New Hampshire

States - Big Screen

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,330,608
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
89,630
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.82%
Change from
2014 to 2015
35,390
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
39.48%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.94%
Change from
2014 to 2015
82.92%

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 1,323,459 1,326,813 1,330,608
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 86,064 81,485 89,630
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 36,000 32,622 35,390
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 607,623 619,658 622,689
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.83% 40.03% 39.48%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.29% 81.31% 82.92%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.10% 4.30% 3.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 16.60% 15.60% 17.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 7.50% 8.30% 6.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 82,920 80,736 82,462
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 83,338 79,653 87,587
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 158,049 152,430 161,605
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,946 1,399 3,207
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,961 4,214 3,901
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A 540 N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,816 1,220 1,052
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 3,104 3,970 3,119
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 844 670 607

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,294 1,329 1,485
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.80% 7.00% 7.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 48,139 48,139 48,223

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,000 9,302 8,321
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 16,515 17,322 14,803
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 25,106 24,650 21,476
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 31.90% 37.70% 38.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 11.40% 11.30% 14.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.40% 7.10% 7.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 71.60%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,244 1,218 1,668
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 263 772 921
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A 8,503

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,397 2,070 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 15 12 13
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 8 7 6
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 53.00% 58.00% 46.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.61 0.53 0.45

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,077
1,890
2,545
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 119 122 126
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 427 341 386
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 419 375 501
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 525 514 740
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 412 314 455
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 175 224 337
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 36.00% 36.10% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 4,099 4,064
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 64,503 64,912
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 32 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 61 56 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $15,504,000 $26,068,000 $32,003,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $59,057,000 $50,540 $45,982,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 41.00% 38.00% 44.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,723 2,350 2,248
Number of people served in facility based work. 25 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 90.60 103.70 120.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.23% 72.85% 72.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.01% 7.97% 8.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.48% 2.61% 2.67%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 60.48% 54.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 47.40% 39.56% 38.52%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 69.90% 63.11% 67.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.80% 77.78% 80.57%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 22.49% 23.55% 28.62%

 

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 0 0

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security (Wagner–Peyser, Veterans Services, Farm Workers, Trade Act); Vocational Rehabilitation (people with disabilities, adult basic education); Community Action Agency (WIOA services dislocated workers, displaced homemakers, low–income individuals and connects to CAP services such as Head Start, Fuel Assistance, and other support programs); Older Worker Program (employment and support programs); and Granite State Independent Living (benefit specialists for the disabled) ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co–located, a close relationship and co–enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One–stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English–speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. (Page 84)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Since the agency began developing a comprehensive approach we have worked with several vendors on pilots to assist this population. The primary services that were provided were coaching and personalized services. The agency is still examining whether these pilots are being more successful with our customers. In May 2012 New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation was recognized by Business New Hampshire Magazine and the NH Association of Chambers of Commerce as the "2012 Business Assistance Organization of the Year." This was a great honor for the agency. Through the nomination process the agency was able to highlight the extensive number of employers the agency works with to achieve successful employment opportunities for customers with disabilities. NHVR collaborates with Northeast Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (NDHHS) and other partners in the deaf community so that there is a team approach when placement of a customer is made. All parties having the same and updated information allow the customer and the team to have more success in obtaining job retention. It also allows for any communication issues that could be occurring in the team, so that the customer has the best chance of success. In 2011, NDHHS sought the participation of NHVR in a project that was facilitated by the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) to review the NASDSE Guidelines for the Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students, and to then utilize those Guidelines in the development of NH specific Guidelines which would serve as best practice for school districts in NH. The year–long project has resulted in the New Hampshire Educational Service Guidelines for Students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing, which will be presented to the New Hampshire Association of Special Education Directors in April 2012, for use in the development of 2012–2013 Individual Education Programs. (Page 147)

The new rule will ensure that if someone is in an employment setting they will have the long–term supports to maintain that job. It also supports that students still in high school can achieve long–term supports while still in school and prior to graduation. The rule also helps families understand that employment should be the first option when looking at goals after high school graduation. In addition the Bureau has also added in employment goals to the contracts of the 10 area agencies. These changes are monumental changes. The Bureau staff are currently out in the community training area agency staff in how to best utilize these new rules. The agency has also added in a new service called “situational assessment.” The situational assessment is a specialized service that provides a VR participant with the opportunity to demonstrate their work skills at a real and functioning worksite (unpaid) within the community. This service will allow this agency to evaluate and identify the necessary services a participant will need to be successful in an actual competitive employment situation. The agency has lined up the insurance component of this service and has had a small team of VR staff that has worked on this diligently. Select vendors at each of the regional offices, will be able to provide this service. These vendors will be selected based on their’ demonstrated abilities to complete this assessment. NHVR staff are also working on individual pilot programs. (Page 197)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses
  • Internships   (Page 28)

Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses  (Page 28)

Post–Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury. In an effort to continue discussing these important issues and determine how, as a community, we can better serve our veterans, service members and their families. Mr. Hinson was re–appointed by Governor Margaret Hassan to serve on the Commission on PTSD and TBI. During FY 15, two internal benefits counselors (Portsmouth and Manchester Regional Offices) provided benefit counseling to 386 customers. Seventy–six of those customers who had received internal benefits counseling during the vr process were closed status 26. Our internal benefits counseling staff also continue to jointly partner with the Institute on Disability with respect to the Real Study, a National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) research project designed to provide money coaching and benefits counseling to job seeking and employed individuals with disabilities. 

Extension. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Fiscal year 2011 data on this item was measured against this baseline. In FY 09 eligibility was determined in 60 days or less from application for 89% of the customers who applied for services. In FY 15, the average days to determine eligibility was 34 days. 2.3 Percent of accurate presumptive eligibility decisions for persons eligible for SSI or SSDI. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Target set for 2010 was 90%. During an FY 11 case review the agency achieved a rating of 76% in this area. The Agency is working to reinforce documentation in this area. Case review of FY 12 cases revealed that only relatively small sample of the cases reviewed received SSA benefits and were reviewed on this criterion. Of those 51% of the cases reviewed demonstrated that the presumption of eligibility was documented in case notes. The 2013-2014 review of FY12 cases is the most recent case review to assess this area. In 2014 the Agency began work on changing its case management system to Alliance’s AWARE system. At that time, the Agency decided to revamp case management practices to match the new system. Staff have been learning the new system and strategies and a case review is planned for the end of FY 2016 to determine any additional training needs to help staff meet the requirements of the program. (Page 188)

School to Work Transition

Continue to assess business interest in work–based learning and the ideal engagement strategies from the businesses’ perspectives. STRATEGY 4.2.C Determine the most appropriate way(s) to link resources from various programs and partners to offer full spectrum of work–based learning opportunities (e.g. Department of Labor School–to–Work Approved Unpaid Work Sites, Vocational Rehabilitation Work Based Learning program, On–the–job training resources from WIOA and TANF, Office of Apprenticeship services, etc.) This could be a digital infrastructure that offers the ability for businesses and emerging workers to be connected for work–based learning opportunities online. But, it may also be clarifying the message, resources, and roles/responsibilities among partners to support work–based learning connections in New Hampshire. Much mapping of the various assets has already been done and will provide a foundation for Strategy 4.2. (Page 47)

Providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA. 

  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff and other constituents, to ensure the inclusion of students and youth with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring in the schools as a result of the IDEA 2008 and the Rehabilitation Act;
  • providing advocacy for students and youth with disabilities to a variety of constituents;
  • improving connections between NHVR and other transition service agencies;
  • providing information and guidance regarding Labor Laws as they relate to job shadow, internships and work experience for students and youth with disabilities;
  • marketing to school staff, students and families, adult service agencies, etc. in a variety of areas, e.g., employment issues as a result of disability, transition of students with disabilities, availability of adult services, best practices in transition of youth with disabilities, accessing adult services, employer perspectives; develop relationships with other agencies providing services to students and youth with disabilities to maximize services offered;
  • providing technical assistance on grants as they are developed with multiple agencies and programs to ensure the inclusion of all students and youth with disabilities.
  • providing continued support of transition programs for students and youth such as the Earn and Learn program, Project INCOME and Project SEARCH The NHVR staff actively facilitates meetings with school staff, NHVR counselors and school–to–work staff to plan the inclusion of students with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring within the state. (Page 150)

NHVR staff and leadership are working closely together to ensure that changes implemented by WIOA are achieved. The activities these positions cover include: 

  • working with NHVR counselors to improve access and services provided to students and youth with disabilities;
  • working with NHVR counselors to develop best practices and examples of best practices to students and youth with disabilities;
  • providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA.
  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff (Page 151)

Target outreach efforts to support the employment outcomes of underserved populations 

  • Improve vocational rehabilitation services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, and deaf blind communities
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff to develop and improve needed skills regarding services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
    • Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School–to– Work transition program.
    • Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind
    • Collaborate with NHVR Office of Services for Blind and Visually Impaired to improve services to students who are deaf and blind.
    • Improve job development, placement, and retention for customers who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened and deaf blind. (Page 178)
  • Build partnerships with school transition personnel and serve as a resource for career planning
  • Encourage career–focused and work–based experiences during the transition from school to work
  • Identify students with disabilities who have been underserved and develop strategies for engagement
  • Utilize alternative and extended learning opportunities (ELO) for skill acquisition and academic achievement for students who require non–traditional learning environments
  • Support and continue to explore opportunities for sector–based and alternative education, employment and training programs for this targeted group, e.g., ACES, Earn and Learn, Project Search, Project Invest, Project Incomes and CHAMP NHVR, in its RFP process, has asked potential bidders to provide regional consortium responses that will outline how “potentially eligible” students shall be identified and how the services shall be provided. These responses will focus on enhancing NHVR’s relationship with the Bureau of Developmental Services, through its area agencies, and the Bureau of Behavioral Health, through its community mental health centers, and School Administrative Units (SAU’s) to better serve students with disabilities. (Page 179)

This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders. (Page 181)

Including individuals with the most significant disabilities, to secure suitable employment, and financial and personal independence by providing rehabilitation services. The Agency continually assesses the barriers and strategies to reduce barriers that relate to equal access to the state VR program. In planning this year specific input was solicited from the Developmental Disabilities Council; the statewide Independent Living Council; the state MH Planning Council; the Governor’s Commission on Disability; the Autism Council and the executive committee of the Special Education Administrators in the state. In providing a quality customer–focused service delivery system that is timely, effective and responds to the needs of individuals with disabilities throughout the state, the NHVR recognizes the need to expand and improve services to individuals with sensory, cognitive, physical and mental impairments who have traditionally not been served or have been underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program. This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders (Page 183)
  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.   (Page 184)
Data Collection

4.2 Percent of cases reviewed for which there is evidence that assistive technology services and assistive technology devices were assessed and used as necessary for individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process. It was identified that current case review data collection did not include this element. It was further identified that this is a training need area for staff. In–service training has included assistive tech services and devices and will continue to target this area as a training need in FY 12 through FY 15. Case review of FY 12 cases identified that that 70% of the time the case documentation showed evidence of an assessment of the need for assistive technology services and devices.   (Page 193)

The CPPOS will play a key role in informing students of opportunities in continued education or entry into the workforce. The CPPOS will list recommended academic courses for students to take for career success. Schools will be able to access relevant documents and guidance on the web and will receive technical assistance on modifying CPPOS’s for local use with students. Documents and guidance will be accessible on the web, including information postsecondary CTE opportunities that are linked to secondary programs. For example, the guidance documents currently tell students which colleges in New Hampshire offer the programs, and on the web they will be able to click on the link and go directly to information on that college program. New Hampshire has a long-term goal of at least implementing one CPPOS in 15 of the career clusters. Also at the end of the five-year period, all secondary CTE centers statewide will need to offer at least one CPPOS opportunity for their students. Competencies for new or updated programs will be required to align with national, state, and local standards. The New Hampshire Department of Education will work with employers and the Community College System to validate the competencies and modify as needed. (Page 219)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

The Governor established and certified the Workforce Opportunity Council (Council) as the State’s Workforce Board under WIA on September 22, 1999. The Council name was changed to State Workforce Investment Board in 2009 with the creation of the Office of Workforce Opportunity (OWO) in the NH Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED). Recently the board’s name changed to the State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB) with the implementation of WIOA. The Board is chaired by a businessperson and has 37 members, of whom 19 members (51%) are business representatives including a minimum of one small business representative. In addition the board includes:

  • The Governor (Section 101(b)(1)(A));
  • Two representatives of the State Legislature (Section 101(b)(1)(B)):
  • Lead officials from state agencies that oversee workforce development programs including chief elected officials (Section 101 (b)(1)(C)(iii) (Page 72)
Career Pathways

ABE staff participate in workforce agency partner meetings and NH Works counselors work with students on-site in ABE classes, called “What’s Next”, to introduce career inventories, career pathways, and promote resources available through NH Works. Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receive referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. (Page 27)

The Community College System and CTE work closely together, offering dual credit opportunities for students, sharing funding streams, recruiting at education and job fairs, and promoting career pathways.

  • Collaboration between the Community College System and ABE is very successful, particularly when programs are co-located. For example, at Great Bay Community College, an MOU between ABE and the college allows ABE to teach remedial English and math courses. This better serves students by reserving financial aid or loans for college-level coursework. There is also a referral process in place and ABE programs can assist students with admissions at community colleges, enrollment, preparing for the Accuplacer and sharing scores, determining eligibility for specific job training programs, and more.
  • Collaboration between Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation, with VR counselors attending ABE programs on a monthly basis. This activity is primarily focused on the special education population. (Page 31)

Within this MOU we will seek to partner with agencies participating with Medicaid (The Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health) to assist in enhancing services to customers needing supported employment and competitive integrated employment. We are very fortunate in New Hampshire to have legislation that prohibits subminimum wage payments to individuals with disabilities (SB 47, 2015). We are proud to work with our business partners to ensure at least minimum wage employment for our mutual customers. In the agreement we will weave in our work on career pathways and work-based learning to expand current sectors (Project SEARCH) and increase employment opportunities. (Page 157)

Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically to disability or implementation.  (Page 206)

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NH Acquired Brain Disorder Waiver (4177.R05.00) - 11/01/2017

~~“Provides community participation services, respite, service coordination, supported employment services, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services - PDMS (formerly consolidated acquired brain disorder services), residential habilitation/personal care services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/brain injury ages 22 - no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Between the Governor of the State of New Hampshire,the State Workforce Innovation Board - 07/01/2017

~~“This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by The Governor of the State of New Hampshire, The State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB), and the consortium of state and other entities serving as the One-stop Operator as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014, for the state of New Hampshire, henceforth known as the NH Works One-stop Operator Consortium.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire - 02/01/2017

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire FFY 2014 State Performance Plan/Annual Report on IDEA - 02/01/2016

“New Hampshire has a responsibility, under federal law, to have a system of general supervision that monitors the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by school districts. The general supervision system is accountable for identifying and correcting noncompliance with IDEA and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of Children with Disabilities, as well as for promoting continuous improvement…. The State Performance Plan (SPP) is a blueprint for systems change for special education in New Hampshire. It is a six-year plan and annual report submitted to the USDOE Office of Special Education in February of each year.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order 2002-9 (Establishing a Governor's Task Force on Employment) - 12/04/2002

“An order establishing the Governor's Task Force on Employment and Economic Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Between the Governor of the State of New Hampshire,the State Workforce Innovation Board - 07/01/2017

~~“This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by The Governor of the State of New Hampshire, The State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB), and the consortium of state and other entities serving as the One-stop Operator as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014, for the state of New Hampshire, henceforth known as the NH Works One-stop Operator Consortium.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire FFY 2014 State Performance Plan/Annual Report on IDEA - 02/01/2016

“New Hampshire has a responsibility, under federal law, to have a system of general supervision that monitors the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by school districts. The general supervision system is accountable for identifying and correcting noncompliance with IDEA and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of Children with Disabilities, as well as for promoting continuous improvement…. The State Performance Plan (SPP) is a blueprint for systems change for special education in New Hampshire. It is a six-year plan and annual report submitted to the USDOE Office of Special Education in February of each year.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Hampshire Department of Vocational Rehabilitation Policy Manual - 05/01/2015

The New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation agency assists eligible individuals with physical and mental impairments to achieve or maintain employment. Employment means entering or retaining full-time employment, or part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market (including supported employment), the practice of a profession, self-employment, homemaking, farm or family work (including work for which payment is in kind rather than in cash), telecommuting, home-based employment, or other gainful work. The VR process is based upon an Individualized Plan for Employment which is oriented to the achievement of a suitable employment outcome.

