidance provided by master’s degree-level rehabilitation counselors with expertise in working with individuals with disabilities to remove barriers to employment.

  • Services provided by VR’s business development team, including: direct recruitment and outreach services to employers regarding hiring individuals with disabilities and disability awareness, and developing recruitment and work readiness programs to meet employers’ hiring needs.
  • Vocational assessments, education and training, skills enhancement training, vocational counseling and guidance, job development and advocacy, transition services for students and youth transitioning to college or careers, customized employment, physical and mental restoration services, and post-employment services that are unique to VR and address the unique needs of individuals with disabilities.(Page 85)

The DSU has long–standing relationships with many workforce system partners, both internal and external, that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals, including youth, with the most significant disabilities. With the implementation of WIOA, new challenges and opportunities are presented to expand the services of supported and customized employment (SE, CE). The collective goal remains to achieve maximum success in assisting individuals with the most significant disabilities into successful integrated employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused on building more effective partnerships and relationships with similar entities throughout the state that support these efforts that expand integrated employment opportunities. (Page 255)

VR Transition Teams statewide are working strategically to develop expanded supported employment services to include customized employment for youth. In this endeavor, VR is working with Opportunity Village, Centers for Independent Living and individual, qualified job development providers to serve this unique and expanding population. VR has taken the lead in providing training for customized employment, including statewide in–service for VR staff and community partners with Denise Bissonette and Abbey Cooper, both nationally recognized supported employment professionals.

The DSU is not currently providing extended services for supported employment youth, as that need is being met statewide through the regional centers, the Division of Public and Behavioral Health and through natural supports. (Page 256)

The DSU and the NDE, Office of Special Education, Elementary and Secondary Education and school improvement programs have an inter-local contract, which contains provisions for the joint training of VR staff and special education personnel. Special education staff members have and will be participating in vocational rehabilitation training on customized employment, job development and placement of individuals with disabilities, and WIOA implications. Special Education staff were also invited to attend two professional presentations in FFY 2015 from Denise Bissonnette (author, trainer, keynote speaker) on career development, job development and workforce development, and from Abby Cooper (renowned leader from SDSU in defining employment practices for individuals with disabilities) on customized employment. (Page 272)

After reviewing the needs assessment and WIOA mandates, the DSU and NSRC focused on the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly the VR service needs of: 

  • Individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment and customized employment;
  • Minorities with disabilities in the Nevada workforce, especially the underserved groups of Hispanic and Asian individuals;
  • Individuals with disabilities that have been underserved, especially those with mental health disabilities;
  • Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system; and,
  • Transition students. (Page 282)

Entities that provide supported employment services, including the Independent Living program within ADSD, which provides customized employment services, a brochure for supported employment services, expanded communication and training services for VR staff and NSRC members and consumers who are eligible for supported employment services, and partners with the Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities to provide supported and customized employment job developer training. (Page 288)

In northern Nevada, the customized/supported employment program continues in collaboration with Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living and Sierra Regional Center (SRC). This initiative strives to serve co–enrolled clients and deliver supported employment services, specifically job carving and person–centered customized employment. Substantial funding was made available and distributed to support this effort. (Page 309)

Braiding/Blending Resources

The DSU works with Nevada’s Medicaid agency (ADSD) to leverage funds for supported employment services by braiding its funding with JDT Medicaid waivers to provide enhanced and expanded services together with agencies that provide JDT Medicaid waiver services, as described below.

The DSU has a contract with the three statewide regional centers, and conducts monthly meetings with staff at these regional centers. The DSU and regional centers collaborate on services for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities who are joint clients. In northern Nevada, the DSU has continued its relationship with High Sierra Industries for its Career Development Academy. In southern Nevada, the DSU developed a contract with Opportunity Village, Inc. for its Pathways to Work program. Both of these programs are with vendors of JDT waiver programs, and both leverage funding toward opportunities for competitive and integrated employment. (Page 260)

The DSU leverages funds for supported employment services by braiding its funding with JDT Medicaid waivers to provide enhanced and expanded services together with agencies that provide JDT Medicaid waiver services. The DSU also partners with the statewide regional centers and Division of Public and Behavioral Health to ensure warm handoffs for extended services. The DSU itself is not currently providing extended services, as that need is being met statewide through the regional centers, the Division of Public and Behavior Health and through natural supports. (Page 288) 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

The state of Nevada provides initial and continuing notices to make all registrants, applicants, and eligible applicants/registrants, applicants for employment, employees, and interested members of the public aware of the recipients’ obligations to operate its programs and activities in a nondiscriminatory manner. The state board has issued specific state compliance policies related to the communication of equal opportunity (EO), with which all grantees must comply. (Page 140)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

To reiterate, the DSU worked with CCSD to formulate a TPCA called JEEP (Job Exploration and Expectation Program), which was implemented in August 2015. There are six designated pilot schools where students participate in work rotations in various departments of the school with the final site being a site within the community. Participants rotate every nine weeks through the sites that they are interested in until they culminate into the community–based assessment experience. Part of this training includes activities under the pre–employment transition services (PETS) category to ensure WIOA compliance. Reflecting back on the initial collaborative efforts with the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disability, the DSU has evolved wherein customized employment is viewed as a standard service that is offered to the most severely disabled consumers. This philosophy is no longer part of a pilot; it is now standard practice with qualified job developers. (Page 252)

Other sources for supported employment services and supports include:

  • Increased supports as defined in WIOA, e.g., VR’s ability to provide long term supports for youth;
  • Social Security Administration work incentives, e.g., Plan for Achieving Self–Support (PASS) and Impairment Related Work Expenses (IRWE);
  • Diversion of jobs and day training/waiver funding for pre–vocational training; and,
  • Natural supports. (Page 255)
Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Education activities provided for WIOA Title I Youth include: tutoring; study skills training; evidence-based dropout prevention; alternative secondary school services and dropout recovery services; financial literacy; and, education offered concurrently with workforce preparation activities and training for specific occupations or occupational clusters. Youth programs also include summer employment opportunities that are directly linked to academic and occupational learning, paid and unpaid work experiences that incorporate academic and occupational education, occupational skills training, and entrepreneurial skills training. (Page 32)

In southern Nevada, VR collaborates with Goodwill of Southern Nevada for their “elite program” serving youth 17–21 by providing identification and work documents, work training programs, interview assistance, transportation, financial literacy and interview clothing. Statewide, Nevada VR collaborates with Child and Family Services within the State’s Health and Human Services Division. VR collaborates on referrals, shared services for assessments, training, employment and restoration. (Page 247)

Benefits
  • Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
  • Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
  • Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high–demand/high growth occupations.
  • Update inter-local contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
  • Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
  • Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 284)

Data is collected and verified though a variety of means and specific to the requirements of each program. Applicants provide information by entering it into the online application AccessNevada system, submitting hardcopy applications and statements, providing third party documentation, and/or providing information directly to a staff member. Some data is collected from third party sources primarily through interfaces, mailed inquiries and documented telephone calls, i.e., NOMADS interfaces directly with the Social Security Administration’s system for information on identity, benefits and disability status, and with DETR’s data systems for information on unemployment insurance (UI) benefits and quarterly wage data. Data on participation hours in the TANF NEON program and federally defined work activities is collected, audited and reported according to the TANF work verification plan, which is a 35 page document outlining the reporting requirements for TANF performance measures, including how hours of participation reporting and the related internal control mechanisms for accurate reporting assurances. (Page 107)

