Nevada

States - Big Screen

In the Silver State of Nevada, workers with disabilities don't have to take a gamble on their future when it comes to finding career success and employment opportunities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nevada’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.2%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,034,392
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.52%
Change from
2017 to 2018
184,884
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.45%
Change from
2017 to 2018
78,230
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.94%
Change from
2017 to 2018
42.31%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.19%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.21%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 2,940,058 2,998,039 3,034,392
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 198,826 183,918 184,884
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 83,453 73,968 78,230
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,211,522 1,264,395 1,277,592
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.97% 40.22% 42.31%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.05% 77.06% 77.21%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.70% 5.00% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.50% 18.00% 20.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.20% 12.30% 11.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 193,158 179,419 187,839
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 191,448 183,450 185,552
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 280,061 252,808 258,453
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 36,044 37,992 39,701
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 73,463 62,671 70,553
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 6,382 5,854 5,871
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 21,526 24,947 22,187
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,102 2,446 1,914
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 13,388 13,759 16,877
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 25,202 25,063 28,388

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,046 2,140 2,109
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.90% 5.10% 4.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 65,717 65,664 64,745

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,371 1,024 990
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 5,043 3,416 3,148
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 9,088 6,252 6,120
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.10% 16.40% 16.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.90% 8.70% 7.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.70% 2.20% 2.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20% 32.50% 31.90%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 816 736 623
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 177 190 171
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 120 2,763 2,686

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,662 4,338 4,568
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 63 161 127
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 46 94 69
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 73.00% 58.00% 54.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.65 3.25 2.39

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
1,800
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 97 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 215 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 425 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 510 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 423 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 130 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.00% 29.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,921 2,164 N/A
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 96,673 98,566 2,190
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 86 73 98,378
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 63 50 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,254,000 $3,638,000 $3,413,939
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $11,549,000 $11,896,000 $12,695,759
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $15,447,000 $16,202,000 $17,191,276
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $187,000 $167,000 $212,329
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 16.00% 17.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 14 16 15
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,114 1,149 1,226
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 881 907 828
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 13.00 14.20 14.43

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.48% 63.63% 62.27%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.66% 14.65% 15.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.54% 1.47% 1.43%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 100.00% 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 18.47% 18.88% 20.71%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.73% 61.29% 57.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 68.94% 75.05% 71.89%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 36.26% 42.41% 36.61%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 811,514
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,144
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 703
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 199,341
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 200,044
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 4
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 336
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,907
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,360,666

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8 8 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8 8 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,121 1,102 935
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,121 1,102 935

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~4.4 Provide effective and efficient job training that is aligned with in-demand occupations.
4.4.1 Increase the number of Nevadans earning sustainable living wages and support best practices that encourage high wage/career-track employment.
4.4.2 Operationalize employment first strategies, which include the strategy that employment services should be the first priority option for individuals with disabilities. Employment first is based on the premise that everyone can work.
4.4.3 Incorporate career readiness content into educational curriculum that links to postsecondary education. (Page 56) Title I
 

Customized Employment

~~The WIN curriculum encompasses self-discovery, life (i.e., soft) skills, money management, mock-interviews, and job retention information with primary emphasis placed on current job seeking techniques. The WIN program is specifically designed to meet the needs of the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) New Employees of Nevada (NEON) recipients and provide solutions to the participant’s most common employment barriers. WIN participants graduate from the program with appropriate interview attire, a master job application, a professionally assisted resume, knowledge of up-to-date job search and successful interview techniques, and the confidence to successfully secure employment. (Page 34) Title I

- Services provided by VR’s business development team, including: direct recruitment and outreach services to employers regarding hiring individuals with disabilities and disability awareness, and developing recruitment and work readiness programs to meet employers’ hiring needs.
- Vocational assessments, education and training, skills enhancement training, vocational counseling and guidance, job development and advocacy, transition services for students and youth transitioning to college or careers, customized employment, physical and mental restoration services, and post-employment services that are unique to VR and address the unique needs of individuals with disabilities.
VR will continue to actively participate in cross-agency councils, commissions, boards, taskforces, and workgroups. (Page 77) Title I

— TMCC: Assistive technology evaluation, recommendation and training; holistic assessments including in transition and career/vocational options; academic supports including intensive, targeted tutoring and coaching; assistance with accessing campus and community resources; job search skill development; job preparation and job readiness skills training; internships and other community, hands—on work experiences; comprehensive exploration with a counselor/coach in job discovery, research, networking, decision—making, planning, action steps and goal setting; and the EPY101 course, which includes the use of assistive technology (AT) to enhance accessibility, improve study skills and student success. (Page 197) Title IV

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(4)). Describe the designated State agency’s efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other State agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide supported employment services and extended employment services, as applicable, to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities.
The DSU has long—standing relationships with many workforce development partners, both internal and external, that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals, including youth, with the most significant disabilities. With the implementation of WIOA, new challenges and opportunities are presented to expand the services of supported and customized employment (SE, CE). The collective goal remains to achieve maximum success in assisting individuals with the most significant disabilities into successful competitive, integrated employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused on building more effective partnerships and relationships with similar entities throughout the state that support these efforts that expand integrated employment opportunities. (Page 209) Title IV

VR Transition Teams statewide are working strategically to develop expanded supported employment services to include customized employment. In this endeavor, VR is working with Opportunity Village, Centers for Independent Living and individual, qualified job development providers to serve this unique and expanding population. Through collaboration and financial support from the Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) and Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC), VR hosted training for customized employment, including statewide in—service for VR staff and statewide community partners with nationally recognized supported employment professionals, Griffin-Hammis. (Page 211) Title IV

The DSU is engaged with a McDonalds Northern Nevada Franchisee group that owns 16 restaurants and one training facility to work with each applicant interested in their desired position with McDonalds. The Human Resources and General Manager along with Store Managers meet with candidates to conduct a tour and discuss employment opportunities throughout the 16 restaurants. McDonalds is seeking to identify applicants with the desire to work in their restaurants to obtain measurable and long term skills gain. This has enabled McDonalds to identify and accommodate an individual with a disability to maintain higher retention rates. A total of two Discovery Sessions have been conducted, resulting in seven interviews and five hires. (Page 212) Title IV

Currently, there are eight VR supervisors, each of whom supervises up to seven direct reports. With an increase in VR counselors, it is likely one additional supervisor will be needed to provide the oversight necessary to ensure quality services to individuals with disabilities. Current staffing levels for accounting staff, administrative assistants, and rehabilitation instructors will not require an increase in the next five years. However, it’s likely the DSU will need additional rehabilitation technicians to fulfill program administration requirements, as mentioned above. The DSU will also need to fill 32 projected vacancies over the next five years. The greatest projected need is for new/dedicated staff to perform internal job development activities, customized employment activities for the most significantly disabled clients, and transition staff to serve this ever-growing population.
The number of qualified personnel for VR is allocated in biennial legislative sessions based on the projected needs of the DSU and available funding. After annually reviewing the personnel vacancy reports, the DSU was able to estimate projected vacancies for the next five years. Longevity of current personnel working in state service was also factored in to determine the number of personnel who will exit the DSU in the next five years due to retirement. (Page 216) Title IV

The DSU has an agreement for Intensive Technical Assistance from WINTAC, Y-TAC and NTACT and as such the DSU has received professional development training from these sources in a variety of topics including;
- Customized Employment, Intensive training leading to Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) certification
- Professional Development Series; Module 1. Knowledge of the Field: The Work the We Do, Module 2. Communication with Youth: The Helping Relationship, Module 3. Assessment and Individualized Planning: Charting a course with Youth, and Module 4. Relationship to Family: Working Together. (Page 226) Title IV

The DSU and the NDOE, Office of Special Education, Elementary and Secondary Education and school improvement programs have an interlocal contract, which contains provisions for the joint training of VR staff and special education personnel. Special education staff members have and will be participating in vocational rehabilitation training on customized employment, job development and placement of individuals with disabilities, and WIOA implications. The DSU was invited by the NDOE to participate in collegial training on meaningful collaboration between special education, Career and Technical Education and VR by renowned educator, George Tilson. The DSU currently is working with the school districts to provide complementary trainings coordinated by local vocational rehabilitation offices to share information on VR processes and programmatic changes such as the requirements in WIOA for pre-employment transition services. The local offices work with special education departments and career and technical education programs for the establishment of pre-vocational coordinated activities. Future plans include an increased effort for outreach to all students with disabilities, including students with disabilities as defined under section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. (Pages 228-229) Title IV

• Provision of soft skills training to clients statewide through WNC, University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), College of Southern Nevada (CSN) and Great Basin College (GBC). Curriculum is based upon the U.S. Department of Labor’s “Skills that Pay the Bills” curriculum.
• Addition of 2 Third Party Cooperative Arrangements (TPCAs) with College of Southern Nevada (CSN) and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV). CSN operated from July 2016 through June 2017 upon which time the contract was cancelled. UNLV began operating in January 2016, and continues to operate presently.
• Staff training on customized employment.
• Staff development through participation in Transition training.
• Provision of assistive technology training statewide for staff.
• With the guidance of the National Technical Assistance Center on Transition (NTACT) the DSU and NDOE began and continue to work with one rural high school providing technical assistance. This program will become the model for how transition activities, including Pre-ETS and collaboration with CTE will be handled across the state especially rural communities. (Page 256) Title IV

Additional programs working with youth exist in southern Nevada through collaboration between the CCSD, Opportunity Village, Inc., the DSU, and the Desert Regional Center. The school district pays for student’s ages 18-21 years to participate in soft skills and vocational training in a program called Job Discovery I and II. When the students graduate to phase II, they are referred to the DSU to begin formal job development and placement activities.
Internally, one rehabilitation team has focused its efforts on SE participants. This team has developed unique relationships with SE employment support providers and meets on a regular basis to staff clients and ensure closer follow along. This model has proven very successful and is consideration for future expansion. (Page 257) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~One-stop partner meetings will be held quarterly to continue to align the workforce services provided by all core, required and optional partners participating in the One-Stop Delivery System (OSDS). The goal is to increase the alignment and coordination with those partner programs already involved in the OSDS, and to engage those partner programs that are new to the OSDS. The availability of employment, training and educational opportunities will be improved through the alignment process. Current program services of all core, required, and optional partners will be inventoried; efficiencies and duplication of efforts across programs will be identified; and, realignment will take place. Topics of discussion will include strategies to maximize and integrate intake processes and other one-stop career center and affiliate site services, with significant emphasis placed on co-enrollment between all applicable program partners. Furthermore, encouragement of co-enrollment and resource leveraging through other means (e.g., requirements built into individual training account policies and procedures will occur. (Page 71) Title I

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Incentives: Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) supports workforce development activities by providing employment services to businesses by educating them about how people with disabilities can contribute to the success of their operations. VR offers hiring incentives that are applicable to the benefits of employers hiring people with disabilities, such as the WOTC, the disability access credit and barrier removal tax deduction. VR also provides training incentives to employers that hire people with disabilities. VR also assists employers in bringing diversity into their workplaces. Disability adds another dimension to diversity efforts, contributing to the development of unique and creative business solutions.

Community-Based Assessments: Vocational Rehabilitation partners with approximately 65 employers statewide to provide community-based assessments for VR clients that are individuals with disabilities. Community- based assessments provide the ability to examine participants’ work-related skills and abilities at actual job sites performing hands-on job duties. These assessments also help identify barriers individuals with disabilities may have in the workplace. VR then provides services and support to mitigate these barriers. While on the job, VR participants in community-based assessment programs are paid wages by VR through a third-party temporary agency. Assessments last up to 100 work hours. (Page 32) Title I

Under the VOICE cooperative arrangement, NRD assigned a VR counselor and a rehabilitation technician as active members of the program team, and a rehabilitation supervisor was assigned as its programmatic contract monitor, providing support and oversight of the program. The NRD continues to provide enhanced VR services for VOICE participants aged 18—21 prior to high school exit through June 30, 2020. NRD will continue to work with the individuals under this program, until their individualized plan for employment (IPE) is realized, or until they exit the program.
WCSD provides the non—federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the school district are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to NRD student consumers. The school district provides training and enhanced programming exclusively to the NRD student consumers that enables them to achieve employment by utilizing community—based vocational instruction, vocational and worksite training, job placement, work incentive wages, and follow—up services. Augmented services include vocational assessment, career development, work experience, job search skills training, job development, placement, follow—up, and non—supported or supported employment job coaching. The contracted services are not educational services that WCSD is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced and/or added services that are exclusively available to NRD student consumers. (Pages 195-196) Title IV

As with the WCSD arrangement, CCSD furnishes the non—federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the school district are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to NRD student consumers. The school district provides training and enhanced programming to the NRD student consumers that enable them to achieve employment utilizing community—based vocational assessments, vocational instruction, employment preparation, on—campus and off—campus job exploration, and vocational experiences including simulated work trials, job shadowing and volunteer activities. These work—based learning experiences provide NRD student consumers with vocational direction, occupational skills, interpersonal skills, and work ethic development. Furthermore, augmented services provided include job development, job placement, follow—up, and non—supported or supported employment job coaching. These contracted services are not educational services that CCSD is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced and/or added services that are exclusively available to NRD student consumers. (Page 196) Title IV

— UNLV: Assistive technology evaluation and training; career assessment; establishing career goals; academic supports (intensive tutoring and coaching); EPY101 course designed to incorporate the use of AT; accessing campus and community resources; workplace readiness skills development; job development and advocacy; and internship or other work experiences that support the individualized plan for employment (IPE) goal. Unique to UNLV is the provision of counseling and psychological services provided by a UNLV Psychologist for participants with mental health disabilities. These three TPCAs formalize the work of the CareerConnect programs and formalize the commitments and financial agreements between the parties to pool resources to provide these new, innovative and comprehensive services to eligible, co—enrolled students of WNC, TMCC, UNLV and the NRD. Each college, as outlined in its TPCA, individually furnishes the non—federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the colleges are provided by new or redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to NRD student consumers. The colleges provide enhanced services exclusively to the NRD consumers that enable them to achieve appropriate degrees and/or certifications to secure competitive and integrated employment. State plan requirements apply to all services approved under any approved waiver. Additionally, NRD approves each service proposed under the waiver before it is put into effect. (Pages 197-198) Title IV

North, south and rural designated transition teams have been established as liaisons with the individual high school programs. The DSU staff members actively participate in individual education plan meetings and are available to provide other consultation, outreach and plan development assistance, and informational support. The DSU has developed a comprehensive scope of work and fee schedule for the delivery of pre—employment transitions services (Pre-ETS), to include the five required activities of job exploration counseling, counseling regarding postsecondary education programs, work—based learning experiences, workplace readiness training, and instruction in self—advocacy.  (Page 203) Title IV

In compliance with WIOA, the individualized plan for employment (IPE) is jointly developed within 90 days, either in consultation with the special education team or directly with the consumer and/or their parent or guardian depending on the individual’s preference. The IPE is agreed to and signed before the student exits school by the rehabilitation counselor and the student, or the parent or guardian if the student is not of the age of majority as mandated in CFR’s §361.22, §361.45. (Page 203) Title IV

• Work with youth with disabilities, the Nevada Department of Education, local education authorities, parent organizations, and families to encourage early discussions with students about the expectations of employment and their skills, abilities, and talents that will empower them to achieve self-sufficiency.
• Increase participation of vocational rehabilitation representatives in Educational Plan (IEP) conferences.
• Expand Work Based Learning opportunities for students to explore employment options.
• Increase communication between Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, Special Education Teachers, and 504 Coordinators.
• Explore a Job Shadowing and/or mentor program.
• Adopt career planning using an evidence based person centered planning model.
• Encourage and support family participation and make training material available.
• Streamline and clarify the referral process for transition students.
• Explore the use of technology and training earlier in plan development. (Page 243) Title IV

• A Financial Management Case Review, which typically involves the review of one case from each counselor’s caseload. This review evaluates financial aspects of the case.
• A Transition Case Review, which typically involves the review of an average of 25% of open transition case files. This review evaluates three federal requirements for transition.
• Case file reviews of the DSU’s contracted job developers are conducted to ensure quality services are provided. This review began in 2013.
In addition, VR supervisors review no less than 10 unique cases annually for every Rehabilitation Counselor under their supervision. Annually, the outside accounting firm of Eide Bailly, LLP performs a targeted review of a random sampling of VR cases (50-60 on average), to test for eligibility and IPE requirements. (Page 259) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~In southern Nevada, serving the school district are four rehabilitation counselors and two rehabilitation technicians that work as two full—time dedicated teams. These teams coordinate transition services to CCSD, which has 47 high schools, charter schools and alternative learning centers.

Serving the northern Nevada school districts, which covers five counties and 26 high schools, has two dedicated transition teams and 1 mixed outreach team. The teams work with WCSD, LCSD, CCSD, SCSD and DCSD transition students in addition to carrying a caseload of specialized special education VR clients.

In August 2017, the DSU proudly partnered with the Lyon County School District to improve post-secondary outcomes for students with disabilities in Lyon County by providing them with support, resources and access to college and career pathways. Effective in August, the transition coordinator had been hired to implement this much needed program for best practice in a rural county. This was innovative for Nevada as it was the first time that we braided funding for a goal in common in this way. Funding was shared between the DSU, Lyon County School District and the Careers and Technical Education program. (Page 207) Title IV

- Create and implement marketing strategies.
- Educate employers about incentives for hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Increase access to quality job development services.
- Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
- Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
- Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high demand/high growth occupations.
- Update interlocal contracts (Memorandums of Understanding-MOUs) with education and workforce.
- Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 238) Title IV

- Increase partnerships with employers to develop work readiness training programs.
- Increase the use of business development representatives (internal or workforce/one-stop partners).
- Create and implement marketing strategies.
- Educate employers about incentives for hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Increase access to quality job development services.
- Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
- Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
- Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high demand/high growth occupations.
- Update interlocal contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
- Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Pages 248-249) Title IV

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The DSU has long—standing relationships with many workforce development partners, both internal and external, that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals, including youth, with the most significant disabilities. With the implementation of WIOA, new challenges and opportunities are presented to expand the services of supported and customized employment (SE, CE). The collective goal remains to achieve maximum success in assisting individuals with the most significant disabilities into successful competitive, integrated employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused on building more effective partnerships and relationships with similar entities throughout the state that support these efforts that expand integrated employment opportunities.
Sources for supported employment services and supports include:
— Increased supports as defined in WIOA, e.g., VR’s ability to provide long term supports for youth;
— Social Security Administration work incentives, e.g., Plan for Achieving Self—Support (PASS) and Impairment Related Work Expenses (IRWE);
— Diversion of jobs and day training/waiver funding for pre—vocational training;
— Natural supports; and
— Expansion of statewide transition services through partnerships with school districts and the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE).
In northern Nevada, the DSU has continued its relationship with High Sierra Industries to partner in the Career Development Academy to provide supported employment services for adults and youth. The program is an intensive prevocational program for supported employment eligible clients who are interested in competitive and integrated employment. High Sierra Industries provides VR—funded, pre—vocational training and job development, and the Sierra Regional Center provides ongoing (i.e., post—90 days) supports through the use of jobs and day training (JDT) Medicaid waiver funds. This collaboration has been very successful, with an average 85 percent placement rate. (Pages 209-210) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~Through the DSU’s employer engagement, it has been identified the number one training requested by employers is Soft Skills. The DSU is providing Soft Skills training for all Vocational Rehabilitation clients, as needed. The soft skills taught include: Company Vision, Mission and Values; Teamwork; Problem Solving; and Critical Thinking. This helps to prepare job seekers in professionalism, communication and attitude. The DSU has developed inter-local agreements with UNR, CSN and Great Basin College (GBC) to deliver the Soft Skills statewide using a curriculum created from the U.S. Department of Labor’s “Skills that Pay the Bills” curriculum. To date, a total of five classes have been delivered with a total of 50 participants.

To address the unique needs of individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, the DSU continues its collaboration with its community rehabilitation partners. In Las Vegas, the DSU collaborates with the Desert Regional Center and Opportunity Village for three to six-month workplace training programs at Centennial Hills Hospital, Boulder Station Casino, Rio Casino and the Get Fresh produce processing center. Consumers gain hands—on work experience and have the opportunity to rotate through several job experiences at all of these locations. (Page 212) Title IV
 

Data Collection

Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Vocational Rehabilitation utilizes Discoverer software for ad-hoc reporting and data validation purposes. Discoverer is an Oracle® application that captures online transactional data from RAISON. Through Through a weekly extract and load process, RAISON information is migrated into a data warehouse that allows users to create analytical tools and produce ad-hoc queries. Discoverer facilitates timely responses to federal and state ad hoc reporting requests and expands special outreach efforts. The NDE, through the U.S. Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), developed and maintains the 911 Data Edit Checker (v. 2015-1.1) using Microsoft Access 2010. This is an edit and anomaly tool that allows VR to validate data prior to multiple annual and quarterly reporting submissions. Other: TANF and SNAP Data is collected and verified though a variety of means and specific to the requirements of each program. Applicants provide information by entering it into the online application AccessNevada system, submitting hardcopy applications and statements, providing third party documentation, and/or providing information directly to a staff member. Some data is collected from third party sources primarily through interfaces, mailed inquiries and documented telephone calls, i.e., NOMADS interfaces directly with the Social Security Administration’s system for information on identity, benefits and disability status, and with DETR’s data systems for information on unemployment insurance (UI) benefits and quarterly wage data. Data on participation hours in the TANF NEON program and federally defined work activities is collected, audited and reported according to the TANF work verification plan, which is a 35 page document outlining the reporting requirements for TANF performance measures, including how hours of participation reporting and the related internal control mechanisms for accurate reporting assurances. (Page 96) Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~The DSU dedicates funding for the provision of reasonable accommodations for employees with disabilities who need assistance to perform the essential functions of their jobs. Examples include interpreters, flexible work schedules and assistive technology.
New Counselor Academy
The Quality Assurance team provides a number of trainings, including an overview of VR processes to VR staff, and a one week new counselor academy for all newly hired counselors. The curriculum for the new counselor academy includes:
- Introduction / Common Performance indicators/application and intakes
- Eligibility
- Informed choice
- Assessment of Vocational Rehabilitation Needs (AVRN)/IPE
- Case documentation
- Case and expenditure management (Page 223) Title IV

The DSU has an agreement for Intensive Technical Assistance from WINTAC, Y-TAC and NTACT and as such the DSU has received professional development training from these sources in a variety of topics including;
- Customized Employment, Intensive training leading to Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) certification
- Professional Development Series; Module 1. Knowledge of the Field: The Work the We Do, Module 2. Communication with Youth: The Helping Relationship, Module 3. Assessment and Individualized Planning: Charting a course with Youth, and Module 4. Relationship to Family: Working Together.
- WIOA Common Performance Measures (Page 226) Title IV

- Collaborate with minority groups with program development and program referrals.
- Participate in appropriate cultural activities or events, such as applicable chambers of commerce meetings and events.
- Ensure documents are available in other languages as needed, including all marketing and advertising materials.
- Provide information and referrals through the statewide regional centers to individuals in sub-minimum wage employment regarding participation in the VR program.
- Continue developing programs, such as Pathway to Work, to move individuals out of sub-minimum wage jobs into competitive, integrated employment. (Page 247) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The state of Nevada provides initial and continuing notices to make all registrants, applicants, and eligible applicants/registrants, applicants for employment, employees, and interested members of the public aware of the recipients’ obligations to operate its programs and activities in a nondiscriminatory manner. The state board has issued specific state compliance policies related to the communication of equal opportunity (EO), with which all grantees must comply. (Page 124) Title IV

Veterans

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

Nevada offers employers and job seekers extensive services that promote workforce development, catalyze employer successes and bolster job seekers’ skill development. Basic skills required of most in-demand occupations include, but are not limited to: reading comprehension, speaking abilities, critical thinking skills, basic writing skills, active listening skills, the ability to monitor, social perceptiveness, learning strategies, and coordination skills. If potential employees have mastered these basic skills, they can be trained to address specific needs upon employment. (Page 25) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist.

Priority of service is provided to all covered persons as defined in U.S.C. §4215. With respect to any qualified job training program, a covered person shall be given priority over non-veterans for the receipt of employment, training and placement services provided under that program, notwithstanding any other provision of law. Such priority includes giving access to such services to a covered person before a non-covered person or, if resources are limited, giving access to such services to a covered person instead of a non-covered person and priority of service is provided in all Nevada JobConnect (NJC) centers. (Page 122) Title I

DOL/VETS has directed all JVSG staff to provide services only to veterans with SBE. Guidelines for screening and implementing services to veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment is provided in VPL 03-14, Change 2. Veterans and eligible spouses are screened at the initial intake with a questionnaire entitled Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE) Eligibility Review form. This form contains a series of questions used to determine if the eligible veteran or eligible spouse possess one or more of the SBE’s set forth in VPL 03-14, Change 2.

- Are you a special disabled or disabled veteran, as those terms are defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(1) and (3); special disabled and disabled veterans are those:

o Who are entitled to compensation (or who, but for the receipt of military retired pay, would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs; or,

o Were discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability;

- A homeless person, as defined in Sections 103(a) and (b) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. I 1302(a) and (b», as amended;

- A recently-separated service member, as defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(6), who has been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months;

- An offender, as defined by WIOA Section 3 (38), who is currently incarcerated or who has been released from incarceration;

- A veteran lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; or

- A low-income individual (as defined by WIOA Section 3 (36).