 A suitable employment outcome is one which will enable a person with a disability to secure employment that is consistent with his or her unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. Services provided to individuals with disabilities must be necessary to overcome the vocational impediment and must be provided in a cost effective manner, utilizing comparable benefits whenever practicable. Reasonable accommodation will be made for all applicants to maximize each person's access to services that will enable the individual to achieve an employment outcome.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Sector-based Training Models: Project Search

Sector based training models are different from conventional training due to a targeted specific industry that involves strategic partnerships amongst the industry, school/college, and community-based organizations and includes training strategies that benefit both employers and workers that promote positive changes to benefit both employer and worker. As a result of sector-based training with people who have disabilities, many businesses in the private and public sector now recognize the competitive edge this has brought to their corporate world. Project SEARCH is an example of a successful sector-based training model that has been used in the United States and abroad.

In New Hampshire, Project SEARCH is a one year, high school transition healthcare program that provides training and education that may lead to employment for individuals with disabilities. Project SEARCH serves as an alternative for students in their last year high school eligibility. The cornerstone of Project SEARCH is total immersion in a large business. Students report to the host business five days a week, where they learn employability skills in the classroom and job skills while participating in a variety of internships/experiences.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Employment Position Statement For New Hampshire’s Regional Service System

We believe that employment, with its powerful and irreplaceable opportunities for autonomy, earned income, self-esteem development, social contacts, structured  activity and life satisfaction, is an import ant ingredient of a fulfilling and valued life for adults in our society. We also recognize that the capacity of adults with any type or degree of developmental disability or acquired brain disorder to participate in employment, in the right setting and with the proper supports, has been amply demonstrated.   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Community Support Network - 06/15/1995

There are 10 Area Agencies that are divided into geographical regions throughout New Hampshire to provide services to individuals with developmental disabilities, people with acquired brain disorder, and their families. Each Area Agency is designated by the State to provide services in their respective region. Combined they serve in excess of 10,000 individuals and families.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Transition Manual – Helping parents prepare students for employment (p. 19)

This "manual" has been compiled with the intent of providing you with enough general information for you to build a framework for creating and achieving goals. There will be sections of this manual that may not apply to your particular situation. All the information enclosed is purely for your reference in the event you may need it at some point. This is not a step-by-step guide, but rather a point of reference with which you can fashion your own plan. It will hopefully give you some direction and spark questions you may have.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NH Employment Community of Practice

The Mission of the NH Employment Community of Practice is to promote economic independence and high quality competitive employment opportunities for people withdisabilities through information sharing and the development and dissemination of best practices among all community partners.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment for All

“The Area Agency of Greater Nashua (AA-GN) will be the lead agency for the cross-disability Employment for All Consortium. With its strong track record and sterling reputation, State funders have tapped AA-GN to field test and sustain a variety of innovative programs and initiatives, including: self-directed community supports; individual career accounts; legislative outreach; minority outreach; the Southern NH Time Exchange, a project promoting community connections and inclusion; self-advocacy; Personal Care Services in the workplace; and the first Enhanced Family Care model for persons served under the ECI waiver.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ND Department of Vocational Rehabilitation & Department of Education

“Vocational Rehabilitation has a long history of providing direct and indirect services to youth with disabilities as they transition from school to work. The services provided have enabled many students to obtain successful employment. This agency is committed to increasing access and improving the overall quality of services offered to school age youth.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Governor's Commission on Disability

The Governor’s Commission on Disability provides information about the many services, laws, and regulations that affect citizens with disabilities.

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Institute on Disability/UCEDD - University of New Hampshire

“Trains students, self-advocates, families and professionals through coursework, seminars, workshops and conferences; Provides technical assistance to organizations and individuals to improve their capacity to include all citizens. Disseminates information to families, consumers, community members and professionals via books, monographs, articles, videos, newsletters, the internet and newspapers and consumer forums; engages in collaborative activities and

joint projects with organizations that share common goals. 

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project

“The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve the employment for people with disabilities in New Hampshire by establishing two pilot demonstration models that will create leadership, collaboration with the community, outreach to employers, businesses, and school systems, build capacity for training and staff development, and support the information technology and employment database needs of the projects.”

Partners include the Governor's Task Force for Employment & Economic Opportunities, NH Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, NH Employment Security, NH Department of Education, DHHS/Bureau of Behavioral Health, and Bureau of Developmental Services.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Next Steps New Hampshire - 09/01/2012

“The New Hampshire Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education has been awarded a $3.8 million State Personnel Development Grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs for the next 5 years. The grant will focus on developing and sustaining the skills of New Hampshire school district personnel and families to increase the number of students with disabilities graduating from high school that are college and career ready. The grant will focus on four strategies to achieve this goal: (1) increasing student competency through our state Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs), regional professional development intermediaries, a transition Community of Practice, and the use of technology.

College and career readiness is not only an academic endeavor. Schools, students, and families must plan and work together to ensure successful transition. The outcomes of the grant will remove the state from a compliance focus to a deeper, more comprehensive evidence-based approach to transition planning. These activities will be conducted collaboratively with our partners at New Hampshire Parent Information Centers, New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation, regional intermediaries and other established professional development providers so that the activities are sustained over time.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire” - 12/30/2011

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Sector-based Training Models: Project Search

Sector based training models are different from conventional training due to a targeted specific industry that involves strategic partnerships amongst the industry, school/college, and community-based organizations and includes training strategies that benefit both employers and workers that promote positive changes to benefit both employer and worker. As a result of sector-based training with people who have disabilities, many businesses in the private and public sector now recognize the competitive edge this has brought to their corporate world. Project SEARCH is an example of a successful sector-based training model that has been used in the United States and abroad.

In New Hampshire, Project SEARCH is a one year, high school transition healthcare program that provides training and education that may lead to employment for individuals with disabilities. Project SEARCH serves as an alternative for students in their last year high school eligibility. The cornerstone of Project SEARCH is total immersion in a large business. Students report to the host business five days a week, where they learn employability skills in the classroom and job skills while participating in a variety of internships/experiences.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011

‘In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI)”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Hampshire Money Follows the Person

“The New Hampshire Community Passport Program (NHCPP) is a nursing home transition initiative made possible through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Money Follows The Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant. This program is designed and implemented to reflect a person-centered approach to service planning and delivery and providing greater opportunities for individuals to direct their own care to the extent that they choose. These are also the values inherent in the State's long term care vision statement”.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual

The New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual provides more in-depth information about the major programs affecting income and benefits for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire.  The Manual is divided into four sections:

1. New Hampshire Adult Assistance Programs

2. Social Security Disability Insurance

3. Supplemental Security Income

4. Medicare

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Indicator 13 Training 2015-2016 Powerpoint

This powerpoint provides information to help special education professionals best help their students plan and set goals for post-secondary transition.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NH Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - VR Counselor Training and Resources

VR Counselor Training and Resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

WorkReadyNH

Work ReadyNH is a tuition-free workforce development program tailored to meet the needs of job seekers and career builders as well as provide training in the specific skills employers are seeking in their current and future employees.

 

The WorkReadyNH program provides assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. Graduates earn two nationally recognized credentials to add to their resume.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Southern New Hampshire Services Workplace Success Program

 Workplace Success is a partnership between the Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies. The goal of the program is to prepare participants to  enter a volunteer  Work Experience position within a nonprofit, business, or local/state government host site for 20-30 hours per week until they obtain full-time paid employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Southern New Hampshire Services Employment and Training Program

An employment and training program funded by the U.S. Department of Labor to help Dislocated Workers and other Eligible Adults access the tools they need to manage their careers through information and high quality services, and to help U.S. companies find skilled workers.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

NH Department of Education - Secondary Transition Statewide Training

Foundations in Transition - Person Centered Strategies for Students with Disabilities Making the Transition to Adult Life. A NH RESPONDS Grant sponsored a four part training series that included training in practices that have been shown to improve the self determination skills and education outcomes for young people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation Guide

This tool-kit includes a description of the vocational rehabilitation process and overview of the entire NHVR process, from application to post-employment services.
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Five Year Plan (2008-2012)

• MIG funds were used during 2002 and 2003 to provide the 13 New Hampshire Employment Security One-Stops with equipment and resource materials (e.g., screen readers, audio “how to” tapes) to make them more accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, training was provided to the staff of One-Stops regarding use of the purchased equipment and resource materials. This initiative with the One-Stops also included staff trainings on disability awareness issues and creation of a resource guide called “Disability Etiquette.”

• MIG was instrumental in the development of towo tool kits. The first, a ready-to work toolkit is a curriculum on personal futures planning, resume writing, self-directed job searching techniques, employment interviewing skills, and negotiating workplace culture, politics, and related skills. It’s currently being used by the independent living center’s 6 peer groups. The second, an employer tool kit, was developed to provide information and guidance to employers regarding reasonable workplace accommodations, tax credits, where to get technical assistance, the ticket-to-work program, and the values and benefits of hiring people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Amanda D., et al. v. Hassan, et al. Settlement Fact Sheet

The United States Department of Justice, a coalition of private plaintiff organizations, and the State of New Hampshire, have entered into a comprehensive Settlement Agreement that will transform New Hampshire’s mental health system by significantly expanding and enhancing mental health service capacity in integrated community settings. The Agreement will enable a class of adults with serious mental illness to receive needed services in the community, which will foster their independence and enable them to participate more fully in community life. The expanded and enhanced community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at State mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (“NHH”) (the State’s only psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (a State-owned and -operated nursing facility for people with mental illness). The Agreement requires the State to expand and enhance community services over the next six years. …

For the first time, the State will deliver supported employment services in accordance with the Dartmouth evidence-based model. These services will help enable individuals to obtain and maintain paid, competitive employment in integrated community settings. Over the life of the Agreement, this provision will impact thousands of people.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

NH Acquired Brain Disorder Waiver (4177.R05.00) - 11/01/2017

~~“Provides community participation services, respite, service coordination, supported employment services, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services - PDMS (formerly consolidated acquired brain disorder services), residential habilitation/personal care services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/brain injury ages 22 - no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire - 02/01/2017

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Waiver Program - 01/05/2016

“On January 5, 2016 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) approved New Hampshire's Section 1115 Research and Demonstration Transformation Waiver, #11-W-00301/1 to access new federal funding to help transform its behavioral health delivery system. The Transformation Waiver has four main targets:

Deliver integrated physical and behavioral health care that better addresses the full range of individuals' needs Expand capacity to address emerging and ongoing behavioral health needs in an appropriate setting Reduce gaps in care during transitions across care settings by improving coordination across providers and linking patients with community supports. Move fifty percent of Medicaid reimbursement to alternative payment models by the end of the demonstration period”
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire ESEA Flexibility Approval - 06/26/2013

The New Hampshire Department of Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on June 26, 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program

“The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program assists low-income elderly or disabled individuals who are eligible for Medicare (available through the Social Security Administration) by paying for some or all of the associated costs of Medicare, specifically the Medicare Insurance Premiums and deductibles. The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program is also referred to as the Buy-In program….

The Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) program provides payment of Medicare Part A premiums for eligible working individuals with disabilities who are entitled to enroll in Medicare Part A, but who have lost Medicare Part A coverage due to earnings. Individuals eligible for QDWI may not otherwise be eligible for Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HCBS Transition Plan

In January 2014, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) finalized regulations that require Medicaid-funded Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) possess particular qualities in residential and nonresidential settings.  All states are required to demonstrate how their HCBS programs comply with the new federal HCBS rules. The purpose of this draft Transition Framework is to ensure that in New Hampshire individuals receiving HCBS are integrated in and have access to supports in the community, including opportunities to seek employment, work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources. Overall, the Transition Plan provides  a roadmap for how the State will assure that individuals receiving HCBS have the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS.    This Transition Plan outlines the proposed process that New Hampshire will be utilizing to ensure alignment with the HCBS requirements.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH Money Follows the Person

The New Hampshire Community Passport Program (NHCPP) is a nursing home transition initiative made possible through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Money Follows The Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant. This program is designed and implemented to reflect a person-centered approach to service planning and delivery and providing greater opportunities for individuals to direct their own care to the extent that they choose. These are also the values inherent in the State's long term care vision statement.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,330,608
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
89,630
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.82%
Change from
2014 to 2015
35,390
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
39.48%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.94%
Change from
2014 to 2015
82.92%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 1,323,459 1,326,813 1,330,608
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 86,064 81,485 89,630
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 36,000 32,622 35,390
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 607,623 619,658 622,689
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.83% 40.03% 39.48%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.29% 81.31% 82.92%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.10% 4.30% 3.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 16.60% 15.60% 17.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 7.50% 8.30% 6.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 82,920 80,736 82,462
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 83,338 79,653 87,587
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 158,049 152,430 161,605
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,946 1,399 3,207
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,961 4,214 3,901
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A 540 N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,816 1,220 1,052
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 3,104 3,970 3,119
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 844 670 607

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,294 1,329 1,485
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.80% 7.00% 7.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 48,139 48,139 48,223

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,000 9,302 8,321
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 16,515 17,322 14,803
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 25,106 24,650 21,476
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 31.90% 37.70% 38.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 11.40% 11.30% 14.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.40% 7.10% 7.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 71.60%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,244 1,218 1,668
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 263 772 921
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A 8,503

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,397 2,070 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 15 12 13
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 8 7 6
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 53.00% 58.00% 46.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.61 0.53 0.45

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,077
1,890
2,545
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 119 122 126
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 427 341 386
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 419 375 501
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 525 514 740
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 412 314 455
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 175 224 337
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 36.00% 36.10% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 4,099 4,064
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 64,503 64,912
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 32 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 61 56 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $15,504,000 $26,068,000 $32,003,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $59,057,000 $50,540 $45,982,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 41.00% 38.00% 44.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,723 2,350 2,248
Number of people served in facility based work. 25 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 90.60 103.70 120.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.23% 72.85% 72.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.01% 7.97% 8.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.48% 2.61% 2.67%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 60.48% 54.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 47.40% 39.56% 38.52%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 69.90% 63.11% 67.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.80% 77.78% 80.57%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 22.49% 23.55% 28.62%

 

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 0 0

 

WIOA Proflie

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security (Wagner–Peyser, Veterans Services, Farm Workers, Trade Act); Vocational Rehabilitation (people with disabilities, adult basic education); Community Action Agency (WIOA services dislocated workers, displaced homemakers, low–income individuals and connects to CAP services such as Head Start, Fuel Assistance, and other support programs); Older Worker Program (employment and support programs); and Granite State Independent Living (benefit specialists for the disabled) ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co–located, a close relationship and co–enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One–stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English–speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. (Page 84)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Since the agency began developing a comprehensive approach we have worked with several vendors on pilots to assist this population. The primary services that were provided were coaching and personalized services. The agency is still examining whether these pilots are being more successful with our customers. In May 2012 New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation was recognized by Business New Hampshire Magazine and the NH Association of Chambers of Commerce as the "2012 Business Assistance Organization of the Year." This was a great honor for the agency. Through the nomination process the agency was able to highlight the extensive number of employers the agency works with to achieve successful employment opportunities for customers with disabilities. NHVR collaborates with Northeast Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (NDHHS) and other partners in the deaf community so that there is a team approach when placement of a customer is made. All parties having the same and updated information allow the customer and the team to have more success in obtaining job retention. It also allows for any communication issues that could be occurring in the team, so that the customer has the best chance of success. In 2011, NDHHS sought the participation of NHVR in a project that was facilitated by the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) to review the NASDSE Guidelines for the Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students, and to then utilize those Guidelines in the development of NH specific Guidelines which would serve as best practice for school districts in NH. The year–long project has resulted in the New Hampshire Educational Service Guidelines for Students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing, which will be presented to the New Hampshire Association of Special Education Directors in April 2012, for use in the development of 2012–2013 Individual Education Programs. (Page 147)

The new rule will ensure that if someone is in an employment setting they will have the long–term supports to maintain that job. It also supports that students still in high school can achieve long–term supports while still in school and prior to graduation. The rule also helps families understand that employment should be the first option when looking at goals after high school graduation. In addition the Bureau has also added in employment goals to the contracts of the 10 area agencies. These changes are monumental changes. The Bureau staff are currently out in the community training area agency staff in how to best utilize these new rules. The agency has also added in a new service called “situational assessment.” The situational assessment is a specialized service that provides a VR participant with the opportunity to demonstrate their work skills at a real and functioning worksite (unpaid) within the community. This service will allow this agency to evaluate and identify the necessary services a participant will need to be successful in an actual competitive employment situation. The agency has lined up the insurance component of this service and has had a small team of VR staff that has worked on this diligently. Select vendors at each of the regional offices, will be able to provide this service. These vendors will be selected based on their’ demonstrated abilities to complete this assessment. NHVR staff are also working on individual pilot programs. (Page 197)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses
  • Internships   (Page 28)

Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses  (Page 28)

Post–Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury. In an effort to continue discussing these important issues and determine how, as a community, we can better serve our veterans, service members and their families. Mr. Hinson was re–appointed by Governor Margaret Hassan to serve on the Commission on PTSD and TBI. During FY 15, two internal benefits counselors (Portsmouth and Manchester Regional Offices) provided benefit counseling to 386 customers. Seventy–six of those customers who had received internal benefits counseling during the vr process were closed status 26. Our internal benefits counseling staff also continue to jointly partner with the Institute on Disability with respect to the Real Study, a National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) research project designed to provide money coaching and benefits counseling to job seeking and employed individuals with disabilities. 