School to Work Transition

The annual Nevada Student Leadership Transition Summit (NSLTS) is a two–day summit geared toward increasing graduation rates, participants’ exposure to postsecondary options, available resources, and improvement of students’ understanding of the requirements for a successful transition to a world beyond high school. The 2014 NSLTS conference was attended by over 200 people, which included high school students, teachers, transition facilitators, young adult facilitators, young adult panelists, adult facilitators, and conference planners and coordinators. The DSU recently participated in the November 2015 NSLTS. Special education students, teachers, and counselors from 16 school districts across the state of Nevada attended this event to learn about services available to students after graduation from high school and how to become active participants in the transition process. They toured UNR, learned about disability services available on college campuses, were provided opportunities to network with other students with disabilities, and learned about resources they were receiving and what their goals were after high school. Young adult speakers with disabilities reflected upon their transition experiences and shared motivational stories on lessons learned as they moved from high school to adult life. The conference also included the parents of students with disabilities to help educate parents on services available to students in both high school and after high school. The DSU transition counselors presented in a breakout session about services available to students with disabilities and how BVR could assist them with the transition from school to work, or high school to postsecondary education and onto employment. (Page 250)

Data Collection

The state continues to lack a unified system for data collection and sharing, and a common intake system across core partners. There needs to be an improvement in coordination of service delivery across programs and partners, of which a statewide, unified system would address.

  • Shrinking state VR funding since 2008, and the inability to fully match federal sec. 110 Rehabilitation Act grant funds. (Page 45)

8.   The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures (including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, performance accountability measurement and reporting processes, and the incorporation of local input into such design and implementation to improve the coordination of services across one-stop partner programs). (Page 74)

Describe any/all data collection/reporting processes that are used for all programs and activities, including those present in the one-stop centers. 

WIOA Title I: Adult, Dislocated Workers and Youth Programs

WIOA Title III: Wagner-Peyser Act of 1933 Programs

NJCOS, a partner of the America‘s One-Stop Operating System (AOSOS) consortium of states, is a one-stop management information system designed to meet the core business needs of state workforce investment systems. NJCOS allows data to be recorded and shared by state and local partner programs that comprise the Nevada JobConnect system. The system supports both customer self-service and mediated case management services, and contains all necessary components to meet the data-collection needs of all one-stop program partners under WIOA, labor exchange and Trade Adjustment Act (TAA) components to meet reporting requirements. (Page 105)

As the state administrator for Title I and the responsible entity for Titles III and IV of WIOA, DETR aligns its information technologies for the workforce system in Nevada with NDE, DHSS’s DWSS division, the state board, and the two local boards to establish efficient and effective interfaces across core WIOA programs, which include: Wagner-Peyser, unemployment insurance, vocational rehabilitation, youth and adult education and literacy, TANF employment and training. The efforts include integration into a common intake case management and reporting system that will reduce limitations on data collections; result in more complete data; provide partner accessibility to employment, education, training, and client support services information; enable data exchange; coordinate appropriate referrals for services according to customer needs; provide support for reporting responsibilities that are required by state and federal laws; provide evidence-based, data-driven and accountable workforce development data to workforce development stakeholders and policymakers; provide automatic and real-time data calculations; eliminate duplicative data entries; and, increase the state’s ability to successfully implement WIOA. (Page 131)

Describe how the state board will assist the governor in aligning technology and data systems across mandatory one-stop partner programs - including design and implementation of common intake, data collection, etc. - and how such alignment will improve service delivery to individuals, including unemployed individuals. 

A statewide workforce integrated accountability system will facilitate common intake and data collection across core programs and required one-stop partner programs, and will improve program services and reduce manual efforts and inefficiencies to benefit Nevada’s job seekers, employers, trainers, educators, and staff. Through the establishment of a common intake system wherein clients can apply across agencies for services, the Nevada workforce system will increase federal and state compliance and upgrade antiquated technologies through the modernization of the current workforce system. (Page 132)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

If FEMA is not involved in a natural disaster in Nevada Rapid Response team members including an unemployment insurance professional and JobConnect Center staff will either present a group orientation or provide a table at community events for staff to provide needed information where affected workers can come for one on one service. Other agencies and programs that may be typically represented are American Red Cross, Internal Revenue Service, Nevada Attorney General, Nevada State Department of Emergency Management, local law enforcement, Salvation Army, Small Business Administration, Social and Rehabilitation Services and other appropriate local service organizations the Rapid Response Coordinator may contact. One or more of the following may also be included to round out the needed services for a disaster situation: Chamber of Commerce, City Clerk and/or Administrator, City Mayor, Red Cross, Salvation Army and United Way may assist the affected workers and businesses affected by a disaster. Once these contacts are made, the information regarding the services available to assist those who have temporarily lost their jobs due to the disaster will be provided. A temporary office in the area may be set up to provide these services. Affected workers who have lost their jobs due to the disaster may be offered the following additional services: (Page 163)

1.8   Increase access to quality job development services.

1.9   Identify key employers.

1.10   Identify federal employment opportunities.

1.11   Support counselor continuing education training.

1.12   Increase the utilization and promotion of the state of Nevada’s 700–hour certification program list and schedule A.

1.13   Promote peer to peer support networks.

1.14   Develop an outreach plan for small businesses.

1.15   Adopt career planning using an evidence based person centered planning model. (Page 289)

Career Pathways
  • The development and dissemination of curricula, including curricula incorporating the essential components of reading instruction;
  • Developing content and models for integrating education and training and career pathways;
  • The provision of assistance to eligible providers in developing and implementing programs that achieve the objectives of this title and in measuring the progress of those programs in achieving such objectives, including meeting the State adjusted levels of performance; or
  • Other allowable activities that of statewide significance. (Page 230)
    • Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
    • Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
    • Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high–demand/high growth occupations.
    • Update inter-local contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
    • Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
    • Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 284 & 297)

One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

The local boards will utilize strategies developed in tandem with core, required and other partner programs to serve the needs of individuals, including those identified in sec. II(a)(1)(B) of WIOA. Coordination of activities to support the identified strategies will be outlined in the one-stop delivery system MOU and include both sector strategies and the implementation of career pathways.

A customer-centered approach will be at the forefront of each strategy and thorough assessments will be provided so that services can be tailored to the unique needs of the individual, and a holistic plan for employment can be developed that includes the need for supportive services and the identification of resources from entities outside the scope of this state plan. The coordination will be recorded in a common client reporting system. (Page 84)

The design of Nevada’s framework of local youth programs provides for an objective assessment of each youth participant, including a review of the academic and occupational skill levels and service needs, for the purpose of identifying appropriate services and career pathways for participants and informing the individual service strategy. A new assessment of a participant is not required if the state board determines that it is appropriate to use a recent (i.e., within the previous six months) assessment of the participant conducted as part of another education or training program.

IEL/CE programming will provide civics contextual English language acquisition instruction (ELA/Civics) in combination with integrated education and training activities (IET) through career pathways and opportunities provided by partnerships with business and industry and other educational institutions.

IEL/CE program delivery approaches include: 

  • Co-enrolling ELA/Civics students in an existing Integrated Education and Training program.
  • Integrating ELA/Civics instruction within an Integrated Education and Training program. 