If any of these questions are answered yes, the eligible person would be referred to the next available Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) where an assessment would be conducted and individualized career services are provided, (Page 123) Title I

The State Plan must include assurances that:

1. The State has implemented a policy to ensure Adult program funds provide a priority in the delivery of training services and individualized career services to individuals who are low income, public assistance recipients and basic skills deficient; Yes

2. The State has implemented a policy to ensure local areas have a process in place for referring veterans with significant barriers to employment to career services provided by the JVSG program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist; Yes

3. The state established a written policy and procedure that set forth criteria to be used by chief elected officials for the appointment of local workforce investment board members. Yes

4. The State established written policy and procedures to ensure local workforce investment boards are certified by the governor every two years in accordance with WIOA section 107(c)(2). Yes

5. Where an alternative entity takes the place of a State Board, the State has written policy and procedures to ensure the alternative entity meets the definition under WIOA section 101(e) and the legal requirements for membership. No (Page 162) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~- Availability of a full array of support services for employment readiness and work activities, which include transportation, child care, job search, employment-related clothing, equipment, special needs, access to domestic violence services, mental health and substance abuse treatment services.
- The online, automated self-sufficiency information system (OASIS), which is a statewide system application that supports case management, notice, sanction, budget, payment, voucher, invoicing, data gathering, and federal reporting functions of the program.  (Page 37) Title I

The weaknesses of the TANF NEON program include:
- The population served includes individuals with the most significant barriers to employment (e.g., low education levels, those lacking marketable job skills and employment histories, homeless/unstable housing, food insecurities, generational poverty, physical and mental health concerns, disabilities, high prevalence of domestic violence, and alcohol and drug addictions).
- The pressure to meet the TANF work participation rate performance measures and avoid and/or minimize TANF penalties results in the program focusing on only countable work activities within prescribed time limitations and quick engagement in employment. This results in TANF recipients being employed in low wage, often part-time jobs with little long-term stability; oftentimes, TANF recipients cycle on and off the TANF program. An investment in education and skill attainment activities initially would provide more promising opportunities for long-term employment and wage gain successes. (Page 39) Title I

1.3.4 Partner with DHHS and state commissions (i.e., the Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities; the Nevada Commission on Services for Persons with Disabilities; the Nevada Commission on Behavioral Health; community training centers; and, the State Employment Leadership Network) related to underserved populations concerned with sensory (i.e., blindness and/or deafness), mental health, intellectual and developmental disabilities. (Page 50) Title I

— Across Nevada, VR hosts a monthly meeting with the Regional Centers (Rural Regional Center-RRC, Desert Regional Center-DRC, and Southern Regional Center-SRC) to discuss clients in common or potential clients and implications stemming from WIOA. VR also participated in a community fair for community agencies in Elko. Staff members from VR, the RRC, the Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living (NNCIL), and other agencies were present to discuss their programs. Counselors from the Winnemucca, Ely, Elko, and Fallon offices attended the chamber of commerce breakfasts. Statewide, each VR office collaborates with the state mental health agencies. In the north, the District Manager is a member on the Transportation Coalition Committee, which is a committee to determine the transportation needs of disabled, youth and senior citizens. (Page 200) Title IV

When mental illness has been identified as a disability, and it is determined that the rehabilitation participant meets the criteria for supported employment, the rehabilitation counselor works with public and private mental health service providers to assist in obtaining long—term supported services:
— Division of Public and Behavioral Health, Mental Health (Reno, Nevada)
— Division of Public and Behavioral Health, Rural Clinics Community Mental Health Centers (Carson City, Gardnerville, Silver Springs, Fallon, Elko, Ely, Battle Mountain, Lovelock, Caliente, Mesquite and Winnemucca, Nevada)
For those individuals who are yet unknown to the DSU, but receiving services through Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services (NNAMHS), a new program has been developed to facilitate direct referrals of such individuals straight from NNAMHS to VR. In an effort to provide intensive services for supported employment, this collaboration is unique, in that NNAMHS is taking responsibility for the long term follow along for maintenance of employment. (Page 210) Title IV

In collaboration and contract with the Division of Public and Behavioral Health (Mental Health), the DSU continues to explore competitive employment opportunities for mutual clients, and the development of on—campus worksites in the community; these efforts are ongoing and development continues. The DSU has established relationships with the Division of Public and Behavioral Health in Las Vegas, Nevada; the Division of Public and Behavioral Health (Mental Health), in Reno, Nevada; the Division of Public and Behavioral Health, rural clinics; and, the community mental health centers in Carson City, Gardnerville, Silver Springs, Fallon, Elko, Ely, Battle Mountain, Lovelock, Caliente, Mesquite, and Winnemucca, Nevada.
For those individuals who are yet unknown to the DSU, but receiving services through Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services (NNAMHS), a new program has been developed to facilitate direct referrals of such individuals straight from NNAMHS to VR. In an effort to provide intensive services for supported employment, this collaboration is unique, in that NNAMHS is taking responsibility for the long term follow along for maintenance of employment. (Page 214) Title IV

ENTRY LEVEL KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES (required at time of application):
Working knowledge of: counseling principles and practices which includes mental health, group, family and individual counseling, psychosocial and cultural issues in counseling, and foundations, ethics and professional issues in counseling; human growth and development; methods and techniques of interviewing; medical and psychological terminology; basic math.
General knowledge of: fact-finding and case recording.
Ability to: establish a counseling rapport with individuals, with varying disabilities and diverse backgrounds; communicate effectively both verbally and in writing; apply appropriate counseling techniques. (Page 222) Title IV

Indicator: The number of consumers participating in Supported Employment will be 500 participants in FFY 2019. Increase Successful Employment Outcomes. The Division’s performance goal in FFY 2019 will be that at least 166 Supported Employment cases are closed as successful employment outcomes.
Goal 4: Collaborate with other resources to support participants with mental health disabilities to become successfully employed. (May include: Alcohol abuse or dependence, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, drug abuse or dependence, mental illness not listed elsewhere, personality disorders, schizophrenia, and other psychotic disorders).
Indicator: The Division’s performance goal in FFY 2019 will be that at least 260 individuals with Mental Health Disabilities are closed as successful employment outcomes. Individuals with Mental Health Disabilities will have a successful case closure rate similar to other Disabilities groups by FFY 2023. (Page 236) Title IV

After reviewing the needs assessment and WIOA mandates, the DSU and NSRC focused on the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly the VR service needs of:
- Individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment and customized employment;
- Minorities with disabilities in the Nevada workforce, especially the underserved groups of Hispanic and Asian individuals;
- Individuals with disabilities that have been underserved, especially those with mental health disabilities;
- Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system; and
- Transition students. (Page 237) Title IV

The NSRC and DSU aligned the revised goals and corresponding strategies and performance indicators to the trends and recommendations they noted within the new, triennial 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment, including the need to: improve the range and types of jobs the DSU helps to secure for its clients; utilize more certified training and education opportunities for clients; provide benefits planning earlier and to more clients; improve employers’ perceptions of hiring individuals with disabilities; assist with securing work experiences, whether paid or unpaid, for more clients but especially for students and youth; and expand the array of mental health services available to clients. (Page 238) Title IV

While the DSU can and may provide extended services, not to exceed 4 years, the most common method to deliver this service is through close collaboration and partnership with the Aging and Disability Services Division. Clients needing extended services are most commonly clients of ADSD and are entitled to long term follow along through Regional Centers.
For individuals with significant mental illness requiring extended follow along, not to exceed 4 years, the DSU is partnering with the states mental health agency, NNAMHS in the north to provide collaborated case management during the VR case and the provision of long term follow along by the NNAMHS case managers. (Page 240) Title IV

Strategies:
• Collaborate with Department of Health and Human Services, and State commissions related to populations concerned with sensory (blindness, deafness), mental health, intellectual and developmental disabilities; including the Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities, the Nevada Commission on Services for Persons with Disabilities, the Nevada Commission on Behavioral Health and Community Training Centers (CTCs). (Pages 244- 245) Title IV

- Continue marketing efforts with mental health hospitals, mental health service providers, and the state’s welfare services.
- Partner with mental health service providers and community training centers (CTCs).
- Partner with Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health, state commissions related to populations concerned with autism, developmental disabilities, and cognitive and mental health disabilities.). (Pages 246) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
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Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) - 04/30/2020

“The Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) and Aging and Disability Services Division provide for a variety of Assistive Technology (AT) services to support people to live more independently and within their communities. Supported through the Administration for Community Living (ACL) grants under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 as amended (AT Act).”

This page includes information on both Program and State Financial activities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

1915(i) State Plan Option - Adult Day Health Care and Habilitation - 02/25/2020

“Section 1915(i) of the Social Security Act allows the Nevada Division of Health Care Financing and Policy (DHCFP) to provide State Plan Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) similar to that of a 1915(c) HCBS Waiver using needs-based eligibility criteria rather than institutional level of care criteria.  This affords individuals who require less than institutional level of care, but still have a significant need, to have access to greater number of services in the community which they might not otherwise qualify if only offered under a 1915(c) Waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED) P2I - Path to Independence - 02/15/2020

“The Path To Independence is:

An inclusive, two-year, non-degree certificate program offering a college experience to students with intellectual disabilities. A collaborative effort of UNR's Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), the University of Nevada Reno Extended Studies Department, (UNR EXS), Sierra Regional Center (SRC), the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR), Lyon County School District and Washoe County School District.

Each student and their invited guests participate in Person Centered Planning (PCP) each semester. The results of the plan determines the level and direction of academic involvement. The STAR (Students Transitioning to Adult Roles) planning process is used, which includes the areas of Academic Enrichment, Independent Living, Self-Determination, Campus & Community Engagement, and Career Development & Employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

ABLE Nevada - 01/26/2020

"ABLE Accounts (Achieving a Better Life Experience)

January 26 is the start date for consumers to open an ABLE Nevada account.

The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act was recently passed by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Obama. Under the new law, a person with a disability and that person’s family may put money into a special tax-advantaged account. The first $100,000 in an ABLE account will not count against the $2000 Supplemental Security Income (SSI) resource limit, nor will it count against asset limits other programs, such as Medical Assistance, may have.

This new work incentive is a big deal: It means that if you get a job, you can start saving up some money without losing your benefits.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program - 01/01/2020

“The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Laws Chapter 613 – Employment Practices - 01/01/2020

“NRS 613.330 Unlawful employment practices

Discrimination on basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability, national origin or discussion of wages; interference with aid or appliance for disability; refusal to permit service animal at place of employment; consideration of criminal history without following required procedure.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship

Nevada Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities (NGCDD) (DRAFT) 2019 Annual Impact Report - 12/31/2019

“The NGCDD is a self-governing organization authorized in accordance with Public Law 106-402 of the Federal Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act (DD Act) and established under NRS 232.320 housed within the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services to advance advocacy through public policy, capacity building and systems change in collaboration with other state and community agencies…

This report highlights some of our achievements this year.”

Topic areas in the report include:

"Increasing Economic Security and Mobility Empowering Individuals, Families and Communities Protecting Rights and Preventing Abuse Working Towards Health and Wellness”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

The Sunshine Works Job Preparation Program - 12/20/2019

“The Sunshine Works Program was developed in response to the youth unemployment rate crisis for individuals with disabilities.  The Sunshine Works Program is a paid internship for high school graduates ages 18 – 25 who are transitioning from school to the workforce but who still struggle socially to fit in. Program participants will become contracted workers who will get the necessary training and experience needed to become confident, working members of society.  All program participants will work (2) 6-hour shifts per week, at a pay rate of $9.00 per hour.

​Sunshine Works Program will offer supported employment services in a retail setting providing program participants with transferable vocational education and relevant social skills development for improving future opportunities for competitive employment.  Supported employment means all participants have consistent training support while on the job.  One Job Coach is assigned to two program participants per 6-month program.  Job coaches are present with the participants during every shift ensuring the appropriate amount of support, guidance and encouragement is provided.  The participants are independent, but job coaches help them continue to grow offering opportunities for more independent employment in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/14/2019

~~“The Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation’s (DETR) Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation is a state and federally funded program designed to help people with disabilities become employed and to help those already employed perform more successfully through training, counseling and other support methods. How the Vocational Rehabilitation Program Works

Vocational Rehabilitation staff begins with an assessment to determine your current abilities and how you might benefit from available services. You will work with a counselor to create an employment plan that best suits your needs. When necessary, counselors may refer clients to other agencies for resources. Vocational Rehabilitation often collaborates with businesses to assess job sites and implement tools that will improve an employees ability to successfully perform duties.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Rehabilitation Division - 06/13/2019

~~“The Rehabilitation Division is comprised of three bureaus, which include Vocational Rehabilitation, Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Bureau of Disability Adjudication. The Division also includes the Blind Business Enterprises of Nevada Program, and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. All of these services are designed to address assessment, training, treatment, and job placement for Nevadans with disabilities. The division places primary emphasis on providing necessary services to help clients work and live independently.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Nevada Assembly Bill 488: Relating to the Administration of Government Departments - 07/01/2013

"AN ACT relating to governmental administration; consolidating the Health Division and the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department of Health and Human Services into the Division of Public and Behavioral Health of the Department; transferring the powers and duties concerning certain services to children with autism spectrum disorders from the Health Division to the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department; transferring the authority for developmental services in the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services to the Aging and Disability Services Division; … renaming the Commission on Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department the Commission on Behavioral Health; making the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department responsible for services for and other oversight relating to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; making various other changes to provisions relating to the organization of the divisions of the Department; and providing other matters properly relating thereto."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Executive Order - Establishing a Program for the Hiring of People with Disabilities into the State Workforce - 10/08/2013

By the power vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and the laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order that all state agencies made a concerted effort to include persons with disabilities into the "preliminary and final group of    candidates" considered for each appropriate opening within the agency. It orders all state agencies to make the hiring of persons with disabilities a priority, mandating that at least five percent of openings give persons with disabilities priority.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 25

Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) - 04/30/2020

“The Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) and Aging and Disability Services Division provide for a variety of Assistive Technology (AT) services to support people to live more independently and within their communities. Supported through the Administration for Community Living (ACL) grants under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 as amended (AT Act).”

This page includes information on both Program and State Financial activities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

ABLE Nevada - 01/26/2020

"ABLE Accounts (Achieving a Better Life Experience)

January 26 is the start date for consumers to open an ABLE Nevada account.

The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act was recently passed by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Obama. Under the new law, a person with a disability and that person’s family may put money into a special tax-advantaged account. The first $100,000 in an ABLE account will not count against the $2000 Supplemental Security Income (SSI) resource limit, nor will it count against asset limits other programs, such as Medical Assistance, may have.

This new work incentive is a big deal: It means that if you get a job, you can start saving up some money without losing your benefits.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Nevada Laws Chapter 613 – Employment Practices - 01/01/2020

“NRS 613.330 Unlawful employment practices

Discrimination on basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability, national origin or discussion of wages; interference with aid or appliance for disability; refusal to permit service animal at place of employment; consideration of criminal history without following required procedure.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship

Nevada Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities (NGCDD) (DRAFT) 2019 Annual Impact Report - 12/31/2019

“The NGCDD is a self-governing organization authorized in accordance with Public Law 106-402 of the Federal Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act (DD Act) and established under NRS 232.320 housed within the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services to advance advocacy through public policy, capacity building and systems change in collaboration with other state and community agencies…

This report highlights some of our achievements this year.”

Topic areas in the report include:

"Increasing Economic Security and Mobility Empowering Individuals, Families and Communities Protecting Rights and Preventing Abuse Working Towards Health and Wellness”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/14/2019

~~“The Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation’s (DETR) Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation is a state and federally funded program designed to help people with disabilities become employed and to help those already employed perform more successfully through training, counseling and other support methods. How the Vocational Rehabilitation Program Works

Vocational Rehabilitation staff begins with an assessment to determine your current abilities and how you might benefit from available services. You will work with a counselor to create an employment plan that best suits your needs. When necessary, counselors may refer clients to other agencies for resources. Vocational Rehabilitation often collaborates with businesses to assess job sites and implement tools that will improve an employees ability to successfully perform duties.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Rehabilitation Division - 06/13/2019

~~“The Rehabilitation Division is comprised of three bureaus, which include Vocational Rehabilitation, Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Bureau of Disability Adjudication. The Division also includes the Blind Business Enterprises of Nevada Program, and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. All of these services are designed to address assessment, training, treatment, and job placement for Nevadans with disabilities. The division places primary emphasis on providing necessary services to help clients work and live independently.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement Strategy (Quality Strategy) - 05/02/2019

~~“Quality Initiatives and Emerging Practices Emerging practices occur by incorporating evidence-based guidelines into operational structures, policies, and procedures. Emerging practices are born out of continual quality improvement efforts to enhance a service, health outcome, systems process, or operational procedure. The goals of these efforts are to improve the quality of and access to services. Only through continual measurement and analyses to determine the efficacy of an intervention may an emerging practice be identified. Therefore, the DHCFP encourages MCEs to continually track and monitor efficacy of quality improvement initiatives and interventions to determine if the benefit of the intervention outweighs effort and cost.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mental Health Intensive Case Management (MHICM) - 03/01/2019

~~“Services Provided to Eligible VeteransClinical case management in the community to facilitate Veteran’s behavioral health recovery• Very frequent contacts typically 2-3 times per week often in the home or community• Interventions target social skills, increased self-care, independent living, employment, crisis resolution, and practical problem solving• Assistance coordinating and/or utilizing transportation services• Medication management and education• Psychotherapy and educational groups• Assistance with connecting or reconnecting with family members and other natural supports• Peer Support Services• Community Resource and Referrals”

Systems
  • Other

ALTERNATIVE DIPLOMA COMPUTER EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY GUIDANCE - 02/25/2019

~~“The Nevada Department of Education’s Office of Special Education recognizes that students with  significant  cognitive  disabilities  (SCD)  represent  a  broad  diversity  of  abilities  and  support  needs.    In  an  effort  to  assist  IEP  teams  in  decision  making  and  planning  for  the  Alternative  Diploma,  we  have  developed  the  following  Recommended  Minimum  Access  Point as  guidance.    This recommended access  point for  students  with  SCD  is  intended  to  promote  the  broadest  level  of  student  access  to  a  Computer  Education  and  Technology  curriculum, while also ensuring a high level of rigor in student programming.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DETR to Recognize Nevada’s Inaugural Groundhog Job Shadow Day - 01/31/2019

~~“In honor of Groundhog Day and the National Job Shadow Day on February 2nd, the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation’s (DETR) Rehabilitation Division will be celebrating February 4th as Nevada’s inaugural Groundhog Job Shadow Day.   This special day highlights the importance of providing opportunities for  Nevada students with disabilities to explore careers."

More information  about this event is available by accessing the weblink.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED) P2I - Path to Independence - 02/15/2020

“The Path To Independence is:

An inclusive, two-year, non-degree certificate program offering a college experience to students with intellectual disabilities. A collaborative effort of UNR's Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), the University of Nevada Reno Extended Studies Department, (UNR EXS), Sierra Regional Center (SRC), the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR), Lyon County School District and Washoe County School District.

Each student and their invited guests participate in Person Centered Planning (PCP) each semester. The results of the plan determines the level and direction of academic involvement. The STAR (Students Transitioning to Adult Roles) planning process is used, which includes the areas of Academic Enrichment, Independent Living, Self-Determination, Campus & Community Engagement, and Career Development & Employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2019 Statewide Transportation Summit - 05/01/2019

~~“This Summit is designed for professionals, self-advocates with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD), and parents or caregivers of individuals with I/DD, highly involved in the community and able to provide productive input in guided conversations about transportation.

Our goal is to start a statewide conversation of how we can gain measurable progress toward a replicable model that promotes an increase of accessible transportation options in Nevada.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Nevada

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all

working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. The expectation is that people work!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada State Use Program "Preferred Purchase"

~~“In accordance with NRS 334.025 Program to Encourage and Facilitate Purchases by Agencies of Commodities and Services From  Organizations for training and employment of persons with mental or physical disabilities:An organization that wishes to participate in the Program must register with the Purchasing Division on a form prescribed by the Administrator before contacting any agency concerning entering into a contract pursuant to the Program.  "Organization" means an organization whose primary purpose is the training and employment of persons with mental or physical disabilities, including, without limitation, community-based training centers for the care and training of persons with physical or mental retardation described in Chapter 435…." 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Nevada State Rehabilitation Council

“The mission of the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) is to help ensure that vocational rehabilitation programs (Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation and Bureau of Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired) are consumer oriented, consumer driven, and that the programs' services and resources result in employment outcomes for Nevadans with disabilities….

 The Council may assist you or others in the community in the following ways:  

1.       Help individuals with disabilities obtain services which may help them become employable.

2.       Put employers in contact with individuals with disabilities who may fill their staffing needs.

3.       Receive and relay client experiences about the state or the community vocational rehabilitation programs.

Receive and relay ideas about improving vocational rehabilitation services.

The Council has a minimum of 16 members as required by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended.”   

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities “Position on Employment” - 04/29/2017

~~“Policy Recommendations:• Remove barriers that create disincentives for people with developmental disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment (employment includes supported employment, job training and job coaching) with competitive wages in the community. These barriers may include: transportation, flexible options for on the job supports, and continued or potential health care benefits.• Implement “Employment First” policies that transform the expectations of state agencies, service providers and people with developmental disabilities. Under “Employment First’, the expectation is that a person with a developmental or other disability can and wants to work, and a successful outcome is finding these individuals meaningful and gainful employment that meets their needs and interests by tailoring services to help them succeed in the workforce.• Fully fund the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that are significantly underfunded to meet the employment needs of individuals with severe disabilities who need VR services to obtain employment.” 

Systems
  • Other

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home Program - 05/30/2006

Through the Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home program, a new offering from the State of Nevada, eligible participants will be provided with the services, support, and assistance necessary to move back into a community setting, such as an apartment or family home.

In order to help eligible participants with the transition process, the program can pay for goods and services, such as furniture, appliances, moving expenses, and housing deposits. See the SERVICES tab for a full list of program benefits.

MFP also gives most participants the option of self-direction, allowing them to decide where they want to live and who will assist them upon returning to the community.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

"The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Learning Community : Improving Systems and Services for Individuals with IDD

~~The Employment Learning Community (ELC) assists states in improving systems and services to increase inclusive, competitive employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).The ELC has three key components:

• Delphi panel,• Communities of practice,• Technical assistance

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

The Sunshine Works Job Preparation Program - 12/20/2019

“The Sunshine Works Program was developed in response to the youth unemployment rate crisis for individuals with disabilities.  The Sunshine Works Program is a paid internship for high school graduates ages 18 – 25 who are transitioning from school to the workforce but who still struggle socially to fit in. Program participants will become contracted workers who will get the necessary training and experience needed to become confident, working members of society.  All program participants will work (2) 6-hour shifts per week, at a pay rate of $9.00 per hour.

​Sunshine Works Program will offer supported employment services in a retail setting providing program participants with transferable vocational education and relevant social skills development for improving future opportunities for competitive employment.  Supported employment means all participants have consistent training support while on the job.  One Job Coach is assigned to two program participants per 6-month program.  Job coaches are present with the participants during every shift ensuring the appropriate amount of support, guidance and encouragement is provided.  The participants are independent, but job coaches help them continue to grow offering opportunities for more independent employment in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Collaborative Initiatives across Career and Technical Education, Vocational Rehabilitation and Special Education: Three State/Local Stories - 03/08/2018

“Learning Objectives

Attendees will gain knowledge of:

• predictors and evidence-based and promising practices specific to interagency collaboration across CTE, VR, and SpEd;

• effective strategies to build partnerships between CTE, VR, and SpEd; and

• tools, resources, and practical solutions to use with addressing common barriers at the state and local levels.

 

The need for collaboration: what we know

•CTE teachers identify collaboration with special educators and VR counselors as a key facet of their success in serving all youth.

•Best practices and resources for collaboration and student development will support self-determination, career exploration, culture, and course offerings of high school that lead to postsecondary education and training as well as employment (NTACT, 2017).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

"Time to Pick the Fruit- It’s Ripe" Customized Employment: Presentation by the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities - 05/21/2014

This presentation given by the staff at the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities defines Employment First (EF) & Customized Employment (CE), elaborates upon the Nevada Collaborators, describes the philosophy, practices, and descendants of CE, and explains who can be served by the CE Project and what those job seekers can hope to achieve.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

"Customized Employment Project offers community members with disabilities hope" - 09/25/2013

The Customized Employment Project, a partnership between the Nevada Rehabilitation Division at the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), Sierra Regional Center at Developmental Services, and the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), is a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both. It is based on an individualized match between the strengths, conditions and interests of a job candidate and the identified business needs of an employer. Customized employment utilizes an individualized approach to employment planning and job development - one person at a time - one employer at a time.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Comprehensive System of Personnel Development - 02/28/2012

The Rehabilitation Division, as the DSU, has established procedures and activities setting forth the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development[MW1]  (CSPD), which will ensure an adequate supply of qualified Rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals for the operation of the Vocational Rehabilitation programs.

The CSPD is coordinated by the Administrator of the DSU with the participation of: the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC), Human Resources staff of the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), and staff of the Bureaus of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR) and Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired (BSBVI). DETR’s personnel records enable an annual analysis of the numbers and types of Rehabilitation personnel. Through the State of Nevada Personnel Department database, information on budgeted positions, duration of vacancy for each position and vacancy rates are available through a data warehouse system.

In addition, a personnel log is maintained at the agency level, delineating the location, type of position and date vacated in order to provide current tracking of vacancies including the status of each vacant position. This tracking mechanism has proved successful in reducing the vacancy rate and the amount of time that each position is vacant. All the sources of information are used to track and forecast the DSU’s personnel needs.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Emerging Practices from Vocational Rehabilitation

This summary document describes different initiatives and emerging practices in the state of Nevada that aim at improving employment outcomes for people with disabilities. The projects include CRAVE, Customized Employment, Voice, Career Development Academy, and the Pathways to Work.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NV Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation

This website contains information on the Job Development Training Series, “Creating Employment Opportunities.”  The modules in the series include: Introduction to Job Development and the Role of the Job Developer, Getting to Know Your Customer; The Employer as Partner; and Job Placement and Retention Services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

1915(i) State Plan Option - Adult Day Health Care and Habilitation - 02/25/2020

“Section 1915(i) of the Social Security Act allows the Nevada Division of Health Care Financing and Policy (DHCFP) to provide State Plan Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) similar to that of a 1915(c) HCBS Waiver using needs-based eligibility criteria rather than institutional level of care criteria.  This affords individuals who require less than institutional level of care, but still have a significant need, to have access to greater number of services in the community which they might not otherwise qualify if only offered under a 1915(c) Waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program - 01/01/2020

“The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid State Plan - 09/12/2017

The Medicaid and CHIP state plans are agreements between Nevada and the federal government describing how we administer these programs. It gives an assurance that Nevada will abide by federal rules and may claim federal matching funds for program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are under way in the state.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Nevada HCBS Transition Plan - 07/09/2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new regulations in early 2014 that define the home and community based settings that will be allowable under HCBS. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS are fully integrated into the community in which they live. These individuals must be offered opportunities to seek employment and engage in community activities in the same manner as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NV HCBW for Persons w/ID and Related Conditions (0125.R06.00) - 10/01/2013

Provides day hab, prevocational, residential support, supported employment, behavioral consultation-training & intervention, counseling, career planning, non-medical transportation, nursing, nutrition counseling, residential support management for individuals w/ID ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver - 10/01/2013

The Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver program is authorized in ­1915(c) of the Social Security Act. The program permits a State to furnish an array of home and community-based services that assist Medicaid beneficiaries to live in the community and avoid institutionalization. The State has broad discretion to design its waiver program to address the needs of the waiver­s target population. Waiver services complement and/or supplement the services that are available to participants through the Medicaid.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program

"The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.