Extension. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Fiscal year 2011 data on this item was measured against this baseline. In FY 09 eligibility was determined in 60 days or less from application for 89% of the customers who applied for services. In FY 15, the average days to determine eligibility was 34 days. 2.3 Percent of accurate presumptive eligibility decisions for persons eligible for SSI or SSDI. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Target set for 2010 was 90%. During an FY 11 case review the agency achieved a rating of 76% in this area. The Agency is working to reinforce documentation in this area. Case review of FY 12 cases revealed that only relatively small sample of the cases reviewed received SSA benefits and were reviewed on this criterion. Of those 51% of the cases reviewed demonstrated that the presumption of eligibility was documented in case notes. The 2013-2014 review of FY12 cases is the most recent case review to assess this area. In 2014 the Agency began work on changing its case management system to Alliance’s AWARE system. At that time, the Agency decided to revamp case management practices to match the new system. Staff have been learning the new system and strategies and a case review is planned for the end of FY 2016 to determine any additional training needs to help staff meet the requirements of the program. (Page 188)

School to Work Transition

Continue to assess business interest in work–based learning and the ideal engagement strategies from the businesses’ perspectives. STRATEGY 4.2.C Determine the most appropriate way(s) to link resources from various programs and partners to offer full spectrum of work–based learning opportunities (e.g. Department of Labor School–to–Work Approved Unpaid Work Sites, Vocational Rehabilitation Work Based Learning program, On–the–job training resources from WIOA and TANF, Office of Apprenticeship services, etc.) This could be a digital infrastructure that offers the ability for businesses and emerging workers to be connected for work–based learning opportunities online. But, it may also be clarifying the message, resources, and roles/responsibilities among partners to support work–based learning connections in New Hampshire. Much mapping of the various assets has already been done and will provide a foundation for Strategy 4.2. (Page 47)

Providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA. 

  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff and other constituents, to ensure the inclusion of students and youth with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring in the schools as a result of the IDEA 2008 and the Rehabilitation Act;
  • providing advocacy for students and youth with disabilities to a variety of constituents;
  • improving connections between NHVR and other transition service agencies;
  • providing information and guidance regarding Labor Laws as they relate to job shadow, internships and work experience for students and youth with disabilities;
  • marketing to school staff, students and families, adult service agencies, etc. in a variety of areas, e.g., employment issues as a result of disability, transition of students with disabilities, availability of adult services, best practices in transition of youth with disabilities, accessing adult services, employer perspectives; develop relationships with other agencies providing services to students and youth with disabilities to maximize services offered;
  • providing technical assistance on grants as they are developed with multiple agencies and programs to ensure the inclusion of all students and youth with disabilities.
  • providing continued support of transition programs for students and youth such as the Earn and Learn program, Project INCOME and Project SEARCH The NHVR staff actively facilitates meetings with school staff, NHVR counselors and school–to–work staff to plan the inclusion of students with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring within the state. (Page 150)

NHVR staff and leadership are working closely together to ensure that changes implemented by WIOA are achieved. The activities these positions cover include: 

  • working with NHVR counselors to improve access and services provided to students and youth with disabilities;
  • working with NHVR counselors to develop best practices and examples of best practices to students and youth with disabilities;
  • providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA.
  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff (Page 151)

Target outreach efforts to support the employment outcomes of underserved populations 

  • Improve vocational rehabilitation services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, and deaf blind communities
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff to develop and improve needed skills regarding services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
    • Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School–to– Work transition program.
    • Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind
    • Collaborate with NHVR Office of Services for Blind and Visually Impaired to improve services to students who are deaf and blind.
    • Improve job development, placement, and retention for customers who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened and deaf blind. (Page 178)
  • Build partnerships with school transition personnel and serve as a resource for career planning
  • Encourage career–focused and work–based experiences during the transition from school to work
  • Identify students with disabilities who have been underserved and develop strategies for engagement
  • Utilize alternative and extended learning opportunities (ELO) for skill acquisition and academic achievement for students who require non–traditional learning environments
  • Support and continue to explore opportunities for sector–based and alternative education, employment and training programs for this targeted group, e.g., ACES, Earn and Learn, Project Search, Project Invest, Project Incomes and CHAMP NHVR, in its RFP process, has asked potential bidders to provide regional consortium responses that will outline how “potentially eligible” students shall be identified and how the services shall be provided. These responses will focus on enhancing NHVR’s relationship with the Bureau of Developmental Services, through its area agencies, and the Bureau of Behavioral Health, through its community mental health centers, and School Administrative Units (SAU’s) to better serve students with disabilities. (Page 179)

This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders. (Page 181)

Including individuals with the most significant disabilities, to secure suitable employment, and financial and personal independence by providing rehabilitation services. The Agency continually assesses the barriers and strategies to reduce barriers that relate to equal access to the state VR program. In planning this year specific input was solicited from the Developmental Disabilities Council; the statewide Independent Living Council; the state MH Planning Council; the Governor’s Commission on Disability; the Autism Council and the executive committee of the Special Education Administrators in the state. In providing a quality customer–focused service delivery system that is timely, effective and responds to the needs of individuals with disabilities throughout the state, the NHVR recognizes the need to expand and improve services to individuals with sensory, cognitive, physical and mental impairments who have traditionally not been served or have been underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program. This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders (Page 183)
  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.   (Page 184)
Data Collection

4.2 Percent of cases reviewed for which there is evidence that assistive technology services and assistive technology devices were assessed and used as necessary for individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process. It was identified that current case review data collection did not include this element. It was further identified that this is a training need area for staff. In–service training has included assistive tech services and devices and will continue to target this area as a training need in FY 12 through FY 15. Case review of FY 12 cases identified that that 70% of the time the case documentation showed evidence of an assessment of the need for assistive technology services and devices.   (Page 193)

The CPPOS will play a key role in informing students of opportunities in continued education or entry into the workforce. The CPPOS will list recommended academic courses for students to take for career success. Schools will be able to access relevant documents and guidance on the web and will receive technical assistance on modifying CPPOS’s for local use with students. Documents and guidance will be accessible on the web, including information postsecondary CTE opportunities that are linked to secondary programs. For example, the guidance documents currently tell students which colleges in New Hampshire offer the programs, and on the web they will be able to click on the link and go directly to information on that college program. New Hampshire has a long-term goal of at least implementing one CPPOS in 15 of the career clusters. Also at the end of the five-year period, all secondary CTE centers statewide will need to offer at least one CPPOS opportunity for their students. Competencies for new or updated programs will be required to align with national, state, and local standards. The New Hampshire Department of Education will work with employers and the Community College System to validate the competencies and modify as needed. (Page 219)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

The Governor established and certified the Workforce Opportunity Council (Council) as the State’s Workforce Board under WIA on September 22, 1999. The Council name was changed to State Workforce Investment Board in 2009 with the creation of the Office of Workforce Opportunity (OWO) in the NH Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED). Recently the board’s name changed to the State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB) with the implementation of WIOA. The Board is chaired by a businessperson and has 37 members, of whom 19 members (51%) are business representatives including a minimum of one small business representative. In addition the board includes:

  • The Governor (Section 101(b)(1)(A));
  • Two representatives of the State Legislature (Section 101(b)(1)(B)):
  • Lead officials from state agencies that oversee workforce development programs including chief elected officials (Section 101 (b)(1)(C)(iii) (Page 72)
Career Pathways

ABE staff participate in workforce agency partner meetings and NH Works counselors work with students on-site in ABE classes, called “What’s Next”, to introduce career inventories, career pathways, and promote resources available through NH Works. Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receive referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. (Page 27)

The Community College System and CTE work closely together, offering dual credit opportunities for students, sharing funding streams, recruiting at education and job fairs, and promoting career pathways.

  • Collaboration between the Community College System and ABE is very successful, particularly when programs are co-located. For example, at Great Bay Community College, an MOU between ABE and the college allows ABE to teach remedial English and math courses. This better serves students by reserving financial aid or loans for college-level coursework. There is also a referral process in place and ABE programs can assist students with admissions at community colleges, enrollment, preparing for the Accuplacer and sharing scores, determining eligibility for specific job training programs, and more.
  • Collaboration between Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation, with VR counselors attending ABE programs on a monthly basis. This activity is primarily focused on the special education population. (Page 31)

Within this MOU we will seek to partner with agencies participating with Medicaid (The Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health) to assist in enhancing services to customers needing supported employment and competitive integrated employment. We are very fortunate in New Hampshire to have legislation that prohibits subminimum wage payments to individuals with disabilities (SB 47, 2015). We are proud to work with our business partners to ensure at least minimum wage employment for our mutual customers. In the agreement we will weave in our work on career pathways and work-based learning to expand current sectors (Project SEARCH) and increase employment opportunities. (Page 157)

Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically to disability or implementation.  (Page 206)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 50

NH Acquired Brain Disorder Waiver (4177.R05.00) - 11/01/2017

~~“Provides community participation services, respite, service coordination, supported employment services, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services - PDMS (formerly consolidated acquired brain disorder services), residential habilitation/personal care services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/brain injury ages 22 - no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Between the Governor of the State of New Hampshire,the State Workforce Innovation Board - 07/01/2017

~~“This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by The Governor of the State of New Hampshire, The State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB), and the consortium of state and other entities serving as the One-stop Operator as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014, for the state of New Hampshire, henceforth known as the NH Works One-stop Operator Consortium.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire - 02/01/2017

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire FFY 2014 State Performance Plan/Annual Report on IDEA - 02/01/2016

“New Hampshire has a responsibility, under federal law, to have a system of general supervision that monitors the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by school districts. The general supervision system is accountable for identifying and correcting noncompliance with IDEA and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of Children with Disabilities, as well as for promoting continuous improvement…. The State Performance Plan (SPP) is a blueprint for systems change for special education in New Hampshire. It is a six-year plan and annual report submitted to the USDOE Office of Special Education in February of each year.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order 2002-9 (Establishing a Governor's Task Force on Employment) - 12/04/2002

“An order establishing the Governor's Task Force on Employment and Economic Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Between the Governor of the State of New Hampshire,the State Workforce Innovation Board - 07/01/2017

~~“This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by The Governor of the State of New Hampshire, The State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB), and the consortium of state and other entities serving as the One-stop Operator as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014, for the state of New Hampshire, henceforth known as the NH Works One-stop Operator Consortium.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire FFY 2014 State Performance Plan/Annual Report on IDEA - 02/01/2016

“New Hampshire has a responsibility, under federal law, to have a system of general supervision that monitors the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by school districts. The general supervision system is accountable for identifying and correcting noncompliance with IDEA and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of Children with Disabilities, as well as for promoting continuous improvement…. The State Performance Plan (SPP) is a blueprint for systems change for special education in New Hampshire. It is a six-year plan and annual report submitted to the USDOE Office of Special Education in February of each year.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Hampshire Department of Vocational Rehabilitation Policy Manual - 05/01/2015

The New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation agency assists eligible individuals with physical and mental impairments to achieve or maintain employment. Employment means entering or retaining full-time employment, or part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market (including supported employment), the practice of a profession, self-employment, homemaking, farm or family work (including work for which payment is in kind rather than in cash), telecommuting, home-based employment, or other gainful work. The VR process is based upon an Individualized Plan for Employment which is oriented to the achievement of a suitable employment outcome.

 A suitable employment outcome is one which will enable a person with a disability to secure employment that is consistent with his or her unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. Services provided to individuals with disabilities must be necessary to overcome the vocational impediment and must be provided in a cost effective manner, utilizing comparable benefits whenever practicable. Reasonable accommodation will be made for all applicants to maximize each person's access to services that will enable the individual to achieve an employment outcome.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Sector-based Training Models: Project Search

Sector based training models are different from conventional training due to a targeted specific industry that involves strategic partnerships amongst the industry, school/college, and community-based organizations and includes training strategies that benefit both employers and workers that promote positive changes to benefit both employer and worker. As a result of sector-based training with people who have disabilities, many businesses in the private and public sector now recognize the competitive edge this has brought to their corporate world. Project SEARCH is an example of a successful sector-based training model that has been used in the United States and abroad.

In New Hampshire, Project SEARCH is a one year, high school transition healthcare program that provides training and education that may lead to employment for individuals with disabilities. Project SEARCH serves as an alternative for students in their last year high school eligibility. The cornerstone of Project SEARCH is total immersion in a large business. Students report to the host business five days a week, where they learn employability skills in the classroom and job skills while participating in a variety of internships/experiences.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Employment Position Statement For New Hampshire’s Regional Service System

We believe that employment, with its powerful and irreplaceable opportunities for autonomy, earned income, self-esteem development, social contacts, structured  activity and life satisfaction, is an import ant ingredient of a fulfilling and valued life for adults in our society. We also recognize that the capacity of adults with any type or degree of developmental disability or acquired brain disorder to participate in employment, in the right setting and with the proper supports, has been amply demonstrated.   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Community Support Network - 06/15/1995

There are 10 Area Agencies that are divided into geographical regions throughout New Hampshire to provide services to individuals with developmental disabilities, people with acquired brain disorder, and their families. Each Area Agency is designated by the State to provide services in their respective region. Combined they serve in excess of 10,000 individuals and families.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Transition Manual – Helping parents prepare students for employment (p. 19)

This "manual" has been compiled with the intent of providing you with enough general information for you to build a framework for creating and achieving goals. There will be sections of this manual that may not apply to your particular situation. All the information enclosed is purely for your reference in the event you may need it at some point. This is not a step-by-step guide, but rather a point of reference with which you can fashion your own plan. It will hopefully give you some direction and spark questions you may have.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NH Employment Community of Practice

The Mission of the NH Employment Community of Practice is to promote economic independence and high quality competitive employment opportunities for people withdisabilities through information sharing and the development and dissemination of best practices among all community partners.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment for All

“The Area Agency of Greater Nashua (AA-GN) will be the lead agency for the cross-disability Employment for All Consortium. With its strong track record and sterling reputation, State funders have tapped AA-GN to field test and sustain a variety of innovative programs and initiatives, including: self-directed community supports; individual career accounts; legislative outreach; minority outreach; the Southern NH Time Exchange, a project promoting community connections and inclusion; self-advocacy; Personal Care Services in the workplace; and the first Enhanced Family Care model for persons served under the ECI waiver.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ND Department of Vocational Rehabilitation & Department of Education

“Vocational Rehabilitation has a long history of providing direct and indirect services to youth with disabilities as they transition from school to work. The services provided have enabled many students to obtain successful employment. This agency is committed to increasing access and improving the overall quality of services offered to school age youth.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Governor's Commission on Disability

The Governor’s Commission on Disability provides information about the many services, laws, and regulations that affect citizens with disabilities.