Integrated EL/Civics focuses the program’s design and goals on preparing adults for employment in in-demand industries in coordination with local workforce system.

All applicants must include in the program narrative section the plans that lead toward full implementation of required integrated EL/civics activities for PY 2016-2017. Suggestions for integrated EL/civics planning may include identifying high wage/high-demand occupations, training and certificate programs with a high percentage of non-native English speakers in the location/zip code of the program area, and updated curricula and program framework to include contextualized instruction for occupational and employability skills. (Page 217)

Procedures will be developed by the Office of Workforce Innovation. Governor Sandoval issued Executive Order 2016-08 creating the Office of Workforce Innovation within the Office of the Governor. This office will participate in designing the strategy for the use of Governor’s Set-aside funds encapsulated in the following duties detailed in the executive order: 

  • Provide support to the Governor’s Workforce Development Board (’State Board’), industry sector councils, and the Office of the Governor in developing a strategy for the cooperation and collaboration among all stakeholders focused on workforce development;
  • Develop a career pathways strategy for Nevada in the fields of technology, advanced manufacturing, education, and health care; 

The design of Nevada’s framework of local youth programs provides for an objective assessment of each youth participant, including a review of the academic and occupational skill levels and service needs, for the purpose of identifying appropriate services and career pathways for participants and informing the individual service strategy. A new assessment of a participant is not required if the state board determines that it is appropriate to use a recent (i.e., within the previous six months) assessment of the participant conducted as part of another education or training program.

NOTE: For purposes of the literacy and numeracy gain performance measure (in effect until July 1, 2016), the prescribed suggested assessments are CASAS or an equivalent. Local boards must have written policy and procedures directing acceptable assessments and procedures. (Page 178)

Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 324)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 41

Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities “Position on Employment” - 04/29/2017

~~“Policy Recommendations:• Remove barriers that create disincentives for people with developmental disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment (employment includes supported employment, job training and job coaching) with competitive wages in the community. These barriers may include: transportation, flexible options for on the job supports, and continued or potential health care benefits.• Implement “Employment First” policies that transform the expectations of state agencies, service providers and people with developmental disabilities. Under “Employment First’, the expectation is that a person with a developmental or other disability can and wants to work, and a successful outcome is finding these individuals meaningful and gainful employment that meets their needs and interests by tailoring services to help them succeed in the workforce.• Fully fund the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that are significantly underfunded to meet the employment needs of individuals with severe disabilities who need VR services to obtain employment.” 

Systems
  • Other

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Cooperation, Collaboration, Coordination - 01/08/2016

The DWSS inter-local contract refers welfare recipients to VR programs for completion of vocational testing and assessment. The DSU has been collaborating with other reciprocal agencies in the delivery of service to individuals who need supportive services or assistance in activities of daily living. Working with the ADSD’s Independent Living program, and their recipient of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 funds, allows for greater community involvement and co-sharing of responsibilities and costs. As such, the DSU and the Independent Living program continue to utilize their interlocal agreement to collaboratively case manage and cost-share goods and services that meet a particular need for an individual who is a mutual client of both the Independent Living and VR programs.

 

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. 1 Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada HCBS Transition Plan - 07/09/2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new regulations in early 2014 that define the home and community based settings that will be allowable under HCBS. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS are fully integrated into the community in which they live. These individuals must be offered opportunities to seek employment and engage in community activities in the same manner as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Integrated Employment Research Report - 01/15/2015

The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment is responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training, and employment opportunities for people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (referred to throughout as I/DD), and for providing a report to the Governor... The Taskforce is also responsible for developing a three, five, and ten-year strategic plan (2015-2025) that will result in "creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Nevada Assembly Bill 488: Relating to the Administration of Government Departments - 07/01/2013

"AN ACT relating to governmental administration; consolidating the Health Division and the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department of Health and Human Services into the Division of Public and Behavioral Health of the Department; transferring the powers and duties concerning certain services to children with autism spectrum disorders from the Health Division to the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department; transferring the authority for developmental services in the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services to the Aging and Disability Services Division; … renaming the Commission on Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department the Commission on Behavioral Health; making the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department responsible for services for and other oversight relating to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; making various other changes to provisions relating to the organization of the divisions of the Department; and providing other matters properly relating thereto."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Executive Order - Establishing a Program for the Hiring of People with Disabilities into the State Workforce - 10/08/2013

By the power vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and the laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order that all state agencies made a concerted effort to include persons with disabilities into the "preliminary and final group of    candidates" considered for each appropriate opening within the agency. It orders all state agencies to make the hiring of persons with disabilities a priority, mandating that at least five percent of openings give persons with disabilities priority.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. 1 Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Integrated Employment Research Report - 01/15/2015

The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment is responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training, and employment opportunities for people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (referred to throughout as I/DD), and for providing a report to the Governor... The Taskforce is also responsible for developing a three, five, and ten-year strategic plan (2015-2025) that will result in "creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Vocational Rehabilitation: Employment Supports Job Development/Placement - 07/01/2014

This document provides the fee schedule for job placement and supported employment services for Nevada Vocational Rehabilitation as of July 2014.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Nevada’s Strategic Plan for Integration of Developmental Services and Early Intervention Services into the ADSD - 06/15/2014

The Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) represents Nevadans who are aged or have a disability, regardless of age, and assists the broader community that touches their lives. Through advocacy, counseling and a broad array of supportive services, ADSD strives to create an environment that enables all of the Nevadans they serve to be self-sufficient, independent and safe. In the 2013 Nevada Legislature, Assembly Bill (AB) 488 took integration a step further by transferring Developmental Services (DS) and Nevada Early Intervention Services (NEIS) to ADSD. Formerly DS was housed within Mental Health and Developmental Services (MHDS) and NEIS was housed within the Health Division. (Since then, Health and MHDS have also merged to become the Division of Public and Behavioral Health.) The benefits of integrating the services include a better ability to:

Promote community living for Nevadans with disabilities of all ages (across the lifespan) Create and enhance strategies to ensure the necessary services and supports Provide a responsive and effective service system that acknowledges unique needs Firmly establish no wrong door for services Expand outreach efforts Promote seamless service delivery including transitions across programs to obtain the full spectrum of care and better service coordination for participants with similar needs Improve access to information on community services and supports such as housing, employment, education, social participation, etc. Create a similar comprehensive community provider application and oversight process Strengthen basic infrastructure such as information technology (IT), fiscal and accountability
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Scope of Work Employment Supports Job Development/Placement, Community Based Assessment Site Development and Monitoring, Job Coaching, and Advocacy Services - 06/01/2014

This document describes the Scope of Work for Supported Employment services provided by the Nevada Vocational Rehabilitation Division. The services include, but are not limited to, Job Development/Placement, Community Based Assessment (CBA) Site Development, Community Based Assessment (CBA) Site Monitoring, job coaching, and advocacy.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Changing Nevada’s Employment Landscape Increasing Integrated Employment Outcomes for Nevadans with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities - 05/21/2014