As required by the funding authorization, Nevada Medicaid (Division of Health Care Financing and Policy) is the lead agency for the BIP. The BIP team, however, is made up of a large number of cross-functional and cross-agency contributors who have been instrumental in moving the project toward its goals and objectives. Many of the projects and workgroups related to BIP have been collaborations between Nevada's Aging and Disability Services Division and Nevada Medicaid. In addition, many other state agencies and contractors have contributed in important ways."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

In the Silver State of Nevada, workers with disabilities don't have to take a gamble on their future when it comes to finding career success and employment opportunities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nevada’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.2%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,034,392
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.52%
Change from
2017 to 2018
184,884
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.45%
Change from
2017 to 2018
78,230
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.94%
Change from
2017 to 2018
42.31%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.19%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.21%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 2,940,058 2,998,039 3,034,392
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 198,826 183,918 184,884
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 83,453 73,968 78,230
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,211,522 1,264,395 1,277,592
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.97% 40.22% 42.31%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.05% 77.06% 77.21%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.70% 5.00% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.50% 18.00% 20.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.20% 12.30% 11.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 193,158 179,419 187,839
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 191,448 183,450 185,552
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 280,061 252,808 258,453
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 36,044 37,992 39,701
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 73,463 62,671 70,553
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 6,382 5,854 5,871
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 21,526 24,947 22,187
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,102 2,446 1,914
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 13,388 13,759 16,877
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 25,202 25,063 28,388

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,046 2,140 2,109
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.90% 5.10% 4.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 65,717 65,664 64,745

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,371 1,024 990
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 5,043 3,416 3,148
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 9,088 6,252 6,120
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.10% 16.40% 16.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.90% 8.70% 7.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.70% 2.20% 2.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20% 32.50% 31.90%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 816 736 623
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 177 190 171
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 120 2,763 2,686

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,662 4,338 4,568
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 63 161 127
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 46 94 69
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 73.00% 58.00% 54.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.65 3.25 2.39

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
1,800
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 97 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 215 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 425 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 510 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 423 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 130 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.00% 29.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,921 2,164 N/A
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 96,673 98,566 2,190
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 86 73 98,378
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 63 50 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,254,000 $3,638,000 $3,413,939
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $11,549,000 $11,896,000 $12,695,759
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $15,447,000 $16,202,000 $17,191,276
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $187,000 $167,000 $212,329
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 16.00% 17.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 14 16 15
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,114 1,149 1,226
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 881 907 828
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 13.00 14.20 14.43

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.48% 63.63% 62.27%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.66% 14.65% 15.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.54% 1.47% 1.43%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 100.00% 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 18.47% 18.88% 20.71%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.73% 61.29% 57.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 68.94% 75.05% 71.89%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 36.26% 42.41% 36.61%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 811,514
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,144
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 703
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 199,341
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 200,044
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 4
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 336
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,907
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,360,666

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8 8 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8 8 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,121 1,102 935
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,121 1,102 935

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~4.4 Provide effective and efficient job training that is aligned with in-demand occupations.
4.4.1 Increase the number of Nevadans earning sustainable living wages and support best practices that encourage high wage/career-track employment.
4.4.2 Operationalize employment first strategies, which include the strategy that employment services should be the first priority option for individuals with disabilities. Employment first is based on the premise that everyone can work.
4.4.3 Incorporate career readiness content into educational curriculum that links to postsecondary education. (Page 56) Title I
 

Customized Employment

~~The WIN curriculum encompasses self-discovery, life (i.e., soft) skills, money management, mock-interviews, and job retention information with primary emphasis placed on current job seeking techniques. The WIN program is specifically designed to meet the needs of the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) New Employees of Nevada (NEON) recipients and provide solutions to the participant’s most common employment barriers. WIN participants graduate from the program with appropriate interview attire, a master job application, a professionally assisted resume, knowledge of up-to-date job search and successful interview techniques, and the confidence to successfully secure employment. (Page 34) Title I

- Services provided by VR’s business development team, including: direct recruitment and outreach services to employers regarding hiring individuals with disabilities and disability awareness, and developing recruitment and work readiness programs to meet employers’ hiring needs.
- Vocational assessments, education and training, skills enhancement training, vocational counseling and guidance, job development and advocacy, transition services for students and youth transitioning to college or careers, customized employment, physical and mental restoration services, and post-employment services that are unique to VR and address the unique needs of individuals with disabilities.
VR will continue to actively participate in cross-agency councils, commissions, boards, taskforces, and workgroups. (Page 77) Title I

— TMCC: Assistive technology evaluation, recommendation and training; holistic assessments including in transition and career/vocational options; academic supports including intensive, targeted tutoring and coaching; assistance with accessing campus and community resources; job search skill development; job preparation and job readiness skills training; internships and other community, hands—on work experiences; comprehensive exploration with a counselor/coach in job discovery, research, networking, decision—making, planning, action steps and goal setting; and the EPY101 course, which includes the use of assistive technology (AT) to enhance accessibility, improve study skills and student success. (Page 197) Title IV

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(4)). Describe the designated State agency’s efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other State agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide supported employment services and extended employment services, as applicable, to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities.
The DSU has long—standing relationships with many workforce development partners, both internal and external, that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals, including youth, with the most significant disabilities. With the implementation of WIOA, new challenges and opportunities are presented to expand the services of supported and customized employment (SE, CE). The collective goal remains to achieve maximum success in assisting individuals with the most significant disabilities into successful competitive, integrated employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused on building more effective partnerships and relationships with similar entities throughout the state that support these efforts that expand integrated employment opportunities. (Page 209) Title IV

VR Transition Teams statewide are working strategically to develop expanded supported employment services to include customized employment. In this endeavor, VR is working with Opportunity Village, Centers for Independent Living and individual, qualified job development providers to serve this unique and expanding population. Through collaboration and financial support from the Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) and Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC), VR hosted training for customized employment, including statewide in—service for VR staff and statewide community partners with nationally recognized supported employment professionals, Griffin-Hammis. (Page 211) Title IV

The DSU is engaged with a McDonalds Northern Nevada Franchisee group that owns 16 restaurants and one training facility to work with each applicant interested in their desired position with McDonalds. The Human Resources and General Manager along with Store Managers meet with candidates to conduct a tour and discuss employment opportunities throughout the 16 restaurants. McDonalds is seeking to identify applicants with the desire to work in their restaurants to obtain measurable and long term skills gain. This has enabled McDonalds to identify and accommodate an individual with a disability to maintain higher retention rates. A total of two Discovery Sessions have been conducted, resulting in seven interviews and five hires. (Page 212) Title IV

Currently, there are eight VR supervisors, each of whom supervises up to seven direct reports. With an increase in VR counselors, it is likely one additional supervisor will be needed to provide the oversight necessary to ensure quality services to individuals with disabilities. Current staffing levels for accounting staff, administrative assistants, and rehabilitation instructors will not require an increase in the next five years. However, it’s likely the DSU will need additional rehabilitation technicians to fulfill program administration requirements, as mentioned above. The DSU will also need to fill 32 projected vacancies over the next five years. The greatest projected need is for new/dedicated staff to perform internal job development activities, customized employment activities for the most significantly disabled clients, and transition staff to serve this ever-growing population.
The number of qualified personnel for VR is allocated in biennial legislative sessions based on the projected needs of the DSU and available funding. After annually reviewing the personnel vacancy reports, the DSU was able to estimate projected vacancies for the next five years. Longevity of current personnel working in state service was also factored in to determine the number of personnel who will exit the DSU in the next five years due to retirement. (Page 216) Title IV

The DSU has an agreement for Intensive Technical Assistance from WINTAC, Y-TAC and NTACT and as such the DSU has received professional development training from these sources in a variety of topics including;
- Customized Employment, Intensive training leading to Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) certification
- Professional Development Series; Module 1. Knowledge of the Field: The Work the We Do, Module 2. Communication with Youth: The Helping Relationship, Module 3. Assessment and Individualized Planning: Charting a course with Youth, and Module 4. Relationship to Family: Working Together. (Page 226) Title IV

The DSU and the NDOE, Office of Special Education, Elementary and Secondary Education and school improvement programs have an interlocal contract, which contains provisions for the joint training of VR staff and special education personnel. Special education staff members have and will be participating in vocational rehabilitation training on customized employment, job development and placement of individuals with disabilities, and WIOA implications. The DSU was invited by the NDOE to participate in collegial training on meaningful collaboration between special education, Career and Technical Education and VR by renowned educator, George Tilson. The DSU currently is working with the school districts to provide complementary trainings coordinated by local vocational rehabilitation offices to share information on VR processes and programmatic changes such as the requirements in WIOA for pre-employment transition services. The local offices work with special education departments and career and technical education programs for the establishment of pre-vocational coordinated activities. Future plans include an increased effort for outreach to all students with disabilities, including students with disabilities as defined under section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. (Pages 228-229) Title IV

• Provision of soft skills training to clients statewide through WNC, University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), College of Southern Nevada (CSN) and Great Basin College (GBC). Curriculum is based upon the U.S. Department of Labor’s “Skills that Pay the Bills” curriculum.
• Addition of 2 Third Party Cooperative Arrangements (TPCAs) with College of Southern Nevada (CSN) and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV). CSN operated from July 2016 through June 2017 upon which time the contract was cancelled. UNLV began operating in January 2016, and continues to operate presently.
• Staff training on customized employment.
• Staff development through participation in Transition training.
• Provision of assistive technology training statewide for staff.
• With the guidance of the National Technical Assistance Center on Transition (NTACT) the DSU and NDOE began and continue to work with one rural high school providing technical assistance. This program will become the model for how transition activities, including Pre-ETS and collaboration with CTE will be handled across the state especially rural communities. (Page 256) Title IV

Additional programs working with youth exist in southern Nevada through collaboration between the CCSD, Opportunity Village, Inc., the DSU, and the Desert Regional Center. The school district pays for student’s ages 18-21 years to participate in soft skills and vocational training in a program called Job Discovery I and II. When the students graduate to phase II, they are referred to the DSU to begin formal job development and placement activities.
Internally, one rehabilitation team has focused its efforts on SE participants. This team has developed unique relationships with SE employment support providers and meets on a regular basis to staff clients and ensure closer follow along. This model has proven very successful and is consideration for future expansion. (Page 257) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~One-stop partner meetings will be held quarterly to continue to align the workforce services provided by all core, required and optional partners participating in the One-Stop Delivery System (OSDS). The goal is to increase the alignment and coordination with those partner programs already involved in the OSDS, and to engage those partner programs that are new to the OSDS. The availability of employment, training and educational opportunities will be improved through the alignment process. Current program services of all core, required, and optional partners will be inventoried; efficiencies and duplication of efforts across programs will be identified; and, realignment will take place. Topics of discussion will include strategies to maximize and integrate intake processes and other one-stop career center and affiliate site services, with significant emphasis placed on co-enrollment between all applicable program partners. Furthermore, encouragement of co-enrollment and resource leveraging through other means (e.g., requirements built into individual training account policies and procedures will occur. (Page 71) Title I

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Incentives: Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) supports workforce development activities by providing employment services to businesses by educating them about how people with disabilities can contribute to the success of their operations. VR offers hiring incentives that are applicable to the benefits of employers hiring people with disabilities, such as the WOTC, the disability access credit and barrier removal tax deduction. VR also provides training incentives to employers that hire people with disabilities. VR also assists employers in bringing diversity into their workplaces. Disability adds another dimension to diversity efforts, contributing to the development of unique and creative business solutions.

Community-Based Assessments: Vocational Rehabilitation partners with approximately 65 employers statewide to provide community-based assessments for VR clients that are individuals with disabilities. Community- based assessments provide the ability to examine participants’ work-related skills and abilities at actual job sites performing hands-on job duties. These assessments also help identify barriers individuals with disabilities may have in the workplace. VR then provides services and support to mitigate these barriers. While on the job, VR participants in community-based assessment programs are paid wages by VR through a third-party temporary agency. Assessments last up to 100 work hours. (Page 32) Title I

Under the VOICE cooperative arrangement, NRD assigned a VR counselor and a rehabilitation technician as active members of the program team, and a rehabilitation supervisor was assigned as its programmatic contract monitor, providing support and oversight of the program. The NRD continues to provide enhanced VR services for VOICE participants aged 18—21 prior to high school exit through June 30, 2020. NRD will continue to work with the individuals under this program, until their individualized plan for employment (IPE) is realized, or until they exit the program.
WCSD provides the non—federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the school district are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to NRD student consumers. The school district provides training and enhanced programming exclusively to the NRD student consumers that enables them to achieve employment by utilizing community—based vocational instruction, vocational and worksite training, job placement, work incentive wages, and follow—up services. Augmented services include vocational assessment, career development, work experience, job search skills training, job development, placement, follow—up, and non—supported or supported employment job coaching. The contracted services are not educational services that WCSD is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced and/or added services that are exclusively available to NRD student consumers. (Pages 195-196) Title IV

As with the WCSD arrangement, CCSD furnishes the non—federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the school district are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to NRD student consumers. The school district provides training and enhanced programming to the NRD student consumers that enable them to achieve employment utilizing community—based vocational assessments, vocational instruction, employment preparation, on—campus and off—campus job exploration, and vocational experiences including simulated work trials, job shadowing and volunteer activities. These work—based learning experiences provide NRD student consumers with vocational direction, occupational skills, interpersonal skills, and work ethic development. Furthermore, augmented services provided include job development, job placement, follow—up, and non—supported or supported employment job coaching. These contracted services are not educational services that CCSD is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced and/or added services that are exclusively available to NRD student consumers. (Page 196) Title IV

— UNLV: Assistive technology evaluation and training; career assessment; establishing career goals; academic supports (intensive tutoring and coaching); EPY101 course designed to incorporate the use of AT; accessing campus and community resources; workplace readiness skills development; job development and advocacy; and internship or other work experiences that support the individualized plan for employment (IPE) goal. Unique to UNLV is the provision of counseling and psychological services provided by a UNLV Psychologist for participants with mental health disabilities. These three TPCAs formalize the work of the CareerConnect programs and formalize the commitments and financial agreements between the parties to pool resources to provide these new, innovative and comprehensive services to eligible, co—enrolled students of WNC, TMCC, UNLV and the NRD. Each college, as outlined in its TPCA, individually furnishes the non—federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the colleges are provided by new or redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to NRD student consumers. The colleges provide enhanced services exclusively to the NRD consumers that enable them to achieve appropriate degrees and/or certifications to secure competitive and integrated employment. State plan requirements apply to all services approved under any approved waiver. Additionally, NRD approves each service proposed under the waiver before it is put into effect. (Pages 197-198) Title IV

North, south and rural designated transition teams have been established as liaisons with the individual high school programs. The DSU staff members actively participate in individual education plan meetings and are available to provide other consultation, outreach and plan development assistance, and informational support. The DSU has developed a comprehensive scope of work and fee schedule for the delivery of pre—employment transitions services (Pre-ETS), to include the five required activities of job exploration counseling, counseling regarding postsecondary education programs, work—based learning experiences, workplace readiness training, and instruction in self—advocacy.  (Page 203) Title IV

In compliance with WIOA, the individualized plan for employment (IPE) is jointly developed within 90 days, either in consultation with the special education team or directly with the consumer and/or their parent or guardian depending on the individual’s preference. The IPE is agreed to and signed before the student exits school by the rehabilitation counselor and the student, or the parent or guardian if the student is not of the age of majority as mandated in CFR’s §361.22, §361.45. (Page 203) Title IV

• Work with youth with disabilities, the Nevada Department of Education, local education authorities, parent organizations, and families to encourage early discussions with students about the expectations of employment and their skills, abilities, and talents that will empower them to achieve self-sufficiency.
• Increase participation of vocational rehabilitation representatives in Educational Plan (IEP) conferences.
• Expand Work Based Learning opportunities for students to explore employment options.
• Increase communication between Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, Special Education Teachers, and 504 Coordinators.
• Explore a Job Shadowing and/or mentor program.
• Adopt career planning using an evidence based person centered planning model.
• Encourage and support family participation and make training material available.
• Streamline and clarify the referral process for transition students.
• Explore the use of technology and training earlier in plan development. (Page 243) Title IV

• A Financial Management Case Review, which typically involves the review of one case from each counselor’s caseload. This review evaluates financial aspects of the case.
• A Transition Case Review, which typically involves the review of an average of 25% of open transition case files. This review evaluates three federal requirements for transition.
• Case file reviews of the DSU’s contracted job developers are conducted to ensure quality services are provided. This review began in 2013.
In addition, VR supervisors review no less than 10 unique cases annually for every Rehabilitation Counselor under their supervision. Annually, the outside accounting firm of Eide Bailly, LLP performs a targeted review of a random sampling of VR cases (50-60 on average), to test for eligibility and IPE requirements. (Page 259) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~In southern Nevada, serving the school district are four rehabilitation counselors and two rehabilitation technicians that work as two full—time dedicated teams. These teams coordinate transition services to CCSD, which has 47 high schools, charter schools and alternative learning centers.

Serving the northern Nevada school districts, which covers five counties and 26 high schools, has two dedicated transition teams and 1 mixed outreach team. The teams work with WCSD, LCSD, CCSD, SCSD and DCSD transition students in addition to carrying a caseload of specialized special education VR clients.

In August 2017, the DSU proudly partnered with the Lyon County School District to improve post-secondary outcomes for students with disabilities in Lyon County by providing them with support, resources and access to college and career pathways. Effective in August, the transition coordinator had been hired to implement this much needed program for best practice in a rural county. This was innovative for Nevada as it was the first time that we braided funding for a goal in common in this way. Funding was shared between the DSU, Lyon County School District and the Careers and Technical Education program. (Page 207) Title IV

- Create and implement marketing strategies.
- Educate employers about incentives for hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Increase access to quality job development services.
- Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
- Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
- Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high demand/high growth occupations.
- Update interlocal contracts (Memorandums of Understanding-MOUs) with education and workforce.
- Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 238) Title IV

- Increase partnerships with employers to develop work readiness training programs.
- Increase the use of business development representatives (internal or workforce/one-stop partners).
- Create and implement marketing strategies.
- Educate employers about incentives for hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Increase access to quality job development services.
- Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
- Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
- Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high demand/high growth occupations.
- Update interlocal contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
- Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Pages 248-249) Title IV

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The DSU has long—standing relationships with many workforce development partners, both internal and external, that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals, including youth, with the most significant disabilities. With the implementation of WIOA, new challenges and opportunities are presented to expand the services of supported and customized employment (SE, CE). The collective goal remains to achieve maximum success in assisting individuals with the most significant disabilities into successful competitive, integrated employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused on building more effective partnerships and relationships with similar entities throughout the state that support these efforts that expand integrated employment opportunities.
Sources for supported employment services and supports include:
— Increased supports as defined in WIOA, e.g., VR’s ability to provide long term supports for youth;
— Social Security Administration work incentives, e.g., Plan for Achieving Self—Support (PASS) and Impairment Related Work Expenses (IRWE);
— Diversion of jobs and day training/waiver funding for pre—vocational training;
— Natural supports; and
— Expansion of statewide transition services through partnerships with school districts and the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE).
In northern Nevada, the DSU has continued its relationship with High Sierra Industries to partner in the Career Development Academy to provide supported employment services for adults and youth. The program is an intensive prevocational program for supported employment eligible clients who are interested in competitive and integrated employment. High Sierra Industries provides VR—funded, pre—vocational training and job development, and the Sierra Regional Center provides ongoing (i.e., post—90 days) supports through the use of jobs and day training (JDT) Medicaid waiver funds. This collaboration has been very successful, with an average 85 percent placement rate. (Pages 209-210) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~Through the DSU’s employer engagement, it has been identified the number one training requested by employers is Soft Skills. The DSU is providing Soft Skills training for all Vocational Rehabilitation clients, as needed. The soft skills taught include: Company Vision, Mission and Values; Teamwork; Problem Solving; and Critical Thinking. This helps to prepare job seekers in professionalism, communication and attitude. The DSU has developed inter-local agreements with UNR, CSN and Great Basin College (GBC) to deliver the Soft Skills statewide using a curriculum created from the U.S. Department of Labor’s “Skills that Pay the Bills” curriculum. To date, a total of five classes have been delivered with a total of 50 participants.

To address the unique needs of individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, the DSU continues its collaboration with its community rehabilitation partners. In Las Vegas, the DSU collaborates with the Desert Regional Center and Opportunity Village for three to six-month workplace training programs at Centennial Hills Hospital, Boulder Station Casino, Rio Casino and the Get Fresh produce processing center. Consumers gain hands—on work experience and have the opportunity to rotate through several job experiences at all of these locations. (Page 212) Title IV
 

Data Collection

Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Vocational Rehabilitation utilizes Discoverer software for ad-hoc reporting and data validation purposes. Discoverer is an Oracle® application that captures online transactional data from RAISON. Through Through a weekly extract and load process, RAISON information is migrated into a data warehouse that allows users to create analytical tools and produce ad-hoc queries. Discoverer facilitates timely responses to federal and state ad hoc reporting requests and expands special outreach efforts. The NDE, through the U.S. Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), developed and maintains the 911 Data Edit Checker (v. 2015-1.1) using Microsoft Access 2010. This is an edit and anomaly tool that allows VR to validate data prior to multiple annual and quarterly reporting submissions. Other: TANF and SNAP Data is collected and verified though a variety of means and specific to the requirements of each program. Applicants provide information by entering it into the online application AccessNevada system, submitting hardcopy applications and statements, providing third party documentation, and/or providing information directly to a staff member. Some data is collected from third party sources primarily through interfaces, mailed inquiries and documented telephone calls, i.e., NOMADS interfaces directly with the Social Security Administration’s system for information on identity, benefits and disability status, and with DETR’s data systems for information on unemployment insurance (UI) benefits and quarterly wage data. Data on participation hours in the TANF NEON program and federally defined work activities is collected, audited and reported according to the TANF work verification plan, which is a 35 page document outlining the reporting requirements for TANF performance measures, including how hours of participation reporting and the related internal control mechanisms for accurate reporting assurances. (Page 96) Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~The DSU dedicates funding for the provision of reasonable accommodations for employees with disabilities who need assistance to perform the essential functions of their jobs. Examples include interpreters, flexible work schedules and assistive technology.
New Counselor Academy
The Quality Assurance team provides a number of trainings, including an overview of VR processes to VR staff, and a one week new counselor academy for all newly hired counselors. The curriculum for the new counselor academy includes:
- Introduction / Common Performance indicators/application and intakes
- Eligibility
- Informed choice
- Assessment of Vocational Rehabilitation Needs (AVRN)/IPE
- Case documentation
- Case and expenditure management (Page 223) Title IV

The DSU has an agreement for Intensive Technical Assistance from WINTAC, Y-TAC and NTACT and as such the DSU has received professional development training from these sources in a variety of topics including;
- Customized Employment, Intensive training leading to Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) certification
- Professional Development Series; Module 1. Knowledge of the Field: The Work the We Do, Module 2. Communication with Youth: The Helping Relationship, Module 3. Assessment and Individualized Planning: Charting a course with Youth, and Module 4. Relationship to Family: Working Together.
- WIOA Common Performance Measures (Page 226) Title IV

- Collaborate with minority groups with program development and program referrals.
- Participate in appropriate cultural activities or events, such as applicable chambers of commerce meetings and events.
- Ensure documents are available in other languages as needed, including all marketing and advertising materials.
- Provide information and referrals through the statewide regional centers to individuals in sub-minimum wage employment regarding participation in the VR program.
- Continue developing programs, such as Pathway to Work, to move individuals out of sub-minimum wage jobs into competitive, integrated employment. (Page 247) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The state of Nevada provides initial and continuing notices to make all registrants, applicants, and eligible applicants/registrants, applicants for employment, employees, and interested members of the public aware of the recipients’ obligations to operate its programs and activities in a nondiscriminatory manner. The state board has issued specific state compliance policies related to the communication of equal opportunity (EO), with which all grantees must comply. (Page 124) Title IV

Veterans

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

Nevada offers employers and job seekers extensive services that promote workforce development, catalyze employer successes and bolster job seekers’ skill development. Basic skills required of most in-demand occupations include, but are not limited to: reading comprehension, speaking abilities, critical thinking skills, basic writing skills, active listening skills, the ability to monitor, social perceptiveness, learning strategies, and coordination skills. If potential employees have mastered these basic skills, they can be trained to address specific needs upon employment. (Page 25) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist.

Priority of service is provided to all covered persons as defined in U.S.C. §4215. With respect to any qualified job training program, a covered person shall be given priority over non-veterans for the receipt of employment, training and placement services provided under that program, notwithstanding any other provision of law. Such priority includes giving access to such services to a covered person before a non-covered person or, if resources are limited, giving access to such services to a covered person instead of a non-covered person and priority of service is provided in all Nevada JobConnect (NJC) centers. (Page 122) Title I

DOL/VETS has directed all JVSG staff to provide services only to veterans with SBE. Guidelines for screening and implementing services to veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment is provided in VPL 03-14, Change 2. Veterans and eligible spouses are screened at the initial intake with a questionnaire entitled Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE) Eligibility Review form. This form contains a series of questions used to determine if the eligible veteran or eligible spouse possess one or more of the SBE’s set forth in VPL 03-14, Change 2.

- Are you a special disabled or disabled veteran, as those terms are defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(1) and (3); special disabled and disabled veterans are those:

o Who are entitled to compensation (or who, but for the receipt of military retired pay, would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs; or,

o Were discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability;

- A homeless person, as defined in Sections 103(a) and (b) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. I 1302(a) and (b», as amended;

- A recently-separated service member, as defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(6), who has been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months;

- An offender, as defined by WIOA Section 3 (38), who is currently incarcerated or who has been released from incarceration;

- A veteran lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; or

- A low-income individual (as defined by WIOA Section 3 (36).