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Institute on Disability/UCEDD - University of New Hampshire

“Trains students, self-advocates, families and professionals through coursework, seminars, workshops and conferences; Provides technical assistance to organizations and individuals to improve their capacity to include all citizens. Disseminates information to families, consumers, community members and professionals via books, monographs, articles, videos, newsletters, the internet and newspapers and consumer forums; engages in collaborative activities and

joint projects with organizations that share common goals. 

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project

“The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve the employment for people with disabilities in New Hampshire by establishing two pilot demonstration models that will create leadership, collaboration with the community, outreach to employers, businesses, and school systems, build capacity for training and staff development, and support the information technology and employment database needs of the projects.”

Partners include the Governor's Task Force for Employment & Economic Opportunities, NH Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, NH Employment Security, NH Department of Education, DHHS/Bureau of Behavioral Health, and Bureau of Developmental Services.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Next Steps New Hampshire - 09/01/2012

“The New Hampshire Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education has been awarded a $3.8 million State Personnel Development Grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs for the next 5 years. The grant will focus on developing and sustaining the skills of New Hampshire school district personnel and families to increase the number of students with disabilities graduating from high school that are college and career ready. The grant will focus on four strategies to achieve this goal: (1) increasing student competency through our state Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs), regional professional development intermediaries, a transition Community of Practice, and the use of technology.

College and career readiness is not only an academic endeavor. Schools, students, and families must plan and work together to ensure successful transition. The outcomes of the grant will remove the state from a compliance focus to a deeper, more comprehensive evidence-based approach to transition planning. These activities will be conducted collaboratively with our partners at New Hampshire Parent Information Centers, New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation, regional intermediaries and other established professional development providers so that the activities are sustained over time.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire” - 12/30/2011

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Sector-based Training Models: Project Search

Sector based training models are different from conventional training due to a targeted specific industry that involves strategic partnerships amongst the industry, school/college, and community-based organizations and includes training strategies that benefit both employers and workers that promote positive changes to benefit both employer and worker. As a result of sector-based training with people who have disabilities, many businesses in the private and public sector now recognize the competitive edge this has brought to their corporate world. Project SEARCH is an example of a successful sector-based training model that has been used in the United States and abroad.

In New Hampshire, Project SEARCH is a one year, high school transition healthcare program that provides training and education that may lead to employment for individuals with disabilities. Project SEARCH serves as an alternative for students in their last year high school eligibility. The cornerstone of Project SEARCH is total immersion in a large business. Students report to the host business five days a week, where they learn employability skills in the classroom and job skills while participating in a variety of internships/experiences.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011

‘In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI)”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Hampshire Money Follows the Person

“The New Hampshire Community Passport Program (NHCPP) is a nursing home transition initiative made possible through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Money Follows The Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant. This program is designed and implemented to reflect a person-centered approach to service planning and delivery and providing greater opportunities for individuals to direct their own care to the extent that they choose. These are also the values inherent in the State's long term care vision statement”.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual

The New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual provides more in-depth information about the major programs affecting income and benefits for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire.  The Manual is divided into four sections:

1. New Hampshire Adult Assistance Programs

2. Social Security Disability Insurance

3. Supplemental Security Income

4. Medicare

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Indicator 13 Training 2015-2016 Powerpoint

This powerpoint provides information to help special education professionals best help their students plan and set goals for post-secondary transition.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NH Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - VR Counselor Training and Resources

VR Counselor Training and Resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

WorkReadyNH

Work ReadyNH is a tuition-free workforce development program tailored to meet the needs of job seekers and career builders as well as provide training in the specific skills employers are seeking in their current and future employees.

 

The WorkReadyNH program provides assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. Graduates earn two nationally recognized credentials to add to their resume.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Southern New Hampshire Services Workplace Success Program

 Workplace Success is a partnership between the Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies. The goal of the program is to prepare participants to  enter a volunteer  Work Experience position within a nonprofit, business, or local/state government host site for 20-30 hours per week until they obtain full-time paid employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Southern New Hampshire Services Employment and Training Program

An employment and training program funded by the U.S. Department of Labor to help Dislocated Workers and other Eligible Adults access the tools they need to manage their careers through information and high quality services, and to help U.S. companies find skilled workers.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

NH Department of Education - Secondary Transition Statewide Training

Foundations in Transition - Person Centered Strategies for Students with Disabilities Making the Transition to Adult Life. A NH RESPONDS Grant sponsored a four part training series that included training in practices that have been shown to improve the self determination skills and education outcomes for young people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation Guide

This tool-kit includes a description of the vocational rehabilitation process and overview of the entire NHVR process, from application to post-employment services.
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Five Year Plan (2008-2012)

• MIG funds were used during 2002 and 2003 to provide the 13 New Hampshire Employment Security One-Stops with equipment and resource materials (e.g., screen readers, audio “how to” tapes) to make them more accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, training was provided to the staff of One-Stops regarding use of the purchased equipment and resource materials. This initiative with the One-Stops also included staff trainings on disability awareness issues and creation of a resource guide called “Disability Etiquette.”

• MIG was instrumental in the development of towo tool kits. The first, a ready-to work toolkit is a curriculum on personal futures planning, resume writing, self-directed job searching techniques, employment interviewing skills, and negotiating workplace culture, politics, and related skills. It’s currently being used by the independent living center’s 6 peer groups. The second, an employer tool kit, was developed to provide information and guidance to employers regarding reasonable workplace accommodations, tax credits, where to get technical assistance, the ticket-to-work program, and the values and benefits of hiring people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Amanda D., et al. v. Hassan, et al. Settlement Fact Sheet

The United States Department of Justice, a coalition of private plaintiff organizations, and the State of New Hampshire, have entered into a comprehensive Settlement Agreement that will transform New Hampshire’s mental health system by significantly expanding and enhancing mental health service capacity in integrated community settings. The Agreement will enable a class of adults with serious mental illness to receive needed services in the community, which will foster their independence and enable them to participate more fully in community life. The expanded and enhanced community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at State mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (“NHH”) (the State’s only psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (a State-owned and -operated nursing facility for people with mental illness). The Agreement requires the State to expand and enhance community services over the next six years. …

For the first time, the State will deliver supported employment services in accordance with the Dartmouth evidence-based model. These services will help enable individuals to obtain and maintain paid, competitive employment in integrated community settings. Over the life of the Agreement, this provision will impact thousands of people.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

NH Acquired Brain Disorder Waiver (4177.R05.00) - 11/01/2017

~~“Provides community participation services, respite, service coordination, supported employment services, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services - PDMS (formerly consolidated acquired brain disorder services), residential habilitation/personal care services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/brain injury ages 22 - no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire - 02/01/2017

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Waiver Program - 01/05/2016

“On January 5, 2016 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) approved New Hampshire's Section 1115 Research and Demonstration Transformation Waiver, #11-W-00301/1 to access new federal funding to help transform its behavioral health delivery system. The Transformation Waiver has four main targets:

Deliver integrated physical and behavioral health care that better addresses the full range of individuals' needs Expand capacity to address emerging and ongoing behavioral health needs in an appropriate setting Reduce gaps in care during transitions across care settings by improving coordination across providers and linking patients with community supports. Move fifty percent of Medicaid reimbursement to alternative payment models by the end of the demonstration period”
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire ESEA Flexibility Approval - 06/26/2013

The New Hampshire Department of Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on June 26, 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program

“The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program assists low-income elderly or disabled individuals who are eligible for Medicare (available through the Social Security Administration) by paying for some or all of the associated costs of Medicare, specifically the Medicare Insurance Premiums and deductibles. The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program is also referred to as the Buy-In program….

The Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) program provides payment of Medicare Part A premiums for eligible working individuals with disabilities who are entitled to enroll in Medicare Part A, but who have lost Medicare Part A coverage due to earnings. Individuals eligible for QDWI may not otherwise be eligible for Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HCBS Transition Plan

In January 2014, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) finalized regulations that require Medicaid-funded Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) possess particular qualities in residential and nonresidential settings.  All states are required to demonstrate how their HCBS programs comply with the new federal HCBS rules. The purpose of this draft Transition Framework is to ensure that in New Hampshire individuals receiving HCBS are integrated in and have access to supports in the community, including opportunities to seek employment, work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources. Overall, the Transition Plan provides  a roadmap for how the State will assure that individuals receiving HCBS have the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS.    This Transition Plan outlines the proposed process that New Hampshire will be utilizing to ensure alignment with the HCBS requirements.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH Money Follows the Person

The New Hampshire Community Passport Program (NHCPP) is a nursing home transition initiative made possible through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Money Follows The Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant. This program is designed and implemented to reflect a person-centered approach to service planning and delivery and providing greater opportunities for individuals to direct their own care to the extent that they choose. These are also the values inherent in the State's long term care vision statement.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,330,608
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
89,630
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.82%
Change from
2014 to 2015
35,390
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
39.48%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.94%
Change from
2014 to 2015
82.92%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 1,323,459 1,326,813 1,330,608
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 86,064 81,485 89,630
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 36,000 32,622 35,390
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 607,623 619,658 622,689
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.83% 40.03% 39.48%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.29% 81.31% 82.92%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.10% 4.30% 3.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 16.60% 15.60% 17.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 7.50% 8.30% 6.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 82,920 80,736 82,462
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 83,338 79,653 87,587
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 158,049 152,430 161,605
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,946 1,399 3,207
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,961 4,214 3,901
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A 540 N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,816 1,220 1,052
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 3,104 3,970 3,119
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 844 670 607

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,294 1,329 1,485
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.80% 7.00% 7.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 48,139 48,139 48,223

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,000 9,302 8,321
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 16,515 17,322 14,803
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 25,106 24,650 21,476
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 31.90% 37.70% 38.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 11.40% 11.30% 14.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.40% 7.10% 7.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 71.60%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,244 1,218 1,668
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 263 772 921
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A 8,503

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,397 2,070 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 15 12 13
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 8 7 6
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 53.00% 58.00% 46.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.61 0.53 0.45

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,077
1,890
2,545
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 119 122 126
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 427 341 386
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 419 375 501
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 525 514 740
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 412 314 455
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 175 224 337
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 36.00% 36.10% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 4,099 4,064
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 64,503 64,912
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 32 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 61 56 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $15,504,000 $26,068,000 $32,003,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $59,057,000 $50,540 $45,982,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 41.00% 38.00% 44.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,723 2,350 2,248
Number of people served in facility based work. 25 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 90.60 103.70 120.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.23% 72.85% 72.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.01% 7.97% 8.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.48% 2.61% 2.67%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 60.48% 54.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 47.40% 39.56% 38.52%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 69.90% 63.11% 67.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.80% 77.78% 80.57%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 22.49% 23.55% 28.62%

 

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 0 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security (Wagner–Peyser, Veterans Services, Farm Workers, Trade Act); Vocational Rehabilitation (people with disabilities, adult basic education); Community Action Agency (WIOA services dislocated workers, displaced homemakers, low–income individuals and connects to CAP services such as Head Start, Fuel Assistance, and other support programs); Older Worker Program (employment and support programs); and Granite State Independent Living (benefit specialists for the disabled) ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co–located, a close relationship and co–enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One–stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English–speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. (Page 84)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Since the agency began developing a comprehensive approach we have worked with several vendors on pilots to assist this population. The primary services that were provided were coaching and personalized services. The agency is still examining whether these pilots are being more successful with our customers. In May 2012 New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation was recognized by Business New Hampshire Magazine and the NH Association of Chambers of Commerce as the "2012 Business Assistance Organization of the Year." This was a great honor for the agency. Through the nomination process the agency was able to highlight the extensive number of employers the agency works with to achieve successful employment opportunities for customers with disabilities. NHVR collaborates with Northeast Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (NDHHS) and other partners in the deaf community so that there is a team approach when placement of a customer is made. All parties having the same and updated information allow the customer and the team to have more success in obtaining job retention. It also allows for any communication issues that could be occurring in the team, so that the customer has the best chance of success. In 2011, NDHHS sought the participation of NHVR in a project that was facilitated by the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) to review the NASDSE Guidelines for the Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students, and to then utilize those Guidelines in the development of NH specific Guidelines which would serve as best practice for school districts in NH. The year–long project has resulted in the New Hampshire Educational Service Guidelines for Students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing, which will be presented to the New Hampshire Association of Special Education Directors in April 2012, for use in the development of 2012–2013 Individual Education Programs. (Page 147)

The new rule will ensure that if someone is in an employment setting they will have the long–term supports to maintain that job. It also supports that students still in high school can achieve long–term supports while still in school and prior to graduation. The rule also helps families understand that employment should be the first option when looking at goals after high school graduation. In addition the Bureau has also added in employment goals to the contracts of the 10 area agencies. These changes are monumental changes. The Bureau staff are currently out in the community training area agency staff in how to best utilize these new rules. The agency has also added in a new service called “situational assessment.” The situational assessment is a specialized service that provides a VR participant with the opportunity to demonstrate their work skills at a real and functioning worksite (unpaid) within the community. This service will allow this agency to evaluate and identify the necessary services a participant will need to be successful in an actual competitive employment situation. The agency has lined up the insurance component of this service and has had a small team of VR staff that has worked on this diligently. Select vendors at each of the regional offices, will be able to provide this service. These vendors will be selected based on their’ demonstrated abilities to complete this assessment. NHVR staff are also working on individual pilot programs. (Page 197)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses
  • Internships   (Page 28)

Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses  (Page 28)

Post–Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury. In an effort to continue discussing these important issues and determine how, as a community, we can better serve our veterans, service members and their families. Mr. Hinson was re–appointed by Governor Margaret Hassan to serve on the Commission on PTSD and TBI. During FY 15, two internal benefits counselors (Portsmouth and Manchester Regional Offices) provided benefit counseling to 386 customers. Seventy–six of those customers who had received internal benefits counseling during the vr process were closed status 26. Our internal benefits counseling staff also continue to jointly partner with the Institute on Disability with respect to the Real Study, a National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) research project designed to provide money coaching and benefits counseling to job seeking and employed individuals with disabilities. 