~~“Work is a fundamental part of adult life, and the benefits of integrated employment for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) have been clearly demonstrated. It gives us a sense of purpose; shaping who we are and how we fit into our community. Nevadans with IDD must not be deprived of the opportunity to work within the general workforce and make a meaningful contribution. Individuals in the labor force have a positive financial impact on our economy, generating income that is ultimately returned in the form of tax revenues. There is literature filled with examples of the benefits and Return on Investment (ROI) when individuals with IDD are working and contributing vocationally in their community. Our state is becoming more diverse and Nevadans with IDD should be included in diversifying the workforce. This can be achieved through established supported employment practices. Improving employment outcomes for Nevadans with IDD at the state level requires a holistic approach that communicates a clear message, incorporates policy change, funding, capacity development, interagency partnerships, outcome measurement and service innovation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities: Position Statement on Integrated Employment - 05/21/2014

Work is a fundamental part of adult life, and the benefits of integrated employment for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) have been clearly demonstrated. It gives us a sense of purpose; shaping who we are and how we fit into our community. Nevadans with IDD must not be deprived of the opportunity to work within the general workforce and make a meaningful contribution. Individuals in the labor force have a positive financial impact on our economy, generating income that is ultimately returned in the form of tax revenues. There is literature filled with examples of the benefits and Return on Investment (ROI) when individuals with IDD are working and contributing vocationally in their community. Our state is becoming more diverse and Nevadans with IDD should be included in diversifying the workforce. This can be achieved through established supported employment practices. Improving employment outcomes for Nevadans with IDD at the state level requires a holistic approach that communicates a clear message, incorporates policy change, funding, capacity development, interagency partnerships, outcome measurement and service innovation.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NEVADA GOVERNOR’S COUNCIL ON DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES: Five Year State Plan - 10/01/2011

~~“ The purpose of the Councils, as defined by statute, is to engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family centered, consumer and family directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive, and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.The Councils utilize strategies such as training, educating policy makers and communities, coalition development, barrier elimination, and demonstration of new approaches to service to meet the mandated purpose. These strategies are incorporated into a five-year State Plan that includes, and is based on, a comprehensive review and analysis of services, supports, and other assistance in the State available to individuals with developmental disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Vocational Rehabilitation: Definition of Terms - 07/01/2006

This document provides an extensive list of service definitions for Vocational Rehabilitation in Nevada. It includes definitions for integrated employment, ongoing support services, competitive employment and supported employment, among many others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Section 15 – Vocational Rehabilitation Supported Employment Policy - 06/01/2006

This document outlines Vocational Rehabilitation’s policy on Supported Employment. It includes information on the referral and assessment process, the range of services available and Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Cooperation, Collaboration, Coordination - 01/08/2016

The DWSS inter-local contract refers welfare recipients to VR programs for completion of vocational testing and assessment. The DSU has been collaborating with other reciprocal agencies in the delivery of service to individuals who need supportive services or assistance in activities of daily living. Working with the ADSD’s Independent Living program, and their recipient of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 funds, allows for greater community involvement and co-sharing of responsibilities and costs. As such, the DSU and the Independent Living program continue to utilize their interlocal agreement to collaboratively case manage and cost-share goods and services that meet a particular need for an individual who is a mutual client of both the Independent Living and VR programs.

 

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Nevada

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all

working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. The expectation is that people work!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada State Use Program "Preferred Purchase"

The Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (DETR), Rehabilitation Division manages Nevada’s State Use Program, Preferred Purchase, in support of workers with disabilities who simply want to be productive working citizens. We help individuals accomplish that goal while providing valuable benefits to government agencies that choose to utilize the services offered.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Nevada State Rehabilitation Council

“The mission of the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) is to help ensure that vocational rehabilitation programs (Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation and Bureau of Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired) are consumer oriented, consumer driven, and that the programs' services and resources result in employment outcomes for Nevadans with disabilities….

 The Council may assist you or others in the community in the following ways:  

1.       Help individuals with disabilities obtain services which may help them become employable.

2.       Put employers in contact with individuals with disabilities who may fill their staffing needs.

3.       Receive and relay client experiences about the state or the community vocational rehabilitation programs.

Receive and relay ideas about improving vocational rehabilitation services.

The Council has a minimum of 16 members as required by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended.”  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities “Position on Employment” - 04/29/2017

~~“Policy Recommendations:• Remove barriers that create disincentives for people with developmental disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment (employment includes supported employment, job training and job coaching) with competitive wages in the community. These barriers may include: transportation, flexible options for on the job supports, and continued or potential health care benefits.• Implement “Employment First” policies that transform the expectations of state agencies, service providers and people with developmental disabilities. Under “Employment First’, the expectation is that a person with a developmental or other disability can and wants to work, and a successful outcome is finding these individuals meaningful and gainful employment that meets their needs and interests by tailoring services to help them succeed in the workforce.• Fully fund the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that are significantly underfunded to meet the employment needs of individuals with severe disabilities who need VR services to obtain employment.” 

Systems
  • Other

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home Program - 05/30/2006

Through the Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home program, a new offering from the State of Nevada, eligible participants will be provided with the services, support, and assistance necessary to move back into a community setting, such as an apartment or family home.

In order to help eligible participants with the transition process, the program can pay for goods and services, such as furniture, appliances, moving expenses, and housing deposits. See the SERVICES tab for a full list of program benefits.

MFP also gives most participants the option of self-direction, allowing them to decide where they want to live and who will assist them upon returning to the community.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

"The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Learning Community : Improving Systems and Services for Individuals with IDD

~~The Employment Learning Community (ELC) assists states in improving systems and services to increase inclusive, competitive employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).The ELC has three key components:

• Delphi panel,• Communities of practice,• Technical assistance

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Nevada Ticket to Work

"If you are currently receiving SSI or SSDI benefits, the Ticket to Work program can help you find the job that is right for you, and you can safely explore your work options without losing your benefits until you have stabilized your job and earnings.

You can easily return to benefits if you have to stop working You can continue to receive healthcare benefits You will not receive a medical continuing disability review (CDR) while using your Ticket"
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

"Time to Pick the Fruit- It’s Ripe" Customized Employment: Presentation by the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities - 05/21/2014

This presentation given by the staff at the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities defines Employment First (EF) & Customized Employment (CE), elaborates upon the Nevada Collaborators, describes the philosophy, practices, and descendants of CE, and explains who can be served by the CE Project and what those job seekers can hope to achieve.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

"Customized Employment Project offers community members with disabilities hope" - 09/25/2013

The Customized Employment Project, a partnership between the Nevada Rehabilitation Division at the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), Sierra Regional Center at Developmental Services, and the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), is a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both. It is based on an individualized match between the strengths, conditions and interests of a job candidate and the identified business needs of an employer. Customized employment utilizes an individualized approach to employment planning and job development - one person at a time - one employer at a time.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Comprehensive System of Personnel Development - 02/28/2012

The Rehabilitation Division, as the DSU, has established procedures and activities setting forth the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development[MW1]  (CSPD), which will ensure an adequate supply of qualified Rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals for the operation of the Vocational Rehabilitation programs.

The CSPD is coordinated by the Administrator of the DSU with the participation of: the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC), Human Resources staff of the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), and staff of the Bureaus of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR) and Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired (BSBVI). DETR’s personnel records enable an annual analysis of the numbers and types of Rehabilitation personnel. Through the State of Nevada Personnel Department database, information on budgeted positions, duration of vacancy for each position and vacancy rates are available through a data warehouse system.