If any of these questions are answered yes, the eligible person would be referred to the next available Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) where an assessment would be conducted and individualized career services are provided, (Page 123) Title I

The State Plan must include assurances that:

1. The State has implemented a policy to ensure Adult program funds provide a priority in the delivery of training services and individualized career services to individuals who are low income, public assistance recipients and basic skills deficient; Yes

2. The State has implemented a policy to ensure local areas have a process in place for referring veterans with significant barriers to employment to career services provided by the JVSG program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist; Yes

3. The state established a written policy and procedure that set forth criteria to be used by chief elected officials for the appointment of local workforce investment board members. Yes

4. The State established written policy and procedures to ensure local workforce investment boards are certified by the governor every two years in accordance with WIOA section 107(c)(2). Yes

5. Where an alternative entity takes the place of a State Board, the State has written policy and procedures to ensure the alternative entity meets the definition under WIOA section 101(e) and the legal requirements for membership. No (Page 162) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~- Availability of a full array of support services for employment readiness and work activities, which include transportation, child care, job search, employment-related clothing, equipment, special needs, access to domestic violence services, mental health and substance abuse treatment services.
- The online, automated self-sufficiency information system (OASIS), which is a statewide system application that supports case management, notice, sanction, budget, payment, voucher, invoicing, data gathering, and federal reporting functions of the program.  (Page 37) Title I

The weaknesses of the TANF NEON program include:
- The population served includes individuals with the most significant barriers to employment (e.g., low education levels, those lacking marketable job skills and employment histories, homeless/unstable housing, food insecurities, generational poverty, physical and mental health concerns, disabilities, high prevalence of domestic violence, and alcohol and drug addictions).
- The pressure to meet the TANF work participation rate performance measures and avoid and/or minimize TANF penalties results in the program focusing on only countable work activities within prescribed time limitations and quick engagement in employment. This results in TANF recipients being employed in low wage, often part-time jobs with little long-term stability; oftentimes, TANF recipients cycle on and off the TANF program. An investment in education and skill attainment activities initially would provide more promising opportunities for long-term employment and wage gain successes. (Page 39) Title I

1.3.4 Partner with DHHS and state commissions (i.e., the Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities; the Nevada Commission on Services for Persons with Disabilities; the Nevada Commission on Behavioral Health; community training centers; and, the State Employment Leadership Network) related to underserved populations concerned with sensory (i.e., blindness and/or deafness), mental health, intellectual and developmental disabilities. (Page 50) Title I

— Across Nevada, VR hosts a monthly meeting with the Regional Centers (Rural Regional Center-RRC, Desert Regional Center-DRC, and Southern Regional Center-SRC) to discuss clients in common or potential clients and implications stemming from WIOA. VR also participated in a community fair for community agencies in Elko. Staff members from VR, the RRC, the Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living (NNCIL), and other agencies were present to discuss their programs. Counselors from the Winnemucca, Ely, Elko, and Fallon offices attended the chamber of commerce breakfasts. Statewide, each VR office collaborates with the state mental health agencies. In the north, the District Manager is a member on the Transportation Coalition Committee, which is a committee to determine the transportation needs of disabled, youth and senior citizens. (Page 200) Title IV

When mental illness has been identified as a disability, and it is determined that the rehabilitation participant meets the criteria for supported employment, the rehabilitation counselor works with public and private mental health service providers to assist in obtaining long—term supported services:
— Division of Public and Behavioral Health, Mental Health (Reno, Nevada)
— Division of Public and Behavioral Health, Rural Clinics Community Mental Health Centers (Carson City, Gardnerville, Silver Springs, Fallon, Elko, Ely, Battle Mountain, Lovelock, Caliente, Mesquite and Winnemucca, Nevada)
For those individuals who are yet unknown to the DSU, but receiving services through Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services (NNAMHS), a new program has been developed to facilitate direct referrals of such individuals straight from NNAMHS to VR. In an effort to provide intensive services for supported employment, this collaboration is unique, in that NNAMHS is taking responsibility for the long term follow along for maintenance of employment. (Page 210) Title IV

In collaboration and contract with the Division of Public and Behavioral Health (Mental Health), the DSU continues to explore competitive employment opportunities for mutual clients, and the development of on—campus worksites in the community; these efforts are ongoing and development continues. The DSU has established relationships with the Division of Public and Behavioral Health in Las Vegas, Nevada; the Division of Public and Behavioral Health (Mental Health), in Reno, Nevada; the Division of Public and Behavioral Health, rural clinics; and, the community mental health centers in Carson City, Gardnerville, Silver Springs, Fallon, Elko, Ely, Battle Mountain, Lovelock, Caliente, Mesquite, and Winnemucca, Nevada.
For those individuals who are yet unknown to the DSU, but receiving services through Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services (NNAMHS), a new program has been developed to facilitate direct referrals of such individuals straight from NNAMHS to VR. In an effort to provide intensive services for supported employment, this collaboration is unique, in that NNAMHS is taking responsibility for the long term follow along for maintenance of employment. (Page 214) Title IV

ENTRY LEVEL KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES (required at time of application):
Working knowledge of: counseling principles and practices which includes mental health, group, family and individual counseling, psychosocial and cultural issues in counseling, and foundations, ethics and professional issues in counseling; human growth and development; methods and techniques of interviewing; medical and psychological terminology; basic math.
General knowledge of: fact-finding and case recording.
Ability to: establish a counseling rapport with individuals, with varying disabilities and diverse backgrounds; communicate effectively both verbally and in writing; apply appropriate counseling techniques. (Page 222) Title IV

Indicator: The number of consumers participating in Supported Employment will be 500 participants in FFY 2019. Increase Successful Employment Outcomes. The Division’s performance goal in FFY 2019 will be that at least 166 Supported Employment cases are closed as successful employment outcomes.
Goal 4: Collaborate with other resources to support participants with mental health disabilities to become successfully employed. (May include: Alcohol abuse or dependence, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, drug abuse or dependence, mental illness not listed elsewhere, personality disorders, schizophrenia, and other psychotic disorders).
Indicator: The Division’s performance goal in FFY 2019 will be that at least 260 individuals with Mental Health Disabilities are closed as successful employment outcomes. Individuals with Mental Health Disabilities will have a successful case closure rate similar to other Disabilities groups by FFY 2023. (Page 236) Title IV

After reviewing the needs assessment and WIOA mandates, the DSU and NSRC focused on the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly the VR service needs of:
- Individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment and customized employment;
- Minorities with disabilities in the Nevada workforce, especially the underserved groups of Hispanic and Asian individuals;
- Individuals with disabilities that have been underserved, especially those with mental health disabilities;
- Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system; and
- Transition students. (Page 237) Title IV

The NSRC and DSU aligned the revised goals and corresponding strategies and performance indicators to the trends and recommendations they noted within the new, triennial 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment, including the need to: improve the range and types of jobs the DSU helps to secure for its clients; utilize more certified training and education opportunities for clients; provide benefits planning earlier and to more clients; improve employers’ perceptions of hiring individuals with disabilities; assist with securing work experiences, whether paid or unpaid, for more clients but especially for students and youth; and expand the array of mental health services available to clients. (Page 238) Title IV

While the DSU can and may provide extended services, not to exceed 4 years, the most common method to deliver this service is through close collaboration and partnership with the Aging and Disability Services Division. Clients needing extended services are most commonly clients of ADSD and are entitled to long term follow along through Regional Centers.
For individuals with significant mental illness requiring extended follow along, not to exceed 4 years, the DSU is partnering with the states mental health agency, NNAMHS in the north to provide collaborated case management during the VR case and the provision of long term follow along by the NNAMHS case managers. (Page 240) Title IV

Strategies:
• Collaborate with Department of Health and Human Services, and State commissions related to populations concerned with sensory (blindness, deafness), mental health, intellectual and developmental disabilities; including the Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities, the Nevada Commission on Services for Persons with Disabilities, the Nevada Commission on Behavioral Health and Community Training Centers (CTCs). (Pages 244- 245) Title IV

- Continue marketing efforts with mental health hospitals, mental health service providers, and the state’s welfare services.
- Partner with mental health service providers and community training centers (CTCs).
- Partner with Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health, state commissions related to populations concerned with autism, developmental disabilities, and cognitive and mental health disabilities.). (Pages 246) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 56

Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) - 04/30/2020

“The Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) and Aging and Disability Services Division provide for a variety of Assistive Technology (AT) services to support people to live more independently and within their communities. Supported through the Administration for Community Living (ACL) grants under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 as amended (AT Act).”

This page includes information on both Program and State Financial activities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

1915(i) State Plan Option - Adult Day Health Care and Habilitation - 02/25/2020

“Section 1915(i) of the Social Security Act allows the Nevada Division of Health Care Financing and Policy (DHCFP) to provide State Plan Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) similar to that of a 1915(c) HCBS Waiver using needs-based eligibility criteria rather than institutional level of care criteria.  This affords individuals who require less than institutional level of care, but still have a significant need, to have access to greater number of services in the community which they might not otherwise qualify if only offered under a 1915(c) Waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED) P2I - Path to Independence - 02/15/2020

“The Path To Independence is:

An inclusive, two-year, non-degree certificate program offering a college experience to students with intellectual disabilities. A collaborative effort of UNR's Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), the University of Nevada Reno Extended Studies Department, (UNR EXS), Sierra Regional Center (SRC), the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR), Lyon County School District and Washoe County School District.

Each student and their invited guests participate in Person Centered Planning (PCP) each semester. The results of the plan determines the level and direction of academic involvement. The STAR (Students Transitioning to Adult Roles) planning process is used, which includes the areas of Academic Enrichment, Independent Living, Self-Determination, Campus & Community Engagement, and Career Development & Employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

ABLE Nevada - 01/26/2020

"ABLE Accounts (Achieving a Better Life Experience)

January 26 is the start date for consumers to open an ABLE Nevada account.

The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act was recently passed by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Obama. Under the new law, a person with a disability and that person’s family may put money into a special tax-advantaged account. The first $100,000 in an ABLE account will not count against the $2000 Supplemental Security Income (SSI) resource limit, nor will it count against asset limits other programs, such as Medical Assistance, may have.

This new work incentive is a big deal: It means that if you get a job, you can start saving up some money without losing your benefits.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program - 01/01/2020

“The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Laws Chapter 613 – Employment Practices - 01/01/2020

“NRS 613.330 Unlawful employment practices

Discrimination on basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability, national origin or discussion of wages; interference with aid or appliance for disability; refusal to permit service animal at place of employment; consideration of criminal history without following required procedure.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship

Nevada Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities (NGCDD) (DRAFT) 2019 Annual Impact Report - 12/31/2019

“The NGCDD is a self-governing organization authorized in accordance with Public Law 106-402 of the Federal Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act (DD Act) and established under NRS 232.320 housed within the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services to advance advocacy through public policy, capacity building and systems change in collaboration with other state and community agencies…

This report highlights some of our achievements this year.”

Topic areas in the report include:

"Increasing Economic Security and Mobility Empowering Individuals, Families and Communities Protecting Rights and Preventing Abuse Working Towards Health and Wellness”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

The Sunshine Works Job Preparation Program - 12/20/2019

“The Sunshine Works Program was developed in response to the youth unemployment rate crisis for individuals with disabilities.  The Sunshine Works Program is a paid internship for high school graduates ages 18 – 25 who are transitioning from school to the workforce but who still struggle socially to fit in. Program participants will become contracted workers who will get the necessary training and experience needed to become confident, working members of society.  All program participants will work (2) 6-hour shifts per week, at a pay rate of $9.00 per hour.

​Sunshine Works Program will offer supported employment services in a retail setting providing program participants with transferable vocational education and relevant social skills development for improving future opportunities for competitive employment.  Supported employment means all participants have consistent training support while on the job.  One Job Coach is assigned to two program participants per 6-month program.  Job coaches are present with the participants during every shift ensuring the appropriate amount of support, guidance and encouragement is provided.  The participants are independent, but job coaches help them continue to grow offering opportunities for more independent employment in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/14/2019

~~“The Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation’s (DETR) Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation is a state and federally funded program designed to help people with disabilities become employed and to help those already employed perform more successfully through training, counseling and other support methods. How the Vocational Rehabilitation Program Works

Vocational Rehabilitation staff begins with an assessment to determine your current abilities and how you might benefit from available services. You will work with a counselor to create an employment plan that best suits your needs. When necessary, counselors may refer clients to other agencies for resources. Vocational Rehabilitation often collaborates with businesses to assess job sites and implement tools that will improve an employees ability to successfully perform duties.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Rehabilitation Division - 06/13/2019

~~“The Rehabilitation Division is comprised of three bureaus, which include Vocational Rehabilitation, Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Bureau of Disability Adjudication. The Division also includes the Blind Business Enterprises of Nevada Program, and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. All of these services are designed to address assessment, training, treatment, and job placement for Nevadans with disabilities. The division places primary emphasis on providing necessary services to help clients work and live independently.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Nevada Assembly Bill 488: Relating to the Administration of Government Departments - 07/01/2013

"AN ACT relating to governmental administration; consolidating the Health Division and the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department of Health and Human Services into the Division of Public and Behavioral Health of the Department; transferring the powers and duties concerning certain services to children with autism spectrum disorders from the Health Division to the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department; transferring the authority for developmental services in the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services to the Aging and Disability Services Division; … renaming the Commission on Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department the Commission on Behavioral Health; making the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department responsible for services for and other oversight relating to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; making various other changes to provisions relating to the organization of the divisions of the Department; and providing other matters properly relating thereto."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Executive Order - Establishing a Program for the Hiring of People with Disabilities into the State Workforce - 10/08/2013

By the power vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and the laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order that all state agencies made a concerted effort to include persons with disabilities into the "preliminary and final group of    candidates" considered for each appropriate opening within the agency. It orders all state agencies to make the hiring of persons with disabilities a priority, mandating that at least five percent of openings give persons with disabilities priority.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 25

Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) - 04/30/2020

“The Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) and Aging and Disability Services Division provide for a variety of Assistive Technology (AT) services to support people to live more independently and within their communities. Supported through the Administration for Community Living (ACL) grants under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 as amended (AT Act).”

This page includes information on both Program and State Financial activities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

ABLE Nevada - 01/26/2020

"ABLE Accounts (Achieving a Better Life Experience)

January 26 is the start date for consumers to open an ABLE Nevada account.

The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act was recently passed by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Obama. Under the new law, a person with a disability and that person’s family may put money into a special tax-advantaged account. The first $100,000 in an ABLE account will not count against the $2000 Supplemental Security Income (SSI) resource limit, nor will it count against asset limits other programs, such as Medical Assistance, may have.

This new work incentive is a big deal: It means that if you get a job, you can start saving up some money without losing your benefits.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Nevada Laws Chapter 613 – Employment Practices - 01/01/2020

“NRS 613.330 Unlawful employment practices

Discrimination on basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability, national origin or discussion of wages; interference with aid or appliance for disability; refusal to permit service animal at place of employment; consideration of criminal history without following required procedure.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship

Nevada Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities (NGCDD) (DRAFT) 2019 Annual Impact Report - 12/31/2019

“The NGCDD is a self-governing organization authorized in accordance with Public Law 106-402 of the Federal Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act (DD Act) and established under NRS 232.320 housed within the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services to advance advocacy through public policy, capacity building and systems change in collaboration with other state and community agencies…

This report highlights some of our achievements this year.”

Topic areas in the report include:

"Increasing Economic Security and Mobility Empowering Individuals, Families and Communities Protecting Rights and Preventing Abuse Working Towards Health and Wellness”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/14/2019

~~“The Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation’s (DETR) Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation is a state and federally funded program designed to help people with disabilities become employed and to help those already employed perform more successfully through training, counseling and other support methods. How the Vocational Rehabilitation Program Works

Vocational Rehabilitation staff begins with an assessment to determine your current abilities and how you might benefit from available services. You will work with a counselor to create an employment plan that best suits your needs. When necessary, counselors may refer clients to other agencies for resources. Vocational Rehabilitation often collaborates with businesses to assess job sites and implement tools that will improve an employees ability to successfully perform duties.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Rehabilitation Division - 06/13/2019

~~“The Rehabilitation Division is comprised of three bureaus, which include Vocational Rehabilitation, Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Bureau of Disability Adjudication. The Division also includes the Blind Business Enterprises of Nevada Program, and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. All of these services are designed to address assessment, training, treatment, and job placement for Nevadans with disabilities. The division places primary emphasis on providing necessary services to help clients work and live independently.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement Strategy (Quality Strategy) - 05/02/2019

~~“Quality Initiatives and Emerging Practices Emerging practices occur by incorporating evidence-based guidelines into operational structures, policies, and procedures. Emerging practices are born out of continual quality improvement efforts to enhance a service, health outcome, systems process, or operational procedure. The goals of these efforts are to improve the quality of and access to services. Only through continual measurement and analyses to determine the efficacy of an intervention may an emerging practice be identified. Therefore, the DHCFP encourages MCEs to continually track and monitor efficacy of quality improvement initiatives and interventions to determine if the benefit of the intervention outweighs effort and cost.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mental Health Intensive Case Management (MHICM) - 03/01/2019

~~“Services Provided to Eligible VeteransClinical case management in the community to facilitate Veteran’s behavioral health recovery• Very frequent contacts typically 2-3 times per week often in the home or community• Interventions target social skills, increased self-care, independent living, employment, crisis resolution, and practical problem solving• Assistance coordinating and/or utilizing transportation services• Medication management and education• Psychotherapy and educational groups• Assistance with connecting or reconnecting with family members and other natural supports• Peer Support Services• Community Resource and Referrals”

Systems
  • Other

ALTERNATIVE DIPLOMA COMPUTER EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY GUIDANCE - 02/25/2019

~~“The Nevada Department of Education’s Office of Special Education recognizes that students with  significant  cognitive  disabilities  (SCD)  represent  a  broad  diversity  of  abilities  and  support  needs.    In  an  effort  to  assist  IEP  teams  in  decision  making  and  planning  for  the  Alternative  Diploma,  we  have  developed  the  following  Recommended  Minimum  Access  Point as  guidance.    This recommended access  point for  students  with  SCD  is  intended  to  promote  the  broadest  level  of  student  access  to  a  Computer  Education  and  Technology  curriculum, while also ensuring a high level of rigor in student programming.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DETR to Recognize Nevada’s Inaugural Groundhog Job Shadow Day - 01/31/2019

~~“In honor of Groundhog Day and the National Job Shadow Day on February 2nd, the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation’s (DETR) Rehabilitation Division will be celebrating February 4th as Nevada’s inaugural Groundhog Job Shadow Day.   This special day highlights the importance of providing opportunities for  Nevada students with disabilities to explore careers."

More information  about this event is available by accessing the weblink.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED) P2I - Path to Independence - 02/15/2020

“The Path To Independence is:

An inclusive, two-year, non-degree certificate program offering a college experience to students with intellectual disabilities. A collaborative effort of UNR's Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), the University of Nevada Reno Extended Studies Department, (UNR EXS), Sierra Regional Center (SRC), the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR), Lyon County School District and Washoe County School District.

Each student and their invited guests participate in Person Centered Planning (PCP) each semester. The results of the plan determines the level and direction of academic involvement. The STAR (Students Transitioning to Adult Roles) planning process is used, which includes the areas of Academic Enrichment, Independent Living, Self-Determination, Campus & Community Engagement, and Career Development & Employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2019 Statewide Transportation Summit - 05/01/2019

~~“This Summit is designed for professionals, self-advocates with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD), and parents or caregivers of individuals with I/DD, highly involved in the community and able to provide productive input in guided conversations about transportation.

Our goal is to start a statewide conversation of how we can gain measurable progress toward a replicable model that promotes an increase of accessible transportation options in Nevada.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Nevada

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all

working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. The expectation is that people work!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada State Use Program "Preferred Purchase"

~~“In accordance with NRS 334.025 Program to Encourage and Facilitate Purchases by Agencies of Commodities and Services From  Organizations for training and employment of persons with mental or physical disabilities:An organization that wishes to participate in the Program must register with the Purchasing Division on a form prescribed by the Administrator before contacting any agency concerning entering into a contract pursuant to the Program.  "Organization" means an organization whose primary purpose is the training and employment of persons with mental or physical disabilities, including, without limitation, community-based training centers for the care and training of persons with physical or mental retardation described in Chapter 435…." 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Nevada State Rehabilitation Council

“The mission of the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) is to help ensure that vocational rehabilitation programs (Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation and Bureau of Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired) are consumer oriented, consumer driven, and that the programs' services and resources result in employment outcomes for Nevadans with disabilities….

 The Council may assist you or others in the community in the following ways:  

1.       Help individuals with disabilities obtain services which may help them become employable.

2.       Put employers in contact with individuals with disabilities who may fill their staffing needs.

3.       Receive and relay client experiences about the state or the community vocational rehabilitation programs.

Receive and relay ideas about improving vocational rehabilitation services.

The Council has a minimum of 16 members as required by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended.”   

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities “Position on Employment” - 04/29/2017

~~“Policy Recommendations:• Remove barriers that create disincentives for people with developmental disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment (employment includes supported employment, job training and job coaching) with competitive wages in the community. These barriers may include: transportation, flexible options for on the job supports, and continued or potential health care benefits.• Implement “Employment First” policies that transform the expectations of state agencies, service providers and people with developmental disabilities. Under “Employment First’, the expectation is that a person with a developmental or other disability can and wants to work, and a successful outcome is finding these individuals meaningful and gainful employment that meets their needs and interests by tailoring services to help them succeed in the workforce.• Fully fund the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that are significantly underfunded to meet the employment needs of individuals with severe disabilities who need VR services to obtain employment.” 

Systems
  • Other

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home Program - 05/30/2006

Through the Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home program, a new offering from the State of Nevada, eligible participants will be provided with the services, support, and assistance necessary to move back into a community setting, such as an apartment or family home.

In order to help eligible participants with the transition process, the program can pay for goods and services, such as furniture, appliances, moving expenses, and housing deposits. See the SERVICES tab for a full list of program benefits.

MFP also gives most participants the option of self-direction, allowing them to decide where they want to live and who will assist them upon returning to the community.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

"The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Learning Community : Improving Systems and Services for Individuals with IDD

~~The Employment Learning Community (ELC) assists states in improving systems and services to increase inclusive, competitive employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).The ELC has three key components:

• Delphi panel,• Communities of practice,• Technical assistance

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

The Sunshine Works Job Preparation Program - 12/20/2019

“The Sunshine Works Program was developed in response to the youth unemployment rate crisis for individuals with disabilities.  The Sunshine Works Program is a paid internship for high school graduates ages 18 – 25 who are transitioning from school to the workforce but who still struggle socially to fit in. Program participants will become contracted workers who will get the necessary training and experience needed to become confident, working members of society.  All program participants will work (2) 6-hour shifts per week, at a pay rate of $9.00 per hour.

​Sunshine Works Program will offer supported employment services in a retail setting providing program participants with transferable vocational education and relevant social skills development for improving future opportunities for competitive employment.  Supported employment means all participants have consistent training support while on the job.  One Job Coach is assigned to two program participants per 6-month program.  Job coaches are present with the participants during every shift ensuring the appropriate amount of support, guidance and encouragement is provided.  The participants are independent, but job coaches help them continue to grow offering opportunities for more independent employment in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Collaborative Initiatives across Career and Technical Education, Vocational Rehabilitation and Special Education: Three State/Local Stories - 03/08/2018

“Learning Objectives

Attendees will gain knowledge of:

• predictors and evidence-based and promising practices specific to interagency collaboration across CTE, VR, and SpEd;

• effective strategies to build partnerships between CTE, VR, and SpEd; and

• tools, resources, and practical solutions to use with addressing common barriers at the state and local levels.

 

The need for collaboration: what we know

•CTE teachers identify collaboration with special educators and VR counselors as a key facet of their success in serving all youth.

•Best practices and resources for collaboration and student development will support self-determination, career exploration, culture, and course offerings of high school that lead to postsecondary education and training as well as employment (NTACT, 2017).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

"Time to Pick the Fruit- It’s Ripe" Customized Employment: Presentation by the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities - 05/21/2014

This presentation given by the staff at the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities defines Employment First (EF) & Customized Employment (CE), elaborates upon the Nevada Collaborators, describes the philosophy, practices, and descendants of CE, and explains who can be served by the CE Project and what those job seekers can hope to achieve.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

"Customized Employment Project offers community members with disabilities hope" - 09/25/2013

The Customized Employment Project, a partnership between the Nevada Rehabilitation Division at the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), Sierra Regional Center at Developmental Services, and the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), is a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both. It is based on an individualized match between the strengths, conditions and interests of a job candidate and the identified business needs of an employer. Customized employment utilizes an individualized approach to employment planning and job development - one person at a time - one employer at a time.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Comprehensive System of Personnel Development - 02/28/2012

The Rehabilitation Division, as the DSU, has established procedures and activities setting forth the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development[MW1]  (CSPD), which will ensure an adequate supply of qualified Rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals for the operation of the Vocational Rehabilitation programs.

The CSPD is coordinated by the Administrator of the DSU with the participation of: the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC), Human Resources staff of the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), and staff of the Bureaus of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR) and Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired (BSBVI). DETR’s personnel records enable an annual analysis of the numbers and types of Rehabilitation personnel. Through the State of Nevada Personnel Department database, information on budgeted positions, duration of vacancy for each position and vacancy rates are available through a data warehouse system.

In addition, a personnel log is maintained at the agency level, delineating the location, type of position and date vacated in order to provide current tracking of vacancies including the status of each vacant position. This tracking mechanism has proved successful in reducing the vacancy rate and the amount of time that each position is vacant. All the sources of information are used to track and forecast the DSU’s personnel needs.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Emerging Practices from Vocational Rehabilitation

This summary document describes different initiatives and emerging practices in the state of Nevada that aim at improving employment outcomes for people with disabilities. The projects include CRAVE, Customized Employment, Voice, Career Development Academy, and the Pathways to Work.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NV Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation

This website contains information on the Job Development Training Series, “Creating Employment Opportunities.”  The modules in the series include: Introduction to Job Development and the Role of the Job Developer, Getting to Know Your Customer; The Employer as Partner; and Job Placement and Retention Services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

1915(i) State Plan Option - Adult Day Health Care and Habilitation - 02/25/2020

“Section 1915(i) of the Social Security Act allows the Nevada Division of Health Care Financing and Policy (DHCFP) to provide State Plan Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) similar to that of a 1915(c) HCBS Waiver using needs-based eligibility criteria rather than institutional level of care criteria.  This affords individuals who require less than institutional level of care, but still have a significant need, to have access to greater number of services in the community which they might not otherwise qualify if only offered under a 1915(c) Waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program - 01/01/2020

“The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid State Plan - 09/12/2017

The Medicaid and CHIP state plans are agreements between Nevada and the federal government describing how we administer these programs. It gives an assurance that Nevada will abide by federal rules and may claim federal matching funds for program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are under way in the state.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Nevada HCBS Transition Plan - 07/09/2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new regulations in early 2014 that define the home and community based settings that will be allowable under HCBS. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS are fully integrated into the community in which they live. These individuals must be offered opportunities to seek employment and engage in community activities in the same manner as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NV HCBW for Persons w/ID and Related Conditions (0125.R06.00) - 10/01/2013

Provides day hab, prevocational, residential support, supported employment, behavioral consultation-training & intervention, counseling, career planning, non-medical transportation, nursing, nutrition counseling, residential support management for individuals w/ID ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver - 10/01/2013

The Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver program is authorized in ­1915(c) of the Social Security Act. The program permits a State to furnish an array of home and community-based services that assist Medicaid beneficiaries to live in the community and avoid institutionalization. The State has broad discretion to design its waiver program to address the needs of the waiver­s target population. Waiver services complement and/or supplement the services that are available to participants through the Medicaid.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program

"The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.