Extension. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Fiscal year 2011 data on this item was measured against this baseline. In FY 09 eligibility was determined in 60 days or less from application for 89% of the customers who applied for services. In FY 15, the average days to determine eligibility was 34 days. 2.3 Percent of accurate presumptive eligibility decisions for persons eligible for SSI or SSDI. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Target set for 2010 was 90%. During an FY 11 case review the agency achieved a rating of 76% in this area. The Agency is working to reinforce documentation in this area. Case review of FY 12 cases revealed that only relatively small sample of the cases reviewed received SSA benefits and were reviewed on this criterion. Of those 51% of the cases reviewed demonstrated that the presumption of eligibility was documented in case notes. The 2013-2014 review of FY12 cases is the most recent case review to assess this area. In 2014 the Agency began work on changing its case management system to Alliance’s AWARE system. At that time, the Agency decided to revamp case management practices to match the new system. Staff have been learning the new system and strategies and a case review is planned for the end of FY 2016 to determine any additional training needs to help staff meet the requirements of the program. (Page 188)

School to Work Transition

Continue to assess business interest in work–based learning and the ideal engagement strategies from the businesses’ perspectives. STRATEGY 4.2.C Determine the most appropriate way(s) to link resources from various programs and partners to offer full spectrum of work–based learning opportunities (e.g. Department of Labor School–to–Work Approved Unpaid Work Sites, Vocational Rehabilitation Work Based Learning program, On–the–job training resources from WIOA and TANF, Office of Apprenticeship services, etc.) This could be a digital infrastructure that offers the ability for businesses and emerging workers to be connected for work–based learning opportunities online. But, it may also be clarifying the message, resources, and roles/responsibilities among partners to support work–based learning connections in New Hampshire. Much mapping of the various assets has already been done and will provide a foundation for Strategy 4.2. (Page 47)

Providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA. 

  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff and other constituents, to ensure the inclusion of students and youth with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring in the schools as a result of the IDEA 2008 and the Rehabilitation Act;
  • providing advocacy for students and youth with disabilities to a variety of constituents;
  • improving connections between NHVR and other transition service agencies;
  • providing information and guidance regarding Labor Laws as they relate to job shadow, internships and work experience for students and youth with disabilities;
  • marketing to school staff, students and families, adult service agencies, etc. in a variety of areas, e.g., employment issues as a result of disability, transition of students with disabilities, availability of adult services, best practices in transition of youth with disabilities, accessing adult services, employer perspectives; develop relationships with other agencies providing services to students and youth with disabilities to maximize services offered;
  • providing technical assistance on grants as they are developed with multiple agencies and programs to ensure the inclusion of all students and youth with disabilities.
  • providing continued support of transition programs for students and youth such as the Earn and Learn program, Project INCOME and Project SEARCH The NHVR staff actively facilitates meetings with school staff, NHVR counselors and school–to–work staff to plan the inclusion of students with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring within the state. (Page 150)

NHVR staff and leadership are working closely together to ensure that changes implemented by WIOA are achieved. The activities these positions cover include: 

  • working with NHVR counselors to improve access and services provided to students and youth with disabilities;
  • working with NHVR counselors to develop best practices and examples of best practices to students and youth with disabilities;
  • providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA.
  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff (Page 151)

Target outreach efforts to support the employment outcomes of underserved populations 

  • Improve vocational rehabilitation services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, and deaf blind communities
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff to develop and improve needed skills regarding services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
    • Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School–to– Work transition program.
    • Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind
    • Collaborate with NHVR Office of Services for Blind and Visually Impaired to improve services to students who are deaf and blind.
    • Improve job development, placement, and retention for customers who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened and deaf blind. (Page 178)
  • Build partnerships with school transition personnel and serve as a resource for career planning
  • Encourage career–focused and work–based experiences during the transition from school to work
  • Identify students with disabilities who have been underserved and develop strategies for engagement
  • Utilize alternative and extended learning opportunities (ELO) for skill acquisition and academic achievement for students who require non–traditional learning environments
  • Support and continue to explore opportunities for sector–based and alternative education, employment and training programs for this targeted group, e.g., ACES, Earn and Learn, Project Search, Project Invest, Project Incomes and CHAMP NHVR, in its RFP process, has asked potential bidders to provide regional consortium responses that will outline how “potentially eligible” students shall be identified and how the services shall be provided. These responses will focus on enhancing NHVR’s relationship with the Bureau of Developmental Services, through its area agencies, and the Bureau of Behavioral Health, through its community mental health centers, and School Administrative Units (SAU’s) to better serve students with disabilities. (Page 179)

This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders. (Page 181)

Including individuals with the most significant disabilities, to secure suitable employment, and financial and personal independence by providing rehabilitation services. The Agency continually assesses the barriers and strategies to reduce barriers that relate to equal access to the state VR program. In planning this year specific input was solicited from the Developmental Disabilities Council; the statewide Independent Living Council; the state MH Planning Council; the Governor’s Commission on Disability; the Autism Council and the executive committee of the Special Education Administrators in the state. In providing a quality customer–focused service delivery system that is timely, effective and responds to the needs of individuals with disabilities throughout the state, the NHVR recognizes the need to expand and improve services to individuals with sensory, cognitive, physical and mental impairments who have traditionally not been served or have been underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program. This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders (Page 183)
  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.   (Page 184)
Data Collection

4.2 Percent of cases reviewed for which there is evidence that assistive technology services and assistive technology devices were assessed and used as necessary for individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process. It was identified that current case review data collection did not include this element. It was further identified that this is a training need area for staff. In–service training has included assistive tech services and devices and will continue to target this area as a training need in FY 12 through FY 15. Case review of FY 12 cases identified that that 70% of the time the case documentation showed evidence of an assessment of the need for assistive technology services and devices.   (Page 193)

The CPPOS will play a key role in informing students of opportunities in continued education or entry into the workforce. The CPPOS will list recommended academic courses for students to take for career success. Schools will be able to access relevant documents and guidance on the web and will receive technical assistance on modifying CPPOS’s for local use with students. Documents and guidance will be accessible on the web, including information postsecondary CTE opportunities that are linked to secondary programs. For example, the guidance documents currently tell students which colleges in New Hampshire offer the programs, and on the web they will be able to click on the link and go directly to information on that college program. New Hampshire has a long-term goal of at least implementing one CPPOS in 15 of the career clusters. Also at the end of the five-year period, all secondary CTE centers statewide will need to offer at least one CPPOS opportunity for their students. Competencies for new or updated programs will be required to align with national, state, and local standards. The New Hampshire Department of Education will work with employers and the Community College System to validate the competencies and modify as needed. (Page 219)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

The Governor established and certified the Workforce Opportunity Council (Council) as the State’s Workforce Board under WIA on September 22, 1999. The Council name was changed to State Workforce Investment Board in 2009 with the creation of the Office of Workforce Opportunity (OWO) in the NH Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED). Recently the board’s name changed to the State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB) with the implementation of WIOA. The Board is chaired by a businessperson and has 37 members, of whom 19 members (51%) are business representatives including a minimum of one small business representative. In addition the board includes:

  • The Governor (Section 101(b)(1)(A));
  • Two representatives of the State Legislature (Section 101(b)(1)(B)):
  • Lead officials from state agencies that oversee workforce development programs including chief elected officials (Section 101 (b)(1)(C)(iii) (Page 72)
Career Pathways

ABE staff participate in workforce agency partner meetings and NH Works counselors work with students on-site in ABE classes, called “What’s Next”, to introduce career inventories, career pathways, and promote resources available through NH Works. Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receive referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. (Page 27)

The Community College System and CTE work closely together, offering dual credit opportunities for students, sharing funding streams, recruiting at education and job fairs, and promoting career pathways.

  • Collaboration between the Community College System and ABE is very successful, particularly when programs are co-located. For example, at Great Bay Community College, an MOU between ABE and the college allows ABE to teach remedial English and math courses. This better serves students by reserving financial aid or loans for college-level coursework. There is also a referral process in place and ABE programs can assist students with admissions at community colleges, enrollment, preparing for the Accuplacer and sharing scores, determining eligibility for specific job training programs, and more.
  • Collaboration between Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation, with VR counselors attending ABE programs on a monthly basis. This activity is primarily focused on the special education population. (Page 31)

Within this MOU we will seek to partner with agencies participating with Medicaid (The Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health) to assist in enhancing services to customers needing supported employment and competitive integrated employment. We are very fortunate in New Hampshire to have legislation that prohibits subminimum wage payments to individuals with disabilities (SB 47, 2015). We are proud to work with our business partners to ensure at least minimum wage employment for our mutual customers. In the agreement we will weave in our work on career pathways and work-based learning to expand current sectors (Project SEARCH) and increase employment opportunities. (Page 157)

Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically to disability or implementation.  (Page 206)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 50

NH Acquired Brain Disorder Waiver (4177.R05.00) - 11/01/2017

~~“Provides community participation services, respite, service coordination, supported employment services, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services - PDMS (formerly consolidated acquired brain disorder services), residential habilitation/personal care services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/brain injury ages 22 - no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Between the Governor of the State of New Hampshire,the State Workforce Innovation Board - 07/01/2017

~~“This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by The Governor of the State of New Hampshire, The State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB), and the consortium of state and other entities serving as the One-stop Operator as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014, for the state of New Hampshire, henceforth known as the NH Works One-stop Operator Consortium.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire - 02/01/2017

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire FFY 2014 State Performance Plan/Annual Report on IDEA - 02/01/2016

“New Hampshire has a responsibility, under federal law, to have a system of general supervision that monitors the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by school districts. The general supervision system is accountable for identifying and correcting noncompliance with IDEA and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of Children with Disabilities, as well as for promoting continuous improvement…. The State Performance Plan (SPP) is a blueprint for systems change for special education in New Hampshire. It is a six-year plan and annual report submitted to the USDOE Office of Special Education in February of each year.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order 2002-9 (Establishing a Governor's Task Force on Employment) - 12/04/2002

“An order establishing the Governor's Task Force on Employment and Economic Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Between the Governor of the State of New Hampshire,the State Workforce Innovation Board - 07/01/2017

~~“This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by The Governor of the State of New Hampshire, The State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB), and the consortium of state and other entities serving as the One-stop Operator as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014, for the state of New Hampshire, henceforth known as the NH Works One-stop Operator Consortium.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire FFY 2014 State Performance Plan/Annual Report on IDEA - 02/01/2016

“New Hampshire has a responsibility, under federal law, to have a system of general supervision that monitors the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by school districts. The general supervision system is accountable for identifying and correcting noncompliance with IDEA and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of Children with Disabilities, as well as for promoting continuous improvement…. The State Performance Plan (SPP) is a blueprint for systems change for special education in New Hampshire. It is a six-year plan and annual report submitted to the USDOE Office of Special Education in February of each year.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Hampshire Department of Vocational Rehabilitation Policy Manual - 05/01/2015

The New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation agency assists eligible individuals with physical and mental impairments to achieve or maintain employment. Employment means entering or retaining full-time employment, or part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market (including supported employment), the practice of a profession, self-employment, homemaking, farm or family work (including work for which payment is in kind rather than in cash), telecommuting, home-based employment, or other gainful work. The VR process is based upon an Individualized Plan for Employment which is oriented to the achievement of a suitable employment outcome.

 A suitable employment outcome is one which will enable a person with a disability to secure employment that is consistent with his or her unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. Services provided to individuals with disabilities must be necessary to overcome the vocational impediment and must be provided in a cost effective manner, utilizing comparable benefits whenever practicable. Reasonable accommodation will be made for all applicants to maximize each person's access to services that will enable the individual to achieve an employment outcome.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Sector-based Training Models: Project Search

Sector based training models are different from conventional training due to a targeted specific industry that involves strategic partnerships amongst the industry, school/college, and community-based organizations and includes training strategies that benefit both employers and workers that promote positive changes to benefit both employer and worker. As a result of sector-based training with people who have disabilities, many businesses in the private and public sector now recognize the competitive edge this has brought to their corporate world. Project SEARCH is an example of a successful sector-based training model that has been used in the United States and abroad.

In New Hampshire, Project SEARCH is a one year, high school transition healthcare program that provides training and education that may lead to employment for individuals with disabilities. Project SEARCH serves as an alternative for students in their last year high school eligibility. The cornerstone of Project SEARCH is total immersion in a large business. Students report to the host business five days a week, where they learn employability skills in the classroom and job skills while participating in a variety of internships/experiences.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Employment Position Statement For New Hampshire’s Regional Service System

We believe that employment, with its powerful and irreplaceable opportunities for autonomy, earned income, self-esteem development, social contacts, structured  activity and life satisfaction, is an import ant ingredient of a fulfilling and valued life for adults in our society. We also recognize that the capacity of adults with any type or degree of developmental disability or acquired brain disorder to participate in employment, in the right setting and with the proper supports, has been amply demonstrated.   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Community Support Network - 06/15/1995

There are 10 Area Agencies that are divided into geographical regions throughout New Hampshire to provide services to individuals with developmental disabilities, people with acquired brain disorder, and their families. Each Area Agency is designated by the State to provide services in their respective region. Combined they serve in excess of 10,000 individuals and families.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Transition Manual – Helping parents prepare students for employment (p. 19)

This "manual" has been compiled with the intent of providing you with enough general information for you to build a framework for creating and achieving goals. There will be sections of this manual that may not apply to your particular situation. All the information enclosed is purely for your reference in the event you may need it at some point. This is not a step-by-step guide, but rather a point of reference with which you can fashion your own plan. It will hopefully give you some direction and spark questions you may have.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NH Employment Community of Practice

The Mission of the NH Employment Community of Practice is to promote economic independence and high quality competitive employment opportunities for people withdisabilities through information sharing and the development and dissemination of best practices among all community partners.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment for All

“The Area Agency of Greater Nashua (AA-GN) will be the lead agency for the cross-disability Employment for All Consortium. With its strong track record and sterling reputation, State funders have tapped AA-GN to field test and sustain a variety of innovative programs and initiatives, including: self-directed community supports; individual career accounts; legislative outreach; minority outreach; the Southern NH Time Exchange, a project promoting community connections and inclusion; self-advocacy; Personal Care Services in the workplace; and the first Enhanced Family Care model for persons served under the ECI waiver.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ND Department of Vocational Rehabilitation & Department of Education

“Vocational Rehabilitation has a long history of providing direct and indirect services to youth with disabilities as they transition from school to work. The services provided have enabled many students to obtain successful employment. This agency is committed to increasing access and improving the overall quality of services offered to school age youth.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Governor's Commission on Disability

The Governor’s Commission on Disability provides information about the many services, laws, and regulations that affect citizens with disabilities.

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Institute on Disability/UCEDD - University of New Hampshire

“Trains students, self-advocates, families and professionals through coursework, seminars, workshops and conferences; Provides technical assistance to organizations and individuals to improve their capacity to include all citizens. Disseminates information to families, consumers, community members and professionals via books, monographs, articles, videos, newsletters, the internet and newspapers and consumer forums; engages in collaborative activities and

joint projects with organizations that share common goals. 

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project

“The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve the employment for people with disabilities in New Hampshire by establishing two pilot demonstration models that will create leadership, collaboration with the community, outreach to employers, businesses, and school systems, build capacity for training and staff development, and support the information technology and employment database needs of the projects.”

Partners include the Governor's Task Force for Employment & Economic Opportunities, NH Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, NH Employment Security, NH Department of Education, DHHS/Bureau of Behavioral Health, and Bureau of Developmental Services.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Next Steps New Hampshire - 09/01/2012

“The New Hampshire Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education has been awarded a $3.8 million State Personnel Development Grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs for the next 5 years. The grant will focus on developing and sustaining the skills of New Hampshire school district personnel and families to increase the number of students with disabilities graduating from high school that are college and career ready. The grant will focus on four strategies to achieve this goal: (1) increasing student competency through our state Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs), regional professional development intermediaries, a transition Community of Practice, and the use of technology.

College and career readiness is not only an academic endeavor. Schools, students, and families must plan and work together to ensure successful transition. The outcomes of the grant will remove the state from a compliance focus to a deeper, more comprehensive evidence-based approach to transition planning. These activities will be conducted collaboratively with our partners at New Hampshire Parent Information Centers, New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation, regional intermediaries and other established professional development providers so that the activities are sustained over time.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire” - 12/30/2011

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Sector-based Training Models: Project Search

Sector based training models are different from conventional training due to a targeted specific industry that involves strategic partnerships amongst the industry, school/college, and community-based organizations and includes training strategies that benefit both employers and workers that promote positive changes to benefit both employer and worker. As a result of sector-based training with people who have disabilities, many businesses in the private and public sector now recognize the competitive edge this has brought to their corporate world. Project SEARCH is an example of a successful sector-based training model that has been used in the United States and abroad.

In New Hampshire, Project SEARCH is a one year, high school transition healthcare program that provides training and education that may lead to employment for individuals with disabilities. Project SEARCH serves as an alternative for students in their last year high school eligibility. The cornerstone of Project SEARCH is total immersion in a large business. Students report to the host business five days a week, where they learn employability skills in the classroom and job skills while participating in a variety of internships/experiences.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011

‘In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI)”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Hampshire Money Follows the Person

“The New Hampshire Community Passport Program (NHCPP) is a nursing home transition initiative made possible through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Money Follows The Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant. This program is designed and implemented to reflect a person-centered approach to service planning and delivery and providing greater opportunities for individuals to direct their own care to the extent that they choose. These are also the values inherent in the State's long term care vision statement”.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual

The New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual provides more in-depth information about the major programs affecting income and benefits for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire.  The Manual is divided into four sections:

1. New Hampshire Adult Assistance Programs

2. Social Security Disability Insurance

3. Supplemental Security Income

4. Medicare

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Indicator 13 Training 2015-2016 Powerpoint

This powerpoint provides information to help special education professionals best help their students plan and set goals for post-secondary transition.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NH Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - VR Counselor Training and Resources

VR Counselor Training and Resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

WorkReadyNH

Work ReadyNH is a tuition-free workforce development program tailored to meet the needs of job seekers and career builders as well as provide training in the specific skills employers are seeking in their current and future employees.

 

The WorkReadyNH program provides assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. Graduates earn two nationally recognized credentials to add to their resume.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Southern New Hampshire Services Workplace Success Program

 Workplace Success is a partnership between the Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies. The goal of the program is to prepare participants to  enter a volunteer  Work Experience position within a nonprofit, business, or local/state government host site for 20-30 hours per week until they obtain full-time paid employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Southern New Hampshire Services Employment and Training Program

An employment and training program funded by the U.S. Department of Labor to help Dislocated Workers and other Eligible Adults access the tools they need to manage their careers through information and high quality services, and to help U.S. companies find skilled workers.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

NH Department of Education - Secondary Transition Statewide Training

Foundations in Transition - Person Centered Strategies for Students with Disabilities Making the Transition to Adult Life. A NH RESPONDS Grant sponsored a four part training series that included training in practices that have been shown to improve the self determination skills and education outcomes for young people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation Guide

This tool-kit includes a description of the vocational rehabilitation process and overview of the entire NHVR process, from application to post-employment services.
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Five Year Plan (2008-2012)

• MIG funds were used during 2002 and 2003 to provide the 13 New Hampshire Employment Security One-Stops with equipment and resource materials (e.g., screen readers, audio “how to” tapes) to make them more accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, training was provided to the staff of One-Stops regarding use of the purchased equipment and resource materials. This initiative with the One-Stops also included staff trainings on disability awareness issues and creation of a resource guide called “Disability Etiquette.”

• MIG was instrumental in the development of towo tool kits. The first, a ready-to work toolkit is a curriculum on personal futures planning, resume writing, self-directed job searching techniques, employment interviewing skills, and negotiating workplace culture, politics, and related skills. It’s currently being used by the independent living center’s 6 peer groups. The second, an employer tool kit, was developed to provide information and guidance to employers regarding reasonable workplace accommodations, tax credits, where to get technical assistance, the ticket-to-work program, and the values and benefits of hiring people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Amanda D., et al. v. Hassan, et al. Settlement Fact Sheet

The United States Department of Justice, a coalition of private plaintiff organizations, and the State of New Hampshire, have entered into a comprehensive Settlement Agreement that will transform New Hampshire’s mental health system by significantly expanding and enhancing mental health service capacity in integrated community settings. The Agreement will enable a class of adults with serious mental illness to receive needed services in the community, which will foster their independence and enable them to participate more fully in community life. The expanded and enhanced community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at State mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (“NHH”) (the State’s only psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (a State-owned and -operated nursing facility for people with mental illness). The Agreement requires the State to expand and enhance community services over the next six years. …

For the first time, the State will deliver supported employment services in accordance with the Dartmouth evidence-based model. These services will help enable individuals to obtain and maintain paid, competitive employment in integrated community settings. Over the life of the Agreement, this provision will impact thousands of people.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

NH Acquired Brain Disorder Waiver (4177.R05.00) - 11/01/2017

~~“Provides community participation services, respite, service coordination, supported employment services, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services - PDMS (formerly consolidated acquired brain disorder services), residential habilitation/personal care services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/brain injury ages 22 - no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire - 02/01/2017

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Waiver Program - 01/05/2016

“On January 5, 2016 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) approved New Hampshire's Section 1115 Research and Demonstration Transformation Waiver, #11-W-00301/1 to access new federal funding to help transform its behavioral health delivery system. The Transformation Waiver has four main targets:

Deliver integrated physical and behavioral health care that better addresses the full range of individuals' needs Expand capacity to address emerging and ongoing behavioral health needs in an appropriate setting Reduce gaps in care during transitions across care settings by improving coordination across providers and linking patients with community supports. Move fifty percent of Medicaid reimbursement to alternative payment models by the end of the demonstration period”
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire ESEA Flexibility Approval - 06/26/2013

The New Hampshire Department of Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on June 26, 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program

“The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program assists low-income elderly or disabled individuals who are eligible for Medicare (available through the Social Security Administration) by paying for some or all of the associated costs of Medicare, specifically the Medicare Insurance Premiums and deductibles. The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program is also referred to as the Buy-In program….

The Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) program provides payment of Medicare Part A premiums for eligible working individuals with disabilities who are entitled to enroll in Medicare Part A, but who have lost Medicare Part A coverage due to earnings. Individuals eligible for QDWI may not otherwise be eligible for Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HCBS Transition Plan

In January 2014, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) finalized regulations that require Medicaid-funded Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) possess particular qualities in residential and nonresidential settings.  All states are required to demonstrate how their HCBS programs comply with the new federal HCBS rules. The purpose of this draft Transition Framework is to ensure that in New Hampshire individuals receiving HCBS are integrated in and have access to supports in the community, including opportunities to seek employment, work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources. Overall, the Transition Plan provides  a roadmap for how the State will assure that individuals receiving HCBS have the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS.    This Transition Plan outlines the proposed process that New Hampshire will be utilizing to ensure alignment with the HCBS requirements.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH Money Follows the Person

The New Hampshire Community Passport Program (NHCPP) is a nursing home transition initiative made possible through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Money Follows The Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant. This program is designed and implemented to reflect a person-centered approach to service planning and delivery and providing greater opportunities for individuals to direct their own care to the extent that they choose. These are also the values inherent in the State's long term care vision statement.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,330,608
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
89,630
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.82%
Change from
2014 to 2015
35,390
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
39.48%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.94%
Change from
2014 to 2015
82.92%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 1,330,608
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 89,630
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 35,390
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 622,689
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.48%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.92%
Overall unemployment rate. 3.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 6.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 82,462
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 87,587
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 161,605
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 3,207
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,901
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,052
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 3,119
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 607

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,485
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 7.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 48,223

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,321
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 14,803
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 21,476
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 14.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 71.60%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,668
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 921
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 8,503

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 13
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 6
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 46.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.45

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,545
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 126
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 386
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 501
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 740
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 455
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 337
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,064
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 64,912
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $32,003,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $45,982,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 44.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,248
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 120.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 72.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.67%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 54.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 38.52%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 67.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.57%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 28.62%

 

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0

 

WIOA Proflie

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security (Wagner–Peyser, Veterans Services, Farm Workers, Trade Act); Vocational Rehabilitation (people with disabilities, adult basic education); Community Action Agency (WIOA services dislocated workers, displaced homemakers, low–income individuals and connects to CAP services such as Head Start, Fuel Assistance, and other support programs); Older Worker Program (employment and support programs); and Granite State Independent Living (benefit specialists for the disabled) ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co–located, a close relationship and co–enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One–stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English–speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. (Page 84)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Since the agency began developing a comprehensive approach we have worked with several vendors on pilots to assist this population. The primary services that were provided were coaching and personalized services. The agency is still examining whether these pilots are being more successful with our customers. In May 2012 New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation was recognized by Business New Hampshire Magazine and the NH Association of Chambers of Commerce as the "2012 Business Assistance Organization of the Year." This was a great honor for the agency. Through the nomination process the agency was able to highlight the extensive number of employers the agency works with to achieve successful employment opportunities for customers with disabilities. NHVR collaborates with Northeast Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (NDHHS) and other partners in the deaf community so that there is a team approach when placement of a customer is made. All parties having the same and updated information allow the customer and the team to have more success in obtaining job retention. It also allows for any communication issues that could be occurring in the team, so that the customer has the best chance of success. In 2011, NDHHS sought the participation of NHVR in a project that was facilitated by the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) to review the NASDSE Guidelines for the Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students, and to then utilize those Guidelines in the development of NH specific Guidelines which would serve as best practice for school districts in NH. The year–long project has resulted in the New Hampshire Educational Service Guidelines for Students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing, which will be presented to the New Hampshire Association of Special Education Directors in April 2012, for use in the development of 2012–2013 Individual Education Programs. (Page 147)

The new rule will ensure that if someone is in an employment setting they will have the long–term supports to maintain that job. It also supports that students still in high school can achieve long–term supports while still in school and prior to graduation. The rule also helps families understand that employment should be the first option when looking at goals after high school graduation. In addition the Bureau has also added in employment goals to the contracts of the 10 area agencies. These changes are monumental changes. The Bureau staff are currently out in the community training area agency staff in how to best utilize these new rules. The agency has also added in a new service called “situational assessment.” The situational assessment is a specialized service that provides a VR participant with the opportunity to demonstrate their work skills at a real and functioning worksite (unpaid) within the community. This service will allow this agency to evaluate and identify the necessary services a participant will need to be successful in an actual competitive employment situation. The agency has lined up the insurance component of this service and has had a small team of VR staff that has worked on this diligently. Select vendors at each of the regional offices, will be able to provide this service. These vendors will be selected based on their’ demonstrated abilities to complete this assessment. NHVR staff are also working on individual pilot programs. (Page 197)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses
  • Internships   (Page 28)

Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses  (Page 28)

Post–Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury. In an effort to continue discussing these important issues and determine how, as a community, we can better serve our veterans, service members and their families. Mr. Hinson was re–appointed by Governor Margaret Hassan to serve on the Commission on PTSD and TBI. During FY 15, two internal benefits counselors (Portsmouth and Manchester Regional Offices) provided benefit counseling to 386 customers. Seventy–six of those customers who had received internal benefits counseling during the vr process were closed status 26. Our internal benefits counseling staff also continue to jointly partner with the Institute on Disability with respect to the Real Study, a National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) research project designed to provide money coaching and benefits counseling to job seeking and employed individuals with disabilities. 

Extension. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Fiscal year 2011 data on this item was measured against this baseline. In FY 09 eligibility was determined in 60 days or less from application for 89% of the customers who applied for services. In FY 15, the average days to determine eligibility was 34 days. 2.3 Percent of accurate presumptive eligibility decisions for persons eligible for SSI or SSDI. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Target set for 2010 was 90%. During an FY 11 case review the agency achieved a rating of 76% in this area. The Agency is working to reinforce documentation in this area. Case review of FY 12 cases revealed that only relatively small sample of the cases reviewed received SSA benefits and were reviewed on this criterion. Of those 51% of the cases reviewed demonstrated that the presumption of eligibility was documented in case notes. The 2013-2014 review of FY12 cases is the most recent case review to assess this area. In 2014 the Agency began work on changing its case management system to Alliance’s AWARE system. At that time, the Agency decided to revamp case management practices to match the new system. Staff have been learning the new system and strategies and a case review is planned for the end of FY 2016 to determine any additional training needs to help staff meet the requirements of the program. (Page 188)

School to Work Transition

Continue to assess business interest in work–based learning and the ideal engagement strategies from the businesses’ perspectives. STRATEGY 4.2.C Determine the most appropriate way(s) to link resources from various programs and partners to offer full spectrum of work–based learning opportunities (e.g. Department of Labor School–to–Work Approved Unpaid Work Sites, Vocational Rehabilitation Work Based Learning program, On–the–job training resources from WIOA and TANF, Office of Apprenticeship services, etc.) This could be a digital infrastructure that offers the ability for businesses and emerging workers to be connected for work–based learning opportunities online. But, it may also be clarifying the message, resources, and roles/responsibilities among partners to support work–based learning connections in New Hampshire. Much mapping of the various assets has already been done and will provide a foundation for Strategy 4.2. (Page 47)

Providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA. 

  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff and other constituents, to ensure the inclusion of students and youth with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring in the schools as a result of the IDEA 2008 and the Rehabilitation Act;
  • providing advocacy for students and youth with disabilities to a variety of constituents;
  • improving connections between NHVR and other transition service agencies;
  • providing information and guidance regarding Labor Laws as they relate to job shadow, internships and work experience for students and youth with disabilities;
  • marketing to school staff, students and families, adult service agencies, etc. in a variety of areas, e.g., employment issues as a result of disability, transition of students with disabilities, availability of adult services, best practices in transition of youth with disabilities, accessing adult services, employer perspectives; develop relationships with other agencies providing services to students and youth with disabilities to maximize services offered;
  • providing technical assistance on grants as they are developed with multiple agencies and programs to ensure the inclusion of all students and youth with disabilities.
  • providing continued support of transition programs for students and youth such as the Earn and Learn program, Project INCOME and Project SEARCH The NHVR staff actively facilitates meetings with school staff, NHVR counselors and school–to–work staff to plan the inclusion of students with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring within the state. (Page 150)

NHVR staff and leadership are working closely together to ensure that changes implemented by WIOA are achieved. The activities these positions cover include: 

  • working with NHVR counselors to improve access and services provided to students and youth with disabilities;
  • working with NHVR counselors to develop best practices and examples of best practices to students and youth with disabilities;
  • providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA.
  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff (Page 151)

Target outreach efforts to support the employment outcomes of underserved populations 

  • Improve vocational rehabilitation services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, and deaf blind communities
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff to develop and improve needed skills regarding services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
    • Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School–to– Work transition program.
    • Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind
    • Collaborate with NHVR Office of Services for Blind and Visually Impaired to improve services to students who are deaf and blind.
    • Improve job development, placement, and retention for customers who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened and deaf blind. (Page 178)
  • Build partnerships with school transition personnel and serve as a resource for career planning
  • Encourage career–focused and work–based experiences during the transition from school to work
  • Identify students with disabilities who have been underserved and develop strategies for engagement
  • Utilize alternative and extended learning opportunities (ELO) for skill acquisition and academic achievement for students who require non–traditional learning environments
  • Support and continue to explore opportunities for sector–based and alternative education, employment and training programs for this targeted group, e.g., ACES, Earn and Learn, Project Search, Project Invest, Project Incomes and CHAMP NHVR, in its RFP process, has asked potential bidders to provide regional consortium responses that will outline how “potentially eligible” students shall be identified and how the services shall be provided. These responses will focus on enhancing NHVR’s relationship with the Bureau of Developmental Services, through its area agencies, and the Bureau of Behavioral Health, through its community mental health centers, and School Administrative Units (SAU’s) to better serve students with disabilities. (Page 179)

This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders. (Page 181)

Including individuals with the most significant disabilities, to secure suitable employment, and financial and personal independence by providing rehabilitation services. The Agency continually assesses the barriers and strategies to reduce barriers that relate to equal access to the state VR program. In planning this year specific input was solicited from the Developmental Disabilities Council; the statewide Independent Living Council; the state MH Planning Council; the Governor’s Commission on Disability; the Autism Council and the executive committee of the Special Education Administrators in the state. In providing a quality customer–focused service delivery system that is timely, effective and responds to the needs of individuals with disabilities throughout the state, the NHVR recognizes the need to expand and improve services to individuals with sensory, cognitive, physical and mental impairments who have traditionally not been served or have been underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program. This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders (Page 183)
  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.   (Page 184)
Data Collection

4.2 Percent of cases reviewed for which there is evidence that assistive technology services and assistive technology devices were assessed and used as necessary for individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process. It was identified that current case review data collection did not include this element. It was further identified that this is a training need area for staff. In–service training has included assistive tech services and devices and will continue to target this area as a training need in FY 12 through FY 15. Case review of FY 12 cases identified that that 70% of the time the case documentation showed evidence of an assessment of the need for assistive technology services and devices.   (Page 193)

The CPPOS will play a key role in informing students of opportunities in continued education or entry into the workforce. The CPPOS will list recommended academic courses for students to take for career success. Schools will be able to access relevant documents and guidance on the web and will receive technical assistance on modifying CPPOS’s for local use with students. Documents and guidance will be accessible on the web, including information postsecondary CTE opportunities that are linked to secondary programs. For example, the guidance documents currently tell students which colleges in New Hampshire offer the programs, and on the web they will be able to click on the link and go directly to information on that college program. New Hampshire has a long-term goal of at least implementing one CPPOS in 15 of the career clusters. Also at the end of the five-year period, all secondary CTE centers statewide will need to offer at least one CPPOS opportunity for their students. Competencies for new or updated programs will be required to align with national, state, and local standards. The New Hampshire Department of Education will work with employers and the Community College System to validate the competencies and modify as needed. (Page 219)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

The Governor established and certified the Workforce Opportunity Council (Council) as the State’s Workforce Board under WIA on September 22, 1999. The Council name was changed to State Workforce Investment Board in 2009 with the creation of the Office of Workforce Opportunity (OWO) in the NH Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED). Recently the board’s name changed to the State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB) with the implementation of WIOA. The Board is chaired by a businessperson and has 37 members, of whom 19 members (51%) are business representatives including a minimum of one small business representative. In addition the board includes:

  • The Governor (Section 101(b)(1)(A));
  • Two representatives of the State Legislature (Section 101(b)(1)(B)):
  • Lead officials from state agencies that oversee workforce development programs including chief elected officials (Section 101 (b)(1)(C)(iii) (Page 72)
Career Pathways

ABE staff participate in workforce agency partner meetings and NH Works counselors work with students on-site in ABE classes, called “What’s Next”, to introduce career inventories, career pathways, and promote resources available through NH Works. Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receive referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. (Page 27)

The Community College System and CTE work closely together, offering dual credit opportunities for students, sharing funding streams, recruiting at education and job fairs, and promoting career pathways.

  • Collaboration between the Community College System and ABE is very successful, particularly when programs are co-located. For example, at Great Bay Community College, an MOU between ABE and the college allows ABE to teach remedial English and math courses. This better serves students by reserving financial aid or loans for college-level coursework. There is also a referral process in place and ABE programs can assist students with admissions at community colleges, enrollment, preparing for the Accuplacer and sharing scores, determining eligibility for specific job training programs, and more.
  • Collaboration between Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation, with VR counselors attending ABE programs on a monthly basis. This activity is primarily focused on the special education population. (Page 31)

Within this MOU we will seek to partner with agencies participating with Medicaid (The Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health) to assist in enhancing services to customers needing supported employment and competitive integrated employment. We are very fortunate in New Hampshire to have legislation that prohibits subminimum wage payments to individuals with disabilities (SB 47, 2015). We are proud to work with our business partners to ensure at least minimum wage employment for our mutual customers. In the agreement we will weave in our work on career pathways and work-based learning to expand current sectors (Project SEARCH) and increase employment opportunities. (Page 157)

Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically to disability or implementation.  (Page 206)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 50

NH Acquired Brain Disorder Waiver (4177.R05.00) - 11/01/2017

~~“Provides community participation services, respite, service coordination, supported employment services, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services - PDMS (formerly consolidated acquired brain disorder services), residential habilitation/personal care services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/brain injury ages 22 - no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Between the Governor of the State of New Hampshire,the State Workforce Innovation Board - 07/01/2017

~~“This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by The Governor of the State of New Hampshire, The State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB), and the consortium of state and other entities serving as the One-stop Operator as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014, for the state of New Hampshire, henceforth known as the NH Works One-stop Operator Consortium.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire - 02/01/2017

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire FFY 2014 State Performance Plan/Annual Report on IDEA - 02/01/2016

“New Hampshire has a responsibility, under federal law, to have a system of general supervision that monitors the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by school districts. The general supervision system is accountable for identifying and correcting noncompliance with IDEA and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of Children with Disabilities, as well as for promoting continuous improvement…. The State Performance Plan (SPP) is a blueprint for systems change for special education in New Hampshire. It is a six-year plan and annual report submitted to the USDOE Office of Special Education in February of each year.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order 2002-9 (Establishing a Governor's Task Force on Employment) - 12/04/2002

“An order establishing the Governor's Task Force on Employment and Economic Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Between the Governor of the State of New Hampshire,the State Workforce Innovation Board - 07/01/2017

~~“This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by The Governor of the State of New Hampshire, The State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB), and the consortium of state and other entities serving as the One-stop Operator as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014, for the state of New Hampshire, henceforth known as the NH Works One-stop Operator Consortium.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire FFY 2014 State Performance Plan/Annual Report on IDEA - 02/01/2016

“New Hampshire has a responsibility, under federal law, to have a system of general supervision that monitors the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by school districts. The general supervision system is accountable for identifying and correcting noncompliance with IDEA and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of Children with Disabilities, as well as for promoting continuous improvement…. The State Performance Plan (SPP) is a blueprint for systems change for special education in New Hampshire. It is a six-year plan and annual report submitted to the USDOE Office of Special Education in February of each year.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Hampshire Department of Vocational Rehabilitation Policy Manual - 05/01/2015

The New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation agency assists eligible individuals with physical and mental impairments to achieve or maintain employment. Employment means entering or retaining full-time employment, or part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market (including supported employment), the practice of a profession, self-employment, homemaking, farm or family work (including work for which payment is in kind rather than in cash), telecommuting, home-based employment, or other gainful work. The VR process is based upon an Individualized Plan for Employment which is oriented to the achievement of a suitable employment outcome.

 A suitable employment outcome is one which will enable a person with a disability to secure employment that is consistent with his or her unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. Services provided to individuals with disabilities must be necessary to overcome the vocational impediment and must be provided in a cost effective manner, utilizing comparable benefits whenever practicable. Reasonable accommodation will be made for all applicants to maximize each person's access to services that will enable the individual to achieve an employment outcome.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Sector-based Training Models: Project Search

Sector based training models are different from conventional training due to a targeted specific industry that involves strategic partnerships amongst the industry, school/college, and community-based organizations and includes training strategies that benefit both employers and workers that promote positive changes to benefit both employer and worker. As a result of sector-based training with people who have disabilities, many businesses in the private and public sector now recognize the competitive edge this has brought to their corporate world. Project SEARCH is an example of a successful sector-based training model that has been used in the United States and abroad.

In New Hampshire, Project SEARCH is a one year, high school transition healthcare program that provides training and education that may lead to employment for individuals with disabilities. Project SEARCH serves as an alternative for students in their last year high school eligibility. The cornerstone of Project SEARCH is total immersion in a large business. Students report to the host business five days a week, where they learn employability skills in the classroom and job skills while participating in a variety of internships/experiences.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Employment Position Statement For New Hampshire’s Regional Service System

We believe that employment, with its powerful and irreplaceable opportunities for autonomy, earned income, self-esteem development, social contacts, structured  activity and life satisfaction, is an import ant ingredient of a fulfilling and valued life for adults in our society. We also recognize that the capacity of adults with any type or degree of developmental disability or acquired brain disorder to participate in employment, in the right setting and with the proper supports, has been amply demonstrated.   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Community Support Network - 06/15/1995

There are 10 Area Agencies that are divided into geographical regions throughout New Hampshire to provide services to individuals with developmental disabilities, people with acquired brain disorder, and their families. Each Area Agency is designated by the State to provide services in their respective region. Combined they serve in excess of 10,000 individuals and families.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Transition Manual – Helping parents prepare students for employment (p. 19)

This "manual" has been compiled with the intent of providing you with enough general information for you to build a framework for creating and achieving goals. There will be sections of this manual that may not apply to your particular situation. All the information enclosed is purely for your reference in the event you may need it at some point. This is not a step-by-step guide, but rather a point of reference with which you can fashion your own plan. It will hopefully give you some direction and spark questions you may have.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NH Employment Community of Practice

The Mission of the NH Employment Community of Practice is to promote economic independence and high quality competitive employment opportunities for people withdisabilities through information sharing and the development and dissemination of best practices among all community partners.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment for All

“The Area Agency of Greater Nashua (AA-GN) will be the lead agency for the cross-disability Employment for All Consortium. With its strong track record and sterling reputation, State funders have tapped AA-GN to field test and sustain a variety of innovative programs and initiatives, including: self-directed community supports; individual career accounts; legislative outreach; minority outreach; the Southern NH Time Exchange, a project promoting community connections and inclusion; self-advocacy; Personal Care Services in the workplace; and the first Enhanced Family Care model for persons served under the ECI waiver.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ND Department of Vocational Rehabilitation & Department of Education

“Vocational Rehabilitation has a long history of providing direct and indirect services to youth with disabilities as they transition from school to work. The services provided have enabled many students to obtain successful employment. This agency is committed to increasing access and improving the overall quality of services offered to school age youth.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Governor's Commission on Disability

The Governor’s Commission on Disability provides information about the many services, laws, and regulations that affect citizens with disabilities.

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Institute on Disability/UCEDD - University of New Hampshire

“Trains students, self-advocates, families and professionals through coursework, seminars, workshops and conferences; Provides technical assistance to organizations and individuals to improve their capacity to include all citizens. Disseminates information to families, consumers, community members and professionals via books, monographs, articles, videos, newsletters, the internet and newspapers and consumer forums; engages in collaborative activities and

joint projects with organizations that share common goals. 

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project

“The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve the employment for people with disabilities in New Hampshire by establishing two pilot demonstration models that will create leadership, collaboration with the community, outreach to employers, businesses, and school systems, build capacity for training and staff development, and support the information technology and employment database needs of the projects.”

Partners include the Governor's Task Force for Employment & Economic Opportunities, NH Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, NH Employment Security, NH Department of Education, DHHS/Bureau of Behavioral Health, and Bureau of Developmental Services.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Next Steps New Hampshire - 09/01/2012

“The New Hampshire Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education has been awarded a $3.8 million State Personnel Development Grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs for the next 5 years. The grant will focus on developing and sustaining the skills of New Hampshire school district personnel and families to increase the number of students with disabilities graduating from high school that are college and career ready. The grant will focus on four strategies to achieve this goal: (1) increasing student competency through our state Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs), regional professional development intermediaries, a transition Community of Practice, and the use of technology.

College and career readiness is not only an academic endeavor. Schools, students, and families must plan and work together to ensure successful transition. The outcomes of the grant will remove the state from a compliance focus to a deeper, more comprehensive evidence-based approach to transition planning. These activities will be conducted collaboratively with our partners at New Hampshire Parent Information Centers, New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation, regional intermediaries and other established professional development providers so that the activities are sustained over time.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire” - 12/30/2011

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Sector-based Training Models: Project Search

Sector based training models are different from conventional training due to a targeted specific industry that involves strategic partnerships amongst the industry, school/college, and community-based organizations and includes training strategies that benefit both employers and workers that promote positive changes to benefit both employer and worker. As a result of sector-based training with people who have disabilities, many businesses in the private and public sector now recognize the competitive edge this has brought to their corporate world. Project SEARCH is an example of a successful sector-based training model that has been used in the United States and abroad.

In New Hampshire, Project SEARCH is a one year, high school transition healthcare program that provides training and education that may lead to employment for individuals with disabilities. Project SEARCH serves as an alternative for students in their last year high school eligibility. The cornerstone of Project SEARCH is total immersion in a large business. Students report to the host business five days a week, where they learn employability skills in the classroom and job skills while participating in a variety of internships/experiences.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011

‘In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI)”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Hampshire Money Follows the Person

“The New Hampshire Community Passport Program (NHCPP) is a nursing home transition initiative made possible through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Money Follows The Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant. This program is designed and implemented to reflect a person-centered approach to service planning and delivery and providing greater opportunities for individuals to direct their own care to the extent that they choose. These are also the values inherent in the State's long term care vision statement”.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual

The New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual provides more in-depth information about the major programs affecting income and benefits for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire.  The Manual is divided into four sections:

1. New Hampshire Adult Assistance Programs

2. Social Security Disability Insurance

3. Supplemental Security Income

4. Medicare

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Indicator 13 Training 2015-2016 Powerpoint

This powerpoint provides information to help special education professionals best help their students plan and set goals for post-secondary transition.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NH Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - VR Counselor Training and Resources

VR Counselor Training and Resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

WorkReadyNH

Work ReadyNH is a tuition-free workforce development program tailored to meet the needs of job seekers and career builders as well as provide training in the specific skills employers are seeking in their current and future employees.

 

The WorkReadyNH program provides assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. Graduates earn two nationally recognized credentials to add to their resume.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Southern New Hampshire Services Workplace Success Program

 Workplace Success is a partnership between the Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies. The goal of the program is to prepare participants to  enter a volunteer  Work Experience position within a nonprofit, business, or local/state government host site for 20-30 hours per week until they obtain full-time paid employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Southern New Hampshire Services Employment and Training Program

An employment and training program funded by the U.S. Department of Labor to help Dislocated Workers and other Eligible Adults access the tools they need to manage their careers through information and high quality services, and to help U.S. companies find skilled workers.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

NH Department of Education - Secondary Transition Statewide Training

Foundations in Transition - Person Centered Strategies for Students with Disabilities Making the Transition to Adult Life. A NH RESPONDS Grant sponsored a four part training series that included training in practices that have been shown to improve the self determination skills and education outcomes for young people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation Guide

This tool-kit includes a description of the vocational rehabilitation process and overview of the entire NHVR process, from application to post-employment services.
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Five Year Plan (2008-2012)

• MIG funds were used during 2002 and 2003 to provide the 13 New Hampshire Employment Security One-Stops with equipment and resource materials (e.g., screen readers, audio “how to” tapes) to make them more accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, training was provided to the staff of One-Stops regarding use of the purchased equipment and resource materials. This initiative with the One-Stops also included staff trainings on disability awareness issues and creation of a resource guide called “Disability Etiquette.”

• MIG was instrumental in the development of towo tool kits. The first, a ready-to work toolkit is a curriculum on personal futures planning, resume writing, self-directed job searching techniques, employment interviewing skills, and negotiating workplace culture, politics, and related skills. It’s currently being used by the independent living center’s 6 peer groups. The second, an employer tool kit, was developed to provide information and guidance to employers regarding reasonable workplace accommodations, tax credits, where to get technical assistance, the ticket-to-work program, and the values and benefits of hiring people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Amanda D., et al. v. Hassan, et al. Settlement Fact Sheet

The United States Department of Justice, a coalition of private plaintiff organizations, and the State of New Hampshire, have entered into a comprehensive Settlement Agreement that will transform New Hampshire’s mental health system by significantly expanding and enhancing mental health service capacity in integrated community settings. The Agreement will enable a class of adults with serious mental illness to receive needed services in the community, which will foster their independence and enable them to participate more fully in community life. The expanded and enhanced community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at State mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (“NHH”) (the State’s only psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (a State-owned and -operated nursing facility for people with mental illness). The Agreement requires the State to expand and enhance community services over the next six years. …

For the first time, the State will deliver supported employment services in accordance with the Dartmouth evidence-based model. These services will help enable individuals to obtain and maintain paid, competitive employment in integrated community settings. Over the life of the Agreement, this provision will impact thousands of people.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

NH Acquired Brain Disorder Waiver (4177.R05.00) - 11/01/2017

~~“Provides community participation services, respite, service coordination, supported employment services, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services - PDMS (formerly consolidated acquired brain disorder services), residential habilitation/personal care services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/brain injury ages 22 - no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire - 02/01/2017

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Waiver Program - 01/05/2016

“On January 5, 2016 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) approved New Hampshire's Section 1115 Research and Demonstration Transformation Waiver, #11-W-00301/1 to access new federal funding to help transform its behavioral health delivery system. The Transformation Waiver has four main targets:

Deliver integrated physical and behavioral health care that better addresses the full range of individuals' needs Expand capacity to address emerging and ongoing behavioral health needs in an appropriate setting Reduce gaps in care during transitions across care settings by improving coordination across providers and linking patients with community supports. Move fifty percent of Medicaid reimbursement to alternative payment models by the end of the demonstration period”
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire ESEA Flexibility Approval - 06/26/2013

The New Hampshire Department of Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on June 26, 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program

“The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program assists low-income elderly or disabled individuals who are eligible for Medicare (available through the Social Security Administration) by paying for some or all of the associated costs of Medicare, specifically the Medicare Insurance Premiums and deductibles. The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program is also referred to as the Buy-In program….

The Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) program provides payment of Medicare Part A premiums for eligible working individuals with disabilities who are entitled to enroll in Medicare Part A, but who have lost Medicare Part A coverage due to earnings. Individuals eligible for QDWI may not otherwise be eligible for Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HCBS Transition Plan

In January 2014, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) finalized regulations that require Medicaid-funded Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) possess particular qualities in residential and nonresidential settings.  All states are required to demonstrate how their HCBS programs comply with the new federal HCBS rules. The purpose of this draft Transition Framework is to ensure that in New Hampshire individuals receiving HCBS are integrated in and have access to supports in the community, including opportunities to seek employment, work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources. Overall, the Transition Plan provides  a roadmap for how the State will assure that individuals receiving HCBS have the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS.    This Transition Plan outlines the proposed process that New Hampshire will be utilizing to ensure alignment with the HCBS requirements.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH Money Follows the Person

The New Hampshire Community Passport Program (NHCPP) is a nursing home transition initiative made possible through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Money Follows The Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant. This program is designed and implemented to reflect a person-centered approach to service planning and delivery and providing greater opportunities for individuals to direct their own care to the extent that they choose. These are also the values inherent in the State's long term care vision statement.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,330,608
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
89,630
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.82%
Change from
2014 to 2015
35,390
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
39.48%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.94%
Change from
2014 to 2015
82.92%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 1,330,608
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 89,630
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 35,390
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 622,689
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.48%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.92%
Overall unemployment rate. 3.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 6.90%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 82,462
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 87,587
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 161,605
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 3,207
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,901
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,052
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 3,119
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 607

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,485
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 7.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 48,223

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,321
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 14,803
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 21,476
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 14.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 71.60%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,668
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 921
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 8,503

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 13
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 6
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 46.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.45

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,545
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 126
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 386
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 501
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 740
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 455
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 337
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,064
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 64,912
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $32,003,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $45,982,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 44.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,248
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 120.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 72.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.67%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 54.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 38.52%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 67.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.57%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 28.62%

 

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security (Wagner–Peyser, Veterans Services, Farm Workers, Trade Act); Vocational Rehabilitation (people with disabilities, adult basic education); Community Action Agency (WIOA services dislocated workers, displaced homemakers, low–income individuals and connects to CAP services such as Head Start, Fuel Assistance, and other support programs); Older Worker Program (employment and support programs); and Granite State Independent Living (benefit specialists for the disabled) ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co–located, a close relationship and co–enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One–stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English–speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. (Page 84)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Since the agency began developing a comprehensive approach we have worked with several vendors on pilots to assist this population. The primary services that were provided were coaching and personalized services. The agency is still examining whether these pilots are being more successful with our customers. In May 2012 New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation was recognized by Business New Hampshire Magazine and the NH Association of Chambers of Commerce as the "2012 Business Assistance Organization of the Year." This was a great honor for the agency. Through the nomination process the agency was able to highlight the extensive number of employers the agency works with to achieve successful employment opportunities for customers with disabilities. NHVR collaborates with Northeast Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (NDHHS) and other partners in the deaf community so that there is a team approach when placement of a customer is made. All parties having the same and updated information allow the customer and the team to have more success in obtaining job retention. It also allows for any communication issues that could be occurring in the team, so that the customer has the best chance of success. In 2011, NDHHS sought the participation of NHVR in a project that was facilitated by the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) to review the NASDSE Guidelines for the Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students, and to then utilize those Guidelines in the development of NH specific Guidelines which would serve as best practice for school districts in NH. The year–long project has resulted in the New Hampshire Educational Service Guidelines for Students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing, which will be presented to the New Hampshire Association of Special Education Directors in April 2012, for use in the development of 2012–2013 Individual Education Programs. (Page 147)

The new rule will ensure that if someone is in an employment setting they will have the long–term supports to maintain that job. It also supports that students still in high school can achieve long–term supports while still in school and prior to graduation. The rule also helps families understand that employment should be the first option when looking at goals after high school graduation. In addition the Bureau has also added in employment goals to the contracts of the 10 area agencies. These changes are monumental changes. The Bureau staff are currently out in the community training area agency staff in how to best utilize these new rules. The agency has also added in a new service called “situational assessment.” The situational assessment is a specialized service that provides a VR participant with the opportunity to demonstrate their work skills at a real and functioning worksite (unpaid) within the community. This service will allow this agency to evaluate and identify the necessary services a participant will need to be successful in an actual competitive employment situation. The agency has lined up the insurance component of this service and has had a small team of VR staff that has worked on this diligently. Select vendors at each of the regional offices, will be able to provide this service. These vendors will be selected based on their’ demonstrated abilities to complete this assessment. NHVR staff are also working on individual pilot programs. (Page 197)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses
  • Internships   (Page 28)

Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses  (Page 28)

Post–Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury. In an effort to continue discussing these important issues and determine how, as a community, we can better serve our veterans, service members and their families. Mr. Hinson was re–appointed by Governor Margaret Hassan to serve on the Commission on PTSD and TBI. During FY 15, two internal benefits counselors (Portsmouth and Manchester Regional Offices) provided benefit counseling to 386 customers. Seventy–six of those customers who had received internal benefits counseling during the vr process were closed status 26. Our internal benefits counseling staff also continue to jointly partner with the Institute on Disability with respect to the Real Study, a National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) research project designed to provide money coaching and benefits counseling to job seeking and employed individuals with disabilities. 

Extension. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Fiscal year 2011 data on this item was measured against this baseline. In FY 09 eligibility was determined in 60 days or less from application for 89% of the customers who applied for services. In FY 15, the average days to determine eligibility was 34 days. 2.3 Percent of accurate presumptive eligibility decisions for persons eligible for SSI or SSDI. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Target set for 2010 was 90%. During an FY 11 case review the agency achieved a rating of 76% in this area. The Agency is working to reinforce documentation in this area. Case review of FY 12 cases revealed that only relatively small sample of the cases reviewed received SSA benefits and were reviewed on this criterion. Of those 51% of the cases reviewed demonstrated that the presumption of eligibility was documented in case notes. The 2013-2014 review of FY12 cases is the most recent case review to assess this area. In 2014 the Agency began work on changing its case management system to Alliance’s AWARE system. At that time, the Agency decided to revamp case management practices to match the new system. Staff have been learning the new system and strategies and a case review is planned for the end of FY 2016 to determine any additional training needs to help staff meet the requirements of the program. (Page 188)

School to Work Transition

Continue to assess business interest in work–based learning and the ideal engagement strategies from the businesses’ perspectives. STRATEGY 4.2.C Determine the most appropriate way(s) to link resources from various programs and partners to offer full spectrum of work–based learning opportunities (e.g. Department of Labor School–to–Work Approved Unpaid Work Sites, Vocational Rehabilitation Work Based Learning program, On–the–job training resources from WIOA and TANF, Office of Apprenticeship services, etc.) This could be a digital infrastructure that offers the ability for businesses and emerging workers to be connected for work–based learning opportunities online. But, it may also be clarifying the message, resources, and roles/responsibilities among partners to support work–based learning connections in New Hampshire. Much mapping of the various assets has already been done and will provide a foundation for Strategy 4.2. (Page 47)

Providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA. 

  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff and other constituents, to ensure the inclusion of students and youth with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring in the schools as a result of the IDEA 2008 and the Rehabilitation Act;
  • providing advocacy for students and youth with disabilities to a variety of constituents;
  • improving connections between NHVR and other transition service agencies;
  • providing information and guidance regarding Labor Laws as they relate to job shadow, internships and work experience for students and youth with disabilities;
  • marketing to school staff, students and families, adult service agencies, etc. in a variety of areas, e.g., employment issues as a result of disability, transition of students with disabilities, availability of adult services, best practices in transition of youth with disabilities, accessing adult services, employer perspectives; develop relationships with other agencies providing services to students and youth with disabilities to maximize services offered;
  • providing technical assistance on grants as they are developed with multiple agencies and programs to ensure the inclusion of all students and youth with disabilities.
  • providing continued support of transition programs for students and youth such as the Earn and Learn program, Project INCOME and Project SEARCH The NHVR staff actively facilitates meetings with school staff, NHVR counselors and school–to–work staff to plan the inclusion of students with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring within the state. (Page 150)

NHVR staff and leadership are working closely together to ensure that changes implemented by WIOA are achieved. The activities these positions cover include: 

  • working with NHVR counselors to improve access and services provided to students and youth with disabilities;
  • working with NHVR counselors to develop best practices and examples of best practices to students and youth with disabilities;
  • providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA.
  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff (Page 151)

Target outreach efforts to support the employment outcomes of underserved populations 

  • Improve vocational rehabilitation services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, and deaf blind communities
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff to develop and improve needed skills regarding services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
    • Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School–to– Work transition program.
    • Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind
    • Collaborate with NHVR Office of Services for Blind and Visually Impaired to improve services to students who are deaf and blind.
    • Improve job development, placement, and retention for customers who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened and deaf blind. (Page 178)
  • Build partnerships with school transition personnel and serve as a resource for career planning
  • Encourage career–focused and work–based experiences during the transition from school to work
  • Identify students with disabilities who have been underserved and develop strategies for engagement
  • Utilize alternative and extended learning opportunities (ELO) for skill acquisition and academic achievement for students who require non–traditional learning environments
  • Support and continue to explore opportunities for sector–based and alternative education, employment and training programs for this targeted group, e.g., ACES, Earn and Learn, Project Search, Project Invest, Project Incomes and CHAMP NHVR, in its RFP process, has asked potential bidders to provide regional consortium responses that will outline how “potentially eligible” students shall be identified and how the services shall be provided. These responses will focus on enhancing NHVR’s relationship with the Bureau of Developmental Services, through its area agencies, and the Bureau of Behavioral Health, through its community mental health centers, and School Administrative Units (SAU’s) to better serve students with disabilities. (Page 179)

This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders. (Page 181)

Including individuals with the most significant disabilities, to secure suitable employment, and financial and personal independence by providing rehabilitation services. The Agency continually assesses the barriers and strategies to reduce barriers that relate to equal access to the state VR program. In planning this year specific input was solicited from the Developmental Disabilities Council; the statewide Independent Living Council; the state MH Planning Council; the Governor’s Commission on Disability; the Autism Council and the executive committee of the Special Education Administrators in the state. In providing a quality customer–focused service delivery system that is timely, effective and responds to the needs of individuals with disabilities throughout the state, the NHVR recognizes the need to expand and improve services to individuals with sensory, cognitive, physical and mental impairments who have traditionally not been served or have been underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program. This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders (Page 183)
  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.   (Page 184)
Data Collection

4.2 Percent of cases reviewed for which there is evidence that assistive technology services and assistive technology devices were assessed and used as necessary for individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process. It was identified that current case review data collection did not include this element. It was further identified that this is a training need area for staff. In–service training has included assistive tech services and devices and will continue to target this area as a training need in FY 12 through FY 15. Case review of FY 12 cases identified that that 70% of the time the case documentation showed evidence of an assessment of the need for assistive technology services and devices.   (Page 193)

The CPPOS will play a key role in informing students of opportunities in continued education or entry into the workforce. The CPPOS will list recommended academic courses for students to take for career success. Schools will be able to access relevant documents and guidance on the web and will receive technical assistance on modifying CPPOS’s for local use with students. Documents and guidance will be accessible on the web, including information postsecondary CTE opportunities that are linked to secondary programs. For example, the guidance documents currently tell students which colleges in New Hampshire offer the programs, and on the web they will be able to click on the link and go directly to information on that college program. New Hampshire has a long-term goal of at least implementing one CPPOS in 15 of the career clusters. Also at the end of the five-year period, all secondary CTE centers statewide will need to offer at least one CPPOS opportunity for their students. Competencies for new or updated programs will be required to align with national, state, and local standards. The New Hampshire Department of Education will work with employers and the Community College System to validate the competencies and modify as needed. (Page 219)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

The Governor established and certified the Workforce Opportunity Council (Council) as the State’s Workforce Board under WIA on September 22, 1999. The Council name was changed to State Workforce Investment Board in 2009 with the creation of the Office of Workforce Opportunity (OWO) in the NH Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED). Recently the board’s name changed to the State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB) with the implementation of WIOA. The Board is chaired by a businessperson and has 37 members, of whom 19 members (51%) are business representatives including a minimum of one small business representative. In addition the board includes:

  • The Governor (Section 101(b)(1)(A));
  • Two representatives of the State Legislature (Section 101(b)(1)(B)):
  • Lead officials from state agencies that oversee workforce development programs including chief elected officials (Section 101 (b)(1)(C)(iii) (Page 72)
Career Pathways

ABE staff participate in workforce agency partner meetings and NH Works counselors work with students on-site in ABE classes, called “What’s Next”, to introduce career inventories, career pathways, and promote resources available through NH Works. Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receive referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. (Page 27)

The Community College System and CTE work closely together, offering dual credit opportunities for students, sharing funding streams, recruiting at education and job fairs, and promoting career pathways.

  • Collaboration between the Community College System and ABE is very successful, particularly when programs are co-located. For example, at Great Bay Community College, an MOU between ABE and the college allows ABE to teach remedial English and math courses. This better serves students by reserving financial aid or loans for college-level coursework. There is also a referral process in place and ABE programs can assist students with admissions at community colleges, enrollment, preparing for the Accuplacer and sharing scores, determining eligibility for specific job training programs, and more.
  • Collaboration between Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation, with VR counselors attending ABE programs on a monthly basis. This activity is primarily focused on the special education population. (Page 31)

Within this MOU we will seek to partner with agencies participating with Medicaid (The Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health) to assist in enhancing services to customers needing supported employment and competitive integrated employment. We are very fortunate in New Hampshire to have legislation that prohibits subminimum wage payments to individuals with disabilities (SB 47, 2015). We are proud to work with our business partners to ensure at least minimum wage employment for our mutual customers. In the agreement we will weave in our work on career pathways and work-based learning to expand current sectors (Project SEARCH) and increase employment opportunities. (Page 157)

Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically to disability or implementation.  (Page 206)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 50

NH Acquired Brain Disorder Waiver (4177.R05.00) - 11/01/2017

~~“Provides community participation services, respite, service coordination, supported employment services, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services - PDMS (formerly consolidated acquired brain disorder services), residential habilitation/personal care services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/brain injury ages 22 - no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Between the Governor of the State of New Hampshire,the State Workforce Innovation Board - 07/01/2017

~~“This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by The Governor of the State of New Hampshire, The State Workforce Innovation Board (SWIB), and the consortium of state and other entities serving as the One-stop Operator as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014, for the state of New Hampshire, henceforth known as the NH Works One-stop Operator Consortium.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire - 02/01/2017

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)