In addition, a personnel log is maintained at the agency level, delineating the location, type of position and date vacated in order to provide current tracking of vacancies including the status of each vacant position. This tracking mechanism has proved successful in reducing the vacancy rate and the amount of time that each position is vacant. All the sources of information are used to track and forecast the DSU’s personnel needs.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Emerging Practices from Vocational Rehabilitation

This summary document describes different initiatives and emerging practices in the state of Nevada that aim at improving employment outcomes for people with disabilities. The projects include CRAVE, Customized Employment, Voice, Career Development Academy, and the Pathways to Work.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NV Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation

This website contains information on the Job Development Training Series, “Creating Employment Opportunities.”  The modules in the series include: Introduction to Job Development and the Role of the Job Developer, Getting to Know Your Customer; The Employer as Partner; and Job Placement and Retention Services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Nevada HCBS Transition Plan - 07/09/2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new regulations in early 2014 that define the home and community based settings that will be allowable under HCBS. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS are fully integrated into the community in which they live. These individuals must be offered opportunities to seek employment and engage in community activities in the same manner as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NV HCBW for Persons w/ID and Related Conditions (0125.R06.00) - 10/01/2013

Provides day hab, prevocational, residential support, supported employment, behavioral consultation-training & intervention, counseling, career planning, non-medical transportation, nursing, nutrition counseling, residential support management for individuals w/ID ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver - 10/01/2013

The Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver program is authorized in ­1915(c) of the Social Security Act. The program permits a State to furnish an array of home and community-based services that assist Medicaid beneficiaries to live in the community and avoid institutionalization. The State has broad discretion to design its waiver program to address the needs of the waiver­s target population. Waiver services complement and/or supplement the services that are available to participants through the Medicaid.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program

"The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.

As required by the funding authorization, Nevada Medicaid (Division of Health Care Financing and Policy) is the lead agency for the BIP. The BIP team, however, is made up of a large number of cross-functional and cross-agency contributors who have been instrumental in moving the project toward its goals and objectives. Many of the projects and workgroups related to BIP have been collaborations between Nevada's Aging and Disability Services Division and Nevada Medicaid. In addition, many other state agencies and contractors have contributed in important ways."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid and CHIP state plans are agreements between Nevada and the federal government describing how we administer these programs. It gives an assurance that Nevada will abide by federal rules and may claim federal matching funds for program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are under way in the state.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Nevada Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Nevada as of 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

In the Silver State of Nevada, workers with disabilities don't have to take a gamble on their future when it comes to finding career success and employment opportunities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nevada’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
2,890,845
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.72%
Change from
2014 to 2015
203,190
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
83,559
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.56%
Change from
2014 to 2015
41.12%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.63%
Change from
2014 to 2015
74.80%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 2,890,845
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 203,190
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 83,559
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,172,440
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.12%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.80%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 192,429
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 190,951
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 278,106
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 33,439
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 70,092
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 6,754
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 22,092
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,705
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 14,784
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 25,500

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,979
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 65,211

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,881
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 7,262
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 12,649
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 14.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 2.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 813
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 184
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 247

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,568
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 161
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 94
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 3.25

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
1,649
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 105
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 234
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 383
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 436
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 344
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 147
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,754
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 93,514
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,401,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $10,644,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $14,632,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $307,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 23
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,140
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 879
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 14.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.83%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.45%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.49%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 21.57%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 56.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 69.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.56%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 811,514
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,144
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 703
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 199,341
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 200,044
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 4
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 336
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,907
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,360,666

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 10
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 10
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,309
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,309

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

4.4.2   Operationalize employment first strategies, which include the strategy that employment services should be the first priority option for individuals with disabilities. Employment first is based on the premise that everyone can work.

4.4.3   Incorporate career readiness content into educational curriculum that links to postsecondary education. (Page 68)

  • Nevada transition conference
  • California State University, Northridge (CSUN)/assistive technology conference
  • The CSAVR fall and spring conferences
  • National Council of State Agencies for the Blind
  • Employment and disability forum
  • Program Evaluation and Quality Assurance Summit
  • BLAST (National Association of Blind Merchants and National Federation of the Blind)
  • Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)
  • National Association of Workforce Development Professionals (NAWDP)   (Page 271) 
Customized Employment

Vocational counseling and guidance provided by master’s degree-level rehabilitation counselors with expertise in working with individuals with disabilities to remove barriers to employment.

  • Services provided by VR’s business development team, including: direct recruitment and outreach services to employers regarding hiring individuals with disabilities and disability awareness, and developing recruitment and work readiness programs to meet employers’ hiring needs.
  • Vocational assessments, education and training, skills enhancement training, vocational counseling and guidance, job development and advocacy, transition services for students and youth transitioning to college or careers, customized employment, physical and mental restoration services, and post-employment services that are unique to VR and address the unique needs of individuals with disabilities.(Page 85)

The DSU has long–standing relationships with many workforce system partners, both internal and external, that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals, including youth, with the most significant disabilities. With the implementation of WIOA, new challenges and opportunities are presented to expand the services of supported and customized employment (SE, CE). The collective goal remains to achieve maximum success in assisting individuals with the most significant disabilities into successful integrated employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused on building more effective partnerships and relationships with similar entities throughout the state that support these efforts that expand integrated employment opportunities. (Page 255)

VR Transition Teams statewide are working strategically to develop expanded supported employment services to include customized employment for youth. In this endeavor, VR is working with Opportunity Village, Centers for Independent Living and individual, qualified job development providers to serve this unique and expanding population. VR has taken the lead in providing training for customized employment, including statewide in–service for VR staff and community partners with Denise Bissonette and Abbey Cooper, both nationally recognized supported employment professionals.

The DSU is not currently providing extended services for supported employment youth, as that need is being met statewide through the regional centers, the Division of Public and Behavioral Health and through natural supports. (Page 256)

The DSU and the NDE, Office of Special Education, Elementary and Secondary Education and school improvement programs have an inter-local contract, which contains provisions for the joint training of VR staff and special education personnel. Special education staff members have and will be participating in vocational rehabilitation training on customized employment, job development and placement of individuals with disabilities, and WIOA implications. Special Education staff were also invited to attend two professional presentations in FFY 2015 from Denise Bissonnette (author, trainer, keynote speaker) on career development, job development and workforce development, and from Abby Cooper (renowned leader from SDSU in defining employment practices for individuals with disabilities) on customized employment. (Page 272)

After reviewing the needs assessment and WIOA mandates, the DSU and NSRC focused on the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly the VR service needs of: 

  • Individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment and customized employment;
  • Minorities with disabilities in the Nevada workforce, especially the underserved groups of Hispanic and Asian individuals;
  • Individuals with disabilities that have been underserved, especially those with mental health disabilities;
  • Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system; and,
  • Transition students. (Page 282)

Entities that provide supported employment services, including the Independent Living program within ADSD, which provides customized employment services, a brochure for supported employment services, expanded communication and training services for VR staff and NSRC members and consumers who are eligible for supported employment services, and partners with the Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities to provide supported and customized employment job developer training. (Page 288)

In northern Nevada, the customized/supported employment program continues in collaboration with Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living and Sierra Regional Center (SRC). This initiative strives to serve co–enrolled clients and deliver supported employment services, specifically job carving and person–centered customized employment. Substantial funding was made available and distributed to support this effort. (Page 309)

Braiding/Blending Resources

The DSU works with Nevada’s Medicaid agency (ADSD) to leverage funds for supported employment services by braiding its funding with JDT Medicaid waivers to provide enhanced and expanded services together with agencies that provide JDT Medicaid waiver services, as described below.