As required by the funding authorization, Nevada Medicaid (Division of Health Care Financing and Policy) is the lead agency for the BIP. The BIP team, however, is made up of a large number of cross-functional and cross-agency contributors who have been instrumental in moving the project toward its goals and objectives. Many of the projects and workgroups related to BIP have been collaborations between Nevada's Aging and Disability Services Division and Nevada Medicaid. In addition, many other state agencies and contractors have contributed in important ways."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

In the Silver State of Nevada, workers with disabilities don't have to take a gamble on their future when it comes to finding career success and employment opportunities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nevada’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.2%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,034,392
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.52%
Change from
2017 to 2018
184,884
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.45%
Change from
2017 to 2018
78,230
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.94%
Change from
2017 to 2018
42.31%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.19%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.21%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 2,940,058 2,998,039 3,034,392
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 198,826 183,918 184,884
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 83,453 73,968 78,230
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,211,522 1,264,395 1,277,592
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.97% 40.22% 42.31%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.05% 77.06% 77.21%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.70% 5.00% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.50% 18.00% 20.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.20% 12.30% 11.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 193,158 179,419 187,839
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 191,448 183,450 185,552
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 280,061 252,808 258,453
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 36,044 37,992 39,701
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 73,463 62,671 70,553
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 6,382 5,854 5,871
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 21,526 24,947 22,187
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,102 2,446 1,914
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 13,388 13,759 16,877
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 25,202 25,063 28,388

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,046 2,140 2,109
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.90% 5.10% 4.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 65,717 65,664 64,745

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,371 1,024 990
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 5,043 3,416 3,148
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 9,088 6,252 6,120
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.10% 16.40% 16.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.90% 8.70% 7.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.70% 2.20% 2.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20% 32.50% 31.90%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 816 736 623
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 177 190 171
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 120 2,763 2,686

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,662 4,338 4,568
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 63 161 127
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 46 94 69
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 73.00% 58.00% 54.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.65 3.25 2.39

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
1,800
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 97 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 215 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 425 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 510 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 423 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 130 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.00% 29.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,921 2,164 N/A
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 96,673 98,566 2,190
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 86 73 98,378
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 63 50 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,254,000 $3,638,000 $3,413,939
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $11,549,000 $11,896,000 $12,695,759
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $15,447,000 $16,202,000 $17,191,276
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $187,000 $167,000 $212,329
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 16.00% 17.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 14 16 15
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,114 1,149 1,226
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 881 907 828
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 13.00 14.20 14.43

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.48% 63.63% 62.27%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.66% 14.65% 15.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.54% 1.47% 1.43%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 100.00% 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 18.47% 18.88% 20.71%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.73% 61.29% 57.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 68.94% 75.05% 71.89%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 36.26% 42.41% 36.61%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 811,514
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,144
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 703
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 199,341
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 200,044
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 4
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 336
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,907
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,360,666

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8 8 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8 8 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,121 1,102 935
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,121 1,102 935

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~4.4 Provide effective and efficient job training that is aligned with in-demand occupations.
4.4.1 Increase the number of Nevadans earning sustainable living wages and support best practices that encourage high wage/career-track employment.
4.4.2 Operationalize employment first strategies, which include the strategy that employment services should be the first priority option for individuals with disabilities. Employment first is based on the premise that everyone can work.
4.4.3 Incorporate career readiness content into educational curriculum that links to postsecondary education. (Page 56) Title I
 

Customized Employment

~~The WIN curriculum encompasses self-discovery, life (i.e., soft) skills, money management, mock-interviews, and job retention information with primary emphasis placed on current job seeking techniques. The WIN program is specifically designed to meet the needs of the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) New Employees of Nevada (NEON) recipients and provide solutions to the participant’s most common employment barriers. WIN participants graduate from the program with appropriate interview attire, a master job application, a professionally assisted resume, knowledge of up-to-date job search and successful interview techniques, and the confidence to successfully secure employment. (Page 34) Title I

- Services provided by VR’s business development team, including: direct recruitment and outreach services to employers regarding hiring individuals with disabilities and disability awareness, and developing recruitment and work readiness programs to meet employers’ hiring needs.
- Vocational assessments, education and training, skills enhancement training, vocational counseling and guidance, job development and advocacy, transition services for students and youth transitioning to college or careers, customized employment, physical and mental restoration services, and post-employment services that are unique to VR and address the unique needs of individuals with disabilities.
VR will continue to actively participate in cross-agency councils, commissions, boards, taskforces, and workgroups. (Page 77) Title I

— TMCC: Assistive technology evaluation, recommendation and training; holistic assessments including in transition and career/vocational options; academic supports including intensive, targeted tutoring and coaching; assistance with accessing campus and community resources; job search skill development; job preparation and job readiness skills training; internships and other community, hands—on work experiences; comprehensive exploration with a counselor/coach in job discovery, research, networking, decision—making, planning, action steps and goal setting; and the EPY101 course, which includes the use of assistive technology (AT) to enhance accessibility, improve study skills and student success. (Page 197) Title IV

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(4)). Describe the designated State agency’s efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other State agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide supported employment services and extended employment services, as applicable, to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities.
The DSU has long—standing relationships with many workforce development partners, both internal and external, that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals, including youth, with the most significant disabilities. With the implementation of WIOA, new challenges and opportunities are presented to expand the services of supported and customized employment (SE, CE). The collective goal remains to achieve maximum success in assisting individuals with the most significant disabilities into successful competitive, integrated employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused on building more effective partnerships and relationships with similar entities throughout the state that support these efforts that expand integrated employment opportunities. (Page 209) Title IV

VR Transition Teams statewide are working strategically to develop expanded supported employment services to include customized employment. In this endeavor, VR is working with Opportunity Village, Centers for Independent Living and individual, qualified job development providers to serve this unique and expanding population. Through collaboration and financial support from the Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) and Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC), VR hosted training for customized employment, including statewide in—service for VR staff and statewide community partners with nationally recognized supported employment professionals, Griffin-Hammis. (Page 211) Title IV

The DSU is engaged with a McDonalds Northern Nevada Franchisee group that owns 16 restaurants and one training facility to work with each applicant interested in their desired position with McDonalds. The Human Resources and General Manager along with Store Managers meet with candidates to conduct a tour and discuss employment opportunities throughout the 16 restaurants. McDonalds is seeking to identify applicants with the desire to work in their restaurants to obtain measurable and long term skills gain. This has enabled McDonalds to identify and accommodate an individual with a disability to maintain higher retention rates. A total of two Discovery Sessions have been conducted, resulting in seven interviews and five hires. (Page 212) Title IV

Currently, there are eight VR supervisors, each of whom supervises up to seven direct reports. With an increase in VR counselors, it is likely one additional supervisor will be needed to provide the oversight necessary to ensure quality services to individuals with disabilities. Current staffing levels for accounting staff, administrative assistants, and rehabilitation instructors will not require an increase in the next five years. However, it’s likely the DSU will need additional rehabilitation technicians to fulfill program administration requirements, as mentioned above. The DSU will also need to fill 32 projected vacancies over the next five years. The greatest projected need is for new/dedicated staff to perform internal job development activities, customized employment activities for the most significantly disabled clients, and transition staff to serve this ever-growing population.
The number of qualified personnel for VR is allocated in biennial legislative sessions based on the projected needs of the DSU and available funding. After annually reviewing the personnel vacancy reports, the DSU was able to estimate projected vacancies for the next five years. Longevity of current personnel working in state service was also factored in to determine the number of personnel who will exit the DSU in the next five years due to retirement. (Page 216) Title IV

The DSU has an agreement for Intensive Technical Assistance from WINTAC, Y-TAC and NTACT and as such the DSU has received professional development training from these sources in a variety of topics including;
- Customized Employment, Intensive training leading to Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) certification
- Professional Development Series; Module 1. Knowledge of the Field: The Work the We Do, Module 2. Communication with Youth: The Helping Relationship, Module 3. Assessment and Individualized Planning: Charting a course with Youth, and Module 4. Relationship to Family: Working Together. (Page 226) Title IV

The DSU and the NDOE, Office of Special Education, Elementary and Secondary Education and school improvement programs have an interlocal contract, which contains provisions for the joint training of VR staff and special education personnel. Special education staff members have and will be participating in vocational rehabilitation training on customized employment, job development and placement of individuals with disabilities, and WIOA implications. The DSU was invited by the NDOE to participate in collegial training on meaningful collaboration between special education, Career and Technical Education and VR by renowned educator, George Tilson. The DSU currently is working with the school districts to provide complementary trainings coordinated by local vocational rehabilitation offices to share information on VR processes and programmatic changes such as the requirements in WIOA for pre-employment transition services. The local offices work with special education departments and career and technical education programs for the establishment of pre-vocational coordinated activities. Future plans include an increased effort for outreach to all students with disabilities, including students with disabilities as defined under section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. (Pages 228-229) Title IV

• Provision of soft skills training to clients statewide through WNC, University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), College of Southern Nevada (CSN) and Great Basin College (GBC). Curriculum is based upon the U.S. Department of Labor’s “Skills that Pay the Bills” curriculum.
• Addition of 2 Third Party Cooperative Arrangements (TPCAs) with College of Southern Nevada (CSN) and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV). CSN operated from July 2016 through June 2017 upon which time the contract was cancelled. UNLV began operating in January 2016, and continues to operate presently.
• Staff training on customized employment.
• Staff development through participation in Transition training.
• Provision of assistive technology training statewide for staff.
• With the guidance of the National Technical Assistance Center on Transition (NTACT) the DSU and NDOE began and continue to work with one rural high school providing technical assistance. This program will become the model for how transition activities, including Pre-ETS and collaboration with CTE will be handled across the state especially rural communities. (Page 256) Title IV

Additional programs working with youth exist in southern Nevada through collaboration between the CCSD, Opportunity Village, Inc., the DSU, and the Desert Regional Center. The school district pays for student’s ages 18-21 years to participate in soft skills and vocational training in a program called Job Discovery I and II. When the students graduate to phase II, they are referred to the DSU to begin formal job development and placement activities.
Internally, one rehabilitation team has focused its efforts on SE participants. This team has developed unique relationships with SE employment support providers and meets on a regular basis to staff clients and ensure closer follow along. This model has proven very successful and is consideration for future expansion. (Page 257) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~One-stop partner meetings will be held quarterly to continue to align the workforce services provided by all core, required and optional partners participating in the One-Stop Delivery System (OSDS). The goal is to increase the alignment and coordination with those partner programs already involved in the OSDS, and to engage those partner programs that are new to the OSDS. The availability of employment, training and educational opportunities will be improved through the alignment process. Current program services of all core, required, and optional partners will be inventoried; efficiencies and duplication of efforts across programs will be identified; and, realignment will take place. Topics of discussion will include strategies to maximize and integrate intake processes and other one-stop career center and affiliate site services, with significant emphasis placed on co-enrollment between all applicable program partners. Furthermore, encouragement of co-enrollment and resource leveraging through other means (e.g., requirements built into individual training account policies and procedures will occur. (Page 71) Title I

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Incentives: Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) supports workforce development activities by providing employment services to businesses by educating them about how people with disabilities can contribute to the success of their operations. VR offers hiring incentives that are applicable to the benefits of employers hiring people with disabilities, such as the WOTC, the disability access credit and barrier removal tax deduction. VR also provides training incentives to employers that hire people with disabilities. VR also assists employers in bringing diversity into their workplaces. Disability adds another dimension to diversity efforts, contributing to the development of unique and creative business solutions.

Community-Based Assessments: Vocational Rehabilitation partners with approximately 65 employers statewide to provide community-based assessments for VR clients that are individuals with disabilities. Community- based assessments provide the ability to examine participants’ work-related skills and abilities at actual job sites performing hands-on job duties. These assessments also help identify barriers individuals with disabilities may have in the workplace. VR then provides services and support to mitigate these barriers. While on the job, VR participants in community-based assessment programs are paid wages by VR through a third-party temporary agency. Assessments last up to 100 work hours. (Page 32) Title I

Under the VOICE cooperative arrangement, NRD assigned a VR counselor and a rehabilitation technician as active members of the program team, and a rehabilitation supervisor was assigned as its programmatic contract monitor, providing support and oversight of the program. The NRD continues to provide enhanced VR services for VOICE participants aged 18—21 prior to high school exit through June 30, 2020. NRD will continue to work with the individuals under this program, until their individualized plan for employment (IPE) is realized, or until they exit the program.
WCSD provides the non—federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the school district are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to NRD student consumers. The school district provides training and enhanced programming exclusively to the NRD student consumers that enables them to achieve employment by utilizing community—based vocational instruction, vocational and worksite training, job placement, work incentive wages, and follow—up services. Augmented services include vocational assessment, career development, work experience, job search skills training, job development, placement, follow—up, and non—supported or supported employment job coaching. The contracted services are not educational services that WCSD is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced and/or added services that are exclusively available to NRD student consumers. (Pages 195-196) Title IV

As with the WCSD arrangement, CCSD furnishes the non—federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the school district are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to NRD student consumers. The school district provides training and enhanced programming to the NRD student consumers that enable them to achieve employment utilizing community—based vocational assessments, vocational instruction, employment preparation, on—campus and off—campus job exploration, and vocational experiences including simulated work trials, job shadowing and volunteer activities. These work—based learning experiences provide NRD student consumers with vocational direction, occupational skills, interpersonal skills, and work ethic development. Furthermore, augmented services provided include job development, job placement, follow—up, and non—supported or supported employment job coaching. These contracted services are not educational services that CCSD is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced and/or added services that are exclusively available to NRD student consumers. (Page 196) Title IV

— UNLV: Assistive technology evaluation and training; career assessment; establishing career goals; academic supports (intensive tutoring and coaching); EPY101 course designed to incorporate the use of AT; accessing campus and community resources; workplace readiness skills development; job development and advocacy; and internship or other work experiences that support the individualized plan for employment (IPE) goal. Unique to UNLV is the provision of counseling and psychological services provided by a UNLV Psychologist for participants with mental health disabilities. These three TPCAs formalize the work of the CareerConnect programs and formalize the commitments and financial agreements between the parties to pool resources to provide these new, innovative and comprehensive services to eligible, co—enrolled students of WNC, TMCC, UNLV and the NRD. Each college, as outlined in its TPCA, individually furnishes the non—federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the colleges are provided by new or redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to NRD student consumers. The colleges provide enhanced services exclusively to the NRD consumers that enable them to achieve appropriate degrees and/or certifications to secure competitive and integrated employment. State plan requirements apply to all services approved under any approved waiver. Additionally, NRD approves each service proposed under the waiver before it is put into effect. (Pages 197-198) Title IV

North, south and rural designated transition teams have been established as liaisons with the individual high school programs. The DSU staff members actively participate in individual education plan meetings and are available to provide other consultation, outreach and plan development assistance, and informational support. The DSU has developed a comprehensive scope of work and fee schedule for the delivery of pre—employment transitions services (Pre-ETS), to include the five required activities of job exploration counseling, counseling regarding postsecondary education programs, work—based learning experiences, workplace readiness training, and instruction in self—advocacy.  (Page 203) Title IV

In compliance with WIOA, the individualized plan for employment (IPE) is jointly developed within 90 days, either in consultation with the special education team or directly with the consumer and/or their parent or guardian depending on the individual’s preference. The IPE is agreed to and signed before the student exits school by the rehabilitation counselor and the student, or the parent or guardian if the student is not of the age of majority as mandated in CFR’s §361.22, §361.45. (Page 203) Title IV

• Work with youth with disabilities, the Nevada Department of Education, local education authorities, parent organizations, and families to encourage early discussions with students about the expectations of employment and their skills, abilities, and talents that will empower them to achieve self-sufficiency.
• Increase participation of vocational rehabilitation representatives in Educational Plan (IEP) conferences.
• Expand Work Based Learning opportunities for students to explore employment options.
• Increase communication between Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, Special Education Teachers, and 504 Coordinators.
• Explore a Job Shadowing and/or mentor program.
• Adopt career planning using an evidence based person centered planning model.
• Encourage and support family participation and make training material available.
• Streamline and clarify the referral process for transition students.
• Explore the use of technology and training earlier in plan development. (Page 243) Title IV

• A Financial Management Case Review, which typically involves the review of one case from each counselor’s caseload. This review evaluates financial aspects of the case.
• A Transition Case Review, which typically involves the review of an average of 25% of open transition case files. This review evaluates three federal requirements for transition.
• Case file reviews of the DSU’s contracted job developers are conducted to ensure quality services are provided. This review began in 2013.
In addition, VR supervisors review no less than 10 unique cases annually for every Rehabilitation Counselor under their supervision. Annually, the outside accounting firm of Eide Bailly, LLP performs a targeted review of a random sampling of VR cases (50-60 on average), to test for eligibility and IPE requirements. (Page 259) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~In southern Nevada, serving the school district are four rehabilitation counselors and two rehabilitation technicians that work as two full—time dedicated teams. These teams coordinate transition services to CCSD, which has 47 high schools, charter schools and alternative learning centers.

Serving the northern Nevada school districts, which covers five counties and 26 high schools, has two dedicated transition teams and 1 mixed outreach team. The teams work with WCSD, LCSD, CCSD, SCSD and DCSD transition students in addition to carrying a caseload of specialized special education VR clients.

In August 2017, the DSU proudly partnered with the Lyon County School District to improve post-secondary outcomes for students with disabilities in Lyon County by providing them with support, resources and access to college and career pathways. Effective in August, the transition coordinator had been hired to implement this much needed program for best practice in a rural county. This was innovative for Nevada as it was the first time that we braided funding for a goal in common in this way. Funding was shared between the DSU, Lyon County School District and the Careers and Technical Education program. (Page 207) Title IV

- Create and implement marketing strategies.
- Educate employers about incentives for hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Increase access to quality job development services.
- Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
- Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
- Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high demand/high growth occupations.
- Update interlocal contracts (Memorandums of Understanding-MOUs) with education and workforce.
- Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 238) Title IV

- Increase partnerships with employers to develop work readiness training programs.
- Increase the use of business development representatives (internal or workforce/one-stop partners).
- Create and implement marketing strategies.
- Educate employers about incentives for hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Increase access to quality job development services.
- Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
- Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
- Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high demand/high growth occupations.
- Update interlocal contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
- Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Pages 248-249) Title IV

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The DSU has long—standing relationships with many workforce development partners, both internal and external, that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals, including youth, with the most significant disabilities. With the implementation of WIOA, new challenges and opportunities are presented to expand the services of supported and customized employment (SE, CE). The collective goal remains to achieve maximum success in assisting individuals with the most significant disabilities into successful competitive, integrated employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused on building more effective partnerships and relationships with similar entities throughout the state that support these efforts that expand integrated employment opportunities.
Sources for supported employment services and supports include:
— Increased supports as defined in WIOA, e.g., VR’s ability to provide long term supports for youth;
— Social Security Administration work incentives, e.g., Plan for Achieving Self—Support (PASS) and Impairment Related Work Expenses (IRWE);
— Diversion of jobs and day training/waiver funding for pre—vocational training;
— Natural supports; and
— Expansion of statewide transition services through partnerships with school districts and the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE).
In northern Nevada, the DSU has continued its relationship with High Sierra Industries to partner in the Career Development Academy to provide supported employment services for adults and youth. The program is an intensive prevocational program for supported employment eligible clients who are interested in competitive and integrated employment. High Sierra Industries provides VR—funded, pre—vocational training and job development, and the Sierra Regional Center provides ongoing (i.e., post—90 days) supports through the use of jobs and day training (JDT) Medicaid waiver funds. This collaboration has been very successful, with an average 85 percent placement rate. (Pages 209-210) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~Through the DSU’s employer engagement, it has been identified the number one training requested by employers is Soft Skills. The DSU is providing Soft Skills training for all Vocational Rehabilitation clients, as needed. The soft skills taught include: Company Vision, Mission and Values; Teamwork; Problem Solving; and Critical Thinking. This helps to prepare job seekers in professionalism, communication and attitude. The DSU has developed inter-local agreements with UNR, CSN and Great Basin College (GBC) to deliver the Soft Skills statewide using a curriculum created from the U.S. Department of Labor’s “Skills that Pay the Bills” curriculum. To date, a total of five classes have been delivered with a total of 50 participants.

To address the unique needs of individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, the DSU continues its collaboration with its community rehabilitation partners. In Las Vegas, the DSU collaborates with the Desert Regional Center and Opportunity Village for three to six-month workplace training programs at Centennial Hills Hospital, Boulder Station Casino, Rio Casino and the Get Fresh produce processing center. Consumers gain hands—on work experience and have the opportunity to rotate through several job experiences at all of these locations. (Page 212) Title IV
 

Data Collection

Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Vocational Rehabilitation utilizes Discoverer software for ad-hoc reporting and data validation purposes. Discoverer is an Oracle® application that captures online transactional data from RAISON. Through Through a weekly extract and load process, RAISON information is migrated into a data warehouse that allows users to create analytical tools and produce ad-hoc queries. Discoverer facilitates timely responses to federal and state ad hoc reporting requests and expands special outreach efforts. The NDE, through the U.S. Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), developed and maintains the 911 Data Edit Checker (v. 2015-1.1) using Microsoft Access 2010. This is an edit and anomaly tool that allows VR to validate data prior to multiple annual and quarterly reporting submissions. Other: TANF and SNAP Data is collected and verified though a variety of means and specific to the requirements of each program. Applicants provide information by entering it into the online application AccessNevada system, submitting hardcopy applications and statements, providing third party documentation, and/or providing information directly to a staff member. Some data is collected from third party sources primarily through interfaces, mailed inquiries and documented telephone calls, i.e., NOMADS interfaces directly with the Social Security Administration’s system for information on identity, benefits and disability status, and with DETR’s data systems for information on unemployment insurance (UI) benefits and quarterly wage data. Data on participation hours in the TANF NEON program and federally defined work activities is collected, audited and reported according to the TANF work verification plan, which is a 35 page document outlining the reporting requirements for TANF performance measures, including how hours of participation reporting and the related internal control mechanisms for accurate reporting assurances. (Page 96) Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~The DSU dedicates funding for the provision of reasonable accommodations for employees with disabilities who need assistance to perform the essential functions of their jobs. Examples include interpreters, flexible work schedules and assistive technology.
New Counselor Academy
The Quality Assurance team provides a number of trainings, including an overview of VR processes to VR staff, and a one week new counselor academy for all newly hired counselors. The curriculum for the new counselor academy includes:
- Introduction / Common Performance indicators/application and intakes
- Eligibility
- Informed choice
- Assessment of Vocational Rehabilitation Needs (AVRN)/IPE
- Case documentation
- Case and expenditure management (Page 223) Title IV

The DSU has an agreement for Intensive Technical Assistance from WINTAC, Y-TAC and NTACT and as such the DSU has received professional development training from these sources in a variety of topics including;
- Customized Employment, Intensive training leading to Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) certification
- Professional Development Series; Module 1. Knowledge of the Field: The Work the We Do, Module 2. Communication with Youth: The Helping Relationship, Module 3. Assessment and Individualized Planning: Charting a course with Youth, and Module 4. Relationship to Family: Working Together.
- WIOA Common Performance Measures (Page 226) Title IV

- Collaborate with minority groups with program development and program referrals.
- Participate in appropriate cultural activities or events, such as applicable chambers of commerce meetings and events.
- Ensure documents are available in other languages as needed, including all marketing and advertising materials.
- Provide information and referrals through the statewide regional centers to individuals in sub-minimum wage employment regarding participation in the VR program.
- Continue developing programs, such as Pathway to Work, to move individuals out of sub-minimum wage jobs into competitive, integrated employment. (Page 247) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The state of Nevada provides initial and continuing notices to make all registrants, applicants, and eligible applicants/registrants, applicants for employment, employees, and interested members of the public aware of the recipients’ obligations to operate its programs and activities in a nondiscriminatory manner. The state board has issued specific state compliance policies related to the communication of equal opportunity (EO), with which all grantees must comply. (Page 124) Title IV

Veterans

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

Nevada offers employers and job seekers extensive services that promote workforce development, catalyze employer successes and bolster job seekers’ skill development. Basic skills required of most in-demand occupations include, but are not limited to: reading comprehension, speaking abilities, critical thinking skills, basic writing skills, active listening skills, the ability to monitor, social perceptiveness, learning strategies, and coordination skills. If potential employees have mastered these basic skills, they can be trained to address specific needs upon employment. (Page 25) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist.

Priority of service is provided to all covered persons as defined in U.S.C. §4215. With respect to any qualified job training program, a covered person shall be given priority over non-veterans for the receipt of employment, training and placement services provided under that program, notwithstanding any other provision of law. Such priority includes giving access to such services to a covered person before a non-covered person or, if resources are limited, giving access to such services to a covered person instead of a non-covered person and priority of service is provided in all Nevada JobConnect (NJC) centers. (Page 122) Title I

DOL/VETS has directed all JVSG staff to provide services only to veterans with SBE. Guidelines for screening and implementing services to veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment is provided in VPL 03-14, Change 2. Veterans and eligible spouses are screened at the initial intake with a questionnaire entitled Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE) Eligibility Review form. This form contains a series of questions used to determine if the eligible veteran or eligible spouse possess one or more of the SBE’s set forth in VPL 03-14, Change 2.

- Are you a special disabled or disabled veteran, as those terms are defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(1) and (3); special disabled and disabled veterans are those:

o Who are entitled to compensation (or who, but for the receipt of military retired pay, would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs; or,

o Were discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability;

- A homeless person, as defined in Sections 103(a) and (b) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. I 1302(a) and (b», as amended;

- A recently-separated service member, as defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(6), who has been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months;

- An offender, as defined by WIOA Section 3 (38), who is currently incarcerated or who has been released from incarceration;

- A veteran lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; or

- A low-income individual (as defined by WIOA Section 3 (36).