The DSU has a contract with the three statewide regional centers, and conducts monthly meetings with staff at these regional centers. The DSU and regional centers collaborate on services for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities who are joint clients. In northern Nevada, the DSU has continued its relationship with High Sierra Industries for its Career Development Academy. In southern Nevada, the DSU developed a contract with Opportunity Village, Inc. for its Pathways to Work program. Both of these programs are with vendors of JDT waiver programs, and both leverage funding toward opportunities for competitive and integrated employment. (Page 260)

The DSU leverages funds for supported employment services by braiding its funding with JDT Medicaid waivers to provide enhanced and expanded services together with agencies that provide JDT Medicaid waiver services. The DSU also partners with the statewide regional centers and Division of Public and Behavioral Health to ensure warm handoffs for extended services. The DSU itself is not currently providing extended services, as that need is being met statewide through the regional centers, the Division of Public and Behavior Health and through natural supports. (Page 288) 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

The state of Nevada provides initial and continuing notices to make all registrants, applicants, and eligible applicants/registrants, applicants for employment, employees, and interested members of the public aware of the recipients’ obligations to operate its programs and activities in a nondiscriminatory manner. The state board has issued specific state compliance policies related to the communication of equal opportunity (EO), with which all grantees must comply. (Page 140)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

To reiterate, the DSU worked with CCSD to formulate a TPCA called JEEP (Job Exploration and Expectation Program), which was implemented in August 2015. There are six designated pilot schools where students participate in work rotations in various departments of the school with the final site being a site within the community. Participants rotate every nine weeks through the sites that they are interested in until they culminate into the community–based assessment experience. Part of this training includes activities under the pre–employment transition services (PETS) category to ensure WIOA compliance. Reflecting back on the initial collaborative efforts with the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disability, the DSU has evolved wherein customized employment is viewed as a standard service that is offered to the most severely disabled consumers. This philosophy is no longer part of a pilot; it is now standard practice with qualified job developers. (Page 252)

Other sources for supported employment services and supports include:

  • Increased supports as defined in WIOA, e.g., VR’s ability to provide long term supports for youth;
  • Social Security Administration work incentives, e.g., Plan for Achieving Self–Support (PASS) and Impairment Related Work Expenses (IRWE);
  • Diversion of jobs and day training/waiver funding for pre–vocational training; and,
  • Natural supports. (Page 255)
Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Education activities provided for WIOA Title I Youth include: tutoring; study skills training; evidence-based dropout prevention; alternative secondary school services and dropout recovery services; financial literacy; and, education offered concurrently with workforce preparation activities and training for specific occupations or occupational clusters. Youth programs also include summer employment opportunities that are directly linked to academic and occupational learning, paid and unpaid work experiences that incorporate academic and occupational education, occupational skills training, and entrepreneurial skills training. (Page 32)

In southern Nevada, VR collaborates with Goodwill of Southern Nevada for their “elite program” serving youth 17–21 by providing identification and work documents, work training programs, interview assistance, transportation, financial literacy and interview clothing. Statewide, Nevada VR collaborates with Child and Family Services within the State’s Health and Human Services Division. VR collaborates on referrals, shared services for assessments, training, employment and restoration. (Page 247)

Benefits
  • Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
  • Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
  • Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high–demand/high growth occupations.
  • Update inter-local contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
  • Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
  • Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 284)

Data is collected and verified though a variety of means and specific to the requirements of each program. Applicants provide information by entering it into the online application AccessNevada system, submitting hardcopy applications and statements, providing third party documentation, and/or providing information directly to a staff member. Some data is collected from third party sources primarily through interfaces, mailed inquiries and documented telephone calls, i.e., NOMADS interfaces directly with the Social Security Administration’s system for information on identity, benefits and disability status, and with DETR’s data systems for information on unemployment insurance (UI) benefits and quarterly wage data. Data on participation hours in the TANF NEON program and federally defined work activities is collected, audited and reported according to the TANF work verification plan, which is a 35 page document outlining the reporting requirements for TANF performance measures, including how hours of participation reporting and the related internal control mechanisms for accurate reporting assurances. (Page 107)

School to Work Transition

The annual Nevada Student Leadership Transition Summit (NSLTS) is a two–day summit geared toward increasing graduation rates, participants’ exposure to postsecondary options, available resources, and improvement of students’ understanding of the requirements for a successful transition to a world beyond high school. The 2014 NSLTS conference was attended by over 200 people, which included high school students, teachers, transition facilitators, young adult facilitators, young adult panelists, adult facilitators, and conference planners and coordinators. The DSU recently participated in the November 2015 NSLTS. Special education students, teachers, and counselors from 16 school districts across the state of Nevada attended this event to learn about services available to students after graduation from high school and how to become active participants in the transition process. They toured UNR, learned about disability services available on college campuses, were provided opportunities to network with other students with disabilities, and learned about resources they were receiving and what their goals were after high school. Young adult speakers with disabilities reflected upon their transition experiences and shared motivational stories on lessons learned as they moved from high school to adult life. The conference also included the parents of students with disabilities to help educate parents on services available to students in both high school and after high school. The DSU transition counselors presented in a breakout session about services available to students with disabilities and how BVR could assist them with the transition from school to work, or high school to postsecondary education and onto employment. (Page 250)

Data Collection

The state continues to lack a unified system for data collection and sharing, and a common intake system across core partners. There needs to be an improvement in coordination of service delivery across programs and partners, of which a statewide, unified system would address.

  • Shrinking state VR funding since 2008, and the inability to fully match federal sec. 110 Rehabilitation Act grant funds. (Page 45)

8.   The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures (including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, performance accountability measurement and reporting processes, and the incorporation of local input into such design and implementation to improve the coordination of services across one-stop partner programs). (Page 74)

Describe any/all data collection/reporting processes that are used for all programs and activities, including those present in the one-stop centers. 

WIOA Title I: Adult, Dislocated Workers and Youth Programs

WIOA Title III: Wagner-Peyser Act of 1933 Programs

NJCOS, a partner of the America‘s One-Stop Operating System (AOSOS) consortium of states, is a one-stop management information system designed to meet the core business needs of state workforce investment systems. NJCOS allows data to be recorded and shared by state and local partner programs that comprise the Nevada JobConnect system. The system supports both customer self-service and mediated case management services, and contains all necessary components to meet the data-collection needs of all one-stop program partners under WIOA, labor exchange and Trade Adjustment Act (TAA) components to meet reporting requirements. (Page 105)

As the state administrator for Title I and the responsible entity for Titles III and IV of WIOA, DETR aligns its information technologies for the workforce system in Nevada with NDE, DHSS’s DWSS division, the state board, and the two local boards to establish efficient and effective interfaces across core WIOA programs, which include: Wagner-Peyser, unemployment insurance, vocational rehabilitation, youth and adult education and literacy, TANF employment and training. The efforts include integration into a common intake case management and reporting system that will reduce limitations on data collections; result in more complete data; provide partner accessibility to employment, education, training, and client support services information; enable data exchange; coordinate appropriate referrals for services according to customer needs; provide support for reporting responsibilities that are required by state and federal laws; provide evidence-based, data-driven and accountable workforce development data to workforce development stakeholders and policymakers; provide automatic and real-time data calculations; eliminate duplicative data entries; and, increase the state’s ability to successfully implement WIOA. (Page 131)

Describe how the state board will assist the governor in aligning technology and data systems across mandatory one-stop partner programs - including design and implementation of common intake, data collection, etc. - and how such alignment will improve service delivery to individuals, including unemployed individuals. 

A statewide workforce integrated accountability system will facilitate common intake and data collection across core programs and required one-stop partner programs, and will improve program services and reduce manual efforts and inefficiencies to benefit Nevada’s job seekers, employers, trainers, educators, and staff. Through the establishment of a common intake system wherein clients can apply across agencies for services, the Nevada workforce system will increase federal and state compliance and upgrade antiquated technologies through the modernization of the current workforce system. (Page 132)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

If FEMA is not involved in a natural disaster in Nevada Rapid Response team members including an unemployment insurance professional and JobConnect Center staff will either present a group orientation or provide a table at community events for staff to provide needed information where affected workers can come for one on one service. Other agencies and programs that may be typically represented are American Red Cross, Internal Revenue Service, Nevada Attorney General, Nevada State Department of Emergency Management, local law enforcement, Salvation Army, Small Business Administration, Social and Rehabilitation Services and other appropriate local service organizations the Rapid Response Coordinator may contact. One or more of the following may also be included to round out the needed services for a disaster situation: Chamber of Commerce, City Clerk and/or Administrator, City Mayor, Red Cross, Salvation Army and United Way may assist the affected workers and businesses affected by a disaster. Once these contacts are made, the information regarding the services available to assist those who have temporarily lost their jobs due to the disaster will be provided. A temporary office in the area may be set up to provide these services. Affected workers who have lost their jobs due to the disaster may be offered the following additional services: (Page 163)

1.8   Increase access to quality job development services.

1.9   Identify key employers.

1.10   Identify federal employment opportunities.

1.11   Support counselor continuing education training.

1.12   Increase the utilization and promotion of the state of Nevada’s 700–hour certification program list and schedule A.

1.13   Promote peer to peer support networks.

1.14   Develop an outreach plan for small businesses.

1.15   Adopt career planning using an evidence based person centered planning model. (Page 289)

Career Pathways
  • The development and dissemination of curricula, including curricula incorporating the essential components of reading instruction;
  • Developing content and models for integrating education and training and career pathways;
  • The provision of assistance to eligible providers in developing and implementing programs that achieve the objectives of this title and in measuring the progress of those programs in achieving such objectives, including meeting the State adjusted levels of performance; or
  • Other allowable activities that of statewide significance. (Page 230)
    • Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
    • Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
    • Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high–demand/high growth occupations.
    • Update inter-local contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
    • Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
    • Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 284 & 297)

One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

The local boards will utilize strategies developed in tandem with core, required and other partner programs to serve the needs of individuals, including those identified in sec. II(a)(1)(B) of WIOA. Coordination of activities to support the identified strategies will be outlined in the one-stop delivery system MOU and include both sector strategies and the implementation of career pathways.

A customer-centered approach will be at the forefront of each strategy and thorough assessments will be provided so that services can be tailored to the unique needs of the individual, and a holistic plan for employment can be developed that includes the need for supportive services and the identification of resources from entities outside the scope of this state plan. The coordination will be recorded in a common client reporting system. (Page 84)

The design of Nevada’s framework of local youth programs provides for an objective assessment of each youth participant, including a review of the academic and occupational skill levels and service needs, for the purpose of identifying appropriate services and career pathways for participants and informing the individual service strategy. A new assessment of a participant is not required if the state board determines that it is appropriate to use a recent (i.e., within the previous six months) assessment of the participant conducted as part of another education or training program.

IEL/CE programming will provide civics contextual English language acquisition instruction (ELA/Civics) in combination with integrated education and training activities (IET) through career pathways and opportunities provided by partnerships with business and industry and other educational institutions.

IEL/CE program delivery approaches include: 

  • Co-enrolling ELA/Civics students in an existing Integrated Education and Training program.
  • Integrating ELA/Civics instruction within an Integrated Education and Training program. 

Integrated EL/Civics focuses the program’s design and goals on preparing adults for employment in in-demand industries in coordination with local workforce system.

All applicants must include in the program narrative section the plans that lead toward full implementation of required integrated EL/civics activities for PY 2016-2017. Suggestions for integrated EL/civics planning may include identifying high wage/high-demand occupations, training and certificate programs with a high percentage of non-native English speakers in the location/zip code of the program area, and updated curricula and program framework to include contextualized instruction for occupational and employability skills. (Page 217)

Procedures will be developed by the Office of Workforce Innovation. Governor Sandoval issued Executive Order 2016-08 creating the Office of Workforce Innovation within the Office of the Governor. This office will participate in designing the strategy for the use of Governor’s Set-aside funds encapsulated in the following duties detailed in the executive order: 

  • Provide support to the Governor’s Workforce Development Board (’State Board’), industry sector councils, and the Office of the Governor in developing a strategy for the cooperation and collaboration among all stakeholders focused on workforce development;
  • Develop a career pathways strategy for Nevada in the fields of technology, advanced manufacturing, education, and health care; 

The design of Nevada’s framework of local youth programs provides for an objective assessment of each youth participant, including a review of the academic and occupational skill levels and service needs, for the purpose of identifying appropriate services and career pathways for participants and informing the individual service strategy. A new assessment of a participant is not required if the state board determines that it is appropriate to use a recent (i.e., within the previous six months) assessment of the participant conducted as part of another education or training program.

NOTE: For purposes of the literacy and numeracy gain performance measure (in effect until July 1, 2016), the prescribed suggested assessments are CASAS or an equivalent. Local boards must have written policy and procedures directing acceptable assessments and procedures. (Page 178)

Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 324)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 41

Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities “Position on Employment” - 04/29/2017

~~“Policy Recommendations:• Remove barriers that create disincentives for people with developmental disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment (employment includes supported employment, job training and job coaching) with competitive wages in the community. These barriers may include: transportation, flexible options for on the job supports, and continued or potential health care benefits.• Implement “Employment First” policies that transform the expectations of state agencies, service providers and people with developmental disabilities. Under “Employment First’, the expectation is that a person with a developmental or other disability can and wants to work, and a successful outcome is finding these individuals meaningful and gainful employment that meets their needs and interests by tailoring services to help them succeed in the workforce.• Fully fund the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that are significantly underfunded to meet the employment needs of individuals with severe disabilities who need VR services to obtain employment.” 

Systems
  • Other

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Cooperation, Collaboration, Coordination - 01/08/2016

The DWSS inter-local contract refers welfare recipients to VR programs for completion of vocational testing and assessment. The DSU has been collaborating with other reciprocal agencies in the delivery of service to individuals who need supportive services or assistance in activities of daily living. Working with the ADSD’s Independent Living program, and their recipient of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 funds, allows for greater community involvement and co-sharing of responsibilities and costs. As such, the DSU and the Independent Living program continue to utilize their interlocal agreement to collaboratively case manage and cost-share goods and services that meet a particular need for an individual who is a mutual client of both the Independent Living and VR programs.