If any of these questions are answered yes, the eligible person would be referred to the next available Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) where an assessment would be conducted and individualized career services are provided, (Page 123) Title I

The State Plan must include assurances that:

1. The State has implemented a policy to ensure Adult program funds provide a priority in the delivery of training services and individualized career services to individuals who are low income, public assistance recipients and basic skills deficient; Yes

2. The State has implemented a policy to ensure local areas have a process in place for referring veterans with significant barriers to employment to career services provided by the JVSG program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist; Yes

3. The state established a written policy and procedure that set forth criteria to be used by chief elected officials for the appointment of local workforce investment board members. Yes

4. The State established written policy and procedures to ensure local workforce investment boards are certified by the governor every two years in accordance with WIOA section 107(c)(2). Yes

5. Where an alternative entity takes the place of a State Board, the State has written policy and procedures to ensure the alternative entity meets the definition under WIOA section 101(e) and the legal requirements for membership. No (Page 162) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~- Availability of a full array of support services for employment readiness and work activities, which include transportation, child care, job search, employment-related clothing, equipment, special needs, access to domestic violence services, mental health and substance abuse treatment services.
- The online, automated self-sufficiency information system (OASIS), which is a statewide system application that supports case management, notice, sanction, budget, payment, voucher, invoicing, data gathering, and federal reporting functions of the program.  (Page 37) Title I

The weaknesses of the TANF NEON program include:
- The population served includes individuals with the most significant barriers to employment (e.g., low education levels, those lacking marketable job skills and employment histories, homeless/unstable housing, food insecurities, generational poverty, physical and mental health concerns, disabilities, high prevalence of domestic violence, and alcohol and drug addictions).
- The pressure to meet the TANF work participation rate performance measures and avoid and/or minimize TANF penalties results in the program focusing on only countable work activities within prescribed time limitations and quick engagement in employment. This results in TANF recipients being employed in low wage, often part-time jobs with little long-term stability; oftentimes, TANF recipients cycle on and off the TANF program. An investment in education and skill attainment activities initially would provide more promising opportunities for long-term employment and wage gain successes. (Page 39) Title I

1.3.4 Partner with DHHS and state commissions (i.e., the Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities; the Nevada Commission on Services for Persons with Disabilities; the Nevada Commission on Behavioral Health; community training centers; and, the State Employment Leadership Network) related to underserved populations concerned with sensory (i.e., blindness and/or deafness), mental health, intellectual and developmental disabilities. (Page 50) Title I

— Across Nevada, VR hosts a monthly meeting with the Regional Centers (Rural Regional Center-RRC, Desert Regional Center-DRC, and Southern Regional Center-SRC) to discuss clients in common or potential clients and implications stemming from WIOA. VR also participated in a community fair for community agencies in Elko. Staff members from VR, the RRC, the Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living (NNCIL), and other agencies were present to discuss their programs. Counselors from the Winnemucca, Ely, Elko, and Fallon offices attended the chamber of commerce breakfasts. Statewide, each VR office collaborates with the state mental health agencies. In the north, the District Manager is a member on the Transportation Coalition Committee, which is a committee to determine the transportation needs of disabled, youth and senior citizens. (Page 200) Title IV

When mental illness has been identified as a disability, and it is determined that the rehabilitation participant meets the criteria for supported employment, the rehabilitation counselor works with public and private mental health service providers to assist in obtaining long—term supported services:
— Division of Public and Behavioral Health, Mental Health (Reno, Nevada)
— Division of Public and Behavioral Health, Rural Clinics Community Mental Health Centers (Carson City, Gardnerville, Silver Springs, Fallon, Elko, Ely, Battle Mountain, Lovelock, Caliente, Mesquite and Winnemucca, Nevada)
For those individuals who are yet unknown to the DSU, but receiving services through Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services (NNAMHS), a new program has been developed to facilitate direct referrals of such individuals straight from NNAMHS to VR. In an effort to provide intensive services for supported employment, this collaboration is unique, in that NNAMHS is taking responsibility for the long term follow along for maintenance of employment. (Page 210) Title IV

In collaboration and contract with the Division of Public and Behavioral Health (Mental Health), the DSU continues to explore competitive employment opportunities for mutual clients, and the development of on—campus worksites in the community; these efforts are ongoing and development continues. The DSU has established relationships with the Division of Public and Behavioral Health in Las Vegas, Nevada; the Division of Public and Behavioral Health (Mental Health), in Reno, Nevada; the Division of Public and Behavioral Health, rural clinics; and, the community mental health centers in Carson City, Gardnerville, Silver Springs, Fallon, Elko, Ely, Battle Mountain, Lovelock, Caliente, Mesquite, and Winnemucca, Nevada.
For those individuals who are yet unknown to the DSU, but receiving services through Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services (NNAMHS), a new program has been developed to facilitate direct referrals of such individuals straight from NNAMHS to VR. In an effort to provide intensive services for supported employment, this collaboration is unique, in that NNAMHS is taking responsibility for the long term follow along for maintenance of employment. (Page 214) Title IV

ENTRY LEVEL KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES (required at time of application):
Working knowledge of: counseling principles and practices which includes mental health, group, family and individual counseling, psychosocial and cultural issues in counseling, and foundations, ethics and professional issues in counseling; human growth and development; methods and techniques of interviewing; medical and psychological terminology; basic math.
General knowledge of: fact-finding and case recording.
Ability to: establish a counseling rapport with individuals, with varying disabilities and diverse backgrounds; communicate effectively both verbally and in writing; apply appropriate counseling techniques. (Page 222) Title IV

Indicator: The number of consumers participating in Supported Employment will be 500 participants in FFY 2019. Increase Successful Employment Outcomes. The Division’s performance goal in FFY 2019 will be that at least 166 Supported Employment cases are closed as successful employment outcomes.
Goal 4: Collaborate with other resources to support participants with mental health disabilities to become successfully employed. (May include: Alcohol abuse or dependence, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, drug abuse or dependence, mental illness not listed elsewhere, personality disorders, schizophrenia, and other psychotic disorders).
Indicator: The Division’s performance goal in FFY 2019 will be that at least 260 individuals with Mental Health Disabilities are closed as successful employment outcomes. Individuals with Mental Health Disabilities will have a successful case closure rate similar to other Disabilities groups by FFY 2023. (Page 236) Title IV

After reviewing the needs assessment and WIOA mandates, the DSU and NSRC focused on the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly the VR service needs of:
- Individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment and customized employment;
- Minorities with disabilities in the Nevada workforce, especially the underserved groups of Hispanic and Asian individuals;
- Individuals with disabilities that have been underserved, especially those with mental health disabilities;
- Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system; and
- Transition students. (Page 237) Title IV

The NSRC and DSU aligned the revised goals and corresponding strategies and performance indicators to the trends and recommendations they noted within the new, triennial 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment, including the need to: improve the range and types of jobs the DSU helps to secure for its clients; utilize more certified training and education opportunities for clients; provide benefits planning earlier and to more clients; improve employers’ perceptions of hiring individuals with disabilities; assist with securing work experiences, whether paid or unpaid, for more clients but especially for students and youth; and expand the array of mental health services available to clients. (Page 238) Title IV

While the DSU can and may provide extended services, not to exceed 4 years, the most common method to deliver this service is through close collaboration and partnership with the Aging and Disability Services Division. Clients needing extended services are most commonly clients of ADSD and are entitled to long term follow along through Regional Centers.
For individuals with significant mental illness requiring extended follow along, not to exceed 4 years, the DSU is partnering with the states mental health agency, NNAMHS in the north to provide collaborated case management during the VR case and the provision of long term follow along by the NNAMHS case managers. (Page 240) Title IV

Strategies:
• Collaborate with Department of Health and Human Services, and State commissions related to populations concerned with sensory (blindness, deafness), mental health, intellectual and developmental disabilities; including the Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities, the Nevada Commission on Services for Persons with Disabilities, the Nevada Commission on Behavioral Health and Community Training Centers (CTCs). (Pages 244- 245) Title IV

- Continue marketing efforts with mental health hospitals, mental health service providers, and the state’s welfare services.
- Partner with mental health service providers and community training centers (CTCs).
- Partner with Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health, state commissions related to populations concerned with autism, developmental disabilities, and cognitive and mental health disabilities.). (Pages 246) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 56

Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) - 04/30/2020

“The Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) and Aging and Disability Services Division provide for a variety of Assistive Technology (AT) services to support people to live more independently and within their communities. Supported through the Administration for Community Living (ACL) grants under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 as amended (AT Act).”

This page includes information on both Program and State Financial activities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

1915(i) State Plan Option - Adult Day Health Care and Habilitation - 02/25/2020

“Section 1915(i) of the Social Security Act allows the Nevada Division of Health Care Financing and Policy (DHCFP) to provide State Plan Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) similar to that of a 1915(c) HCBS Waiver using needs-based eligibility criteria rather than institutional level of care criteria.  This affords individuals who require less than institutional level of care, but still have a significant need, to have access to greater number of services in the community which they might not otherwise qualify if only offered under a 1915(c) Waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED) P2I - Path to Independence - 02/15/2020

“The Path To Independence is:

An inclusive, two-year, non-degree certificate program offering a college experience to students with intellectual disabilities. A collaborative effort of UNR's Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), the University of Nevada Reno Extended Studies Department, (UNR EXS), Sierra Regional Center (SRC), the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR), Lyon County School District and Washoe County School District.

Each student and their invited guests participate in Person Centered Planning (PCP) each semester. The results of the plan determines the level and direction of academic involvement. The STAR (Students Transitioning to Adult Roles) planning process is used, which includes the areas of Academic Enrichment, Independent Living, Self-Determination, Campus & Community Engagement, and Career Development & Employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

ABLE Nevada - 01/26/2020

"ABLE Accounts (Achieving a Better Life Experience)

January 26 is the start date for consumers to open an ABLE Nevada account.

The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act was recently passed by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Obama. Under the new law, a person with a disability and that person’s family may put money into a special tax-advantaged account. The first $100,000 in an ABLE account will not count against the $2000 Supplemental Security Income (SSI) resource limit, nor will it count against asset limits other programs, such as Medical Assistance, may have.

This new work incentive is a big deal: It means that if you get a job, you can start saving up some money without losing your benefits.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program - 01/01/2020

“The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Laws Chapter 613 – Employment Practices - 01/01/2020

“NRS 613.330 Unlawful employment practices

Discrimination on basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability, national origin or discussion of wages; interference with aid or appliance for disability; refusal to permit service animal at place of employment; consideration of criminal history without following required procedure.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship

Nevada Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities (NGCDD) (DRAFT) 2019 Annual Impact Report - 12/31/2019

“The NGCDD is a self-governing organization authorized in accordance with Public Law 106-402 of the Federal Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act (DD Act) and established under NRS 232.320 housed within the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services to advance advocacy through public policy, capacity building and systems change in collaboration with other state and community agencies…

This report highlights some of our achievements this year.”

Topic areas in the report include:

"Increasing Economic Security and Mobility Empowering Individuals, Families and Communities Protecting Rights and Preventing Abuse Working Towards Health and Wellness”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

The Sunshine Works Job Preparation Program - 12/20/2019

“The Sunshine Works Program was developed in response to the youth unemployment rate crisis for individuals with disabilities.  The Sunshine Works Program is a paid internship for high school graduates ages 18 – 25 who are transitioning from school to the workforce but who still struggle socially to fit in. Program participants will become contracted workers who will get the necessary training and experience needed to become confident, working members of society.  All program participants will work (2) 6-hour shifts per week, at a pay rate of $9.00 per hour.

​Sunshine Works Program will offer supported employment services in a retail setting providing program participants with transferable vocational education and relevant social skills development for improving future opportunities for competitive employment.  Supported employment means all participants have consistent training support while on the job.  One Job Coach is assigned to two program participants per 6-month program.  Job coaches are present with the participants during every shift ensuring the appropriate amount of support, guidance and encouragement is provided.  The participants are independent, but job coaches help them continue to grow offering opportunities for more independent employment in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/14/2019

~~“The Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation’s (DETR) Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation is a state and federally funded program designed to help people with disabilities become employed and to help those already employed perform more successfully through training, counseling and other support methods. How the Vocational Rehabilitation Program Works

Vocational Rehabilitation staff begins with an assessment to determine your current abilities and how you might benefit from available services. You will work with a counselor to create an employment plan that best suits your needs. When necessary, counselors may refer clients to other agencies for resources. Vocational Rehabilitation often collaborates with businesses to assess job sites and implement tools that will improve an employees ability to successfully perform duties.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Rehabilitation Division - 06/13/2019

~~“The Rehabilitation Division is comprised of three bureaus, which include Vocational Rehabilitation, Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Bureau of Disability Adjudication. The Division also includes the Blind Business Enterprises of Nevada Program, and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. All of these services are designed to address assessment, training, treatment, and job placement for Nevadans with disabilities. The division places primary emphasis on providing necessary services to help clients work and live independently.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Nevada Assembly Bill 488: Relating to the Administration of Government Departments - 07/01/2013

"AN ACT relating to governmental administration; consolidating the Health Division and the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department of Health and Human Services into the Division of Public and Behavioral Health of the Department; transferring the powers and duties concerning certain services to children with autism spectrum disorders from the Health Division to the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department; transferring the authority for developmental services in the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services to the Aging and Disability Services Division; … renaming the Commission on Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department the Commission on Behavioral Health; making the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department responsible for services for and other oversight relating to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; making various other changes to provisions relating to the organization of the divisions of the Department; and providing other matters properly relating thereto."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Executive Order - Establishing a Program for the Hiring of People with Disabilities into the State Workforce - 10/08/2013

By the power vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and the laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order that all state agencies made a concerted effort to include persons with disabilities into the "preliminary and final group of    candidates" considered for each appropriate opening within the agency. It orders all state agencies to make the hiring of persons with disabilities a priority, mandating that at least five percent of openings give persons with disabilities priority.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 25

Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) - 04/30/2020

“The Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) and Aging and Disability Services Division provide for a variety of Assistive Technology (AT) services to support people to live more independently and within their communities. Supported through the Administration for Community Living (ACL) grants under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 as amended (AT Act).”

This page includes information on both Program and State Financial activities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

ABLE Nevada - 01/26/2020

"ABLE Accounts (Achieving a Better Life Experience)

January 26 is the start date for consumers to open an ABLE Nevada account.

The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act was recently passed by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Obama. Under the new law, a person with a disability and that person’s family may put money into a special tax-advantaged account. The first $100,000 in an ABLE account will not count against the $2000 Supplemental Security Income (SSI) resource limit, nor will it count against asset limits other programs, such as Medical Assistance, may have.

This new work incentive is a big deal: It means that if you get a job, you can start saving up some money without losing your benefits.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Nevada Laws Chapter 613 – Employment Practices - 01/01/2020

“NRS 613.330 Unlawful employment practices

Discrimination on basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability, national origin or discussion of wages; interference with aid or appliance for disability; refusal to permit service animal at place of employment; consideration of criminal history without following required procedure.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship

Nevada Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities (NGCDD) (DRAFT) 2019 Annual Impact Report - 12/31/2019

“The NGCDD is a self-governing organization authorized in accordance with Public Law 106-402 of the Federal Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act (DD Act) and established under NRS 232.320 housed within the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services to advance advocacy through public policy, capacity building and systems change in collaboration with other state and community agencies…

This report highlights some of our achievements this year.”

Topic areas in the report include:

"Increasing Economic Security and Mobility Empowering Individuals, Families and Communities Protecting Rights and Preventing Abuse Working Towards Health and Wellness”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/14/2019

~~“The Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation’s (DETR) Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation is a state and federally funded program designed to help people with disabilities become employed and to help those already employed perform more successfully through training, counseling and other support methods. How the Vocational Rehabilitation Program Works

Vocational Rehabilitation staff begins with an assessment to determine your current abilities and how you might benefit from available services. You will work with a counselor to create an employment plan that best suits your needs. When necessary, counselors may refer clients to other agencies for resources. Vocational Rehabilitation often collaborates with businesses to assess job sites and implement tools that will improve an employees ability to successfully perform duties.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Rehabilitation Division - 06/13/2019

~~“The Rehabilitation Division is comprised of three bureaus, which include Vocational Rehabilitation, Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Bureau of Disability Adjudication. The Division also includes the Blind Business Enterprises of Nevada Program, and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. All of these services are designed to address assessment, training, treatment, and job placement for Nevadans with disabilities. The division places primary emphasis on providing necessary services to help clients work and live independently.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement Strategy (Quality Strategy) - 05/02/2019

~~“Quality Initiatives and Emerging Practices Emerging practices occur by incorporating evidence-based guidelines into operational structures, policies, and procedures. Emerging practices are born out of continual quality improvement efforts to enhance a service, health outcome, systems process, or operational procedure. The goals of these efforts are to improve the quality of and access to services. Only through continual measurement and analyses to determine the efficacy of an intervention may an emerging practice be identified. Therefore, the DHCFP encourages MCEs to continually track and monitor efficacy of quality improvement initiatives and interventions to determine if the benefit of the intervention outweighs effort and cost.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mental Health Intensive Case Management (MHICM) - 03/01/2019

~~“Services Provided to Eligible VeteransClinical case management in the community to facilitate Veteran’s behavioral health recovery• Very frequent contacts typically 2-3 times per week often in the home or community• Interventions target social skills, increased self-care, independent living, employment, crisis resolution, and practical problem solving• Assistance coordinating and/or utilizing transportation services• Medication management and education• Psychotherapy and educational groups• Assistance with connecting or reconnecting with family members and other natural supports• Peer Support Services• Community Resource and Referrals”

Systems
  • Other

ALTERNATIVE DIPLOMA COMPUTER EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY GUIDANCE - 02/25/2019

~~“The Nevada Department of Education’s Office of Special Education recognizes that students with  significant  cognitive  disabilities  (SCD)  represent  a  broad  diversity  of  abilities  and  support  needs.    In  an  effort  to  assist  IEP  teams  in  decision  making  and  planning  for  the  Alternative  Diploma,  we  have  developed  the  following  Recommended  Minimum  Access  Point as  guidance.    This recommended access  point for  students  with  SCD  is  intended  to  promote  the  broadest  level  of  student  access  to  a  Computer  Education  and  Technology  curriculum, while also ensuring a high level of rigor in student programming.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DETR to Recognize Nevada’s Inaugural Groundhog Job Shadow Day - 01/31/2019

~~“In honor of Groundhog Day and the National Job Shadow Day on February 2nd, the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation’s (DETR) Rehabilitation Division will be celebrating February 4th as Nevada’s inaugural Groundhog Job Shadow Day.   This special day highlights the importance of providing opportunities for  Nevada students with disabilities to explore careers."

More information  about this event is available by accessing the weblink.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED) P2I - Path to Independence - 02/15/2020

“The Path To Independence is:

An inclusive, two-year, non-degree certificate program offering a college experience to students with intellectual disabilities. A collaborative effort of UNR's Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), the University of Nevada Reno Extended Studies Department, (UNR EXS), Sierra Regional Center (SRC), the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR), Lyon County School District and Washoe County School District.

Each student and their invited guests participate in Person Centered Planning (PCP) each semester. The results of the plan determines the level and direction of academic involvement. The STAR (Students Transitioning to Adult Roles) planning process is used, which includes the areas of Academic Enrichment, Independent Living, Self-Determination, Campus & Community Engagement, and Career Development & Employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2019 Statewide Transportation Summit - 05/01/2019

~~“This Summit is designed for professionals, self-advocates with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD), and parents or caregivers of individuals with I/DD, highly involved in the community and able to provide productive input in guided conversations about transportation.

Our goal is to start a statewide conversation of how we can gain measurable progress toward a replicable model that promotes an increase of accessible transportation options in Nevada.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Nevada

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all

working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. The expectation is that people work!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada State Use Program "Preferred Purchase"

~~“In accordance with NRS 334.025 Program to Encourage and Facilitate Purchases by Agencies of Commodities and Services From  Organizations for training and employment of persons with mental or physical disabilities:An organization that wishes to participate in the Program must register with the Purchasing Division on a form prescribed by the Administrator before contacting any agency concerning entering into a contract pursuant to the Program.  "Organization" means an organization whose primary purpose is the training and employment of persons with mental or physical disabilities, including, without limitation, community-based training centers for the care and training of persons with physical or mental retardation described in Chapter 435…." 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Nevada State Rehabilitation Council

“The mission of the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) is to help ensure that vocational rehabilitation programs (Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation and Bureau of Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired) are consumer oriented, consumer driven, and that the programs' services and resources result in employment outcomes for Nevadans with disabilities….

 The Council may assist you or others in the community in the following ways:  

1.       Help individuals with disabilities obtain services which may help them become employable.

2.       Put employers in contact with individuals with disabilities who may fill their staffing needs.

3.       Receive and relay client experiences about the state or the community vocational rehabilitation programs.

Receive and relay ideas about improving vocational rehabilitation services.

The Council has a minimum of 16 members as required by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended.”   

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities “Position on Employment” - 04/29/2017

~~“Policy Recommendations:• Remove barriers that create disincentives for people with developmental disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment (employment includes supported employment, job training and job coaching) with competitive wages in the community. These barriers may include: transportation, flexible options for on the job supports, and continued or potential health care benefits.• Implement “Employment First” policies that transform the expectations of state agencies, service providers and people with developmental disabilities. Under “Employment First’, the expectation is that a person with a developmental or other disability can and wants to work, and a successful outcome is finding these individuals meaningful and gainful employment that meets their needs and interests by tailoring services to help them succeed in the workforce.• Fully fund the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that are significantly underfunded to meet the employment needs of individuals with severe disabilities who need VR services to obtain employment.” 

Systems
  • Other

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home Program - 05/30/2006

Through the Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home program, a new offering from the State of Nevada, eligible participants will be provided with the services, support, and assistance necessary to move back into a community setting, such as an apartment or family home.

In order to help eligible participants with the transition process, the program can pay for goods and services, such as furniture, appliances, moving expenses, and housing deposits. See the SERVICES tab for a full list of program benefits.

MFP also gives most participants the option of self-direction, allowing them to decide where they want to live and who will assist them upon returning to the community.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

"The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Learning Community : Improving Systems and Services for Individuals with IDD

~~The Employment Learning Community (ELC) assists states in improving systems and services to increase inclusive, competitive employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).The ELC has three key components:

• Delphi panel,• Communities of practice,• Technical assistance

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

The Sunshine Works Job Preparation Program - 12/20/2019

“The Sunshine Works Program was developed in response to the youth unemployment rate crisis for individuals with disabilities.  The Sunshine Works Program is a paid internship for high school graduates ages 18 – 25 who are transitioning from school to the workforce but who still struggle socially to fit in. Program participants will become contracted workers who will get the necessary training and experience needed to become confident, working members of society.  All program participants will work (2) 6-hour shifts per week, at a pay rate of $9.00 per hour.

​Sunshine Works Program will offer supported employment services in a retail setting providing program participants with transferable vocational education and relevant social skills development for improving future opportunities for competitive employment.  Supported employment means all participants have consistent training support while on the job.  One Job Coach is assigned to two program participants per 6-month program.  Job coaches are present with the participants during every shift ensuring the appropriate amount of support, guidance and encouragement is provided.  The participants are independent, but job coaches help them continue to grow offering opportunities for more independent employment in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Collaborative Initiatives across Career and Technical Education, Vocational Rehabilitation and Special Education: Three State/Local Stories - 03/08/2018

“Learning Objectives

Attendees will gain knowledge of:

• predictors and evidence-based and promising practices specific to interagency collaboration across CTE, VR, and SpEd;

• effective strategies to build partnerships between CTE, VR, and SpEd; and

• tools, resources, and practical solutions to use with addressing common barriers at the state and local levels.

 

The need for collaboration: what we know

•CTE teachers identify collaboration with special educators and VR counselors as a key facet of their success in serving all youth.

•Best practices and resources for collaboration and student development will support self-determination, career exploration, culture, and course offerings of high school that lead to postsecondary education and training as well as employment (NTACT, 2017).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

"Time to Pick the Fruit- It’s Ripe" Customized Employment: Presentation by the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities - 05/21/2014

This presentation given by the staff at the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities defines Employment First (EF) & Customized Employment (CE), elaborates upon the Nevada Collaborators, describes the philosophy, practices, and descendants of CE, and explains who can be served by the CE Project and what those job seekers can hope to achieve.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

"Customized Employment Project offers community members with disabilities hope" - 09/25/2013

The Customized Employment Project, a partnership between the Nevada Rehabilitation Division at the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), Sierra Regional Center at Developmental Services, and the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), is a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both. It is based on an individualized match between the strengths, conditions and interests of a job candidate and the identified business needs of an employer. Customized employment utilizes an individualized approach to employment planning and job development - one person at a time - one employer at a time.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Comprehensive System of Personnel Development - 02/28/2012

The Rehabilitation Division, as the DSU, has established procedures and activities setting forth the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development[MW1]  (CSPD), which will ensure an adequate supply of qualified Rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals for the operation of the Vocational Rehabilitation programs.

The CSPD is coordinated by the Administrator of the DSU with the participation of: the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC), Human Resources staff of the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), and staff of the Bureaus of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR) and Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired (BSBVI). DETR’s personnel records enable an annual analysis of the numbers and types of Rehabilitation personnel. Through the State of Nevada Personnel Department database, information on budgeted positions, duration of vacancy for each position and vacancy rates are available through a data warehouse system.

In addition, a personnel log is maintained at the agency level, delineating the location, type of position and date vacated in order to provide current tracking of vacancies including the status of each vacant position. This tracking mechanism has proved successful in reducing the vacancy rate and the amount of time that each position is vacant. All the sources of information are used to track and forecast the DSU’s personnel needs.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Emerging Practices from Vocational Rehabilitation

This summary document describes different initiatives and emerging practices in the state of Nevada that aim at improving employment outcomes for people with disabilities. The projects include CRAVE, Customized Employment, Voice, Career Development Academy, and the Pathways to Work.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NV Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation

This website contains information on the Job Development Training Series, “Creating Employment Opportunities.”  The modules in the series include: Introduction to Job Development and the Role of the Job Developer, Getting to Know Your Customer; The Employer as Partner; and Job Placement and Retention Services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

1915(i) State Plan Option - Adult Day Health Care and Habilitation - 02/25/2020

“Section 1915(i) of the Social Security Act allows the Nevada Division of Health Care Financing and Policy (DHCFP) to provide State Plan Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) similar to that of a 1915(c) HCBS Waiver using needs-based eligibility criteria rather than institutional level of care criteria.  This affords individuals who require less than institutional level of care, but still have a significant need, to have access to greater number of services in the community which they might not otherwise qualify if only offered under a 1915(c) Waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program - 01/01/2020

“The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid State Plan - 09/12/2017

The Medicaid and CHIP state plans are agreements between Nevada and the federal government describing how we administer these programs. It gives an assurance that Nevada will abide by federal rules and may claim federal matching funds for program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are under way in the state.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Nevada HCBS Transition Plan - 07/09/2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new regulations in early 2014 that define the home and community based settings that will be allowable under HCBS. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS are fully integrated into the community in which they live. These individuals must be offered opportunities to seek employment and engage in community activities in the same manner as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NV HCBW for Persons w/ID and Related Conditions (0125.R06.00) - 10/01/2013

Provides day hab, prevocational, residential support, supported employment, behavioral consultation-training & intervention, counseling, career planning, non-medical transportation, nursing, nutrition counseling, residential support management for individuals w/ID ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver - 10/01/2013

The Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver program is authorized in ­1915(c) of the Social Security Act. The program permits a State to furnish an array of home and community-based services that assist Medicaid beneficiaries to live in the community and avoid institutionalization. The State has broad discretion to design its waiver program to address the needs of the waiver­s target population. Waiver services complement and/or supplement the services that are available to participants through the Medicaid.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program

"The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.

As required by the funding authorization, Nevada Medicaid (Division of Health Care Financing and Policy) is the lead agency for the BIP. The BIP team, however, is made up of a large number of cross-functional and cross-agency contributors who have been instrumental in moving the project toward its goals and objectives. Many of the projects and workgroups related to BIP have been collaborations between Nevada's Aging and Disability Services Division and Nevada Medicaid. In addition, many other state agencies and contractors have contributed in important ways."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

In the Silver State of Nevada, workers with disabilities don't have to take a gamble on their future when it comes to finding career success and employment opportunities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nevada’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.2%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,034,392
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.52%
Change from
2017 to 2018
184,884
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.45%
Change from
2017 to 2018
78,230
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.94%
Change from
2017 to 2018
42.31%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.19%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.21%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 3,034,392
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 184,884
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 78,230
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,277,592
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 42.31%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.21%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 11.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 187,839
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 185,552
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 258,453
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 39,701
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 70,553
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,871
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 22,187
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,914
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 16,877
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 28,388

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,109
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 64,745

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 990
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 3,148
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 6,120
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 16.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 31.90%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 623
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 171
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 2,686

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,568
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 127
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 69
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 54.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.39

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 2,190
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 98,378
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,413,939
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $12,695,759
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $17,191,276
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $212,329
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 15
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,226
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 828
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 14.43

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 62.27%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.43%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 20.71%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 57.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 71.89%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 36.61%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 811,514
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,144
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 703
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 199,341
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 200,044
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 4
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 336
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,907
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,360,666

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 935
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 935

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~4.4 Provide effective and efficient job training that is aligned with in-demand occupations.
4.4.1 Increase the number of Nevadans earning sustainable living wages and support best practices that encourage high wage/career-track employment.
4.4.2 Operationalize employment first strategies, which include the strategy that employment services should be the first priority option for individuals with disabilities. Employment first is based on the premise that everyone can work.
4.4.3 Incorporate career readiness content into educational curriculum that links to postsecondary education. (Page 56) Title I
 

Customized Employment

~~The WIN curriculum encompasses self-discovery, life (i.e., soft) skills, money management, mock-interviews, and job retention information with primary emphasis placed on current job seeking techniques. The WIN program is specifically designed to meet the needs of the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) New Employees of Nevada (NEON) recipients and provide solutions to the participant’s most common employment barriers. WIN participants graduate from the program with appropriate interview attire, a master job application, a professionally assisted resume, knowledge of up-to-date job search and successful interview techniques, and the confidence to successfully secure employment. (Page 34) Title I

- Services provided by VR’s business development team, including: direct recruitment and outreach services to employers regarding hiring individuals with disabilities and disability awareness, and developing recruitment and work readiness programs to meet employers’ hiring needs.
- Vocational assessments, education and training, skills enhancement training, vocational counseling and guidance, job development and advocacy, transition services for students and youth transitioning to college or careers, customized employment, physical and mental restoration services, and post-employment services that are unique to VR and address the unique needs of individuals with disabilities.
VR will continue to actively participate in cross-agency councils, commissions, boards, taskforces, and workgroups. (Page 77) Title I

— TMCC: Assistive technology evaluation, recommendation and training; holistic assessments including in transition and career/vocational options; academic supports including intensive, targeted tutoring and coaching; assistance with accessing campus and community resources; job search skill development; job preparation and job readiness skills training; internships and other community, hands—on work experiences; comprehensive exploration with a counselor/coach in job discovery, research, networking, decision—making, planning, action steps and goal setting; and the EPY101 course, which includes the use of assistive technology (AT) to enhance accessibility, improve study skills and student success. (Page 197) Title IV

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(4)). Describe the designated State agency’s efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other State agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide supported employment services and extended employment services, as applicable, to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities.
The DSU has long—standing relationships with many workforce development partners, both internal and external, that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals, including youth, with the most significant disabilities. With the implementation of WIOA, new challenges and opportunities are presented to expand the services of supported and customized employment (SE, CE). The collective goal remains to achieve maximum success in assisting individuals with the most significant disabilities into successful competitive, integrated employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused on building more effective partnerships and relationships with similar entities throughout the state that support these efforts that expand integrated employment opportunities. (Page 209) Title IV

VR Transition Teams statewide are working strategically to develop expanded supported employment services to include customized employment. In this endeavor, VR is working with Opportunity Village, Centers for Independent Living and individual, qualified job development providers to serve this unique and expanding population. Through collaboration and financial support from the Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) and Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC), VR hosted training for customized employment, including statewide in—service for VR staff and statewide community partners with nationally recognized supported employment professionals, Griffin-Hammis. (Page 211) Title IV

The DSU is engaged with a McDonalds Northern Nevada Franchisee group that owns 16 restaurants and one training facility to work with each applicant interested in their desired position with McDonalds. The Human Resources and General Manager along with Store Managers meet with candidates to conduct a tour and discuss employment opportunities throughout the 16 restaurants. McDonalds is seeking to identify applicants with the desire to work in their restaurants to obtain measurable and long term skills gain. This has enabled McDonalds to identify and accommodate an individual with a disability to maintain higher retention rates. A total of two Discovery Sessions have been conducted, resulting in seven interviews and five hires. (Page 212) Title IV

Currently, there are eight VR supervisors, each of whom supervises up to seven direct reports. With an increase in VR counselors, it is likely one additional supervisor will be needed to provide the oversight necessary to ensure quality services to individuals with disabilities. Current staffing levels for accounting staff, administrative assistants, and rehabilitation instructors will not require an increase in the next five years. However, it’s likely the DSU will need additional rehabilitation technicians to fulfill program administration requirements, as mentioned above. The DSU will also need to fill 32 projected vacancies over the next five years. The greatest projected need is for new/dedicated staff to perform internal job development activities, customized employment activities for the most significantly disabled clients, and transition staff to serve this ever-growing population.
The number of qualified personnel for VR is allocated in biennial legislative sessions based on the projected needs of the DSU and available funding. After annually reviewing the personnel vacancy reports, the DSU was able to estimate projected vacancies for the next five years. Longevity of current personnel working in state service was also factored in to determine the number of personnel who will exit the DSU in the next five years due to retirement. (Page 216) Title IV

The DSU has an agreement for Intensive Technical Assistance from WINTAC, Y-TAC and NTACT and as such the DSU has received professional development training from these sources in a variety of topics including;
- Customized Employment, Intensive training leading to Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) certification
- Professional Development Series; Module 1. Knowledge of the Field: The Work the We Do, Module 2. Communication with Youth: The Helping Relationship, Module 3. Assessment and Individualized Planning: Charting a course with Youth, and Module 4. Relationship to Family: Working Together. (Page 226) Title IV

The DSU and the NDOE, Office of Special Education, Elementary and Secondary Education and school improvement programs have an interlocal contract, which contains provisions for the joint training of VR staff and special education personnel. Special education staff members have and will be participating in vocational rehabilitation training on customized employment, job development and placement of individuals with disabilities, and WIOA implications. The DSU was invited by the NDOE to participate in collegial training on meaningful collaboration between special education, Career and Technical Education and VR by renowned educator, George Tilson. The DSU currently is working with the school districts to provide complementary trainings coordinated by local vocational rehabilitation offices to share information on VR processes and programmatic changes such as the requirements in WIOA for pre-employment transition services. The local offices work with special education departments and career and technical education programs for the establishment of pre-vocational coordinated activities. Future plans include an increased effort for outreach to all students with disabilities, including students with disabilities as defined under section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. (Pages 228-229) Title IV

• Provision of soft skills training to clients statewide through WNC, University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), College of Southern Nevada (CSN) and Great Basin College (GBC). Curriculum is based upon the U.S. Department of Labor’s “Skills that Pay the Bills” curriculum.
• Addition of 2 Third Party Cooperative Arrangements (TPCAs) with College of Southern Nevada (CSN) and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV). CSN operated from July 2016 through June 2017 upon which time the contract was cancelled. UNLV began operating in January 2016, and continues to operate presently.
• Staff training on customized employment.
• Staff development through participation in Transition training.
• Provision of assistive technology training statewide for staff.
• With the guidance of the National Technical Assistance Center on Transition (NTACT) the DSU and NDOE began and continue to work with one rural high school providing technical assistance. This program will become the model for how transition activities, including Pre-ETS and collaboration with CTE will be handled across the state especially rural communities. (Page 256) Title IV

Additional programs working with youth exist in southern Nevada through collaboration between the CCSD, Opportunity Village, Inc., the DSU, and the Desert Regional Center. The school district pays for student’s ages 18-21 years to participate in soft skills and vocational training in a program called Job Discovery I and II. When the students graduate to phase II, they are referred to the DSU to begin formal job development and placement activities.
Internally, one rehabilitation team has focused its efforts on SE participants. This team has developed unique relationships with SE employment support providers and meets on a regular basis to staff clients and ensure closer follow along. This model has proven very successful and is consideration for future expansion. (Page 257) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~One-stop partner meetings will be held quarterly to continue to align the workforce services provided by all core, required and optional partners participating in the One-Stop Delivery System (OSDS). The goal is to increase the alignment and coordination with those partner programs already involved in the OSDS, and to engage those partner programs that are new to the OSDS. The availability of employment, training and educational opportunities will be improved through the alignment process. Current program services of all core, required, and optional partners will be inventoried; efficiencies and duplication of efforts across programs will be identified; and, realignment will take place. Topics of discussion will include strategies to maximize and integrate intake processes and other one-stop career center and affiliate site services, with significant emphasis placed on co-enrollment between all applicable program partners. Furthermore, encouragement of co-enrollment and resource leveraging through other means (e.g., requirements built into individual training account policies and procedures will occur. (Page 71) Title I

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Incentives: Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) supports workforce development activities by providing employment services to businesses by educating them about how people with disabilities can contribute to the success of their operations. VR offers hiring incentives that are applicable to the benefits of employers hiring people with disabilities, such as the WOTC, the disability access credit and barrier removal tax deduction. VR also provides training incentives to employers that hire people with disabilities. VR also assists employers in bringing diversity into their workplaces. Disability adds another dimension to diversity efforts, contributing to the development of unique and creative business solutions.

Community-Based Assessments: Vocational Rehabilitation partners with approximately 65 employers statewide to provide community-based assessments for VR clients that are individuals with disabilities. Community- based assessments provide the ability to examine participants’ work-related skills and abilities at actual job sites performing hands-on job duties. These assessments also help identify barriers individuals with disabilities may have in the workplace. VR then provides services and support to mitigate these barriers. While on the job, VR participants in community-based assessment programs are paid wages by VR through a third-party temporary agency. Assessments last up to 100 work hours. (Page 32) Title I

Under the VOICE cooperative arrangement, NRD assigned a VR counselor and a rehabilitation technician as active members of the program team, and a rehabilitation supervisor was assigned as its programmatic contract monitor, providing support and oversight of the program. The NRD continues to provide enhanced VR services for VOICE participants aged 18—21 prior to high school exit through June 30, 2020. NRD will continue to work with the individuals under this program, until their individualized plan for employment (IPE) is realized, or until they exit the program.
WCSD provides the non—federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the school district are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to NRD student consumers. The school district provides training and enhanced programming exclusively to the NRD student consumers that enables them to achieve employment by utilizing community—based vocational instruction, vocational and worksite training, job placement, work incentive wages, and follow—up services. Augmented services include vocational assessment, career development, work experience, job search skills training, job development, placement, follow—up, and non—supported or supported employment job coaching. The contracted services are not educational services that WCSD is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced and/or added services that are exclusively available to NRD student consumers. (Pages 195-196) Title IV

As with the WCSD arrangement, CCSD furnishes the non—federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the school district are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to NRD student consumers. The school district provides training and enhanced programming to the NRD student consumers that enable them to achieve employment utilizing community—based vocational assessments, vocational instruction, employment preparation, on—campus and off—campus job exploration, and vocational experiences including simulated work trials, job shadowing and volunteer activities. These work—based learning experiences provide NRD student consumers with vocational direction, occupational skills, interpersonal skills, and work ethic development. Furthermore, augmented services provided include job development, job placement, follow—up, and non—supported or supported employment job coaching. These contracted services are not educational services that CCSD is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced and/or added services that are exclusively available to NRD student consumers. (Page 196) Title IV

— UNLV: Assistive technology evaluation and training; career assessment; establishing career goals; academic supports (intensive tutoring and coaching); EPY101 course designed to incorporate the use of AT; accessing campus and community resources; workplace readiness skills development; job development and advocacy; and internship or other work experiences that support the individualized plan for employment (IPE) goal. Unique to UNLV is the provision of counseling and psychological services provided by a UNLV Psychologist for participants with mental health disabilities. These three TPCAs formalize the work of the CareerConnect programs and formalize the commitments and financial agreements between the parties to pool resources to provide these new, innovative and comprehensive services to eligible, co—enrolled students of WNC, TMCC, UNLV and the NRD. Each college, as outlined in its TPCA, individually furnishes the non—federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the colleges are provided by new or redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to NRD student consumers. The colleges provide enhanced services exclusively to the NRD consumers that enable them to achieve appropriate degrees and/or certifications to secure competitive and integrated employment. State plan requirements apply to all services approved under any approved waiver. Additionally, NRD approves each service proposed under the waiver before it is put into effect. (Pages 197-198) Title IV

North, south and rural designated transition teams have been established as liaisons with the individual high school programs. The DSU staff members actively participate in individual education plan meetings and are available to provide other consultation, outreach and plan development assistance, and informational support. The DSU has developed a comprehensive scope of work and fee schedule for the delivery of pre—employment transitions services (Pre-ETS), to include the five required activities of job exploration counseling, counseling regarding postsecondary education programs, work—based learning experiences, workplace readiness training, and instruction in self—advocacy.  (Page 203) Title IV

In compliance with WIOA, the individualized plan for employment (IPE) is jointly developed within 90 days, either in consultation with the special education team or directly with the consumer and/or their parent or guardian depending on the individual’s preference. The IPE is agreed to and signed before the student exits school by the rehabilitation counselor and the student, or the parent or guardian if the student is not of the age of majority as mandated in CFR’s §361.22, §361.45. (Page 203) Title IV

• Work with youth with disabilities, the Nevada Department of Education, local education authorities, parent organizations, and families to encourage early discussions with students about the expectations of employment and their skills, abilities, and talents that will empower them to achieve self-sufficiency.
• Increase participation of vocational rehabilitation representatives in Educational Plan (IEP) conferences.
• Expand Work Based Learning opportunities for students to explore employment options.
• Increase communication between Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, Special Education Teachers, and 504 Coordinators.
• Explore a Job Shadowing and/or mentor program.
• Adopt career planning using an evidence based person centered planning model.
• Encourage and support family participation and make training material available.
• Streamline and clarify the referral process for transition students.
• Explore the use of technology and training earlier in plan development. (Page 243) Title IV

• A Financial Management Case Review, which typically involves the review of one case from each counselor’s caseload. This review evaluates financial aspects of the case.
• A Transition Case Review, which typically involves the review of an average of 25% of open transition case files. This review evaluates three federal requirements for transition.
• Case file reviews of the DSU’s contracted job developers are conducted to ensure quality services are provided. This review began in 2013.
In addition, VR supervisors review no less than 10 unique cases annually for every Rehabilitation Counselor under their supervision. Annually, the outside accounting firm of Eide Bailly, LLP performs a targeted review of a random sampling of VR cases (50-60 on average), to test for eligibility and IPE requirements. (Page 259) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~In southern Nevada, serving the school district are four rehabilitation counselors and two rehabilitation technicians that work as two full—time dedicated teams. These teams coordinate transition services to CCSD, which has 47 high schools, charter schools and alternative learning centers.

Serving the northern Nevada school districts, which covers five counties and 26 high schools, has two dedicated transition teams and 1 mixed outreach team. The teams work with WCSD, LCSD, CCSD, SCSD and DCSD transition students in addition to carrying a caseload of specialized special education VR clients.

In August 2017, the DSU proudly partnered with the Lyon County School District to improve post-secondary outcomes for students with disabilities in Lyon County by providing them with support, resources and access to college and career pathways. Effective in August, the transition coordinator had been hired to implement this much needed program for best practice in a rural county. This was innovative for Nevada as it was the first time that we braided funding for a goal in common in this way. Funding was shared between the DSU, Lyon County School District and the Careers and Technical Education program. (Page 207) Title IV

- Create and implement marketing strategies.
- Educate employers about incentives for hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Increase access to quality job development services.
- Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
- Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
- Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high demand/high growth occupations.
- Update interlocal contracts (Memorandums of Understanding-MOUs) with education and workforce.
- Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Page 238) Title IV

- Increase partnerships with employers to develop work readiness training programs.
- Increase the use of business development representatives (internal or workforce/one-stop partners).
- Create and implement marketing strategies.
- Educate employers about incentives for hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Increase access to quality job development services.
- Identify key employers for recruitment efforts and for work readiness training programs.
- Work with state sector councils to identify growth occupations with strong labor markets and areas of industry need.
- Work collaboratively with WIOA partners to send clients to appropriate training programs to get the specific education, credentialing, licensure, etc. to fill high demand/high growth occupations.
- Update interlocal contracts (MOUs) with education and workforce.
- Increase the use of social media outlets to inform employers and the public about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
- Collaborate on the creation of career pathways. (Pages 248-249) Title IV

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The DSU has long—standing relationships with many workforce development partners, both internal and external, that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals, including youth, with the most significant disabilities. With the implementation of WIOA, new challenges and opportunities are presented to expand the services of supported and customized employment (SE, CE). The collective goal remains to achieve maximum success in assisting individuals with the most significant disabilities into successful competitive, integrated employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused on building more effective partnerships and relationships with similar entities throughout the state that support these efforts that expand integrated employment opportunities.
Sources for supported employment services and supports include:
— Increased supports as defined in WIOA, e.g., VR’s ability to provide long term supports for youth;
— Social Security Administration work incentives, e.g., Plan for Achieving Self—Support (PASS) and Impairment Related Work Expenses (IRWE);
— Diversion of jobs and day training/waiver funding for pre—vocational training;
— Natural supports; and
— Expansion of statewide transition services through partnerships with school districts and the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE).
In northern Nevada, the DSU has continued its relationship with High Sierra Industries to partner in the Career Development Academy to provide supported employment services for adults and youth. The program is an intensive prevocational program for supported employment eligible clients who are interested in competitive and integrated employment. High Sierra Industries provides VR—funded, pre—vocational training and job development, and the Sierra Regional Center provides ongoing (i.e., post—90 days) supports through the use of jobs and day training (JDT) Medicaid waiver funds. This collaboration has been very successful, with an average 85 percent placement rate. (Pages 209-210) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~Through the DSU’s employer engagement, it has been identified the number one training requested by employers is Soft Skills. The DSU is providing Soft Skills training for all Vocational Rehabilitation clients, as needed. The soft skills taught include: Company Vision, Mission and Values; Teamwork; Problem Solving; and Critical Thinking. This helps to prepare job seekers in professionalism, communication and attitude. The DSU has developed inter-local agreements with UNR, CSN and Great Basin College (GBC) to deliver the Soft Skills statewide using a curriculum created from the U.S. Department of Labor’s “Skills that Pay the Bills” curriculum. To date, a total of five classes have been delivered with a total of 50 participants.

To address the unique needs of individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, the DSU continues its collaboration with its community rehabilitation partners. In Las Vegas, the DSU collaborates with the Desert Regional Center and Opportunity Village for three to six-month workplace training programs at Centennial Hills Hospital, Boulder Station Casino, Rio Casino and the Get Fresh produce processing center. Consumers gain hands—on work experience and have the opportunity to rotate through several job experiences at all of these locations. (Page 212) Title IV
 

Data Collection

Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Vocational Rehabilitation utilizes Discoverer software for ad-hoc reporting and data validation purposes. Discoverer is an Oracle® application that captures online transactional data from RAISON. Through Through a weekly extract and load process, RAISON information is migrated into a data warehouse that allows users to create analytical tools and produce ad-hoc queries. Discoverer facilitates timely responses to federal and state ad hoc reporting requests and expands special outreach efforts. The NDE, through the U.S. Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), developed and maintains the 911 Data Edit Checker (v. 2015-1.1) using Microsoft Access 2010. This is an edit and anomaly tool that allows VR to validate data prior to multiple annual and quarterly reporting submissions. Other: TANF and SNAP Data is collected and verified though a variety of means and specific to the requirements of each program. Applicants provide information by entering it into the online application AccessNevada system, submitting hardcopy applications and statements, providing third party documentation, and/or providing information directly to a staff member. Some data is collected from third party sources primarily through interfaces, mailed inquiries and documented telephone calls, i.e., NOMADS interfaces directly with the Social Security Administration’s system for information on identity, benefits and disability status, and with DETR’s data systems for information on unemployment insurance (UI) benefits and quarterly wage data. Data on participation hours in the TANF NEON program and federally defined work activities is collected, audited and reported according to the TANF work verification plan, which is a 35 page document outlining the reporting requirements for TANF performance measures, including how hours of participation reporting and the related internal control mechanisms for accurate reporting assurances. (Page 96) Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~The DSU dedicates funding for the provision of reasonable accommodations for employees with disabilities who need assistance to perform the essential functions of their jobs. Examples include interpreters, flexible work schedules and assistive technology.
New Counselor Academy
The Quality Assurance team provides a number of trainings, including an overview of VR processes to VR staff, and a one week new counselor academy for all newly hired counselors. The curriculum for the new counselor academy includes:
- Introduction / Common Performance indicators/application and intakes
- Eligibility
- Informed choice
- Assessment of Vocational Rehabilitation Needs (AVRN)/IPE
- Case documentation
- Case and expenditure management (Page 223) Title IV

The DSU has an agreement for Intensive Technical Assistance from WINTAC, Y-TAC and NTACT and as such the DSU has received professional development training from these sources in a variety of topics including;
- Customized Employment, Intensive training leading to Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) certification
- Professional Development Series; Module 1. Knowledge of the Field: The Work the We Do, Module 2. Communication with Youth: The Helping Relationship, Module 3. Assessment and Individualized Planning: Charting a course with Youth, and Module 4. Relationship to Family: Working Together.
- WIOA Common Performance Measures (Page 226) Title IV

- Collaborate with minority groups with program development and program referrals.
- Participate in appropriate cultural activities or events, such as applicable chambers of commerce meetings and events.
- Ensure documents are available in other languages as needed, including all marketing and advertising materials.
- Provide information and referrals through the statewide regional centers to individuals in sub-minimum wage employment regarding participation in the VR program.
- Continue developing programs, such as Pathway to Work, to move individuals out of sub-minimum wage jobs into competitive, integrated employment. (Page 247) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The state of Nevada provides initial and continuing notices to make all registrants, applicants, and eligible applicants/registrants, applicants for employment, employees, and interested members of the public aware of the recipients’ obligations to operate its programs and activities in a nondiscriminatory manner. The state board has issued specific state compliance policies related to the communication of equal opportunity (EO), with which all grantees must comply. (Page 124) Title IV

Veterans

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

Nevada offers employers and job seekers extensive services that promote workforce development, catalyze employer successes and bolster job seekers’ skill development. Basic skills required of most in-demand occupations include, but are not limited to: reading comprehension, speaking abilities, critical thinking skills, basic writing skills, active listening skills, the ability to monitor, social perceptiveness, learning strategies, and coordination skills. If potential employees have mastered these basic skills, they can be trained to address specific needs upon employment. (Page 25) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist.

Priority of service is provided to all covered persons as defined in U.S.C. §4215. With respect to any qualified job training program, a covered person shall be given priority over non-veterans for the receipt of employment, training and placement services provided under that program, notwithstanding any other provision of law. Such priority includes giving access to such services to a covered person before a non-covered person or, if resources are limited, giving access to such services to a covered person instead of a non-covered person and priority of service is provided in all Nevada JobConnect (NJC) centers. (Page 122) Title I

DOL/VETS has directed all JVSG staff to provide services only to veterans with SBE. Guidelines for screening and implementing services to veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment is provided in VPL 03-14, Change 2. Veterans and eligible spouses are screened at the initial intake with a questionnaire entitled Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE) Eligibility Review form. This form contains a series of questions used to determine if the eligible veteran or eligible spouse possess one or more of the SBE’s set forth in VPL 03-14, Change 2.

- Are you a special disabled or disabled veteran, as those terms are defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(1) and (3); special disabled and disabled veterans are those:

o Who are entitled to compensation (or who, but for the receipt of military retired pay, would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs; or,

o Were discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability;

- A homeless person, as defined in Sections 103(a) and (b) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. I 1302(a) and (b», as amended;

- A recently-separated service member, as defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(6), who has been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months;

- An offender, as defined by WIOA Section 3 (38), who is currently incarcerated or who has been released from incarceration;

- A veteran lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; or

- A low-income individual (as defined by WIOA Section 3 (36).

If any of these questions are answered yes, the eligible person would be referred to the next available Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) where an assessment would be conducted and individualized career services are provided, (Page 123) Title I

The State Plan must include assurances that:

1. The State has implemented a policy to ensure Adult program funds provide a priority in the delivery of training services and individualized career services to individuals who are low income, public assistance recipients and basic skills deficient; Yes

2. The State has implemented a policy to ensure local areas have a process in place for referring veterans with significant barriers to employment to career services provided by the JVSG program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist; Yes

3. The state established a written policy and procedure that set forth criteria to be used by chief elected officials for the appointment of local workforce investment board members. Yes

4. The State established written policy and procedures to ensure local workforce investment boards are certified by the governor every two years in accordance with WIOA section 107(c)(2). Yes

5. Where an alternative entity takes the place of a State Board, the State has written policy and procedures to ensure the alternative entity meets the definition under WIOA section 101(e) and the legal requirements for membership. No (Page 162) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~- Availability of a full array of support services for employment readiness and work activities, which include transportation, child care, job search, employment-related clothing, equipment, special needs, access to domestic violence services, mental health and substance abuse treatment services.
- The online, automated self-sufficiency information system (OASIS), which is a statewide system application that supports case management, notice, sanction, budget, payment, voucher, invoicing, data gathering, and federal reporting functions of the program.  (Page 37) Title I

The weaknesses of the TANF NEON program include:
- The population served includes individuals with the most significant barriers to employment (e.g., low education levels, those lacking marketable job skills and employment histories, homeless/unstable housing, food insecurities, generational poverty, physical and mental health concerns, disabilities, high prevalence of domestic violence, and alcohol and drug addictions).
- The pressure to meet the TANF work participation rate performance measures and avoid and/or minimize TANF penalties results in the program focusing on only countable work activities within prescribed time limitations and quick engagement in employment. This results in TANF recipients being employed in low wage, often part-time jobs with little long-term stability; oftentimes, TANF recipients cycle on and off the TANF program. An investment in education and skill attainment activities initially would provide more promising opportunities for long-term employment and wage gain successes. (Page 39) Title I

1.3.4 Partner with DHHS and state commissions (i.e., the Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities; the Nevada Commission on Services for Persons with Disabilities; the Nevada Commission on Behavioral Health; community training centers; and, the State Employment Leadership Network) related to underserved populations concerned with sensory (i.e., blindness and/or deafness), mental health, intellectual and developmental disabilities. (Page 50) Title I

— Across Nevada, VR hosts a monthly meeting with the Regional Centers (Rural Regional Center-RRC, Desert Regional Center-DRC, and Southern Regional Center-SRC) to discuss clients in common or potential clients and implications stemming from WIOA. VR also participated in a community fair for community agencies in Elko. Staff members from VR, the RRC, the Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living (NNCIL), and other agencies were present to discuss their programs. Counselors from the Winnemucca, Ely, Elko, and Fallon offices attended the chamber of commerce breakfasts. Statewide, each VR office collaborates with the state mental health agencies. In the north, the District Manager is a member on the Transportation Coalition Committee, which is a committee to determine the transportation needs of disabled, youth and senior citizens. (Page 200) Title IV

When mental illness has been identified as a disability, and it is determined that the rehabilitation participant meets the criteria for supported employment, the rehabilitation counselor works with public and private mental health service providers to assist in obtaining long—term supported services:
— Division of Public and Behavioral Health, Mental Health (Reno, Nevada)
— Division of Public and Behavioral Health, Rural Clinics Community Mental Health Centers (Carson City, Gardnerville, Silver Springs, Fallon, Elko, Ely, Battle Mountain, Lovelock, Caliente, Mesquite and Winnemucca, Nevada)
For those individuals who are yet unknown to the DSU, but receiving services through Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services (NNAMHS), a new program has been developed to facilitate direct referrals of such individuals straight from NNAMHS to VR. In an effort to provide intensive services for supported employment, this collaboration is unique, in that NNAMHS is taking responsibility for the long term follow along for maintenance of employment. (Page 210) Title IV

In collaboration and contract with the Division of Public and Behavioral Health (Mental Health), the DSU continues to explore competitive employment opportunities for mutual clients, and the development of on—campus worksites in the community; these efforts are ongoing and development continues. The DSU has established relationships with the Division of Public and Behavioral Health in Las Vegas, Nevada; the Division of Public and Behavioral Health (Mental Health), in Reno, Nevada; the Division of Public and Behavioral Health, rural clinics; and, the community mental health centers in Carson City, Gardnerville, Silver Springs, Fallon, Elko, Ely, Battle Mountain, Lovelock, Caliente, Mesquite, and Winnemucca, Nevada.
For those individuals who are yet unknown to the DSU, but receiving services through Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services (NNAMHS), a new program has been developed to facilitate direct referrals of such individuals straight from NNAMHS to VR. In an effort to provide intensive services for supported employment, this collaboration is unique, in that NNAMHS is taking responsibility for the long term follow along for maintenance of employment. (Page 214) Title IV

ENTRY LEVEL KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES (required at time of application):
Working knowledge of: counseling principles and practices which includes mental health, group, family and individual counseling, psychosocial and cultural issues in counseling, and foundations, ethics and professional issues in counseling; human growth and development; methods and techniques of interviewing; medical and psychological terminology; basic math.
General knowledge of: fact-finding and case recording.
Ability to: establish a counseling rapport with individuals, with varying disabilities and diverse backgrounds; communicate effectively both verbally and in writing; apply appropriate counseling techniques. (Page 222) Title IV

Indicator: The number of consumers participating in Supported Employment will be 500 participants in FFY 2019. Increase Successful Employment Outcomes. The Division’s performance goal in FFY 2019 will be that at least 166 Supported Employment cases are closed as successful employment outcomes.
Goal 4: Collaborate with other resources to support participants with mental health disabilities to become successfully employed. (May include: Alcohol abuse or dependence, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, drug abuse or dependence, mental illness not listed elsewhere, personality disorders, schizophrenia, and other psychotic disorders).
Indicator: The Division’s performance goal in FFY 2019 will be that at least 260 individuals with Mental Health Disabilities are closed as successful employment outcomes. Individuals with Mental Health Disabilities will have a successful case closure rate similar to other Disabilities groups by FFY 2023. (Page 236) Title IV

After reviewing the needs assessment and WIOA mandates, the DSU and NSRC focused on the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly the VR service needs of:
- Individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment and customized employment;
- Minorities with disabilities in the Nevada workforce, especially the underserved groups of Hispanic and Asian individuals;
- Individuals with disabilities that have been underserved, especially those with mental health disabilities;
- Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system; and
- Transition students. (Page 237) Title IV

The NSRC and DSU aligned the revised goals and corresponding strategies and performance indicators to the trends and recommendations they noted within the new, triennial 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment, including the need to: improve the range and types of jobs the DSU helps to secure for its clients; utilize more certified training and education opportunities for clients; provide benefits planning earlier and to more clients; improve employers’ perceptions of hiring individuals with disabilities; assist with securing work experiences, whether paid or unpaid, for more clients but especially for students and youth; and expand the array of mental health services available to clients. (Page 238) Title IV

While the DSU can and may provide extended services, not to exceed 4 years, the most common method to deliver this service is through close collaboration and partnership with the Aging and Disability Services Division. Clients needing extended services are most commonly clients of ADSD and are entitled to long term follow along through Regional Centers.
For individuals with significant mental illness requiring extended follow along, not to exceed 4 years, the DSU is partnering with the states mental health agency, NNAMHS in the north to provide collaborated case management during the VR case and the provision of long term follow along by the NNAMHS case managers. (Page 240) Title IV

Strategies:
• Collaborate with Department of Health and Human Services, and State commissions related to populations concerned with sensory (blindness, deafness), mental health, intellectual and developmental disabilities; including the Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities, the Nevada Commission on Services for Persons with Disabilities, the Nevada Commission on Behavioral Health and Community Training Centers (CTCs). (Pages 244- 245) Title IV

- Continue marketing efforts with mental health hospitals, mental health service providers, and the state’s welfare services.
- Partner with mental health service providers and community training centers (CTCs).
- Partner with Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health, state commissions related to populations concerned with autism, developmental disabilities, and cognitive and mental health disabilities.). (Pages 246) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 56

Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) - 04/30/2020

“The Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) and Aging and Disability Services Division provide for a variety of Assistive Technology (AT) services to support people to live more independently and within their communities. Supported through the Administration for Community Living (ACL) grants under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 as amended (AT Act).”

This page includes information on both Program and State Financial activities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

1915(i) State Plan Option - Adult Day Health Care and Habilitation - 02/25/2020

“Section 1915(i) of the Social Security Act allows the Nevada Division of Health Care Financing and Policy (DHCFP) to provide State Plan Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) similar to that of a 1915(c) HCBS Waiver using needs-based eligibility criteria rather than institutional level of care criteria.  This affords individuals who require less than institutional level of care, but still have a significant need, to have access to greater number of services in the community which they might not otherwise qualify if only offered under a 1915(c) Waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED) P2I - Path to Independence - 02/15/2020

“The Path To Independence is:

An inclusive, two-year, non-degree certificate program offering a college experience to students with intellectual disabilities. A collaborative effort of UNR's Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), the University of Nevada Reno Extended Studies Department, (UNR EXS), Sierra Regional Center (SRC), the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR), Lyon County School District and Washoe County School District.

Each student and their invited guests participate in Person Centered Planning (PCP) each semester. The results of the plan determines the level and direction of academic involvement. The STAR (Students Transitioning to Adult Roles) planning process is used, which includes the areas of Academic Enrichment, Independent Living, Self-Determination, Campus & Community Engagement, and Career Development & Employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

ABLE Nevada - 01/26/2020

"ABLE Accounts (Achieving a Better Life Experience)

January 26 is the start date for consumers to open an ABLE Nevada account.

The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act was recently passed by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Obama. Under the new law, a person with a disability and that person’s family may put money into a special tax-advantaged account. The first $100,000 in an ABLE account will not count against the $2000 Supplemental Security Income (SSI) resource limit, nor will it count against asset limits other programs, such as Medical Assistance, may have.

This new work incentive is a big deal: It means that if you get a job, you can start saving up some money without losing your benefits.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program - 01/01/2020

“The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Laws Chapter 613 – Employment Practices - 01/01/2020

“NRS 613.330 Unlawful employment practices

Discrimination on basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability, national origin or discussion of wages; interference with aid or appliance for disability; refusal to permit service animal at place of employment; consideration of criminal history without following required procedure.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship

Nevada Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities (NGCDD) (DRAFT) 2019 Annual Impact Report - 12/31/2019

“The NGCDD is a self-governing organization authorized in accordance with Public Law 106-402 of the Federal Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act (DD Act) and established under NRS 232.320 housed within the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services to advance advocacy through public policy, capacity building and systems change in collaboration with other state and community agencies…

This report highlights some of our achievements this year.”

Topic areas in the report include:

"Increasing Economic Security and Mobility Empowering Individuals, Families and Communities Protecting Rights and Preventing Abuse Working Towards Health and Wellness”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

The Sunshine Works Job Preparation Program - 12/20/2019

“The Sunshine Works Program was developed in response to the youth unemployment rate crisis for individuals with disabilities.  The Sunshine Works Program is a paid internship for high school graduates ages 18 – 25 who are transitioning from school to the workforce but who still struggle socially to fit in. Program participants will become contracted workers who will get the necessary training and experience needed to become confident, working members of society.  All program participants will work (2) 6-hour shifts per week, at a pay rate of $9.00 per hour.

​Sunshine Works Program will offer supported employment services in a retail setting providing program participants with transferable vocational education and relevant social skills development for improving future opportunities for competitive employment.  Supported employment means all participants have consistent training support while on the job.  One Job Coach is assigned to two program participants per 6-month program.  Job coaches are present with the participants during every shift ensuring the appropriate amount of support, guidance and encouragement is provided.  The participants are independent, but job coaches help them continue to grow offering opportunities for more independent employment in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/14/2019

~~“The Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation’s (DETR) Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation is a state and federally funded program designed to help people with disabilities become employed and to help those already employed perform more successfully through training, counseling and other support methods. How the Vocational Rehabilitation Program Works

Vocational Rehabilitation staff begins with an assessment to determine your current abilities and how you might benefit from available services. You will work with a counselor to create an employment plan that best suits your needs. When necessary, counselors may refer clients to other agencies for resources. Vocational Rehabilitation often collaborates with businesses to assess job sites and implement tools that will improve an employees ability to successfully perform duties.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Rehabilitation Division - 06/13/2019

~~“The Rehabilitation Division is comprised of three bureaus, which include Vocational Rehabilitation, Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Bureau of Disability Adjudication. The Division also includes the Blind Business Enterprises of Nevada Program, and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. All of these services are designed to address assessment, training, treatment, and job placement for Nevadans with disabilities. The division places primary emphasis on providing necessary services to help clients work and live independently.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Assembly Bill 20 Session 79) (Revises Provisions related to services to assist PWD in Obtaining Employment) - 05/22/2017

~~“AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; revising provisions concerning the duties and employees of the Bureau of Services to Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; prohibiting, under certain circumstances, the solicitation, disclosure, receipt or use of information concerning persons receiving services from the Division; authorizing the Division to adopt, amend and repeal certain policies; authorizing the denial of services to persons who are blind under certain circumstances; removing the designation of the Division as the designated state unit for the purpose of certain federal regulations governing vocational rehabilitation; prescribing the purposes for which certain money may be used; providing penalties; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Nevada Assembly Bill 5 - 07/01/2015

AN ACT relating to public welfare; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department of Health and Human Services to enter into an agreement with the Rehabilitation Division of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to provide long-term support to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; authorizing the Administrator of the Aging and Disability Services Division to adopt regulations governing the provision of services to certain persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; requiring the Aging and Disability Services Division to provide preferences for potential providers of jobs and day training services in issuing certificates authorizing the provision of such services and in entering into agreements concerning the provision of such services; and providing other matters properly relating thereto.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada SB 419 - 07/01/2015

"AN ACT relating to persons with disabilities; creating the Nevada ABLE Savings Program as a qualified ABLE program under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014..."

"Recently enacted federal law allows for the creation of tax-advantaged savings accounts for persons who have certain qualifying disabilities. Under the program, any person, including family members, may make a contribution to the account of a person with a qualified disability. Any interest or other growth in the value of the account and distributions taken from the account are tax free. The maximum amount that can be contributed tax free to the account of a qualified person is $14,000 per year. Distributions from the account may only be used to pay expenses related to living a life with a disability and may include such things as education, housing, transportation and employment training and support."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Nevada Assembly Bill 488: Relating to the Administration of Government Departments - 07/01/2013

"AN ACT relating to governmental administration; consolidating the Health Division and the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department of Health and Human Services into the Division of Public and Behavioral Health of the Department; transferring the powers and duties concerning certain services to children with autism spectrum disorders from the Health Division to the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department; transferring the authority for developmental services in the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services to the Aging and Disability Services Division; … renaming the Commission on Mental Health and Developmental Services of the Department the Commission on Behavioral Health; making the Aging and Disability Services Division of the Department responsible for services for and other oversight relating to persons with intellectual disabilities and persons with related conditions; making various other changes to provisions relating to the organization of the divisions of the Department; and providing other matters properly relating thereto."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order 2014-16: Establishing the Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment - 07/21/2014

"…By the authority vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order:

1.       The Governor’s Taskforce on Integrated Employment (“Taskforce”) is here by established.

2.       The Taskforce shall be responsible for examining and evaluating current employment programs, resources, funding, available training and employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and shall provide a report to the Governor, on or before July 1, 2015, setting forth their findings as well as a three, five and ten-year strategic plan for creating a more integrated workforce and expanding competitive employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities…"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Executive Order - Establishing a Program for the Hiring of People with Disabilities into the State Workforce - 10/08/2013

By the power vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and the laws of the State of Nevada, I hereby direct and order that all state agencies made a concerted effort to include persons with disabilities into the "preliminary and final group of    candidates" considered for each appropriate opening within the agency. It orders all state agencies to make the hiring of persons with disabilities a priority, mandating that at least five percent of openings give persons with disabilities priority.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
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Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) - 04/30/2020

“The Nevada Assistive Technology Collaborative (NATC) and Aging and Disability Services Division provide for a variety of Assistive Technology (AT) services to support people to live more independently and within their communities. Supported through the Administration for Community Living (ACL) grants under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 as amended (AT Act).”

This page includes information on both Program and State Financial activities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

ABLE Nevada - 01/26/2020

"ABLE Accounts (Achieving a Better Life Experience)

January 26 is the start date for consumers to open an ABLE Nevada account.

The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act was recently passed by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Obama. Under the new law, a person with a disability and that person’s family may put money into a special tax-advantaged account. The first $100,000 in an ABLE account will not count against the $2000 Supplemental Security Income (SSI) resource limit, nor will it count against asset limits other programs, such as Medical Assistance, may have.

This new work incentive is a big deal: It means that if you get a job, you can start saving up some money without losing your benefits.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Nevada Laws Chapter 613 – Employment Practices - 01/01/2020

“NRS 613.330 Unlawful employment practices

Discrimination on basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability, national origin or discussion of wages; interference with aid or appliance for disability; refusal to permit service animal at place of employment; consideration of criminal history without following required procedure.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship

Nevada Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities (NGCDD) (DRAFT) 2019 Annual Impact Report - 12/31/2019

“The NGCDD is a self-governing organization authorized in accordance with Public Law 106-402 of the Federal Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act (DD Act) and established under NRS 232.320 housed within the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services to advance advocacy through public policy, capacity building and systems change in collaboration with other state and community agencies…

This report highlights some of our achievements this year.”

Topic areas in the report include:

"Increasing Economic Security and Mobility Empowering Individuals, Families and Communities Protecting Rights and Preventing Abuse Working Towards Health and Wellness”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/14/2019

~~“The Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation’s (DETR) Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation is a state and federally funded program designed to help people with disabilities become employed and to help those already employed perform more successfully through training, counseling and other support methods. How the Vocational Rehabilitation Program Works

Vocational Rehabilitation staff begins with an assessment to determine your current abilities and how you might benefit from available services. You will work with a counselor to create an employment plan that best suits your needs. When necessary, counselors may refer clients to other agencies for resources. Vocational Rehabilitation often collaborates with businesses to assess job sites and implement tools that will improve an employees ability to successfully perform duties.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Rehabilitation Division - 06/13/2019

~~“The Rehabilitation Division is comprised of three bureaus, which include Vocational Rehabilitation, Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Bureau of Disability Adjudication. The Division also includes the Blind Business Enterprises of Nevada Program, and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. All of these services are designed to address assessment, training, treatment, and job placement for Nevadans with disabilities. The division places primary emphasis on providing necessary services to help clients work and live independently.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement Strategy (Quality Strategy) - 05/02/2019

~~“Quality Initiatives and Emerging Practices Emerging practices occur by incorporating evidence-based guidelines into operational structures, policies, and procedures. Emerging practices are born out of continual quality improvement efforts to enhance a service, health outcome, systems process, or operational procedure. The goals of these efforts are to improve the quality of and access to services. Only through continual measurement and analyses to determine the efficacy of an intervention may an emerging practice be identified. Therefore, the DHCFP encourages MCEs to continually track and monitor efficacy of quality improvement initiatives and interventions to determine if the benefit of the intervention outweighs effort and cost.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Mental Health Intensive Case Management (MHICM) - 03/01/2019

~~“Services Provided to Eligible VeteransClinical case management in the community to facilitate Veteran’s behavioral health recovery• Very frequent contacts typically 2-3 times per week often in the home or community• Interventions target social skills, increased self-care, independent living, employment, crisis resolution, and practical problem solving• Assistance coordinating and/or utilizing transportation services• Medication management and education• Psychotherapy and educational groups• Assistance with connecting or reconnecting with family members and other natural supports• Peer Support Services• Community Resource and Referrals”

Systems
  • Other

ALTERNATIVE DIPLOMA COMPUTER EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY GUIDANCE - 02/25/2019

~~“The Nevada Department of Education’s Office of Special Education recognizes that students with  significant  cognitive  disabilities  (SCD)  represent  a  broad  diversity  of  abilities  and  support  needs.    In  an  effort  to  assist  IEP  teams  in  decision  making  and  planning  for  the  Alternative  Diploma,  we  have  developed  the  following  Recommended  Minimum  Access  Point as  guidance.    This recommended access  point for  students  with  SCD  is  intended  to  promote  the  broadest  level  of  student  access  to  a  Computer  Education  and  Technology  curriculum, while also ensuring a high level of rigor in student programming.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DETR to Recognize Nevada’s Inaugural Groundhog Job Shadow Day - 01/31/2019

~~“In honor of Groundhog Day and the National Job Shadow Day on February 2nd, the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation’s (DETR) Rehabilitation Division will be celebrating February 4th as Nevada’s inaugural Groundhog Job Shadow Day.   This special day highlights the importance of providing opportunities for  Nevada students with disabilities to explore careers."

More information  about this event is available by accessing the weblink.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
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Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED) P2I - Path to Independence - 02/15/2020

“The Path To Independence is:

An inclusive, two-year, non-degree certificate program offering a college experience to students with intellectual disabilities. A collaborative effort of UNR's Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), the University of Nevada Reno Extended Studies Department, (UNR EXS), Sierra Regional Center (SRC), the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR), Lyon County School District and Washoe County School District.

Each student and their invited guests participate in Person Centered Planning (PCP) each semester. The results of the plan determines the level and direction of academic involvement. The STAR (Students Transitioning to Adult Roles) planning process is used, which includes the areas of Academic Enrichment, Independent Living, Self-Determination, Campus & Community Engagement, and Career Development & Employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2019 Statewide Transportation Summit - 05/01/2019

~~“This Summit is designed for professionals, self-advocates with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD), and parents or caregivers of individuals with I/DD, highly involved in the community and able to provide productive input in guided conversations about transportation.

Our goal is to start a statewide conversation of how we can gain measurable progress toward a replicable model that promotes an increase of accessible transportation options in Nevada.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First in Nevada

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all

working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. The expectation is that people work!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada State Use Program "Preferred Purchase"

~~“In accordance with NRS 334.025 Program to Encourage and Facilitate Purchases by Agencies of Commodities and Services From  Organizations for training and employment of persons with mental or physical disabilities:An organization that wishes to participate in the Program must register with the Purchasing Division on a form prescribed by the Administrator before contacting any agency concerning entering into a contract pursuant to the Program.  "Organization" means an organization whose primary purpose is the training and employment of persons with mental or physical disabilities, including, without limitation, community-based training centers for the care and training of persons with physical or mental retardation described in Chapter 435…." 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Nevada State Rehabilitation Council

“The mission of the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) is to help ensure that vocational rehabilitation programs (Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation and Bureau of Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired) are consumer oriented, consumer driven, and that the programs' services and resources result in employment outcomes for Nevadans with disabilities….

 The Council may assist you or others in the community in the following ways:  

1.       Help individuals with disabilities obtain services which may help them become employable.

2.       Put employers in contact with individuals with disabilities who may fill their staffing needs.

3.       Receive and relay client experiences about the state or the community vocational rehabilitation programs.

Receive and relay ideas about improving vocational rehabilitation services.

The Council has a minimum of 16 members as required by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended.”   

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities “Position on Employment” - 04/29/2017

~~“Policy Recommendations:• Remove barriers that create disincentives for people with developmental disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment (employment includes supported employment, job training and job coaching) with competitive wages in the community. These barriers may include: transportation, flexible options for on the job supports, and continued or potential health care benefits.• Implement “Employment First” policies that transform the expectations of state agencies, service providers and people with developmental disabilities. Under “Employment First’, the expectation is that a person with a developmental or other disability can and wants to work, and a successful outcome is finding these individuals meaningful and gainful employment that meets their needs and interests by tailoring services to help them succeed in the workforce.• Fully fund the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program that are significantly underfunded to meet the employment needs of individuals with severe disabilities who need VR services to obtain employment.” 

Systems
  • Other

Nevada’s No Wrong Door Strategic Plan 2015-2018 - 08/28/2015

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) help people with functional limitations accomplish tasks necessary for daily living. Older adults, and those living with disabilities, will often need assistance with issues such as bathing, getting dressed, fixing meals, and managing a home. Others may need behavioral health care to encourage growth and development, or to manage the challenges of everyday life. All of these services are best provided in a consumer’s own home and community, however, they are not always easy to identify or access.

 Finding the right long term services and supports to fit a family’s needs can be difficult. There are a variety of different service providers, funding streams, and eligibility requirements that can make the search confusing, difficult, or frustrating. To address this reality, Nevada has been actively pursuing improvements to its LTSS system. Multiple state division mergers and streamlined access through implementation of the Money Follows the Person (MFP) approach and Balancing Incentives Program (BIP) are some of the efforts used to support improvement. Most recently, the state established an Advisory Board to develop a 3-year plan to develop a comprehensive “No Wrong Door” (NWD) approach to LTSS services for all Nevadans regardless of age or payee status.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home Program - 05/30/2006

Through the Money Follows the Person (MFP) Transitioning Home program, a new offering from the State of Nevada, eligible participants will be provided with the services, support, and assistance necessary to move back into a community setting, such as an apartment or family home.

In order to help eligible participants with the transition process, the program can pay for goods and services, such as furniture, appliances, moving expenses, and housing deposits. See the SERVICES tab for a full list of program benefits.

MFP also gives most participants the option of self-direction, allowing them to decide where they want to live and who will assist them upon returning to the community.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nevada Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/01/2000

"The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. For additional information concerning the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, please visit our Web site."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Learning Community : Improving Systems and Services for Individuals with IDD

~~The Employment Learning Community (ELC) assists states in improving systems and services to increase inclusive, competitive employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).The ELC has three key components:

• Delphi panel,• Communities of practice,• Technical assistance

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

The Sunshine Works Job Preparation Program - 12/20/2019

“The Sunshine Works Program was developed in response to the youth unemployment rate crisis for individuals with disabilities.  The Sunshine Works Program is a paid internship for high school graduates ages 18 – 25 who are transitioning from school to the workforce but who still struggle socially to fit in. Program participants will become contracted workers who will get the necessary training and experience needed to become confident, working members of society.  All program participants will work (2) 6-hour shifts per week, at a pay rate of $9.00 per hour.

​Sunshine Works Program will offer supported employment services in a retail setting providing program participants with transferable vocational education and relevant social skills development for improving future opportunities for competitive employment.  Supported employment means all participants have consistent training support while on the job.  One Job Coach is assigned to two program participants per 6-month program.  Job coaches are present with the participants during every shift ensuring the appropriate amount of support, guidance and encouragement is provided.  The participants are independent, but job coaches help them continue to grow offering opportunities for more independent employment in the future.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Collaborative Initiatives across Career and Technical Education, Vocational Rehabilitation and Special Education: Three State/Local Stories - 03/08/2018

“Learning Objectives

Attendees will gain knowledge of:

• predictors and evidence-based and promising practices specific to interagency collaboration across CTE, VR, and SpEd;

• effective strategies to build partnerships between CTE, VR, and SpEd; and

• tools, resources, and practical solutions to use with addressing common barriers at the state and local levels.

 

The need for collaboration: what we know

•CTE teachers identify collaboration with special educators and VR counselors as a key facet of their success in serving all youth.

•Best practices and resources for collaboration and student development will support self-determination, career exploration, culture, and course offerings of high school that lead to postsecondary education and training as well as employment (NTACT, 2017).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

"Time to Pick the Fruit- It’s Ripe" Customized Employment: Presentation by the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities - 05/21/2014

This presentation given by the staff at the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities defines Employment First (EF) & Customized Employment (CE), elaborates upon the Nevada Collaborators, describes the philosophy, practices, and descendants of CE, and explains who can be served by the CE Project and what those job seekers can hope to achieve.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

"Customized Employment Project offers community members with disabilities hope" - 09/25/2013

The Customized Employment Project, a partnership between the Nevada Rehabilitation Division at the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), Sierra Regional Center at Developmental Services, and the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED), is a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both. It is based on an individualized match between the strengths, conditions and interests of a job candidate and the identified business needs of an employer. Customized employment utilizes an individualized approach to employment planning and job development - one person at a time - one employer at a time.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nevada Disability Services Unit: Comprehensive System of Personnel Development - 02/28/2012

The Rehabilitation Division, as the DSU, has established procedures and activities setting forth the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development[MW1]  (CSPD), which will ensure an adequate supply of qualified Rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals for the operation of the Vocational Rehabilitation programs.

The CSPD is coordinated by the Administrator of the DSU with the participation of: the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC), Human Resources staff of the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR), and staff of the Bureaus of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR) and Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired (BSBVI). DETR’s personnel records enable an annual analysis of the numbers and types of Rehabilitation personnel. Through the State of Nevada Personnel Department database, information on budgeted positions, duration of vacancy for each position and vacancy rates are available through a data warehouse system.

In addition, a personnel log is maintained at the agency level, delineating the location, type of position and date vacated in order to provide current tracking of vacancies including the status of each vacant position. This tracking mechanism has proved successful in reducing the vacancy rate and the amount of time that each position is vacant. All the sources of information are used to track and forecast the DSU’s personnel needs.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Emerging Practices from Vocational Rehabilitation

This summary document describes different initiatives and emerging practices in the state of Nevada that aim at improving employment outcomes for people with disabilities. The projects include CRAVE, Customized Employment, Voice, Career Development Academy, and the Pathways to Work.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NV Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation

This website contains information on the Job Development Training Series, “Creating Employment Opportunities.”  The modules in the series include: Introduction to Job Development and the Role of the Job Developer, Getting to Know Your Customer; The Employer as Partner; and Job Placement and Retention Services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

1915(i) State Plan Option - Adult Day Health Care and Habilitation - 02/25/2020

“Section 1915(i) of the Social Security Act allows the Nevada Division of Health Care Financing and Policy (DHCFP) to provide State Plan Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) similar to that of a 1915(c) HCBS Waiver using needs-based eligibility criteria rather than institutional level of care criteria.  This affords individuals who require less than institutional level of care, but still have a significant need, to have access to greater number of services in the community which they might not otherwise qualify if only offered under a 1915(c) Waiver.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Balancing Incentives Program - 01/01/2020

“The Balancing Incentive Program is a grant-funded program established by the Affordable Care Act through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The goal of the program is to make structural changes to the way individuals access long term services and supports (LTSS) in order to rebalance institutional care with home and community based services. The desired result is to increase the amount spent on home and community based services to 50% of total spending on LTSS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Nevada Medicaid State Plan - 09/12/2017

The Medicaid and CHIP state plans are agreements between Nevada and the federal government describing how we administer these programs. It gives an assurance that Nevada will abide by federal rules and may claim federal matching funds for program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are under way in the state.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Nevada HCBS Transition Plan - 07/09/2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new regulations in early 2014 that define the home and community based settings that will be allowable under HCBS. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS are fully integrated into the community in which they live. These individuals must be offered opportunities to seek employment and engage in community activities in the same manner as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NV HCBW for Persons w/ID and Related Conditions (0125.R06.00) -