 

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. 1 Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada HCBS Transition Plan - 07/09/2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new regulations in early 2014 that define the home and community based settings that will be allowable under HCBS. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS are fully integrated into the community in which they live. These individuals must be offered opportunities to seek employment and engage in community activities in the same manner as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Integrated Employment Research Report - 01/15/2015

The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment is responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training, and employment opportunities for people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (referred to throughout as I/DD), and for providing a report to the Governor... The Taskforce is also responsible for developing a three, five, and ten-year strategic plan (2015-2025) that will result in "creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Nevada Assembly Bill 488: Relating to the Administration of Government Departments - 07/01/2013

"AN ACT relating to governmental administration; consolidating the Health Division and the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department of Health and Human Services into the Division of Public and Behavioral Health of the Department; transferring the powers and duties concerning certain services to children with autism spectrum disorders from the Health Division to the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department; transferring the authority for developmental services in the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services to the Aging and Disability Services Division; … renaming the Commission on Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department the Commission on Behavioral Health; making the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department responsible for services for and other oversight relating to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; making various other changes to provisions relating to the organization of the divisions of the Department; and providing other matters properly relating thereto."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Executive Order - Establishing a Program for the Hiring of People with Disabilities into the State Workforce - 10/08/2013

By the power vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and the laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order that all state agencies made a concerted effort to include persons with disabilities into the "preliminary and final group of    candidates" considered for each appropriate opening within the agency. It orders all state agencies to make the hiring of persons with disabilities a priority, mandating that at least five percent of openings give persons with disabilities priority.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. 1 Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Integrated Employment Research Report - 01/15/2015

The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment is responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training, and employment opportunities for people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (referred to throughout as I/DD), and for providing a report to the Governor... The Taskforce is also responsible for developing a three, five, and ten-year strategic plan (2015-2025) that will result in "creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Vocational Rehabilitation: Employment Supports Job Development/Placement - 07/01/2014

This document provides the fee schedule for job placement and supported employment services for Nevada Vocational Rehabilitation as of July 2014.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Nevada’s Strategic Plan for Integration of Developmental Services and Early Intervention Services into the ADSD - 06/15/2014

The Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) represents Nevadans who are aged or have a disability, regardless of age, and assists the broader community that touches their lives. Through advocacy, counseling and a broad array of supportive services, ADSD strives to create an environment that enables all of the Nevadans they serve to be self-sufficient, independent and safe. In the 2013 Nevada Legislature, Assembly Bill (AB) 488 took integration a step further by transferring Developmental Services (DS) and Nevada Early Intervention Services (NEIS) to ADSD. Formerly DS was housed within Mental Health and Developmental Services (MHDS) and NEIS was housed within the Health Division. (Since then, Health and MHDS have also merged to become the Division of Public and Behavioral Health.) The benefits of integrating the services include a better ability to:

Promote community living for Nevadans with disabilities of all ages (across the lifespan) Create and enhance strategies to ensure the necessary services and supports Provide a responsive and effective service system that acknowledges unique needs Firmly establish no wrong door for services Expand outreach efforts Promote seamless service delivery including transitions across programs to obtain the full spectrum of care and better service coordination for participants with similar needs Improve access to information on community services and supports such as housing, employment, education, social participation, etc. Create a similar comprehensive community provider application and oversight process Strengthen basic infrastructure such as information technology (IT), fiscal and accountability
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Scope of Work Employment Supports Job Development/Placement, Community Based Assessment Site Development and Monitoring, Job Coaching, and Advocacy Services - 06/01/2014

This document describes the Scope of Work for Supported Employment services provided by the Nevada Vocational Rehabilitation Division. The services include, but are not limited to, Job Development/Placement, Community Based Assessment (CBA) Site Development, Community Based Assessment (CBA) Site Monitoring, job coaching, and advocacy.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Changing Nevada’s Employment Landscape Increasing Integrated Employment Outcomes for Nevadans with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities - 05/21/2014

~~“Work is a fundamental part of adult life, and the benefits of integrated employment for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) have been clearly demonstrated. It gives us a sense of purpose; shaping who we are and how we fit into our community. Nevadans with IDD must not be deprived of the opportunity to work within the general workforce and make a meaningful contribution. Individuals in the labor force have a positive financial impact on our economy, generating income that is ultimately returned in the form of tax revenues. There is literature filled with examples of the benefits and Return on Investment (ROI) when individuals with IDD are working and contributing vocationally in their community. Our state is becoming more diverse and Nevadans with IDD should be included in diversifying the workforce. This can be achieved through established supported employment practices. Improving employment outcomes for Nevadans with IDD at the state level requires a holistic approach that communicates a clear message, incorporates policy change, funding, capacity development, interagency partnerships, outcome measurement and service innovation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities: Position Statement on Integrated Employment - 05/21/2014

Work is a fundamental part of adult life, and the benefits of integrated employment for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) have been clearly demonstrated. It gives us a sense of purpose; shaping who we are and how we fit into our community. Nevadans with IDD must not be deprived of the opportunity to work within the general workforce and make a meaningful contribution. Individuals in the labor force have a positive financial impact on our economy, generating income that is ultimately returned in the form of tax revenues. There is literature filled with examples of the benefits and Return on Investment (ROI) when individuals with IDD are working and contributing vocationally in their community. Our state is becoming more diverse and Nevadans with IDD should be included in diversifying the workforce. This can be achieved through established supported employment practices. Improving employment outcomes for Nevadans with IDD at the state level requires a holistic approach that communicates a clear message, incorporates policy change, funding, capacity development, interagency partnerships, outcome measurement and service innovation.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NEVADA GOVERNOR’S COUNCIL ON DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES: Five Year State Plan - 10/01/2011

~~“ The purpose of the Councils, as defined by statute, is to engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family centered, consumer and family directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive, and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.The Councils utilize strategies such as training, educating policy makers and communities, coalition development, barrier elimination, and demonstration of new approaches to service to meet the mandated purpose. These strategies are incorporated into a five-year State Plan that includes, and is based on, a comprehensive review and analysis of services, supports, and other assistance in the State available to individuals with developmental disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Vocational Rehabilitation: Definition of Terms - 07/01/2006

This document provides an extensive list of service definitions for Vocational Rehabilitation in Nevada. It includes definitions for integrated employment, ongoing support services, competitive employment and supported employment, among many others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Section 15 – Vocational Rehabilitation Supported Employment Policy - 06/01/2006

This document outlines Vocational Rehabilitation’s policy on Supported Employment. It includes information on the referral and assessment process, the range of services available and Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Cooperation, Collaboration, Coordination - 01/08/2016

The DWSS inter-local contract refers welfare recipients to VR programs for completion of vocational testing and assessment. The DSU has been collaborating with other reciprocal agencies in the delivery of service to individuals who need supportive services or assistance in activities of daily living. Working with the ADSD’s Independent Living program, and their recipient of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 funds, allows for greater community involvement and co-sharing of responsibilities and costs. As such, the DSU and the Independent Living program continue to utilize their interlocal agreement to collaboratively case manage and cost-share goods and services that meet a particular need for an individual who is a mutual client of both the Independent Living and VR programs.

 

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Nevada

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all

working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. The expectation is that people work!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada State Use Program "Preferred Purchase"

The Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (DETR), Rehabilitation Division manages Nevada’s State Use Program, Preferred Purchase, in support of workers with disabilities who simply want to be productive working citizens. We help individuals accomplish that goal while providing valuable benefits to government agencies that choose to utilize the services offered.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition