New Hampshire

States - Big Screen

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.01%
Change from
2017 to 2018
1,356,458
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.18%
Change from
2017 to 2018
90,754
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.24%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39,742
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.22%
Change from
2017 to 2018
43.79%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.98%
Change from
2017 to 2018
82.62%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 1,334,795 1,342,795 1,356,458
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 88,094 84,234 90,754
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 36,745 36,069 39,742
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 621,838 630,403 622,874
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.71% 42.82% 43.79%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.80% 83.43% 82.62%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.80% 2.70% 2.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 15.70% 15.30% 13.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 6.10% 6.50% 6.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 85,334 86,440 88,766
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 82,957 85,164 86,025
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 158,669 163,580 164,932
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,282 1,508 2,726
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 5,225 3,690 6,614
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A 555 1,387
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,403 1,733 1,147
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 4,781 3,620 3,586
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 603 530 900

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,605 1,659 1,700
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.50% 8.90% 9.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 48,091 47,738 47,128

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,500 4,600 5,625
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 15,256 8,125 10,792
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 22,208 14,395 16,875
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.30% 32.00% 33.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 19.70% 28.50% 30.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.70% 9.90% 10.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 84.60% 85.80% N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,364 3,375 3,789
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 808 1,171 1,282
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 10,150 10,148 N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,397 2,070 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 13 23
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 16
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 46.00% 70.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.53 0.45 1.20

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
1,774
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 97 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 354 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 291 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 564 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 269 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 199 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 35.40% 30.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,943 4,365 4,156
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 65,481 65,474 65,173
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 96 71 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 92 40 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $32,003,000 $37,894,000 $36,193,689
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $45,982,000 $43,996,000 $53,705,630
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 44.00% 45.00% 46.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,248 1,970 2,254
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 120.70 117.80 124.76

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 72.44% 71.71% 70.81%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.44% 8.79% 9.05%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.73% 2.88% 2.84%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 56.76% 56.90% 71.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 38.89% 29.48% 36.36%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.67% 62.31% 66.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.48% 80.22% 75.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 27.78% 32.83% 29.87%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0 0 0

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The NH Works branding and colocation of services has been very successful in blending resources so customers know if they have any workforce development need, NH Works is the place to go. Workforce activities that are conducted through the NH Works office, for both job-seeker and business customers. (Page 19- 20) Title I

NH BEA, NH Employment Security, and NH DOE will lead and utilize the workforce development system partnerships as described above to ensure all resources are leveraged for education participants in attaining their educational goals. Core and non-core program staff will utilize WIOA, TAA, Vocational Rehabilitation, Pell Grants, public and private grants, and other resources to assist participants in their education goals. Professional development, guided by the PDT, and accurate training program information, provided through the ETP Team, will ensure all program staff are up-to-date with the latest educational resources information (Page 53) Title I

The NH Youth Council is committed to coordinating existing resources and identifying new resources specific to achieving improved outcomes for out-of-school youth. Working with the NH Department of Education (e.g., ABE, CTE, VR and In-school Programs) to strengthen the connections for students who drop out of or leave school without the skills necessary to obtain suitable and sustainable employment, the Council will play a lead role in coordinating and leveraging resources. The work of the Youth Council will be further supported by the NH Works system of partner agencies, which include Job Corps, Youth Build (when an active grant is in place) and the various community based organizations focused on services to youth. Strategies to achieve improved outcomes will include some or all of the following: • Develop and identify clear and concise pathways to achieving individual education/employment goals. (Page 88) Title I
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Job seekers can access an array of services and activities including but not limited to: NH Works Center Services Career Services (Basic, Individual, and Follow-up); Determination of Eligibility; Assessments; Labor Exchange Information; Labor Market Information; Unemployment Insurance Information; FAFSA Assistance; Development of Individual Employment Plan; Group Counseling; Individual Counseling; Career Planning; Internships; Short-Term Per-Vocational Services (soft skills such as communication, punctuality, and personal maintenance skills); Workforce Preparation Activities (i.e., MS office, keyboarding, and Internet); Financial Literacy. (Pages 49 - 50) Title I.

School to Work Transition

~~The NH Youth Council is committed to coordinating existing resources and identifying new resources specific to achieving improved outcomes for out-of-school youth. Working with the NH Department of Education (e.g., ABE, CTE, VR and In-school Programs) to strengthen the connections for students who drop out of or leave school without the skills necessary to obtain suitable and sustainable employment, the Council will play a lead role in coordinating and leveraging resources. The work of the Youth Council will be further supported by the NH Works system of partner agencies, which include Job Corps, Youth Build (when an active grant is in place) and the various community based organizations focused on services to youth. Strategies to achieve improved outcomes will include some or all of the following: • Develop and identify clear and concise pathways to achieving individual education/employment goals. • Connect out-of-school youth with state developed sector training and/or job opportunities. • Encourage credential-granting training options. • Expand work-based learning and training opportunities that allow youth to explore employment options - e.g., Return to Work, OJT, Apprenticeship, Internship, Work experience (paid or unpaid), etc. • Increase co-enrollments in/across core programs to maximize available resources for the provision of comprehensive work and training supports i.e., full complement of wrap around services to support success. (Page 88) Title I

NHVR participates in the State’s transition initiatives in a variety of ways. NHVR counselors across the state are involved in the local and regional partnerships which were developed to implement the activities of grants available. Counselors advocate for the inclusion of students with disabilities and special education staff in the systemic changes occurring in the schools. NHVR understands the need for services to be identified and in place prior to a student leaving the school setting in order to assist the student with a smooth transition to post-school activities which may include postsecondary education, training, employment, and related vocational rehabilitation services which will lead to competitive integrated employment. To assure this planning, the Agency provides for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment while the student is in school and within 90 days of eligibility determination. Local relationships of the VR Counselors and Special Education staff provide opportunities for VR staff to attend the IEP team meetings and assist in the overall transition plan to allow the student to successfully transition to post-secondary education or employment. VR Counselors participate in transition planning activities and IEP meetings to assist in the development of the IPE.  (Pages 131-132) Title II

As mentioned above Business Relations staff work with students and adults with disabilities. The Transition Administrator and the Program Specialist are working closely together to implement individualized pre-employment transition services, including creating programs with multiple partner agencies to provide Work Based Learning opportunities for students.
The Agency has been working with employers and CRPs to develop opportunities for career exploration and work-based learning for students with disabilities. The Agency has focused on developing menu of services and supports to assure that pre-employment transition services are widely available in the state. (Page 136) Title II

o Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
o Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
o Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School-to- Work transition program.
o Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind. (Page 169) Title II

The overall goal of the SCSEP is to place participants in unsubsidized employment for the purpose of sustained self-sufficiency. We aim to achieve this goal through expanded engagement and partnerships with employers, identifying employment opportunities with established career ladders, placing individuals in high growth industries and occupations as well as other industries and occupations that provide substantial employment opportunities for participants, and retention activities once participants enter the workforce. SCSEP staff will work with its network of employers to identify and cultivate appropriate employment opportunities for participants, taking into account the needs of mature workers. Staff will pair the job-ready participants’ interests, employment goals and skills with the requirements of local employers specific to employment vacancies. Unsubsidized placement will be informed by the nature of local industry growth and availability of positions that meet individual criteria in terms of physical requirements, access to transportation, and social needs. Staff will help clients develop their IEP to prepare them for opportunities in high-growth fields such as healthcare, transportation, warehousing and logistics, hospitality and retail, and various customer-service opportunities. These opportunities will primarily be shaped by the participants’ IEP objectives and their expressed desires concerning their work environments. Staff will secure opportunities for participants to gain critical skills for in-demand industries through training with community service providers and other workforce partners. SCSEP staff realize the importance of fostering relationships with local employers. (Page 271) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~NHVR has many relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs that coordinate and collaborate to provide transition services to out-of-school youth. Connections to programs like Project SEARCH, apprenticeship and OJT are examples of these connected services for youth with disabilities. NHVR staff are also a part of national Community of Practice surrounding students and youth with disabilities. (Page 128) Title II

The Agency will continue to seek ways to identify and meet the needs of individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire including, where appropriate, provision of services to groups of individuals with disabilities through the establishment, development and improvement of collaboration with private vocational rehabilitation service providers including community rehabilitation programs. In an effort to standardize services in the field, all CRP’s will be required to complete ACRE training, prior to receiving referrals from NHVR, in order to meet the minimum requirements to work with people with disabilities. All CRP’s looking to receive Supported Employment referrals, are encouraged to pursue and/or obtain the Certified Employment Support Professional (CESP) credential, in order to demonstrate a sufficient level of knowledge and skill to provide integrated employment supports to a variety of people with disabilities. In addition, the CRP Management Liaison will review their resume and qualifications to ensure they have the knowledge, skills and abilities to work with our customers. Once a CRP is approved by the CRP Management Liaison, the CRP will be placed in NHVR’s “Customer Guide to Job Development Services” and scheduled to attend training on NHVR’s job placement and referral process. Additional OJT will be offered by VR counselors and Rehabilitation Technicians to ensure the CRP understands NHVR’s referral and invoice process. CRP’s are required to meet with the Regional Offices, at least once a year, to review progress being made with each of their customers. At this meeting, CRP’s will ensure their records match with those of the local Regional Office. In addition, they will review NHVR’s “Customer Guide to Job Development Services” to ensure we have their updated contact information and document any additional training. NHVR’s case management system, AWARE, has the capacity to evaluate vendor success rate and report card information that documents the number of referrals for individual services, referrals for job placement, and successful placement outcomes. (Page 134-135) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receives referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. The Bureau also provides refugee service programs. With approximately 500 local employers in refugee resettlement areas, ABE staff work closely with employers and develops programs in partnership to provide employees with on-site English literacy training. The Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) provides assistance to eligible persons with disabilities throughout the state to gain and retain employment outcomes through the provision of direct vocational rehabilitation services, as funded under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. VR is a joint State/Federal program that seeks to empower people to make informed choices, build viable careers, and live more independently in the community. To that end, VR supports the following programs and priorities: • Disability Determination Services • Independent Living • Rehabilitation Services • Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired • Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing • Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. (Page 21) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~There was strong support in the CSNA results to support the services the agency provides to individuals with the most significant disabilities that require on-the-job and other supports to maintain employment through the supplemental Supported Employment Services program. Through informed choice and partnership with the NHVR program, individuals with disabilities are able to maximize their potential and reach their goals of employment within their local communities. Results also demonstrated the need to continue to support and provide services to individuals who experienced the most significant disabilities, including the need for supported employment services. Examples of responses received include the continued need for services in the areas of: transportation, benefits counseling assistance, agency should improve counselors’ knowledge and awareness in the areas of accommodations including rehabilitation technology, continuing education for counselors on disability areas and the continuing research and developments in rehabilitation, better relations with businesses and employers, expanded options for customized and creative solutions for employment, Ticket to Work and expanded options for individuals, continue to build relationships with Mental Health Centers and Area Agencies. (Page 147-148) Title II

NH Vocational Rehabilitation ensures that Counselors are aware of how an individual's cognitive disability might affect his or her ability to participate in the vocational rehabilitation process and the need to provide supports and accommodations to these individuals in the process.• Working with the Bureau of Behavioral Health toward strategies and practices to improve supported employment outcomes.• Exploring long-term funding options such as Partnership Plus, for individuals who need extended supports. (Page 178) Title II
 

Employer/ Business

~~VR continues working with Project RENEW, to bring their person-centered planning approach to VR in our work with students with mental health and emotional and behavioral challenges. The Agency continues to seek ways in which to better serve our customer population with Autism. In 2016 NHVR brought “Autism Employment Advisors” to NH. This program, Employer Connect, seeks to educate business partners on how to work with and manage individuals on the autism spectrum. It also seeks to prepare the students, recently graduated from college, with real interview opportunities with some of NH’s best technology and sector-based companies.
Goal 4---Promote an environment that supports the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor - Customer relationship (Page 180) Title I
 

Data Collection

New Hampshire manages customer data collection and reporting for WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs through the State Board administered e—TEAMS case management and reporting system. All entities that receive WIOA funds are mandated to use this system consistent with service delivery contractual agreements. The ELMIB has been designated the Performance Accountability and Customer Information Agency (PACIA) by the Governor of New Hampshire and as such performs the necessary performance analysis and reporting functions under WIOA under contract with the Office of Workforce Opportunity. ELMIB generates the performance related items that must be submitted to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) as part of the WIOA Quarterly Summaries and Annual Report. (Page 57) Title I

NH Vocational Rehabilitation strives to meet all negotiated performance accountability measures. Goal: NHVR will achieve or exceed the established and negotiated common performance measures once identified through the appropriate approval process. This first two years of this plan have been a baseline measurement. (Page 175) Title II

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security; Vocational Rehabilitation; Community Action Agency; Older Worker Program; and Granite State Independent Living ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co—located, a close relationship and co—enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One—stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English—speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. The State will continue to support enhanced services to those with significant barriers to employment through a variety of new and ongoing strategies. Accessibility and quality of service provision will continue to be evaluated affecting greater access to employment opportunities for people with disabilities and will continue to be addressed through the collaborative partnership established through the Governor’s Task Force on People with Disabilities, which is directly linked to One—Stop center activities, and continuous improvement strategies that include staff development and adopting new approaches to service delivery will be planned for and implemented to achieve improved services and outcomes. As referenced earlier, all partners provide employment and training services in response to the needs of individuals with disabilities. One of the NH Works Partners, NH Department of Education, Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation focuses on individuals with significant disabilities. They are co—located at each of the twelve NH Works offices. VR has productive relationships with all of the NH Works partners. Together they assist those mutual customers with disabilities in obtaining necessary services to improve their ability to obtain and maintain employment. (Page 72) Title I

Vets

The State Veteran Services plan defines the veteran priority of service for Wagner-Peyser pursuant to the Jobs for Veterans Act. In the local One-Stop Career Centers veterans receive priority of service from all partner staff. Priority is given to veterans for all new job listings posted on the NHWorks Job Match System by placing new job orders on a twenty-four hour veteran hold during which time the job order is only viewable by staff for the referral of veterans, and on-line the job order can only be viewed by registrants that are identified as veterans. The DVOP specialists and the LVER staff work in daily collaboration with one-stop delivery system partner staff to promote employment, training, placement and other opportunities for veterans. (Page 71) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. (Page 239) Title IV

Twelve New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) offices have been designated American Job Centers called NHWORKS. As identified on the JVSG Staffing Directory (VETS-501), the four full-time and seven part-time DVOP grant-funded positions, and the two full-time and two part-time LVER grant-funded positions are being assigned to American Job Centers (local offices) throughout the State. This planned deployment allows New Hampshire to have a DVOP specialist assigned to eleven of our twelve American Job Centers to provide the delivery of intensive services to targeted veterans. (Page 239) Title IV

Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; • Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and • Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. The LVER’s second primary function is to facilitate employment, training and placement services provided to veterans within the NHWORKS system via capacity building to ensure easier access to the appropriate employment and training services for eligible job-seeking veterans and eligible persons. The LVER, as an integral member of the NHES Business Services Team, will work with the staff to coordinate outreach activities to solicit job orders and promote the hiring of veterans. The LVER staff is responsible for maintaining contact with Federal Contractors and is also involved in the planning and participation in job fairs. Until further guidance is disseminated by USDOL VETS, LVER outreach efforts and other LVER staff activities are monitored locally by NHES managers and the DVET to assure compliance with statutory duties as described in VPL 03-14. (Page 240-241) Tittle IV

The DVOP specialists and the LVER staff work in daily collaboration with New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) staff, WIOA, State Vocational Rehabilitation, and other AJC partners to promote employment, training, placement and other opportunities for veterans. Intra-staff collaboration is also enforced via program updates shared among partners during regularly scheduled staff meetings. In many local offices “5 minute stand up” meetings are held each morning as a daily briefing of the events of the day. During this briefing, all AJC staff share information on new job orders received, employer information received by staff during outreach, training opportunities, and any positive recruitment taking place in the American Job Center. The DVOP specialist position assigned to the Manchester AJC is also assigned the responsibility of Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC). As agreed upon by the DVET, the State Agency and the VA, the ISC spends up to one day per week out-stationed at the VAVR&E office. The DVOP specialists throughout the State work with the VAVR&E program to assist qualified veterans seeking training. VAVR&E, in turn, refer veterans who are completing training programs to the DVOP specialists for job placement assistance. Through an agreement with the NH State Office of Veterans Services, representatives from their agency visit the NHES offices throughout the state at least twice a month to assist veterans with problems or questions regarding Federal or State benefits. The State has three HVRP Grantee, Harbor Homes, Veterans, Inc., and Easter Seals. The DVOP specialists in the Hillsborough County area do outreach on-site and participate in Stand Down activity by Harbor Homes. Representatives from Veterans, Inc. and Easter Seals periodically vist local offices as an additional means of outreach to homeless veterans. Many of the JVSG funded staff are members of Veterans’ Service Organizations (VSOs) in their community or have established working relationships with these groups. NHES is a member of the State Apprenticeship Advisory Council and works closely with the Federal apprenticeship representatives. DVOP staff will continue to conduct outreach to local Veterans’ Service Organizations (VSOs), homeless shelters, VA Medical Centers and Vet Centers, food pantries, correctional institutions and halfway houses in their labor market area to reach out to veterans and inform them of the services available through the American Job Centers. (Page 241) Title IV

One of the LVER’s principal duties is to conduct outreach to employers, employer associations, and business groups to promote the advantages of hiring veterans, to assist veterans in gaining employment, and to develop relationships, jobs, training, or job training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons. To accomplish this, LVERs will participate in appropriate activities such as: Planning and participating in job and career fairs; Conducting employer outreach; Conducting seminars for employers; In conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups; Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. (Page 245) Title IV

Mental Health

~~The process to determine the need for new, improved or expanded programs will be accomplished through: public forums in six regions to include customers of Vocational Rehabilitation, Vocational Rehabilitation staff, community rehabilitation programs staff, developmental services area agency staff, mental health center staff, and the general public. (Page 133) Title II

A revised Memorandum of Agreement with the Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health was planned for 2016, however due to staffing and coordination issues with the Department of Health and Human Services, this activity is still in progress. As mentioned previously we expect completion of this MOU in mid to late 2018.Individuals with the most significant disabilities to be served under this program will likely have developmental disabilities, acquired brain disorders and/or mental health diagnoses, since these are the groups for which funding is available for long-term support after Vocational Rehabilitation services are completed. (Pages 134-135) Title II

The State Medicaid plan under title XIX of the Social Security Act; The agency will seek to develop and enact a Memorandum of Understanding with this entity during the calendar year 2018 including all partners (mental health, developmental services, adult and elderly services, substance abuse, Division of Children and Youth Services and other Health and Human Services programs) that can assist in providing services for mutual customers. The discussion and process for order of selection will be critical so individuals know how and when they will be served based on their assigned category. (Page 137) Title II

The State agency responsible for providing mental health services: As identified above, the Agency has been working with the Bureau of Behavioral health toward developing a Memorandum of Understanding. The target is to finalize this work in 2018 with the completion of an MOU with the Department of Health and Human Services in 2018. That Department has experienced significant reorganization and staffing changes over the last two years which has slowed the progress on this agreement. The completed MOU will help to identify referral and service provision agreements as well as supported employment strategies and services to increase the successful competitive, integrated employment outcomes for the mutual customers of each system.  (Page 137) Title II

Who Are Our Customers- During Federal Fiscal Year 2017, NH Vocational Rehabilitation…
• Worked with 3,591 eligible clients
• Received 2,340 new applicants
Types of Disabilities
Mental Health 28%Cognitive 34%Blind or Visual Impairment 7%Deafness 2%Hard of Hearing 9%Physical Disability 18%Communicative 3% (page 157)
Goal 1---Quality competitive integrated employment outcomes for persons with disabilities in New HampshireStrategies and Activities:
• Restructure job placement and support activities, and the corresponding menu of services, to be in alignment with new performance accountabilities under WIOA.
- Require CRPs to complete ACRE training in order to meet minimum certification requirements
- Encourage CRPs to pursue and/or obtain CESP credential
- Support training to demonstrate and enhance competencies
• Coordinate with the systems for community mental health centers and community developmental disability organizations to increase the expectations for competitive integrated employment for individuals served under these programs.  (Page 168) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

In order to coordinate these activities at the community level, regular BRS team meetings that include appropriate NH Works staff and partners are conducted. These meeting allow discussion on employer needs, which can then be matched to individual needs of NH Works and partner agency customers thereby creating a more customer-centric workforce system. Support through the NH Works Professional Development Team provides for continued professional development opportunities for BRS staff across agencies to cross train, share information, and maximize resources. The US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship has two staff members assigned to New Hampshire. We have effectively woven the staff with representation at the State Board, Youth Council, Interagency Directors Group, Interagency Business Team and Shared Youth Vision to ensure inclusion of their programs. Furthermore, we have included pre-apprenticeship, work-based learning and Registered Apprenticeship within the partners’ job developers’ tool kit. Whenever an individual is placed (on-the-job training, work experience, or direct placement), the employer and participant is made aware of these programs and encouraged to participate. All of these efforts for coordination, alignment, and services are to ensure that the education and workforce systems increase opportunities for all individuals including individuals with disabilities and/or barriers to employment, on the local level. On the state level the Governor has charged the newly formed Office of Business and Economic Affairs to serve as the State's lead entity for coordinating business activities within the state. The BEA is working to attract new business and new talent to support New Hampshire's growing economy. As well as work with existing businesses from addressing skill shortages to working with employers to promote recovery friendly work environments to support the State's opioid recovery efforts. (Page 51-52) Title II

The Return to Work is one part of the Governor’s NH Working Initiative. The Return to Work initiative is an opportunity for a trainee to get their foot in the door and learn new skills and an opportunity for an employer to train without the accompanying costs. The training must be authorized through the Department of Employment Security prior to the beginning of the training. The training program may be up to six weeks, and a maximum of 24 hours per week per benefit year. Claimants are required to submit paper weekly claims for benefits timely and meet all other unemployment compensation eligibility requirements. Claimants will continue to receive their weekly unemployment compensation benefits during the training program. A Return to Work claimant trainee must be able and available to seek and accept work during this period. A non-claimant trainee is required to complete a weekly status form to NHES. The trainee is covered under a state provided Workers Compensation program. In addition, adult, dislocated worker, NEG, and youth may be enrolled in On-the-Job Training programs. The term “On-the-Job Training” (OJT) means training by an employer that is provided to a participant paid while engaged in productive work in a job that - a) Provides knowledge or skills essential to the full and adequate performance of the job; b) Provides reimbursement to the employer of up to 50% of the participant wage rate for the cost of providing the training and additional supervision related to the training; and c) Is limited in duration as appropriate to the occupation for which the participant is being trained, not exceeding 6 months, and taking into account the content of the training, the prior work experience of the participant, the skills gap between the participant’s education and experience level and the skills required for the job, and the service strategy of the participant, as appropriate. The Job Training fund funded with state unemployment insurance trust funds incumbent workers. Although no customized training programs currently exist, we may pursue this training strategy if circumstances warrant. (Page 83) Title I

New Hampshire makes extensive use of the Worker Profiling and Reemployment Service (WPRS) model for early identification of claimants who are likely to face long-term unemployment. NHES administers a statistical model, to identify qualified UI claimants who will enter the UI Profile Pool. Answers to certain questions during the initial claim process and their resulting score are used to identify potential claimants. On a weekly basis, Employment Service staff in the NH Works Centers specify a number of claimants to be randomly extracted from the pool in their respective service area. A weekly report is produced listing the claimants ranked by their profiling score and who received a first payment in the previous week. Claimants with the highest score in the pool are selected to attend an orientation and receive one-on-one assessment and reemployment services. (Page 100) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 31 - 40 of 58

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

NH Disability & Public Health Project - 01/01/2017

“The New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) is a collaboration between the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services and its Bona Fide Agent, the Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire. The overarching goal of the collaboration is to improve the health and quality of life of people with disabilities in NH by strengthening the capacity of the state’s public health programs and initiatives to include people with intellectual disabilities and mobility limitations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire ESEA Flexibility Approval - 06/26/2013

The New Hampshire Department of Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on June 26, 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order 2002-9 (Establishing a Governor's Task Force on Employment) - 12/04/2002

“An order establishing the Governor's Task Force on Employment and Economic Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

Vocational Rehab Jobs Will Be Cut in H.H. - 04/24/2018

“Concord — A New Hampshire agency that helps people with disabilities find jobs soon will be downsized, after education officials identified a looming shortfall within the group’s budget.

About 20 jobs will be cut from the state Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation in an attempt to stabilize finances for the organization, which provides job coaching and educational opportunities, and also pairs disabled people with employers in the Granite State, Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut announced last week.

Nonetheless, officials are working to continue many of those services, even with fewer staff, Edelblut said in a phone interview on Monday. They intend to partner with community organizations and area nonprofits to help fill the void, he said.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2018 New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Report - 01/01/2018

~~“Prevalence of Mobility and/or Cognitive Disabilities among NH Adults 18 and Older.

This report used pooled data from the 2013-2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). In the BRFSS, mobility and cognitive limitations are defined by two questions: 1. Do you have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs? (“Mobility”); and 2. Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, do you have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions? (“Cognitive”) BRFSS data is available on the CDC website via the Disability and Health Data System: https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/disabilityandhealth/dhds/index.html The NH Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) is funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cooperative agreement number 1NU27DD000007. DPH is a collaboration between the Institute on Disability at the University of New Hampshire and the NH Division of Public Health Services. The contents of this report are the responsibility of DPH staff and do not necessarily represent the views of the CDC or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Supported Employment - 01/01/2018

“Supported Employment (SE) is a well-defined approach to helping people with mental illnesses find and keep competitive employment within their communities.

SE programs are staffed by employment specialists who have frequent meetings with treatment providers to integrate supported employment with mental health services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

“Aid to the Permanently & Totally Disabled” - 01/01/2018

“Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled (APTD) is cash assistance for individuals who are between the ages of 18 and 64 and who are physically or mentally disabled.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Position Statement For New Hampshire’s Regional Service System

We believe that employment, with its powerful and irreplaceable opportunities for autonomy, earned income, self-esteem development, social contacts, structured  activity and life satisfaction, is an import ant ingredient of a fulfilling and valued life for adults in our society. We also recognize that the capacity of adults with any type or degree of developmental disability or acquired brain disorder to participate in employment, in the right setting and with the proper supports, has been amply demonstrated.   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Project Search - 12/17/2018

~~“Project Search is designed to provide an on campus intellectually challenging experience for academically motivated high school students. The program has been in operation since 1983 and currently serves over 200 students.

Project Search's mission is to provide a forum in a college campus setting where high school students from South Eastern New Hampshire and Southern Maine can experience a series of presentations covering challenging interdisciplinary topics and interact with each other in discussion groups. More information about Project Search may be found by accessing the weblink."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

PROJECT SEARCH SEACOAST NEW HAMPSHIRE - 10/18/2018

~~“Combining classroom instruction, career exploration, on-the-job training and support, Project SEARCH Seacoast NH helps students gain employment in the community by providing real-life work experience and teaching independent living skills. Classroom group lessons and meetings followed by internship rotations both take place at Portsmouth Regional Hospital. The goal for each student is competitive employment in the community at the end of the program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire WIOA Combined State Plan 2016-2020 - 03/15/2018

~~“Several vendors provide direct services for those with disabilities throughout the state. A close collaboration between VR, the state legislature, families, the governor’s commission, Developmental Disability Council, and other stakeholders resulted in the passing of State Bill 47 to eliminate subminimum wage for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire – a great success in closing the unemployment gap for this demographic.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

NH Disability & Public Health Project - 01/01/2017

“The New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) is a collaboration between the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services and its Bona Fide Agent, the Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire. The overarching goal of the collaboration is to improve the health and quality of life of people with disabilities in NH by strengthening the capacity of the state’s public health programs and initiatives to include people with intellectual disabilities and mobility limitations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Community Support Network - 06/15/1995

~~“CSNI is the association of the ten Area Agencies in New Hampshire providing services to individuals with developmental disabilities  and acquired brain disorders.  We achieve our mission through a variety of activities including advocacy, education, centralized operational supports to improve efficiency of the Area Agency system, and group purchasing.  At the heart of what we do is a core belief that the system of supports and services to individuals with developmental disabilities and acquired brain disorders functions best when all of its elements are working together.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Employment Community of Practice

The Mission of the NH Employment Community of Practice is to promote economic independence and high quality competitive employment opportunities for people withdisabilities through information sharing and the development and dissemination of best practices among all community partners.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire Governor's Commission on Disability

The Governor’s Commission on Disability provides information about the many services, laws, and regulations that affect citizens with disabilities.

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Institute on Disability/UCEDD - University of New Hampshire

“Trains students, self-advocates, families and professionals through coursework, seminars, workshops and conferences; Provides technical assistance to organizations and individuals to improve their capacity to include all citizens. Disseminates information to families, consumers, community members and professionals via books, monographs, articles, videos, newsletters, the internet and newspapers and consumer forums; engages in collaborative activities and

joint projects with organizations that share common goals. 

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011

‘In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI)”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Next Steps NH - 03/30/2020

“The Next Steps NH project provided professional development and coaching to selected New Hampshire high schools for the purpose of increasing the graduation rate of students with disabilities, and students at risk. This was done through implementing evidence-informed transition planning practices that helped students prepare for college, career, and adult life.

This website was part of the project and housed all tools and resources developed as part of the project. The website is now supported by the NH Department of Education and managed at Keene State College.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

NHWorks Employers - 03/06/2020

“Employers

If you’re an employer, you already know that there’s a lot more to hiring new employees than just finding the right candidate. If you browse within the Employer category, we not only present you with recruitment services, but we also provide information on employment and labor laws, hiring incentives, disability resources and other services and benefits. These services are provided at no cost to you.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations; small business owners; self-employed individuals; part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Consumers of behavioral health services, Comprehensive behavioral health centers, Substance Abuse Prevention providers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Agencies/people who serve pregnant women, Veteran’s service organizations, The disability community, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Hospitals, Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, Post-secondary Educational Institutions, Economic Development Authorities, and Chambers of Commerce.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH’s 13th Annual Transition Summit - 06/13/2019

~~“The New Hampshire Transition Community of Practice organizes the annual Transition Summit, the only statewide conference for training, collaboration, networking, and information focused exclusively on the transition to life after high school for students with disabilities.NH’s 13th Annual Transition SummitFriday, November 22, 20198:00 am – 3:30 pmGrappone Conference Center, Concord, NH ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

2018 Labor Law Training Seminar Offered - 02/26/2018

“The New Hampshire Department of Labor is offering a Labor Law training seminar on how to stay in compliance with NH Labor Laws. The seminar will be offered on 18 dates at a variety of locations throughout the state. These events are free and open to employers, businesses and the public. These seminars are made possible by the generosity of the businesses donating their establishment’s function room to host these events.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual

The New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual provides more in-depth information about the major programs affecting income and benefits for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire.  The Manual is divided into four sections:

1. New Hampshire Adult Assistance Programs

2. Social Security Disability Insurance

3. Supplemental Security Income

4. Medicare

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

WorkReadyNH

Work ReadyNH is a tuition-free workforce development program tailored to meet the needs of job seekers and career builders as well as provide training in the specific skills employers are seeking in their current and future employees.

 

The WorkReadyNH program provides assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. Graduates earn two nationally recognized credentials to add to their resume.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Southern New Hampshire Services Workplace Success Program

~~“The Workplace Success (WPS) Program is funded by the NH Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and represents  a collaboration between the Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies to enable TANF recipients to move from welfare to work. Workplace Success provides participants in the New Hampshire Employment Program (NHEP) with the skills, knowledge, experience, and support needed to obtain paid employment.The program prepares participants to enter the workforce by providing them a broad set of workforce development services starting with an in-depth vocational assessment process leading to a personal Career Plan.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workplace Success

~~“The Workplace Success (WPS) Program is funded by the NH Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and represents a collaboration between the Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies to enable TANF recipients to move from welfare to work. Workplace Success provides participants in the New Hampshire Employment Program (NHEP) with the skills, knowledge, experience, and support needed to obtain paid employment.

The program prepares participants to enter the workforce by providing them a broad set of workforce development services starting with an in-depth vocational assessment process leading to a personal Career Plan. “

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Five Year Plan (2008-2012)

• MIG funds were used during 2002 and 2003 to provide the 13 New Hampshire Employment Security One-Stops with equipment and resource materials (e.g., screen readers, audio “how to” tapes) to make them more accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, training was provided to the staff of One-Stops regarding use of the purchased equipment and resource materials. This initiative with the One-Stops also included staff trainings on disability awareness issues and creation of a resource guide called “Disability Etiquette.”

• MIG was instrumental in the development of towo tool kits. The first, a ready-to work toolkit is a curriculum on personal futures planning, resume writing, self-directed job searching techniques, employment interviewing skills, and negotiating workplace culture, politics, and related skills. It’s currently being used by the independent living center’s 6 peer groups. The second, an employer tool kit, was developed to provide information and guidance to employers regarding reasonable workplace accommodations, tax credits, where to get technical assistance, the ticket-to-work program, and the values and benefits of hiring people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Amanda D., et al. v. Hassan, et al. Settlement Fact Sheet

The United States Department of Justice, a coalition of private plaintiff organizations, and the State of New Hampshire, have entered into a comprehensive Settlement Agreement that will transform New Hampshire’s mental health system by significantly expanding and enhancing mental health service capacity in integrated community settings. The Agreement will enable a class of adults with serious mental illness to receive needed services in the community, which will foster their independence and enable them to participate more fully in community life. The expanded and enhanced community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at State mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (“NHH”) (the State’s only psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (a State-owned and -operated nursing facility for people with mental illness). The Agreement requires the State to expand and enhance community services over the next six years. …

For the first time, the State will deliver supported employment services in accordance with the Dartmouth evidence-based model. These services will help enable individuals to obtain and maintain paid, competitive employment in integrated community settings. Over the life of the Agreement, this provision will impact thousands of people.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program

“The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program assists low-income elderly or disabled individuals who are eligible for Medicare (available through the Social Security Administration) by paying for some or all of the associated costs of Medicare, specifically the Medicare Insurance Premiums and deductibles. The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program is also referred to as the Buy-In program….

The Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) program provides payment of Medicare Part A premiums for eligible working individuals with disabilities who are entitled to enroll in Medicare Part A, but who have lost Medicare Part A coverage due to earnings. Individuals eligible for QDWI may not otherwise be eligible for Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.01%
Change from
2017 to 2018
1,356,458
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.18%
Change from
2017 to 2018
90,754
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.24%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39,742
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.22%
Change from
2017 to 2018
43.79%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.98%
Change from
2017 to 2018
82.62%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 1,334,795 1,342,795 1,356,458
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 88,094 84,234 90,754
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 36,745 36,069 39,742
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 621,838 630,403 622,874
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.71% 42.82% 43.79%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.80% 83.43% 82.62%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.80% 2.70% 2.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 15.70% 15.30% 13.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 6.10% 6.50% 6.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 85,334 86,440 88,766
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 82,957 85,164 86,025
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 158,669 163,580 164,932
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,282 1,508 2,726
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 5,225 3,690 6,614
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A 555 1,387
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,403 1,733 1,147
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 4,781 3,620 3,586
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 603 530 900

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,605 1,659 1,700
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.50% 8.90% 9.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 48,091 47,738 47,128

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,500 4,600 5,625
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 15,256 8,125 10,792
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 22,208 14,395 16,875
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.30% 32.00% 33.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 19.70% 28.50% 30.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.70% 9.90% 10.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 84.60% 85.80% N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,364 3,375 3,789
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 808 1,171 1,282
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 10,150 10,148 N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,397 2,070 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 13 23
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 16
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 46.00% 70.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.53 0.45 1.20

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
1,774
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 97 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 354 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 291 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 564 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 269 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 199 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 35.40% 30.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,943 4,365 4,156
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 65,481 65,474 65,173
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 96 71 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 92 40 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $32,003,000 $37,894,000 $36,193,689
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $45,982,000 $43,996,000 $53,705,630
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 44.00% 45.00% 46.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,248 1,970 2,254
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 120.70 117.80 124.76

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 72.44% 71.71% 70.81%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.44% 8.79% 9.05%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.73% 2.88% 2.84%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 56.76% 56.90% 71.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 38.89% 29.48% 36.36%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.67% 62.31% 66.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.48% 80.22% 75.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 27.78% 32.83% 29.87%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0 0 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The NH Works branding and colocation of services has been very successful in blending resources so customers know if they have any workforce development need, NH Works is the place to go. Workforce activities that are conducted through the NH Works office, for both job-seeker and business customers. (Page 19- 20) Title I

NH BEA, NH Employment Security, and NH DOE will lead and utilize the workforce development system partnerships as described above to ensure all resources are leveraged for education participants in attaining their educational goals. Core and non-core program staff will utilize WIOA, TAA, Vocational Rehabilitation, Pell Grants, public and private grants, and other resources to assist participants in their education goals. Professional development, guided by the PDT, and accurate training program information, provided through the ETP Team, will ensure all program staff are up-to-date with the latest educational resources information (Page 53) Title I

The NH Youth Council is committed to coordinating existing resources and identifying new resources specific to achieving improved outcomes for out-of-school youth. Working with the NH Department of Education (e.g., ABE, CTE, VR and In-school Programs) to strengthen the connections for students who drop out of or leave school without the skills necessary to obtain suitable and sustainable employment, the Council will play a lead role in coordinating and leveraging resources. The work of the Youth Council will be further supported by the NH Works system of partner agencies, which include Job Corps, Youth Build (when an active grant is in place) and the various community based organizations focused on services to youth. Strategies to achieve improved outcomes will include some or all of the following: • Develop and identify clear and concise pathways to achieving individual education/employment goals. (Page 88) Title I
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Job seekers can access an array of services and activities including but not limited to: NH Works Center Services Career Services (Basic, Individual, and Follow-up); Determination of Eligibility; Assessments; Labor Exchange Information; Labor Market Information; Unemployment Insurance Information; FAFSA Assistance; Development of Individual Employment Plan; Group Counseling; Individual Counseling; Career Planning; Internships; Short-Term Per-Vocational Services (soft skills such as communication, punctuality, and personal maintenance skills); Workforce Preparation Activities (i.e., MS office, keyboarding, and Internet); Financial Literacy. (Pages 49 - 50) Title I.

School to Work Transition

~~The NH Youth Council is committed to coordinating existing resources and identifying new resources specific to achieving improved outcomes for out-of-school youth. Working with the NH Department of Education (e.g., ABE, CTE, VR and In-school Programs) to strengthen the connections for students who drop out of or leave school without the skills necessary to obtain suitable and sustainable employment, the Council will play a lead role in coordinating and leveraging resources. The work of the Youth Council will be further supported by the NH Works system of partner agencies, which include Job Corps, Youth Build (when an active grant is in place) and the various community based organizations focused on services to youth. Strategies to achieve improved outcomes will include some or all of the following: • Develop and identify clear and concise pathways to achieving individual education/employment goals. • Connect out-of-school youth with state developed sector training and/or job opportunities. • Encourage credential-granting training options. • Expand work-based learning and training opportunities that allow youth to explore employment options - e.g., Return to Work, OJT, Apprenticeship, Internship, Work experience (paid or unpaid), etc. • Increase co-enrollments in/across core programs to maximize available resources for the provision of comprehensive work and training supports i.e., full complement of wrap around services to support success. (Page 88) Title I

NHVR participates in the State’s transition initiatives in a variety of ways. NHVR counselors across the state are involved in the local and regional partnerships which were developed to implement the activities of grants available. Counselors advocate for the inclusion of students with disabilities and special education staff in the systemic changes occurring in the schools. NHVR understands the need for services to be identified and in place prior to a student leaving the school setting in order to assist the student with a smooth transition to post-school activities which may include postsecondary education, training, employment, and related vocational rehabilitation services which will lead to competitive integrated employment. To assure this planning, the Agency provides for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment while the student is in school and within 90 days of eligibility determination. Local relationships of the VR Counselors and Special Education staff provide opportunities for VR staff to attend the IEP team meetings and assist in the overall transition plan to allow the student to successfully transition to post-secondary education or employment. VR Counselors participate in transition planning activities and IEP meetings to assist in the development of the IPE.  (Pages 131-132) Title II

As mentioned above Business Relations staff work with students and adults with disabilities. The Transition Administrator and the Program Specialist are working closely together to implement individualized pre-employment transition services, including creating programs with multiple partner agencies to provide Work Based Learning opportunities for students.
The Agency has been working with employers and CRPs to develop opportunities for career exploration and work-based learning for students with disabilities. The Agency has focused on developing menu of services and supports to assure that pre-employment transition services are widely available in the state. (Page 136) Title II

o Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
o Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
o Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School-to- Work transition program.
o Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind. (Page 169) Title II

The overall goal of the SCSEP is to place participants in unsubsidized employment for the purpose of sustained self-sufficiency. We aim to achieve this goal through expanded engagement and partnerships with employers, identifying employment opportunities with established career ladders, placing individuals in high growth industries and occupations as well as other industries and occupations that provide substantial employment opportunities for participants, and retention activities once participants enter the workforce. SCSEP staff will work with its network of employers to identify and cultivate appropriate employment opportunities for participants, taking into account the needs of mature workers. Staff will pair the job-ready participants’ interests, employment goals and skills with the requirements of local employers specific to employment vacancies. Unsubsidized placement will be informed by the nature of local industry growth and availability of positions that meet individual criteria in terms of physical requirements, access to transportation, and social needs. Staff will help clients develop their IEP to prepare them for opportunities in high-growth fields such as healthcare, transportation, warehousing and logistics, hospitality and retail, and various customer-service opportunities. These opportunities will primarily be shaped by the participants’ IEP objectives and their expressed desires concerning their work environments. Staff will secure opportunities for participants to gain critical skills for in-demand industries through training with community service providers and other workforce partners. SCSEP staff realize the importance of fostering relationships with local employers. (Page 271) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~NHVR has many relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs that coordinate and collaborate to provide transition services to out-of-school youth. Connections to programs like Project SEARCH, apprenticeship and OJT are examples of these connected services for youth with disabilities. NHVR staff are also a part of national Community of Practice surrounding students and youth with disabilities. (Page 128) Title II

The Agency will continue to seek ways to identify and meet the needs of individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire including, where appropriate, provision of services to groups of individuals with disabilities through the establishment, development and improvement of collaboration with private vocational rehabilitation service providers including community rehabilitation programs. In an effort to standardize services in the field, all CRP’s will be required to complete ACRE training, prior to receiving referrals from NHVR, in order to meet the minimum requirements to work with people with disabilities. All CRP’s looking to receive Supported Employment referrals, are encouraged to pursue and/or obtain the Certified Employment Support Professional (CESP) credential, in order to demonstrate a sufficient level of knowledge and skill to provide integrated employment supports to a variety of people with disabilities. In addition, the CRP Management Liaison will review their resume and qualifications to ensure they have the knowledge, skills and abilities to work with our customers. Once a CRP is approved by the CRP Management Liaison, the CRP will be placed in NHVR’s “Customer Guide to Job Development Services” and scheduled to attend training on NHVR’s job placement and referral process. Additional OJT will be offered by VR counselors and Rehabilitation Technicians to ensure the CRP understands NHVR’s referral and invoice process. CRP’s are required to meet with the Regional Offices, at least once a year, to review progress being made with each of their customers. At this meeting, CRP’s will ensure their records match with those of the local Regional Office. In addition, they will review NHVR’s “Customer Guide to Job Development Services” to ensure we have their updated contact information and document any additional training. NHVR’s case management system, AWARE, has the capacity to evaluate vendor success rate and report card information that documents the number of referrals for individual services, referrals for job placement, and successful placement outcomes. (Page 134-135) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receives referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. The Bureau also provides refugee service programs. With approximately 500 local employers in refugee resettlement areas, ABE staff work closely with employers and develops programs in partnership to provide employees with on-site English literacy training. The Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) provides assistance to eligible persons with disabilities throughout the state to gain and retain employment outcomes through the provision of direct vocational rehabilitation services, as funded under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. VR is a joint State/Federal program that seeks to empower people to make informed choices, build viable careers, and live more independently in the community. To that end, VR supports the following programs and priorities: • Disability Determination Services • Independent Living • Rehabilitation Services • Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired • Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing • Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. (Page 21) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~There was strong support in the CSNA results to support the services the agency provides to individuals with the most significant disabilities that require on-the-job and other supports to maintain employment through the supplemental Supported Employment Services program. Through informed choice and partnership with the NHVR program, individuals with disabilities are able to maximize their potential and reach their goals of employment within their local communities. Results also demonstrated the need to continue to support and provide services to individuals who experienced the most significant disabilities, including the need for supported employment services. Examples of responses received include the continued need for services in the areas of: transportation, benefits counseling assistance, agency should improve counselors’ knowledge and awareness in the areas of accommodations including rehabilitation technology, continuing education for counselors on disability areas and the continuing research and developments in rehabilitation, better relations with businesses and employers, expanded options for customized and creative solutions for employment, Ticket to Work and expanded options for individuals, continue to build relationships with Mental Health Centers and Area Agencies. (Page 147-148) Title II

NH Vocational Rehabilitation ensures that Counselors are aware of how an individual's cognitive disability might affect his or her ability to participate in the vocational rehabilitation process and the need to provide supports and accommodations to these individuals in the process.• Working with the Bureau of Behavioral Health toward strategies and practices to improve supported employment outcomes.• Exploring long-term funding options such as Partnership Plus, for individuals who need extended supports. (Page 178) Title II
 

Employer/ Business

~~VR continues working with Project RENEW, to bring their person-centered planning approach to VR in our work with students with mental health and emotional and behavioral challenges. The Agency continues to seek ways in which to better serve our customer population with Autism. In 2016 NHVR brought “Autism Employment Advisors” to NH. This program, Employer Connect, seeks to educate business partners on how to work with and manage individuals on the autism spectrum. It also seeks to prepare the students, recently graduated from college, with real interview opportunities with some of NH’s best technology and sector-based companies.
Goal 4---Promote an environment that supports the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor - Customer relationship (Page 180) Title I
 

Data Collection

New Hampshire manages customer data collection and reporting for WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs through the State Board administered e—TEAMS case management and reporting system. All entities that receive WIOA funds are mandated to use this system consistent with service delivery contractual agreements. The ELMIB has been designated the Performance Accountability and Customer Information Agency (PACIA) by the Governor of New Hampshire and as such performs the necessary performance analysis and reporting functions under WIOA under contract with the Office of Workforce Opportunity. ELMIB generates the performance related items that must be submitted to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) as part of the WIOA Quarterly Summaries and Annual Report. (Page 57) Title I

NH Vocational Rehabilitation strives to meet all negotiated performance accountability measures. Goal: NHVR will achieve or exceed the established and negotiated common performance measures once identified through the appropriate approval process. This first two years of this plan have been a baseline measurement. (Page 175) Title II

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security; Vocational Rehabilitation; Community Action Agency; Older Worker Program; and Granite State Independent Living ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co—located, a close relationship and co—enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One—stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English—speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. The State will continue to support enhanced services to those with significant barriers to employment through a variety of new and ongoing strategies. Accessibility and quality of service provision will continue to be evaluated affecting greater access to employment opportunities for people with disabilities and will continue to be addressed through the collaborative partnership established through the Governor’s Task Force on People with Disabilities, which is directly linked to One—Stop center activities, and continuous improvement strategies that include staff development and adopting new approaches to service delivery will be planned for and implemented to achieve improved services and outcomes. As referenced earlier, all partners provide employment and training services in response to the needs of individuals with disabilities. One of the NH Works Partners, NH Department of Education, Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation focuses on individuals with significant disabilities. They are co—located at each of the twelve NH Works offices. VR has productive relationships with all of the NH Works partners. Together they assist those mutual customers with disabilities in obtaining necessary services to improve their ability to obtain and maintain employment. (Page 72) Title I

Vets

The State Veteran Services plan defines the veteran priority of service for Wagner-Peyser pursuant to the Jobs for Veterans Act. In the local One-Stop Career Centers veterans receive priority of service from all partner staff. Priority is given to veterans for all new job listings posted on the NHWorks Job Match System by placing new job orders on a twenty-four hour veteran hold during which time the job order is only viewable by staff for the referral of veterans, and on-line the job order can only be viewed by registrants that are identified as veterans. The DVOP specialists and the LVER staff work in daily collaboration with one-stop delivery system partner staff to promote employment, training, placement and other opportunities for veterans. (Page 71) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. (Page 239) Title IV

Twelve New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) offices have been designated American Job Centers called NHWORKS. As identified on the JVSG Staffing Directory (VETS-501), the four full-time and seven part-time DVOP grant-funded positions, and the two full-time and two part-time LVER grant-funded positions are being assigned to American Job Centers (local offices) throughout the State. This planned deployment allows New Hampshire to have a DVOP specialist assigned to eleven of our twelve American Job Centers to provide the delivery of intensive services to targeted veterans. (Page 239) Title IV

Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; • Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and • Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. The LVER’s second primary function is to facilitate employment, training and placement services provided to veterans within the NHWORKS system via capacity building to ensure easier access to the appropriate employment and training services for eligible job-seeking veterans and eligible persons. The LVER, as an integral member of the NHES Business Services Team, will work with the staff to coordinate outreach activities to solicit job orders and promote the hiring of veterans. The LVER staff is responsible for maintaining contact with Federal Contractors and is also involved in the planning and participation in job fairs. Until further guidance is disseminated by USDOL VETS, LVER outreach efforts and other LVER staff activities are monitored locally by NHES managers and the DVET to assure compliance with statutory duties as described in VPL 03-14. (Page 240-241) Tittle IV

The DVOP specialists and the LVER staff work in daily collaboration with New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) staff, WIOA, State Vocational Rehabilitation, and other AJC partners to promote employment, training, placement and other opportunities for veterans. Intra-staff collaboration is also enforced via program updates shared among partners during regularly scheduled staff meetings. In many local offices “5 minute stand up” meetings are held each morning as a daily briefing of the events of the day. During this briefing, all AJC staff share information on new job orders received, employer information received by staff during outreach, training opportunities, and any positive recruitment taking place in the American Job Center. The DVOP specialist position assigned to the Manchester AJC is also assigned the responsibility of Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC). As agreed upon by the DVET, the State Agency and the VA, the ISC spends up to one day per week out-stationed at the VAVR&E office. The DVOP specialists throughout the State work with the VAVR&E program to assist qualified veterans seeking training. VAVR&E, in turn, refer veterans who are completing training programs to the DVOP specialists for job placement assistance. Through an agreement with the NH State Office of Veterans Services, representatives from their agency visit the NHES offices throughout the state at least twice a month to assist veterans with problems or questions regarding Federal or State benefits. The State has three HVRP Grantee, Harbor Homes, Veterans, Inc., and Easter Seals. The DVOP specialists in the Hillsborough County area do outreach on-site and participate in Stand Down activity by Harbor Homes. Representatives from Veterans, Inc. and Easter Seals periodically vist local offices as an additional means of outreach to homeless veterans. Many of the JVSG funded staff are members of Veterans’ Service Organizations (VSOs) in their community or have established working relationships with these groups. NHES is a member of the State Apprenticeship Advisory Council and works closely with the Federal apprenticeship representatives. DVOP staff will continue to conduct outreach to local Veterans’ Service Organizations (VSOs), homeless shelters, VA Medical Centers and Vet Centers, food pantries, correctional institutions and halfway houses in their labor market area to reach out to veterans and inform them of the services available through the American Job Centers. (Page 241) Title IV

One of the LVER’s principal duties is to conduct outreach to employers, employer associations, and business groups to promote the advantages of hiring veterans, to assist veterans in gaining employment, and to develop relationships, jobs, training, or job training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons. To accomplish this, LVERs will participate in appropriate activities such as: Planning and participating in job and career fairs; Conducting employer outreach; Conducting seminars for employers; In conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups; Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. (Page 245) Title IV

Mental Health

~~The process to determine the need for new, improved or expanded programs will be accomplished through: public forums in six regions to include customers of Vocational Rehabilitation, Vocational Rehabilitation staff, community rehabilitation programs staff, developmental services area agency staff, mental health center staff, and the general public. (Page 133) Title II

A revised Memorandum of Agreement with the Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health was planned for 2016, however due to staffing and coordination issues with the Department of Health and Human Services, this activity is still in progress. As mentioned previously we expect completion of this MOU in mid to late 2018.Individuals with the most significant disabilities to be served under this program will likely have developmental disabilities, acquired brain disorders and/or mental health diagnoses, since these are the groups for which funding is available for long-term support after Vocational Rehabilitation services are completed. (Pages 134-135) Title II

The State Medicaid plan under title XIX of the Social Security Act; The agency will seek to develop and enact a Memorandum of Understanding with this entity during the calendar year 2018 including all partners (mental health, developmental services, adult and elderly services, substance abuse, Division of Children and Youth Services and other Health and Human Services programs) that can assist in providing services for mutual customers. The discussion and process for order of selection will be critical so individuals know how and when they will be served based on their assigned category. (Page 137) Title II

The State agency responsible for providing mental health services: As identified above, the Agency has been working with the Bureau of Behavioral health toward developing a Memorandum of Understanding. The target is to finalize this work in 2018 with the completion of an MOU with the Department of Health and Human Services in 2018. That Department has experienced significant reorganization and staffing changes over the last two years which has slowed the progress on this agreement. The completed MOU will help to identify referral and service provision agreements as well as supported employment strategies and services to increase the successful competitive, integrated employment outcomes for the mutual customers of each system.  (Page 137) Title II

Who Are Our Customers- During Federal Fiscal Year 2017, NH Vocational Rehabilitation…
• Worked with 3,591 eligible clients
• Received 2,340 new applicants
Types of Disabilities
Mental Health 28%Cognitive 34%Blind or Visual Impairment 7%Deafness 2%Hard of Hearing 9%Physical Disability 18%Communicative 3% (page 157)
Goal 1---Quality competitive integrated employment outcomes for persons with disabilities in New HampshireStrategies and Activities:
• Restructure job placement and support activities, and the corresponding menu of services, to be in alignment with new performance accountabilities under WIOA.
- Require CRPs to complete ACRE training in order to meet minimum certification requirements
- Encourage CRPs to pursue and/or obtain CESP credential
- Support training to demonstrate and enhance competencies
• Coordinate with the systems for community mental health centers and community developmental disability organizations to increase the expectations for competitive integrated employment for individuals served under these programs.  (Page 168) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

In order to coordinate these activities at the community level, regular BRS team meetings that include appropriate NH Works staff and partners are conducted. These meeting allow discussion on employer needs, which can then be matched to individual needs of NH Works and partner agency customers thereby creating a more customer-centric workforce system. Support through the NH Works Professional Development Team provides for continued professional development opportunities for BRS staff across agencies to cross train, share information, and maximize resources. The US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship has two staff members assigned to New Hampshire. We have effectively woven the staff with representation at the State Board, Youth Council, Interagency Directors Group, Interagency Business Team and Shared Youth Vision to ensure inclusion of their programs. Furthermore, we have included pre-apprenticeship, work-based learning and Registered Apprenticeship within the partners’ job developers’ tool kit. Whenever an individual is placed (on-the-job training, work experience, or direct placement), the employer and participant is made aware of these programs and encouraged to participate. All of these efforts for coordination, alignment, and services are to ensure that the education and workforce systems increase opportunities for all individuals including individuals with disabilities and/or barriers to employment, on the local level. On the state level the Governor has charged the newly formed Office of Business and Economic Affairs to serve as the State's lead entity for coordinating business activities within the state. The BEA is working to attract new business and new talent to support New Hampshire's growing economy. As well as work with existing businesses from addressing skill shortages to working with employers to promote recovery friendly work environments to support the State's opioid recovery efforts. (Page 51-52) Title II

The Return to Work is one part of the Governor’s NH Working Initiative. The Return to Work initiative is an opportunity for a trainee to get their foot in the door and learn new skills and an opportunity for an employer to train without the accompanying costs. The training must be authorized through the Department of Employment Security prior to the beginning of the training. The training program may be up to six weeks, and a maximum of 24 hours per week per benefit year. Claimants are required to submit paper weekly claims for benefits timely and meet all other unemployment compensation eligibility requirements. Claimants will continue to receive their weekly unemployment compensation benefits during the training program. A Return to Work claimant trainee must be able and available to seek and accept work during this period. A non-claimant trainee is required to complete a weekly status form to NHES. The trainee is covered under a state provided Workers Compensation program. In addition, adult, dislocated worker, NEG, and youth may be enrolled in On-the-Job Training programs. The term “On-the-Job Training” (OJT) means training by an employer that is provided to a participant paid while engaged in productive work in a job that - a) Provides knowledge or skills essential to the full and adequate performance of the job; b) Provides reimbursement to the employer of up to 50% of the participant wage rate for the cost of providing the training and additional supervision related to the training; and c) Is limited in duration as appropriate to the occupation for which the participant is being trained, not exceeding 6 months, and taking into account the content of the training, the prior work experience of the participant, the skills gap between the participant’s education and experience level and the skills required for the job, and the service strategy of the participant, as appropriate. The Job Training fund funded with state unemployment insurance trust funds incumbent workers. Although no customized training programs currently exist, we may pursue this training strategy if circumstances warrant. (Page 83) Title I

New Hampshire makes extensive use of the Worker Profiling and Reemployment Service (WPRS) model for early identification of claimants who are likely to face long-term unemployment. NHES administers a statistical model, to identify qualified UI claimants who will enter the UI Profile Pool. Answers to certain questions during the initial claim process and their resulting score are used to identify potential claimants. On a weekly basis, Employment Service staff in the NH Works Centers specify a number of claimants to be randomly extracted from the pool in their respective service area. A weekly report is produced listing the claimants ranked by their profiling score and who received a first payment in the previous week. Claimants with the highest score in the pool are selected to attend an orientation and receive one-on-one assessment and reemployment services. (Page 100) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 58

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

NH Disability & Public Health Project - 01/01/2017

“The New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) is a collaboration between the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services and its Bona Fide Agent, the Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire. The overarching goal of the collaboration is to improve the health and quality of life of people with disabilities in NH by strengthening the capacity of the state’s public health programs and initiatives to include people with intellectual disabilities and mobility limitations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire ESEA Flexibility Approval - 06/26/2013

The New Hampshire Department of Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on June 26, 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order 2002-9 (Establishing a Governor's Task Force on Employment) - 12/04/2002

“An order establishing the Governor's Task Force on Employment and Economic Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

Vocational Rehab Jobs Will Be Cut in H.H. - 04/24/2018

“Concord — A New Hampshire agency that helps people with disabilities find jobs soon will be downsized, after education officials identified a looming shortfall within the group’s budget.

About 20 jobs will be cut from the state Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation in an attempt to stabilize finances for the organization, which provides job coaching and educational opportunities, and also pairs disabled people with employers in the Granite State, Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut announced last week.

Nonetheless, officials are working to continue many of those services, even with fewer staff, Edelblut said in a phone interview on Monday. They intend to partner with community organizations and area nonprofits to help fill the void, he said.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2018 New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Report - 01/01/2018

~~“Prevalence of Mobility and/or Cognitive Disabilities among NH Adults 18 and Older.

This report used pooled data from the 2013-2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). In the BRFSS, mobility and cognitive limitations are defined by two questions: 1. Do you have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs? (“Mobility”); and 2. Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, do you have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions? (“Cognitive”) BRFSS data is available on the CDC website via the Disability and Health Data System: https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/disabilityandhealth/dhds/index.html The NH Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) is funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cooperative agreement number 1NU27DD000007. DPH is a collaboration between the Institute on Disability at the University of New Hampshire and the NH Division of Public Health Services. The contents of this report are the responsibility of DPH staff and do not necessarily represent the views of the CDC or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Supported Employment - 01/01/2018

“Supported Employment (SE) is a well-defined approach to helping people with mental illnesses find and keep competitive employment within their communities.

SE programs are staffed by employment specialists who have frequent meetings with treatment providers to integrate supported employment with mental health services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

“Aid to the Permanently & Totally Disabled” - 01/01/2018

“Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled (APTD) is cash assistance for individuals who are between the ages of 18 and 64 and who are physically or mentally disabled.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Position Statement For New Hampshire’s Regional Service System

We believe that employment, with its powerful and irreplaceable opportunities for autonomy, earned income, self-esteem development, social contacts, structured  activity and life satisfaction, is an import ant ingredient of a fulfilling and valued life for adults in our society. We also recognize that the capacity of adults with any type or degree of developmental disability or acquired brain disorder to participate in employment, in the right setting and with the proper supports, has been amply demonstrated.   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Project Search - 12/17/2018

~~“Project Search is designed to provide an on campus intellectually challenging experience for academically motivated high school students. The program has been in operation since 1983 and currently serves over 200 students.

Project Search's mission is to provide a forum in a college campus setting where high school students from South Eastern New Hampshire and Southern Maine can experience a series of presentations covering challenging interdisciplinary topics and interact with each other in discussion groups. More information about Project Search may be found by accessing the weblink."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

PROJECT SEARCH SEACOAST NEW HAMPSHIRE - 10/18/2018

~~“Combining classroom instruction, career exploration, on-the-job training and support, Project SEARCH Seacoast NH helps students gain employment in the community by providing real-life work experience and teaching independent living skills. Classroom group lessons and meetings followed by internship rotations both take place at Portsmouth Regional Hospital. The goal for each student is competitive employment in the community at the end of the program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire WIOA Combined State Plan 2016-2020 - 03/15/2018

~~“Several vendors provide direct services for those with disabilities throughout the state. A close collaboration between VR, the state legislature, families, the governor’s commission, Developmental Disability Council, and other stakeholders resulted in the passing of State Bill 47 to eliminate subminimum wage for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire – a great success in closing the unemployment gap for this demographic.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

NH Disability & Public Health Project - 01/01/2017

“The New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) is a collaboration between the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services and its Bona Fide Agent, the Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire. The overarching goal of the collaboration is to improve the health and quality of life of people with disabilities in NH by strengthening the capacity of the state’s public health programs and initiatives to include people with intellectual disabilities and mobility limitations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Community Support Network - 06/15/1995

~~“CSNI is the association of the ten Area Agencies in New Hampshire providing services to individuals with developmental disabilities  and acquired brain disorders.  We achieve our mission through a variety of activities including advocacy, education, centralized operational supports to improve efficiency of the Area Agency system, and group purchasing.  At the heart of what we do is a core belief that the system of supports and services to individuals with developmental disabilities and acquired brain disorders functions best when all of its elements are working together.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Employment Community of Practice

The Mission of the NH Employment Community of Practice is to promote economic independence and high quality competitive employment opportunities for people withdisabilities through information sharing and the development and dissemination of best practices among all community partners.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire Governor's Commission on Disability

The Governor’s Commission on Disability provides information about the many services, laws, and regulations that affect citizens with disabilities.

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Institute on Disability/UCEDD - University of New Hampshire

“Trains students, self-advocates, families and professionals through coursework, seminars, workshops and conferences; Provides technical assistance to organizations and individuals to improve their capacity to include all citizens. Disseminates information to families, consumers, community members and professionals via books, monographs, articles, videos, newsletters, the internet and newspapers and consumer forums; engages in collaborative activities and

joint projects with organizations that share common goals. 

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011

‘In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI)”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Next Steps NH - 03/30/2020

“The Next Steps NH project provided professional development and coaching to selected New Hampshire high schools for the purpose of increasing the graduation rate of students with disabilities, and students at risk. This was done through implementing evidence-informed transition planning practices that helped students prepare for college, career, and adult life.

This website was part of the project and housed all tools and resources developed as part of the project. The website is now supported by the NH Department of Education and managed at Keene State College.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

NHWorks Employers - 03/06/2020

“Employers

If you’re an employer, you already know that there’s a lot more to hiring new employees than just finding the right candidate. If you browse within the Employer category, we not only present you with recruitment services, but we also provide information on employment and labor laws, hiring incentives, disability resources and other services and benefits. These services are provided at no cost to you.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations; small business owners; self-employed individuals; part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Consumers of behavioral health services, Comprehensive behavioral health centers, Substance Abuse Prevention providers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Agencies/people who serve pregnant women, Veteran’s service organizations, The disability community, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Hospitals, Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, Post-secondary Educational Institutions, Economic Development Authorities, and Chambers of Commerce.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH’s 13th Annual Transition Summit - 06/13/2019

~~“The New Hampshire Transition Community of Practice organizes the annual Transition Summit, the only statewide conference for training, collaboration, networking, and information focused exclusively on the transition to life after high school for students with disabilities.NH’s 13th Annual Transition SummitFriday, November 22, 20198:00 am – 3:30 pmGrappone Conference Center, Concord, NH ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

2018 Labor Law Training Seminar Offered - 02/26/2018

“The New Hampshire Department of Labor is offering a Labor Law training seminar on how to stay in compliance with NH Labor Laws. The seminar will be offered on 18 dates at a variety of locations throughout the state. These events are free and open to employers, businesses and the public. These seminars are made possible by the generosity of the businesses donating their establishment’s function room to host these events.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual

The New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual provides more in-depth information about the major programs affecting income and benefits for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire.  The Manual is divided into four sections:

1. New Hampshire Adult Assistance Programs

2. Social Security Disability Insurance

3. Supplemental Security Income

4. Medicare

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

WorkReadyNH

Work ReadyNH is a tuition-free workforce development program tailored to meet the needs of job seekers and career builders as well as provide training in the specific skills employers are seeking in their current and future employees.

 

The WorkReadyNH program provides assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. Graduates earn two nationally recognized credentials to add to their resume.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Southern New Hampshire Services Workplace Success Program

~~“The Workplace Success (WPS) Program is funded by the NH Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and represents  a collaboration between the Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies to enable TANF recipients to move from welfare to work. Workplace Success provides participants in the New Hampshire Employment Program (NHEP) with the skills, knowledge, experience, and support needed to obtain paid employment.The program prepares participants to enter the workforce by providing them a broad set of workforce development services starting with an in-depth vocational assessment process leading to a personal Career Plan.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workplace Success

~~“The Workplace Success (WPS) Program is funded by the NH Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and represents a collaboration between the Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies to enable TANF recipients to move from welfare to work. Workplace Success provides participants in the New Hampshire Employment Program (NHEP) with the skills, knowledge, experience, and support needed to obtain paid employment.

The program prepares participants to enter the workforce by providing them a broad set of workforce development services starting with an in-depth vocational assessment process leading to a personal Career Plan. “

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Five Year Plan (2008-2012)

• MIG funds were used during 2002 and 2003 to provide the 13 New Hampshire Employment Security One-Stops with equipment and resource materials (e.g., screen readers, audio “how to” tapes) to make them more accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, training was provided to the staff of One-Stops regarding use of the purchased equipment and resource materials. This initiative with the One-Stops also included staff trainings on disability awareness issues and creation of a resource guide called “Disability Etiquette.”

• MIG was instrumental in the development of towo tool kits. The first, a ready-to work toolkit is a curriculum on personal futures planning, resume writing, self-directed job searching techniques, employment interviewing skills, and negotiating workplace culture, politics, and related skills. It’s currently being used by the independent living center’s 6 peer groups. The second, an employer tool kit, was developed to provide information and guidance to employers regarding reasonable workplace accommodations, tax credits, where to get technical assistance, the ticket-to-work program, and the values and benefits of hiring people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Amanda D., et al. v. Hassan, et al. Settlement Fact Sheet

The United States Department of Justice, a coalition of private plaintiff organizations, and the State of New Hampshire, have entered into a comprehensive Settlement Agreement that will transform New Hampshire’s mental health system by significantly expanding and enhancing mental health service capacity in integrated community settings. The Agreement will enable a class of adults with serious mental illness to receive needed services in the community, which will foster their independence and enable them to participate more fully in community life. The expanded and enhanced community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at State mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (“NHH”) (the State’s only psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (a State-owned and -operated nursing facility for people with mental illness). The Agreement requires the State to expand and enhance community services over the next six years. …

For the first time, the State will deliver supported employment services in accordance with the Dartmouth evidence-based model. These services will help enable individuals to obtain and maintain paid, competitive employment in integrated community settings. Over the life of the Agreement, this provision will impact thousands of people.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program

“The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program assists low-income elderly or disabled individuals who are eligible for Medicare (available through the Social Security Administration) by paying for some or all of the associated costs of Medicare, specifically the Medicare Insurance Premiums and deductibles. The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program is also referred to as the Buy-In program….

The Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) program provides payment of Medicare Part A premiums for eligible working individuals with disabilities who are entitled to enroll in Medicare Part A, but who have lost Medicare Part A coverage due to earnings. Individuals eligible for QDWI may not otherwise be eligible for Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.01%
Change from
2017 to 2018
1,356,458
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.18%
Change from
2017 to 2018
90,754
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.24%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39,742
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.22%
Change from
2017 to 2018
43.79%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.98%
Change from
2017 to 2018
82.62%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 1,334,795 1,342,795 1,356,458
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 88,094 84,234 90,754
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 36,745 36,069 39,742
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 621,838 630,403 622,874
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.71% 42.82% 43.79%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.80% 83.43% 82.62%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.80% 2.70% 2.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 15.70% 15.30% 13.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 6.10% 6.50% 6.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 85,334 86,440 88,766
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 82,957 85,164 86,025
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 158,669 163,580 164,932
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,282 1,508 2,726
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 5,225 3,690 6,614
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A 555 1,387
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,403 1,733 1,147
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 4,781 3,620 3,586
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 603 530 900

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,605 1,659 1,700
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.50% 8.90% 9.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 48,091 47,738 47,128

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,500 4,600 5,625
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 15,256 8,125 10,792
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 22,208 14,395 16,875
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.30% 32.00% 33.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 19.70% 28.50% 30.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.70% 9.90% 10.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 84.60% 85.80% N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,364 3,375 3,789
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 808 1,171 1,282
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 10,150 10,148 N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,397 2,070 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 13 23
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 16
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 46.00% 70.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.53 0.45 1.20

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
1,774
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 97 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 354 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 291 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 564 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 269 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 199 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 35.40% 30.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,943 4,365 4,156
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 65,481 65,474 65,173
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 96 71 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 92 40 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $32,003,000 $37,894,000 $36,193,689
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $45,982,000 $43,996,000 $53,705,630
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 44.00% 45.00% 46.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,248 1,970 2,254
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 120.70 117.80 124.76

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 72.44% 71.71% 70.81%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.44% 8.79% 9.05%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.73% 2.88% 2.84%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 56.76% 56.90% 71.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 38.89% 29.48% 36.36%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.67% 62.31% 66.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.48% 80.22% 75.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 27.78% 32.83% 29.87%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0 0 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The NH Works branding and colocation of services has been very successful in blending resources so customers know if they have any workforce development need, NH Works is the place to go. Workforce activities that are conducted through the NH Works office, for both job-seeker and business customers. (Page 19- 20) Title I

NH BEA, NH Employment Security, and NH DOE will lead and utilize the workforce development system partnerships as described above to ensure all resources are leveraged for education participants in attaining their educational goals. Core and non-core program staff will utilize WIOA, TAA, Vocational Rehabilitation, Pell Grants, public and private grants, and other resources to assist participants in their education goals. Professional development, guided by the PDT, and accurate training program information, provided through the ETP Team, will ensure all program staff are up-to-date with the latest educational resources information (Page 53) Title I

The NH Youth Council is committed to coordinating existing resources and identifying new resources specific to achieving improved outcomes for out-of-school youth. Working with the NH Department of Education (e.g., ABE, CTE, VR and In-school Programs) to strengthen the connections for students who drop out of or leave school without the skills necessary to obtain suitable and sustainable employment, the Council will play a lead role in coordinating and leveraging resources. The work of the Youth Council will be further supported by the NH Works system of partner agencies, which include Job Corps, Youth Build (when an active grant is in place) and the various community based organizations focused on services to youth. Strategies to achieve improved outcomes will include some or all of the following: • Develop and identify clear and concise pathways to achieving individual education/employment goals. (Page 88) Title I
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Job seekers can access an array of services and activities including but not limited to: NH Works Center Services Career Services (Basic, Individual, and Follow-up); Determination of Eligibility; Assessments; Labor Exchange Information; Labor Market Information; Unemployment Insurance Information; FAFSA Assistance; Development of Individual Employment Plan; Group Counseling; Individual Counseling; Career Planning; Internships; Short-Term Per-Vocational Services (soft skills such as communication, punctuality, and personal maintenance skills); Workforce Preparation Activities (i.e., MS office, keyboarding, and Internet); Financial Literacy. (Pages 49 - 50) Title I.

School to Work Transition

~~The NH Youth Council is committed to coordinating existing resources and identifying new resources specific to achieving improved outcomes for out-of-school youth. Working with the NH Department of Education (e.g., ABE, CTE, VR and In-school Programs) to strengthen the connections for students who drop out of or leave school without the skills necessary to obtain suitable and sustainable employment, the Council will play a lead role in coordinating and leveraging resources. The work of the Youth Council will be further supported by the NH Works system of partner agencies, which include Job Corps, Youth Build (when an active grant is in place) and the various community based organizations focused on services to youth. Strategies to achieve improved outcomes will include some or all of the following: • Develop and identify clear and concise pathways to achieving individual education/employment goals. • Connect out-of-school youth with state developed sector training and/or job opportunities. • Encourage credential-granting training options. • Expand work-based learning and training opportunities that allow youth to explore employment options - e.g., Return to Work, OJT, Apprenticeship, Internship, Work experience (paid or unpaid), etc. • Increase co-enrollments in/across core programs to maximize available resources for the provision of comprehensive work and training supports i.e., full complement of wrap around services to support success. (Page 88) Title I

NHVR participates in the State’s transition initiatives in a variety of ways. NHVR counselors across the state are involved in the local and regional partnerships which were developed to implement the activities of grants available. Counselors advocate for the inclusion of students with disabilities and special education staff in the systemic changes occurring in the schools. NHVR understands the need for services to be identified and in place prior to a student leaving the school setting in order to assist the student with a smooth transition to post-school activities which may include postsecondary education, training, employment, and related vocational rehabilitation services which will lead to competitive integrated employment. To assure this planning, the Agency provides for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment while the student is in school and within 90 days of eligibility determination. Local relationships of the VR Counselors and Special Education staff provide opportunities for VR staff to attend the IEP team meetings and assist in the overall transition plan to allow the student to successfully transition to post-secondary education or employment. VR Counselors participate in transition planning activities and IEP meetings to assist in the development of the IPE.  (Pages 131-132) Title II

As mentioned above Business Relations staff work with students and adults with disabilities. The Transition Administrator and the Program Specialist are working closely together to implement individualized pre-employment transition services, including creating programs with multiple partner agencies to provide Work Based Learning opportunities for students.
The Agency has been working with employers and CRPs to develop opportunities for career exploration and work-based learning for students with disabilities. The Agency has focused on developing menu of services and supports to assure that pre-employment transition services are widely available in the state. (Page 136) Title II

o Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
o Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
o Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School-to- Work transition program.
o Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind. (Page 169) Title II

The overall goal of the SCSEP is to place participants in unsubsidized employment for the purpose of sustained self-sufficiency. We aim to achieve this goal through expanded engagement and partnerships with employers, identifying employment opportunities with established career ladders, placing individuals in high growth industries and occupations as well as other industries and occupations that provide substantial employment opportunities for participants, and retention activities once participants enter the workforce. SCSEP staff will work with its network of employers to identify and cultivate appropriate employment opportunities for participants, taking into account the needs of mature workers. Staff will pair the job-ready participants’ interests, employment goals and skills with the requirements of local employers specific to employment vacancies. Unsubsidized placement will be informed by the nature of local industry growth and availability of positions that meet individual criteria in terms of physical requirements, access to transportation, and social needs. Staff will help clients develop their IEP to prepare them for opportunities in high-growth fields such as healthcare, transportation, warehousing and logistics, hospitality and retail, and various customer-service opportunities. These opportunities will primarily be shaped by the participants’ IEP objectives and their expressed desires concerning their work environments. Staff will secure opportunities for participants to gain critical skills for in-demand industries through training with community service providers and other workforce partners. SCSEP staff realize the importance of fostering relationships with local employers. (Page 271) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~NHVR has many relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs that coordinate and collaborate to provide transition services to out-of-school youth. Connections to programs like Project SEARCH, apprenticeship and OJT are examples of these connected services for youth with disabilities. NHVR staff are also a part of national Community of Practice surrounding students and youth with disabilities. (Page 128) Title II

The Agency will continue to seek ways to identify and meet the needs of individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire including, where appropriate, provision of services to groups of individuals with disabilities through the establishment, development and improvement of collaboration with private vocational rehabilitation service providers including community rehabilitation programs. In an effort to standardize services in the field, all CRP’s will be required to complete ACRE training, prior to receiving referrals from NHVR, in order to meet the minimum requirements to work with people with disabilities. All CRP’s looking to receive Supported Employment referrals, are encouraged to pursue and/or obtain the Certified Employment Support Professional (CESP) credential, in order to demonstrate a sufficient level of knowledge and skill to provide integrated employment supports to a variety of people with disabilities. In addition, the CRP Management Liaison will review their resume and qualifications to ensure they have the knowledge, skills and abilities to work with our customers. Once a CRP is approved by the CRP Management Liaison, the CRP will be placed in NHVR’s “Customer Guide to Job Development Services” and scheduled to attend training on NHVR’s job placement and referral process. Additional OJT will be offered by VR counselors and Rehabilitation Technicians to ensure the CRP understands NHVR’s referral and invoice process. CRP’s are required to meet with the Regional Offices, at least once a year, to review progress being made with each of their customers. At this meeting, CRP’s will ensure their records match with those of the local Regional Office. In addition, they will review NHVR’s “Customer Guide to Job Development Services” to ensure we have their updated contact information and document any additional training. NHVR’s case management system, AWARE, has the capacity to evaluate vendor success rate and report card information that documents the number of referrals for individual services, referrals for job placement, and successful placement outcomes. (Page 134-135) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receives referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. The Bureau also provides refugee service programs. With approximately 500 local employers in refugee resettlement areas, ABE staff work closely with employers and develops programs in partnership to provide employees with on-site English literacy training. The Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) provides assistance to eligible persons with disabilities throughout the state to gain and retain employment outcomes through the provision of direct vocational rehabilitation services, as funded under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. VR is a joint State/Federal program that seeks to empower people to make informed choices, build viable careers, and live more independently in the community. To that end, VR supports the following programs and priorities: • Disability Determination Services • Independent Living • Rehabilitation Services • Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired • Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing • Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. (Page 21) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~There was strong support in the CSNA results to support the services the agency provides to individuals with the most significant disabilities that require on-the-job and other supports to maintain employment through the supplemental Supported Employment Services program. Through informed choice and partnership with the NHVR program, individuals with disabilities are able to maximize their potential and reach their goals of employment within their local communities. Results also demonstrated the need to continue to support and provide services to individuals who experienced the most significant disabilities, including the need for supported employment services. Examples of responses received include the continued need for services in the areas of: transportation, benefits counseling assistance, agency should improve counselors’ knowledge and awareness in the areas of accommodations including rehabilitation technology, continuing education for counselors on disability areas and the continuing research and developments in rehabilitation, better relations with businesses and employers, expanded options for customized and creative solutions for employment, Ticket to Work and expanded options for individuals, continue to build relationships with Mental Health Centers and Area Agencies. (Page 147-148) Title II

NH Vocational Rehabilitation ensures that Counselors are aware of how an individual's cognitive disability might affect his or her ability to participate in the vocational rehabilitation process and the need to provide supports and accommodations to these individuals in the process.• Working with the Bureau of Behavioral Health toward strategies and practices to improve supported employment outcomes.• Exploring long-term funding options such as Partnership Plus, for individuals who need extended supports. (Page 178) Title II
 

Employer/ Business

~~VR continues working with Project RENEW, to bring their person-centered planning approach to VR in our work with students with mental health and emotional and behavioral challenges. The Agency continues to seek ways in which to better serve our customer population with Autism. In 2016 NHVR brought “Autism Employment Advisors” to NH. This program, Employer Connect, seeks to educate business partners on how to work with and manage individuals on the autism spectrum. It also seeks to prepare the students, recently graduated from college, with real interview opportunities with some of NH’s best technology and sector-based companies.
Goal 4---Promote an environment that supports the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor - Customer relationship (Page 180) Title I
 

Data Collection

New Hampshire manages customer data collection and reporting for WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs through the State Board administered e—TEAMS case management and reporting system. All entities that receive WIOA funds are mandated to use this system consistent with service delivery contractual agreements. The ELMIB has been designated the Performance Accountability and Customer Information Agency (PACIA) by the Governor of New Hampshire and as such performs the necessary performance analysis and reporting functions under WIOA under contract with the Office of Workforce Opportunity. ELMIB generates the performance related items that must be submitted to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) as part of the WIOA Quarterly Summaries and Annual Report. (Page 57) Title I

NH Vocational Rehabilitation strives to meet all negotiated performance accountability measures. Goal: NHVR will achieve or exceed the established and negotiated common performance measures once identified through the appropriate approval process. This first two years of this plan have been a baseline measurement. (Page 175) Title II

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security; Vocational Rehabilitation; Community Action Agency; Older Worker Program; and Granite State Independent Living ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co—located, a close relationship and co—enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One—stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English—speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. The State will continue to support enhanced services to those with significant barriers to employment through a variety of new and ongoing strategies. Accessibility and quality of service provision will continue to be evaluated affecting greater access to employment opportunities for people with disabilities and will continue to be addressed through the collaborative partnership established through the Governor’s Task Force on People with Disabilities, which is directly linked to One—Stop center activities, and continuous improvement strategies that include staff development and adopting new approaches to service delivery will be planned for and implemented to achieve improved services and outcomes. As referenced earlier, all partners provide employment and training services in response to the needs of individuals with disabilities. One of the NH Works Partners, NH Department of Education, Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation focuses on individuals with significant disabilities. They are co—located at each of the twelve NH Works offices. VR has productive relationships with all of the NH Works partners. Together they assist those mutual customers with disabilities in obtaining necessary services to improve their ability to obtain and maintain employment. (Page 72) Title I

Vets

The State Veteran Services plan defines the veteran priority of service for Wagner-Peyser pursuant to the Jobs for Veterans Act. In the local One-Stop Career Centers veterans receive priority of service from all partner staff. Priority is given to veterans for all new job listings posted on the NHWorks Job Match System by placing new job orders on a twenty-four hour veteran hold during which time the job order is only viewable by staff for the referral of veterans, and on-line the job order can only be viewed by registrants that are identified as veterans. The DVOP specialists and the LVER staff work in daily collaboration with one-stop delivery system partner staff to promote employment, training, placement and other opportunities for veterans. (Page 71) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. (Page 239) Title IV

Twelve New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) offices have been designated American Job Centers called NHWORKS. As identified on the JVSG Staffing Directory (VETS-501), the four full-time and seven part-time DVOP grant-funded positions, and the two full-time and two part-time LVER grant-funded positions are being assigned to American Job Centers (local offices) throughout the State. This planned deployment allows New Hampshire to have a DVOP specialist assigned to eleven of our twelve American Job Centers to provide the delivery of intensive services to targeted veterans. (Page 239) Title IV

Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; • Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and • Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. The LVER’s second primary function is to facilitate employment, training and placement services provided to veterans within the NHWORKS system via capacity building to ensure easier access to the appropriate employment and training services for eligible job-seeking veterans and eligible persons. The LVER, as an integral member of the NHES Business Services Team, will work with the staff to coordinate outreach activities to solicit job orders and promote the hiring of veterans. The LVER staff is responsible for maintaining contact with Federal Contractors and is also involved in the planning and participation in job fairs. Until further guidance is disseminated by USDOL VETS, LVER outreach efforts and other LVER staff activities are monitored locally by NHES managers and the DVET to assure compliance with statutory duties as described in VPL 03-14. (Page 240-241) Tittle IV

The DVOP specialists and the LVER staff work in daily collaboration with New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) staff, WIOA, State Vocational Rehabilitation, and other AJC partners to promote employment, training, placement and other opportunities for veterans. Intra-staff collaboration is also enforced via program updates shared among partners during regularly scheduled staff meetings. In many local offices “5 minute stand up” meetings are held each morning as a daily briefing of the events of the day. During this briefing, all AJC staff share information on new job orders received, employer information received by staff during outreach, training opportunities, and any positive recruitment taking place in the American Job Center. The DVOP specialist position assigned to the Manchester AJC is also assigned the responsibility of Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC). As agreed upon by the DVET, the State Agency and the VA, the ISC spends up to one day per week out-stationed at the VAVR&E office. The DVOP specialists throughout the State work with the VAVR&E program to assist qualified veterans seeking training. VAVR&E, in turn, refer veterans who are completing training programs to the DVOP specialists for job placement assistance. Through an agreement with the NH State Office of Veterans Services, representatives from their agency visit the NHES offices throughout the state at least twice a month to assist veterans with problems or questions regarding Federal or State benefits. The State has three HVRP Grantee, Harbor Homes, Veterans, Inc., and Easter Seals. The DVOP specialists in the Hillsborough County area do outreach on-site and participate in Stand Down activity by Harbor Homes. Representatives from Veterans, Inc. and Easter Seals periodically vist local offices as an additional means of outreach to homeless veterans. Many of the JVSG funded staff are members of Veterans’ Service Organizations (VSOs) in their community or have established working relationships with these groups. NHES is a member of the State Apprenticeship Advisory Council and works closely with the Federal apprenticeship representatives. DVOP staff will continue to conduct outreach to local Veterans’ Service Organizations (VSOs), homeless shelters, VA Medical Centers and Vet Centers, food pantries, correctional institutions and halfway houses in their labor market area to reach out to veterans and inform them of the services available through the American Job Centers. (Page 241) Title IV

One of the LVER’s principal duties is to conduct outreach to employers, employer associations, and business groups to promote the advantages of hiring veterans, to assist veterans in gaining employment, and to develop relationships, jobs, training, or job training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons. To accomplish this, LVERs will participate in appropriate activities such as: Planning and participating in job and career fairs; Conducting employer outreach; Conducting seminars for employers; In conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups; Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. (Page 245) Title IV

Mental Health

~~The process to determine the need for new, improved or expanded programs will be accomplished through: public forums in six regions to include customers of Vocational Rehabilitation, Vocational Rehabilitation staff, community rehabilitation programs staff, developmental services area agency staff, mental health center staff, and the general public. (Page 133) Title II

A revised Memorandum of Agreement with the Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health was planned for 2016, however due to staffing and coordination issues with the Department of Health and Human Services, this activity is still in progress. As mentioned previously we expect completion of this MOU in mid to late 2018.Individuals with the most significant disabilities to be served under this program will likely have developmental disabilities, acquired brain disorders and/or mental health diagnoses, since these are the groups for which funding is available for long-term support after Vocational Rehabilitation services are completed. (Pages 134-135) Title II

The State Medicaid plan under title XIX of the Social Security Act; The agency will seek to develop and enact a Memorandum of Understanding with this entity during the calendar year 2018 including all partners (mental health, developmental services, adult and elderly services, substance abuse, Division of Children and Youth Services and other Health and Human Services programs) that can assist in providing services for mutual customers. The discussion and process for order of selection will be critical so individuals know how and when they will be served based on their assigned category. (Page 137) Title II

The State agency responsible for providing mental health services: As identified above, the Agency has been working with the Bureau of Behavioral health toward developing a Memorandum of Understanding. The target is to finalize this work in 2018 with the completion of an MOU with the Department of Health and Human Services in 2018. That Department has experienced significant reorganization and staffing changes over the last two years which has slowed the progress on this agreement. The completed MOU will help to identify referral and service provision agreements as well as supported employment strategies and services to increase the successful competitive, integrated employment outcomes for the mutual customers of each system.  (Page 137) Title II

Who Are Our Customers- During Federal Fiscal Year 2017, NH Vocational Rehabilitation…
• Worked with 3,591 eligible clients
• Received 2,340 new applicants
Types of Disabilities
Mental Health 28%Cognitive 34%Blind or Visual Impairment 7%Deafness 2%Hard of Hearing 9%Physical Disability 18%Communicative 3% (page 157)
Goal 1---Quality competitive integrated employment outcomes for persons with disabilities in New HampshireStrategies and Activities:
• Restructure job placement and support activities, and the corresponding menu of services, to be in alignment with new performance accountabilities under WIOA.
- Require CRPs to complete ACRE training in order to meet minimum certification requirements
- Encourage CRPs to pursue and/or obtain CESP credential
- Support training to demonstrate and enhance competencies
• Coordinate with the systems for community mental health centers and community developmental disability organizations to increase the expectations for competitive integrated employment for individuals served under these programs.  (Page 168) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

In order to coordinate these activities at the community level, regular BRS team meetings that include appropriate NH Works staff and partners are conducted. These meeting allow discussion on employer needs, which can then be matched to individual needs of NH Works and partner agency customers thereby creating a more customer-centric workforce system. Support through the NH Works Professional Development Team provides for continued professional development opportunities for BRS staff across agencies to cross train, share information, and maximize resources. The US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship has two staff members assigned to New Hampshire. We have effectively woven the staff with representation at the State Board, Youth Council, Interagency Directors Group, Interagency Business Team and Shared Youth Vision to ensure inclusion of their programs. Furthermore, we have included pre-apprenticeship, work-based learning and Registered Apprenticeship within the partners’ job developers’ tool kit. Whenever an individual is placed (on-the-job training, work experience, or direct placement), the employer and participant is made aware of these programs and encouraged to participate. All of these efforts for coordination, alignment, and services are to ensure that the education and workforce systems increase opportunities for all individuals including individuals with disabilities and/or barriers to employment, on the local level. On the state level the Governor has charged the newly formed Office of Business and Economic Affairs to serve as the State's lead entity for coordinating business activities within the state. The BEA is working to attract new business and new talent to support New Hampshire's growing economy. As well as work with existing businesses from addressing skill shortages to working with employers to promote recovery friendly work environments to support the State's opioid recovery efforts. (Page 51-52) Title II

The Return to Work is one part of the Governor’s NH Working Initiative. The Return to Work initiative is an opportunity for a trainee to get their foot in the door and learn new skills and an opportunity for an employer to train without the accompanying costs. The training must be authorized through the Department of Employment Security prior to the beginning of the training. The training program may be up to six weeks, and a maximum of 24 hours per week per benefit year. Claimants are required to submit paper weekly claims for benefits timely and meet all other unemployment compensation eligibility requirements. Claimants will continue to receive their weekly unemployment compensation benefits during the training program. A Return to Work claimant trainee must be able and available to seek and accept work during this period. A non-claimant trainee is required to complete a weekly status form to NHES. The trainee is covered under a state provided Workers Compensation program. In addition, adult, dislocated worker, NEG, and youth may be enrolled in On-the-Job Training programs. The term “On-the-Job Training” (OJT) means training by an employer that is provided to a participant paid while engaged in productive work in a job that - a) Provides knowledge or skills essential to the full and adequate performance of the job; b) Provides reimbursement to the employer of up to 50% of the participant wage rate for the cost of providing the training and additional supervision related to the training; and c) Is limited in duration as appropriate to the occupation for which the participant is being trained, not exceeding 6 months, and taking into account the content of the training, the prior work experience of the participant, the skills gap between the participant’s education and experience level and the skills required for the job, and the service strategy of the participant, as appropriate. The Job Training fund funded with state unemployment insurance trust funds incumbent workers. Although no customized training programs currently exist, we may pursue this training strategy if circumstances warrant. (Page 83) Title I

New Hampshire makes extensive use of the Worker Profiling and Reemployment Service (WPRS) model for early identification of claimants who are likely to face long-term unemployment. NHES administers a statistical model, to identify qualified UI claimants who will enter the UI Profile Pool. Answers to certain questions during the initial claim process and their resulting score are used to identify potential claimants. On a weekly basis, Employment Service staff in the NH Works Centers specify a number of claimants to be randomly extracted from the pool in their respective service area. A weekly report is produced listing the claimants ranked by their profiling score and who received a first payment in the previous week. Claimants with the highest score in the pool are selected to attend an orientation and receive one-on-one assessment and reemployment services. (Page 100) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 58

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

NH Disability & Public Health Project - 01/01/2017

“The New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) is a collaboration between the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services and its Bona Fide Agent, the Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire. The overarching goal of the collaboration is to improve the health and quality of life of people with disabilities in NH by strengthening the capacity of the state’s public health programs and initiatives to include people with intellectual disabilities and mobility limitations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire ESEA Flexibility Approval - 06/26/2013

The New Hampshire Department of Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on June 26, 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order 2002-9 (Establishing a Governor's Task Force on Employment) - 12/04/2002

“An order establishing the Governor's Task Force on Employment and Economic Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

Vocational Rehab Jobs Will Be Cut in H.H. - 04/24/2018

“Concord — A New Hampshire agency that helps people with disabilities find jobs soon will be downsized, after education officials identified a looming shortfall within the group’s budget.

About 20 jobs will be cut from the state Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation in an attempt to stabilize finances for the organization, which provides job coaching and educational opportunities, and also pairs disabled people with employers in the Granite State, Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut announced last week.

Nonetheless, officials are working to continue many of those services, even with fewer staff, Edelblut said in a phone interview on Monday. They intend to partner with community organizations and area nonprofits to help fill the void, he said.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2018 New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Report - 01/01/2018

~~“Prevalence of Mobility and/or Cognitive Disabilities among NH Adults 18 and Older.

This report used pooled data from the 2013-2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). In the BRFSS, mobility and cognitive limitations are defined by two questions: 1. Do you have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs? (“Mobility”); and 2. Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, do you have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions? (“Cognitive”) BRFSS data is available on the CDC website via the Disability and Health Data System: https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/disabilityandhealth/dhds/index.html The NH Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) is funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cooperative agreement number 1NU27DD000007. DPH is a collaboration between the Institute on Disability at the University of New Hampshire and the NH Division of Public Health Services. The contents of this report are the responsibility of DPH staff and do not necessarily represent the views of the CDC or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Supported Employment - 01/01/2018

“Supported Employment (SE) is a well-defined approach to helping people with mental illnesses find and keep competitive employment within their communities.

SE programs are staffed by employment specialists who have frequent meetings with treatment providers to integrate supported employment with mental health services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

“Aid to the Permanently & Totally Disabled” - 01/01/2018

“Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled (APTD) is cash assistance for individuals who are between the ages of 18 and 64 and who are physically or mentally disabled.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Position Statement For New Hampshire’s Regional Service System

We believe that employment, with its powerful and irreplaceable opportunities for autonomy, earned income, self-esteem development, social contacts, structured  activity and life satisfaction, is an import ant ingredient of a fulfilling and valued life for adults in our society. We also recognize that the capacity of adults with any type or degree of developmental disability or acquired brain disorder to participate in employment, in the right setting and with the proper supports, has been amply demonstrated.   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Project Search - 12/17/2018

~~“Project Search is designed to provide an on campus intellectually challenging experience for academically motivated high school students. The program has been in operation since 1983 and currently serves over 200 students.

Project Search's mission is to provide a forum in a college campus setting where high school students from South Eastern New Hampshire and Southern Maine can experience a series of presentations covering challenging interdisciplinary topics and interact with each other in discussion groups. More information about Project Search may be found by accessing the weblink."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

PROJECT SEARCH SEACOAST NEW HAMPSHIRE - 10/18/2018

~~“Combining classroom instruction, career exploration, on-the-job training and support, Project SEARCH Seacoast NH helps students gain employment in the community by providing real-life work experience and teaching independent living skills. Classroom group lessons and meetings followed by internship rotations both take place at Portsmouth Regional Hospital. The goal for each student is competitive employment in the community at the end of the program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire WIOA Combined State Plan 2016-2020 - 03/15/2018

~~“Several vendors provide direct services for those with disabilities throughout the state. A close collaboration between VR, the state legislature, families, the governor’s commission, Developmental Disability Council, and other stakeholders resulted in the passing of State Bill 47 to eliminate subminimum wage for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire – a great success in closing the unemployment gap for this demographic.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

NH Disability & Public Health Project - 01/01/2017

“The New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) is a collaboration between the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services and its Bona Fide Agent, the Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire. The overarching goal of the collaboration is to improve the health and quality of life of people with disabilities in NH by strengthening the capacity of the state’s public health programs and initiatives to include people with intellectual disabilities and mobility limitations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Community Support Network - 06/15/1995

~~“CSNI is the association of the ten Area Agencies in New Hampshire providing services to individuals with developmental disabilities  and acquired brain disorders.  We achieve our mission through a variety of activities including advocacy, education, centralized operational supports to improve efficiency of the Area Agency system, and group purchasing.  At the heart of what we do is a core belief that the system of supports and services to individuals with developmental disabilities and acquired brain disorders functions best when all of its elements are working together.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Employment Community of Practice

The Mission of the NH Employment Community of Practice is to promote economic independence and high quality competitive employment opportunities for people withdisabilities through information sharing and the development and dissemination of best practices among all community partners.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire Governor's Commission on Disability

The Governor’s Commission on Disability provides information about the many services, laws, and regulations that affect citizens with disabilities.

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Institute on Disability/UCEDD - University of New Hampshire

“Trains students, self-advocates, families and professionals through coursework, seminars, workshops and conferences; Provides technical assistance to organizations and individuals to improve their capacity to include all citizens. Disseminates information to families, consumers, community members and professionals via books, monographs, articles, videos, newsletters, the internet and newspapers and consumer forums; engages in collaborative activities and

joint projects with organizations that share common goals. 

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011

‘In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI)”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Next Steps NH - 03/30/2020

“The Next Steps NH project provided professional development and coaching to selected New Hampshire high schools for the purpose of increasing the graduation rate of students with disabilities, and students at risk. This was done through implementing evidence-informed transition planning practices that helped students prepare for college, career, and adult life.

This website was part of the project and housed all tools and resources developed as part of the project. The website is now supported by the NH Department of Education and managed at Keene State College.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

NHWorks Employers - 03/06/2020

“Employers

If you’re an employer, you already know that there’s a lot more to hiring new employees than just finding the right candidate. If you browse within the Employer category, we not only present you with recruitment services, but we also provide information on employment and labor laws, hiring incentives, disability resources and other services and benefits. These services are provided at no cost to you.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations; small business owners; self-employed individuals; part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Consumers of behavioral health services, Comprehensive behavioral health centers, Substance Abuse Prevention providers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Agencies/people who serve pregnant women, Veteran’s service organizations, The disability community, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Hospitals, Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, Post-secondary Educational Institutions, Economic Development Authorities, and Chambers of Commerce.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH’s 13th Annual Transition Summit - 06/13/2019

~~“The New Hampshire Transition Community of Practice organizes the annual Transition Summit, the only statewide conference for training, collaboration, networking, and information focused exclusively on the transition to life after high school for students with disabilities.NH’s 13th Annual Transition SummitFriday, November 22, 20198:00 am – 3:30 pmGrappone Conference Center, Concord, NH ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

2018 Labor Law Training Seminar Offered - 02/26/2018

“The New Hampshire Department of Labor is offering a Labor Law training seminar on how to stay in compliance with NH Labor Laws. The seminar will be offered on 18 dates at a variety of locations throughout the state. These events are free and open to employers, businesses and the public. These seminars are made possible by the generosity of the businesses donating their establishment’s function room to host these events.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual

The New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual provides more in-depth information about the major programs affecting income and benefits for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire.  The Manual is divided into four sections:

1. New Hampshire Adult Assistance Programs

2. Social Security Disability Insurance

3. Supplemental Security Income

4. Medicare

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

WorkReadyNH

Work ReadyNH is a tuition-free workforce development program tailored to meet the needs of job seekers and career builders as well as provide training in the specific skills employers are seeking in their current and future employees.

 

The WorkReadyNH program provides assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. Graduates earn two nationally recognized credentials to add to their resume.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Southern New Hampshire Services Workplace Success Program

~~“The Workplace Success (WPS) Program is funded by the NH Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and represents  a collaboration between the Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies to enable TANF recipients to move from welfare to work. Workplace Success provides participants in the New Hampshire Employment Program (NHEP) with the skills, knowledge, experience, and support needed to obtain paid employment.The program prepares participants to enter the workforce by providing them a broad set of workforce development services starting with an in-depth vocational assessment process leading to a personal Career Plan.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workplace Success

~~“The Workplace Success (WPS) Program is funded by the NH Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and represents a collaboration between the Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies to enable TANF recipients to move from welfare to work. Workplace Success provides participants in the New Hampshire Employment Program (NHEP) with the skills, knowledge, experience, and support needed to obtain paid employment.

The program prepares participants to enter the workforce by providing them a broad set of workforce development services starting with an in-depth vocational assessment process leading to a personal Career Plan. “

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Five Year Plan (2008-2012)

• MIG funds were used during 2002 and 2003 to provide the 13 New Hampshire Employment Security One-Stops with equipment and resource materials (e.g., screen readers, audio “how to” tapes) to make them more accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, training was provided to the staff of One-Stops regarding use of the purchased equipment and resource materials. This initiative with the One-Stops also included staff trainings on disability awareness issues and creation of a resource guide called “Disability Etiquette.”

• MIG was instrumental in the development of towo tool kits. The first, a ready-to work toolkit is a curriculum on personal futures planning, resume writing, self-directed job searching techniques, employment interviewing skills, and negotiating workplace culture, politics, and related skills. It’s currently being used by the independent living center’s 6 peer groups. The second, an employer tool kit, was developed to provide information and guidance to employers regarding reasonable workplace accommodations, tax credits, where to get technical assistance, the ticket-to-work program, and the values and benefits of hiring people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Amanda D., et al. v. Hassan, et al. Settlement Fact Sheet

The United States Department of Justice, a coalition of private plaintiff organizations, and the State of New Hampshire, have entered into a comprehensive Settlement Agreement that will transform New Hampshire’s mental health system by significantly expanding and enhancing mental health service capacity in integrated community settings. The Agreement will enable a class of adults with serious mental illness to receive needed services in the community, which will foster their independence and enable them to participate more fully in community life. The expanded and enhanced community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at State mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (“NHH”) (the State’s only psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (a State-owned and -operated nursing facility for people with mental illness). The Agreement requires the State to expand and enhance community services over the next six years. …

For the first time, the State will deliver supported employment services in accordance with the Dartmouth evidence-based model. These services will help enable individuals to obtain and maintain paid, competitive employment in integrated community settings. Over the life of the Agreement, this provision will impact thousands of people.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program

“The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program assists low-income elderly or disabled individuals who are eligible for Medicare (available through the Social Security Administration) by paying for some or all of the associated costs of Medicare, specifically the Medicare Insurance Premiums and deductibles. The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program is also referred to as the Buy-In program….

The Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) program provides payment of Medicare Part A premiums for eligible working individuals with disabilities who are entitled to enroll in Medicare Part A, but who have lost Medicare Part A coverage due to earnings. Individuals eligible for QDWI may not otherwise be eligible for Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.01%
Change from
2017 to 2018
1,356,458
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.18%
Change from
2017 to 2018
90,754
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.24%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39,742
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.22%
Change from
2017 to 2018
43.79%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.98%
Change from
2017 to 2018
82.62%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 1,356,458
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 90,754
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 39,742
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 622,874
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 43.79%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.62%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 13.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 6.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 88,766
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 86,025
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 164,932
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 2,726
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 6,614
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 1,387
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,147
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 3,586
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 900

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,700
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 9.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 47,128

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,625
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 10,792
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 16,875
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 33.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 30.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 10.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,789
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,282
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 23
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 16
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 70.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.20

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,156
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 65,173
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $36,193,689
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $53,705,630
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 46.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,254
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 124.76

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 70.81%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.05%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.84%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 71.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.36%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 75.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.87%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The NH Works branding and colocation of services has been very successful in blending resources so customers know if they have any workforce development need, NH Works is the place to go. Workforce activities that are conducted through the NH Works office, for both job-seeker and business customers. (Page 19- 20) Title I

NH BEA, NH Employment Security, and NH DOE will lead and utilize the workforce development system partnerships as described above to ensure all resources are leveraged for education participants in attaining their educational goals. Core and non-core program staff will utilize WIOA, TAA, Vocational Rehabilitation, Pell Grants, public and private grants, and other resources to assist participants in their education goals. Professional development, guided by the PDT, and accurate training program information, provided through the ETP Team, will ensure all program staff are up-to-date with the latest educational resources information (Page 53) Title I

The NH Youth Council is committed to coordinating existing resources and identifying new resources specific to achieving improved outcomes for out-of-school youth. Working with the NH Department of Education (e.g., ABE, CTE, VR and In-school Programs) to strengthen the connections for students who drop out of or leave school without the skills necessary to obtain suitable and sustainable employment, the Council will play a lead role in coordinating and leveraging resources. The work of the Youth Council will be further supported by the NH Works system of partner agencies, which include Job Corps, Youth Build (when an active grant is in place) and the various community based organizations focused on services to youth. Strategies to achieve improved outcomes will include some or all of the following: • Develop and identify clear and concise pathways to achieving individual education/employment goals. (Page 88) Title I
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Job seekers can access an array of services and activities including but not limited to: NH Works Center Services Career Services (Basic, Individual, and Follow-up); Determination of Eligibility; Assessments; Labor Exchange Information; Labor Market Information; Unemployment Insurance Information; FAFSA Assistance; Development of Individual Employment Plan; Group Counseling; Individual Counseling; Career Planning; Internships; Short-Term Per-Vocational Services (soft skills such as communication, punctuality, and personal maintenance skills); Workforce Preparation Activities (i.e., MS office, keyboarding, and Internet); Financial Literacy. (Pages 49 - 50) Title I.

School to Work Transition

~~The NH Youth Council is committed to coordinating existing resources and identifying new resources specific to achieving improved outcomes for out-of-school youth. Working with the NH Department of Education (e.g., ABE, CTE, VR and In-school Programs) to strengthen the connections for students who drop out of or leave school without the skills necessary to obtain suitable and sustainable employment, the Council will play a lead role in coordinating and leveraging resources. The work of the Youth Council will be further supported by the NH Works system of partner agencies, which include Job Corps, Youth Build (when an active grant is in place) and the various community based organizations focused on services to youth. Strategies to achieve improved outcomes will include some or all of the following: • Develop and identify clear and concise pathways to achieving individual education/employment goals. • Connect out-of-school youth with state developed sector training and/or job opportunities. • Encourage credential-granting training options. • Expand work-based learning and training opportunities that allow youth to explore employment options - e.g., Return to Work, OJT, Apprenticeship, Internship, Work experience (paid or unpaid), etc. • Increase co-enrollments in/across core programs to maximize available resources for the provision of comprehensive work and training supports i.e., full complement of wrap around services to support success. (Page 88) Title I

NHVR participates in the State’s transition initiatives in a variety of ways. NHVR counselors across the state are involved in the local and regional partnerships which were developed to implement the activities of grants available. Counselors advocate for the inclusion of students with disabilities and special education staff in the systemic changes occurring in the schools. NHVR understands the need for services to be identified and in place prior to a student leaving the school setting in order to assist the student with a smooth transition to post-school activities which may include postsecondary education, training, employment, and related vocational rehabilitation services which will lead to competitive integrated employment. To assure this planning, the Agency provides for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment while the student is in school and within 90 days of eligibility determination. Local relationships of the VR Counselors and Special Education staff provide opportunities for VR staff to attend the IEP team meetings and assist in the overall transition plan to allow the student to successfully transition to post-secondary education or employment. VR Counselors participate in transition planning activities and IEP meetings to assist in the development of the IPE.  (Pages 131-132) Title II

As mentioned above Business Relations staff work with students and adults with disabilities. The Transition Administrator and the Program Specialist are working closely together to implement individualized pre-employment transition services, including creating programs with multiple partner agencies to provide Work Based Learning opportunities for students.
The Agency has been working with employers and CRPs to develop opportunities for career exploration and work-based learning for students with disabilities. The Agency has focused on developing menu of services and supports to assure that pre-employment transition services are widely available in the state. (Page 136) Title II

o Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
o Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
o Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School-to- Work transition program.
o Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind. (Page 169) Title II

The overall goal of the SCSEP is to place participants in unsubsidized employment for the purpose of sustained self-sufficiency. We aim to achieve this goal through expanded engagement and partnerships with employers, identifying employment opportunities with established career ladders, placing individuals in high growth industries and occupations as well as other industries and occupations that provide substantial employment opportunities for participants, and retention activities once participants enter the workforce. SCSEP staff will work with its network of employers to identify and cultivate appropriate employment opportunities for participants, taking into account the needs of mature workers. Staff will pair the job-ready participants’ interests, employment goals and skills with the requirements of local employers specific to employment vacancies. Unsubsidized placement will be informed by the nature of local industry growth and availability of positions that meet individual criteria in terms of physical requirements, access to transportation, and social needs. Staff will help clients develop their IEP to prepare them for opportunities in high-growth fields such as healthcare, transportation, warehousing and logistics, hospitality and retail, and various customer-service opportunities. These opportunities will primarily be shaped by the participants’ IEP objectives and their expressed desires concerning their work environments. Staff will secure opportunities for participants to gain critical skills for in-demand industries through training with community service providers and other workforce partners. SCSEP staff realize the importance of fostering relationships with local employers. (Page 271) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~NHVR has many relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs that coordinate and collaborate to provide transition services to out-of-school youth. Connections to programs like Project SEARCH, apprenticeship and OJT are examples of these connected services for youth with disabilities. NHVR staff are also a part of national Community of Practice surrounding students and youth with disabilities. (Page 128) Title II

The Agency will continue to seek ways to identify and meet the needs of individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire including, where appropriate, provision of services to groups of individuals with disabilities through the establishment, development and improvement of collaboration with private vocational rehabilitation service providers including community rehabilitation programs. In an effort to standardize services in the field, all CRP’s will be required to complete ACRE training, prior to receiving referrals from NHVR, in order to meet the minimum requirements to work with people with disabilities. All CRP’s looking to receive Supported Employment referrals, are encouraged to pursue and/or obtain the Certified Employment Support Professional (CESP) credential, in order to demonstrate a sufficient level of knowledge and skill to provide integrated employment supports to a variety of people with disabilities. In addition, the CRP Management Liaison will review their resume and qualifications to ensure they have the knowledge, skills and abilities to work with our customers. Once a CRP is approved by the CRP Management Liaison, the CRP will be placed in NHVR’s “Customer Guide to Job Development Services” and scheduled to attend training on NHVR’s job placement and referral process. Additional OJT will be offered by VR counselors and Rehabilitation Technicians to ensure the CRP understands NHVR’s referral and invoice process. CRP’s are required to meet with the Regional Offices, at least once a year, to review progress being made with each of their customers. At this meeting, CRP’s will ensure their records match with those of the local Regional Office. In addition, they will review NHVR’s “Customer Guide to Job Development Services” to ensure we have their updated contact information and document any additional training. NHVR’s case management system, AWARE, has the capacity to evaluate vendor success rate and report card information that documents the number of referrals for individual services, referrals for job placement, and successful placement outcomes. (Page 134-135) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receives referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. The Bureau also provides refugee service programs. With approximately 500 local employers in refugee resettlement areas, ABE staff work closely with employers and develops programs in partnership to provide employees with on-site English literacy training. The Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) provides assistance to eligible persons with disabilities throughout the state to gain and retain employment outcomes through the provision of direct vocational rehabilitation services, as funded under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. VR is a joint State/Federal program that seeks to empower people to make informed choices, build viable careers, and live more independently in the community. To that end, VR supports the following programs and priorities: • Disability Determination Services • Independent Living • Rehabilitation Services • Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired • Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing • Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. (Page 21) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~There was strong support in the CSNA results to support the services the agency provides to individuals with the most significant disabilities that require on-the-job and other supports to maintain employment through the supplemental Supported Employment Services program. Through informed choice and partnership with the NHVR program, individuals with disabilities are able to maximize their potential and reach their goals of employment within their local communities. Results also demonstrated the need to continue to support and provide services to individuals who experienced the most significant disabilities, including the need for supported employment services. Examples of responses received include the continued need for services in the areas of: transportation, benefits counseling assistance, agency should improve counselors’ knowledge and awareness in the areas of accommodations including rehabilitation technology, continuing education for counselors on disability areas and the continuing research and developments in rehabilitation, better relations with businesses and employers, expanded options for customized and creative solutions for employment, Ticket to Work and expanded options for individuals, continue to build relationships with Mental Health Centers and Area Agencies. (Page 147-148) Title II

NH Vocational Rehabilitation ensures that Counselors are aware of how an individual's cognitive disability might affect his or her ability to participate in the vocational rehabilitation process and the need to provide supports and accommodations to these individuals in the process.• Working with the Bureau of Behavioral Health toward strategies and practices to improve supported employment outcomes.• Exploring long-term funding options such as Partnership Plus, for individuals who need extended supports. (Page 178) Title II
 

Employer/ Business

~~VR continues working with Project RENEW, to bring their person-centered planning approach to VR in our work with students with mental health and emotional and behavioral challenges. The Agency continues to seek ways in which to better serve our customer population with Autism. In 2016 NHVR brought “Autism Employment Advisors” to NH. This program, Employer Connect, seeks to educate business partners on how to work with and manage individuals on the autism spectrum. It also seeks to prepare the students, recently graduated from college, with real interview opportunities with some of NH’s best technology and sector-based companies.
Goal 4---Promote an environment that supports the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor - Customer relationship (Page 180) Title I
 

Data Collection

New Hampshire manages customer data collection and reporting for WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs through the State Board administered e—TEAMS case management and reporting system. All entities that receive WIOA funds are mandated to use this system consistent with service delivery contractual agreements. The ELMIB has been designated the Performance Accountability and Customer Information Agency (PACIA) by the Governor of New Hampshire and as such performs the necessary performance analysis and reporting functions under WIOA under contract with the Office of Workforce Opportunity. ELMIB generates the performance related items that must be submitted to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) as part of the WIOA Quarterly Summaries and Annual Report. (Page 57) Title I

NH Vocational Rehabilitation strives to meet all negotiated performance accountability measures. Goal: NHVR will achieve or exceed the established and negotiated common performance measures once identified through the appropriate approval process. This first two years of this plan have been a baseline measurement. (Page 175) Title II

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security; Vocational Rehabilitation; Community Action Agency; Older Worker Program; and Granite State Independent Living ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co—located, a close relationship and co—enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One—stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English—speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. The State will continue to support enhanced services to those with significant barriers to employment through a variety of new and ongoing strategies. Accessibility and quality of service provision will continue to be evaluated affecting greater access to employment opportunities for people with disabilities and will continue to be addressed through the collaborative partnership established through the Governor’s Task Force on People with Disabilities, which is directly linked to One—Stop center activities, and continuous improvement strategies that include staff development and adopting new approaches to service delivery will be planned for and implemented to achieve improved services and outcomes. As referenced earlier, all partners provide employment and training services in response to the needs of individuals with disabilities. One of the NH Works Partners, NH Department of Education, Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation focuses on individuals with significant disabilities. They are co—located at each of the twelve NH Works offices. VR has productive relationships with all of the NH Works partners. Together they assist those mutual customers with disabilities in obtaining necessary services to improve their ability to obtain and maintain employment. (Page 72) Title I

Vets

The State Veteran Services plan defines the veteran priority of service for Wagner-Peyser pursuant to the Jobs for Veterans Act. In the local One-Stop Career Centers veterans receive priority of service from all partner staff. Priority is given to veterans for all new job listings posted on the NHWorks Job Match System by placing new job orders on a twenty-four hour veteran hold during which time the job order is only viewable by staff for the referral of veterans, and on-line the job order can only be viewed by registrants that are identified as veterans. The DVOP specialists and the LVER staff work in daily collaboration with one-stop delivery system partner staff to promote employment, training, placement and other opportunities for veterans. (Page 71) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. (Page 239) Title IV

Twelve New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) offices have been designated American Job Centers called NHWORKS. As identified on the JVSG Staffing Directory (VETS-501), the four full-time and seven part-time DVOP grant-funded positions, and the two full-time and two part-time LVER grant-funded positions are being assigned to American Job Centers (local offices) throughout the State. This planned deployment allows New Hampshire to have a DVOP specialist assigned to eleven of our twelve American Job Centers to provide the delivery of intensive services to targeted veterans. (Page 239) Title IV

Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; • Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and • Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. The LVER’s second primary function is to facilitate employment, training and placement services provided to veterans within the NHWORKS system via capacity building to ensure easier access to the appropriate employment and training services for eligible job-seeking veterans and eligible persons. The LVER, as an integral member of the NHES Business Services Team, will work with the staff to coordinate outreach activities to solicit job orders and promote the hiring of veterans. The LVER staff is responsible for maintaining contact with Federal Contractors and is also involved in the planning and participation in job fairs. Until further guidance is disseminated by USDOL VETS, LVER outreach efforts and other LVER staff activities are monitored locally by NHES managers and the DVET to assure compliance with statutory duties as described in VPL 03-14. (Page 240-241) Tittle IV

The DVOP specialists and the LVER staff work in daily collaboration with New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) staff, WIOA, State Vocational Rehabilitation, and other AJC partners to promote employment, training, placement and other opportunities for veterans. Intra-staff collaboration is also enforced via program updates shared among partners during regularly scheduled staff meetings. In many local offices “5 minute stand up” meetings are held each morning as a daily briefing of the events of the day. During this briefing, all AJC staff share information on new job orders received, employer information received by staff during outreach, training opportunities, and any positive recruitment taking place in the American Job Center. The DVOP specialist position assigned to the Manchester AJC is also assigned the responsibility of Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC). As agreed upon by the DVET, the State Agency and the VA, the ISC spends up to one day per week out-stationed at the VAVR&E office. The DVOP specialists throughout the State work with the VAVR&E program to assist qualified veterans seeking training. VAVR&E, in turn, refer veterans who are completing training programs to the DVOP specialists for job placement assistance. Through an agreement with the NH State Office of Veterans Services, representatives from their agency visit the NHES offices throughout the state at least twice a month to assist veterans with problems or questions regarding Federal or State benefits. The State has three HVRP Grantee, Harbor Homes, Veterans, Inc., and Easter Seals. The DVOP specialists in the Hillsborough County area do outreach on-site and participate in Stand Down activity by Harbor Homes. Representatives from Veterans, Inc. and Easter Seals periodically vist local offices as an additional means of outreach to homeless veterans. Many of the JVSG funded staff are members of Veterans’ Service Organizations (VSOs) in their community or have established working relationships with these groups. NHES is a member of the State Apprenticeship Advisory Council and works closely with the Federal apprenticeship representatives. DVOP staff will continue to conduct outreach to local Veterans’ Service Organizations (VSOs), homeless shelters, VA Medical Centers and Vet Centers, food pantries, correctional institutions and halfway houses in their labor market area to reach out to veterans and inform them of the services available through the American Job Centers. (Page 241) Title IV

One of the LVER’s principal duties is to conduct outreach to employers, employer associations, and business groups to promote the advantages of hiring veterans, to assist veterans in gaining employment, and to develop relationships, jobs, training, or job training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons. To accomplish this, LVERs will participate in appropriate activities such as: Planning and participating in job and career fairs; Conducting employer outreach; Conducting seminars for employers; In conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups; Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. (Page 245) Title IV

Mental Health

~~The process to determine the need for new, improved or expanded programs will be accomplished through: public forums in six regions to include customers of Vocational Rehabilitation, Vocational Rehabilitation staff, community rehabilitation programs staff, developmental services area agency staff, mental health center staff, and the general public. (Page 133) Title II

A revised Memorandum of Agreement with the Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health was planned for 2016, however due to staffing and coordination issues with the Department of Health and Human Services, this activity is still in progress. As mentioned previously we expect completion of this MOU in mid to late 2018.Individuals with the most significant disabilities to be served under this program will likely have developmental disabilities, acquired brain disorders and/or mental health diagnoses, since these are the groups for which funding is available for long-term support after Vocational Rehabilitation services are completed. (Pages 134-135) Title II

The State Medicaid plan under title XIX of the Social Security Act; The agency will seek to develop and enact a Memorandum of Understanding with this entity during the calendar year 2018 including all partners (mental health, developmental services, adult and elderly services, substance abuse, Division of Children and Youth Services and other Health and Human Services programs) that can assist in providing services for mutual customers. The discussion and process for order of selection will be critical so individuals know how and when they will be served based on their assigned category. (Page 137) Title II

The State agency responsible for providing mental health services: As identified above, the Agency has been working with the Bureau of Behavioral health toward developing a Memorandum of Understanding. The target is to finalize this work in 2018 with the completion of an MOU with the Department of Health and Human Services in 2018. That Department has experienced significant reorganization and staffing changes over the last two years which has slowed the progress on this agreement. The completed MOU will help to identify referral and service provision agreements as well as supported employment strategies and services to increase the successful competitive, integrated employment outcomes for the mutual customers of each system.  (Page 137) Title II

Who Are Our Customers- During Federal Fiscal Year 2017, NH Vocational Rehabilitation…
• Worked with 3,591 eligible clients
• Received 2,340 new applicants
Types of Disabilities
Mental Health 28%Cognitive 34%Blind or Visual Impairment 7%Deafness 2%Hard of Hearing 9%Physical Disability 18%Communicative 3% (page 157)
Goal 1---Quality competitive integrated employment outcomes for persons with disabilities in New HampshireStrategies and Activities:
• Restructure job placement and support activities, and the corresponding menu of services, to be in alignment with new performance accountabilities under WIOA.
- Require CRPs to complete ACRE training in order to meet minimum certification requirements
- Encourage CRPs to pursue and/or obtain CESP credential
- Support training to demonstrate and enhance competencies
• Coordinate with the systems for community mental health centers and community developmental disability organizations to increase the expectations for competitive integrated employment for individuals served under these programs.  (Page 168) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

In order to coordinate these activities at the community level, regular BRS team meetings that include appropriate NH Works staff and partners are conducted. These meeting allow discussion on employer needs, which can then be matched to individual needs of NH Works and partner agency customers thereby creating a more customer-centric workforce system. Support through the NH Works Professional Development Team provides for continued professional development opportunities for BRS staff across agencies to cross train, share information, and maximize resources. The US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship has two staff members assigned to New Hampshire. We have effectively woven the staff with representation at the State Board, Youth Council, Interagency Directors Group, Interagency Business Team and Shared Youth Vision to ensure inclusion of their programs. Furthermore, we have included pre-apprenticeship, work-based learning and Registered Apprenticeship within the partners’ job developers’ tool kit. Whenever an individual is placed (on-the-job training, work experience, or direct placement), the employer and participant is made aware of these programs and encouraged to participate. All of these efforts for coordination, alignment, and services are to ensure that the education and workforce systems increase opportunities for all individuals including individuals with disabilities and/or barriers to employment, on the local level. On the state level the Governor has charged the newly formed Office of Business and Economic Affairs to serve as the State's lead entity for coordinating business activities within the state. The BEA is working to attract new business and new talent to support New Hampshire's growing economy. As well as work with existing businesses from addressing skill shortages to working with employers to promote recovery friendly work environments to support the State's opioid recovery efforts. (Page 51-52) Title II

The Return to Work is one part of the Governor’s NH Working Initiative. The Return to Work initiative is an opportunity for a trainee to get their foot in the door and learn new skills and an opportunity for an employer to train without the accompanying costs. The training must be authorized through the Department of Employment Security prior to the beginning of the training. The training program may be up to six weeks, and a maximum of 24 hours per week per benefit year. Claimants are required to submit paper weekly claims for benefits timely and meet all other unemployment compensation eligibility requirements. Claimants will continue to receive their weekly unemployment compensation benefits during the training program. A Return to Work claimant trainee must be able and available to seek and accept work during this period. A non-claimant trainee is required to complete a weekly status form to NHES. The trainee is covered under a state provided Workers Compensation program. In addition, adult, dislocated worker, NEG, and youth may be enrolled in On-the-Job Training programs. The term “On-the-Job Training” (OJT) means training by an employer that is provided to a participant paid while engaged in productive work in a job that - a) Provides knowledge or skills essential to the full and adequate performance of the job; b) Provides reimbursement to the employer of up to 50% of the participant wage rate for the cost of providing the training and additional supervision related to the training; and c) Is limited in duration as appropriate to the occupation for which the participant is being trained, not exceeding 6 months, and taking into account the content of the training, the prior work experience of the participant, the skills gap between the participant’s education and experience level and the skills required for the job, and the service strategy of the participant, as appropriate. The Job Training fund funded with state unemployment insurance trust funds incumbent workers. Although no customized training programs currently exist, we may pursue this training strategy if circumstances warrant. (Page 83) Title I

New Hampshire makes extensive use of the Worker Profiling and Reemployment Service (WPRS) model for early identification of claimants who are likely to face long-term unemployment. NHES administers a statistical model, to identify qualified UI claimants who will enter the UI Profile Pool. Answers to certain questions during the initial claim process and their resulting score are used to identify potential claimants. On a weekly basis, Employment Service staff in the NH Works Centers specify a number of claimants to be randomly extracted from the pool in their respective service area. A weekly report is produced listing the claimants ranked by their profiling score and who received a first payment in the previous week. Claimants with the highest score in the pool are selected to attend an orientation and receive one-on-one assessment and reemployment services. (Page 100) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 58

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

NH Disability & Public Health Project - 01/01/2017

“The New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) is a collaboration between the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services and its Bona Fide Agent, the Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire. The overarching goal of the collaboration is to improve the health and quality of life of people with disabilities in NH by strengthening the capacity of the state’s public health programs and initiatives to include people with intellectual disabilities and mobility limitations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire ESEA Flexibility Approval - 06/26/2013

The New Hampshire Department of Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on June 26, 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order 2002-9 (Establishing a Governor's Task Force on Employment) - 12/04/2002

“An order establishing the Governor's Task Force on Employment and Economic Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

Vocational Rehab Jobs Will Be Cut in H.H. - 04/24/2018

“Concord — A New Hampshire agency that helps people with disabilities find jobs soon will be downsized, after education officials identified a looming shortfall within the group’s budget.

About 20 jobs will be cut from the state Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation in an attempt to stabilize finances for the organization, which provides job coaching and educational opportunities, and also pairs disabled people with employers in the Granite State, Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut announced last week.

Nonetheless, officials are working to continue many of those services, even with fewer staff, Edelblut said in a phone interview on Monday. They intend to partner with community organizations and area nonprofits to help fill the void, he said.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2018 New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Report - 01/01/2018

~~“Prevalence of Mobility and/or Cognitive Disabilities among NH Adults 18 and Older.

This report used pooled data from the 2013-2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). In the BRFSS, mobility and cognitive limitations are defined by two questions: 1. Do you have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs? (“Mobility”); and 2. Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, do you have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions? (“Cognitive”) BRFSS data is available on the CDC website via the Disability and Health Data System: https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/disabilityandhealth/dhds/index.html The NH Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) is funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cooperative agreement number 1NU27DD000007. DPH is a collaboration between the Institute on Disability at the University of New Hampshire and the NH Division of Public Health Services. The contents of this report are the responsibility of DPH staff and do not necessarily represent the views of the CDC or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Supported Employment - 01/01/2018

“Supported Employment (SE) is a well-defined approach to helping people with mental illnesses find and keep competitive employment within their communities.

SE programs are staffed by employment specialists who have frequent meetings with treatment providers to integrate supported employment with mental health services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

“Aid to the Permanently & Totally Disabled” - 01/01/2018

“Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled (APTD) is cash assistance for individuals who are between the ages of 18 and 64 and who are physically or mentally disabled.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Position Statement For New Hampshire’s Regional Service System

We believe that employment, with its powerful and irreplaceable opportunities for autonomy, earned income, self-esteem development, social contacts, structured  activity and life satisfaction, is an import ant ingredient of a fulfilling and valued life for adults in our society. We also recognize that the capacity of adults with any type or degree of developmental disability or acquired brain disorder to participate in employment, in the right setting and with the proper supports, has been amply demonstrated.   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Project Search - 12/17/2018

~~“Project Search is designed to provide an on campus intellectually challenging experience for academically motivated high school students. The program has been in operation since 1983 and currently serves over 200 students.

Project Search's mission is to provide a forum in a college campus setting where high school students from South Eastern New Hampshire and Southern Maine can experience a series of presentations covering challenging interdisciplinary topics and interact with each other in discussion groups. More information about Project Search may be found by accessing the weblink."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

PROJECT SEARCH SEACOAST NEW HAMPSHIRE - 10/18/2018

~~“Combining classroom instruction, career exploration, on-the-job training and support, Project SEARCH Seacoast NH helps students gain employment in the community by providing real-life work experience and teaching independent living skills. Classroom group lessons and meetings followed by internship rotations both take place at Portsmouth Regional Hospital. The goal for each student is competitive employment in the community at the end of the program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire WIOA Combined State Plan 2016-2020 - 03/15/2018

~~“Several vendors provide direct services for those with disabilities throughout the state. A close collaboration between VR, the state legislature, families, the governor’s commission, Developmental Disability Council, and other stakeholders resulted in the passing of State Bill 47 to eliminate subminimum wage for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire – a great success in closing the unemployment gap for this demographic.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

NH Disability & Public Health Project - 01/01/2017

“The New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) is a collaboration between the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services and its Bona Fide Agent, the Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire. The overarching goal of the collaboration is to improve the health and quality of life of people with disabilities in NH by strengthening the capacity of the state’s public health programs and initiatives to include people with intellectual disabilities and mobility limitations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Community Support Network - 06/15/1995

~~“CSNI is the association of the ten Area Agencies in New Hampshire providing services to individuals with developmental disabilities  and acquired brain disorders.  We achieve our mission through a variety of activities including advocacy, education, centralized operational supports to improve efficiency of the Area Agency system, and group purchasing.  At the heart of what we do is a core belief that the system of supports and services to individuals with developmental disabilities and acquired brain disorders functions best when all of its elements are working together.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Employment Community of Practice

The Mission of the NH Employment Community of Practice is to promote economic independence and high quality competitive employment opportunities for people withdisabilities through information sharing and the development and dissemination of best practices among all community partners.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire Governor's Commission on Disability

The Governor’s Commission on Disability provides information about the many services, laws, and regulations that affect citizens with disabilities.

 

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Institute on Disability/UCEDD - University of New Hampshire

“Trains students, self-advocates, families and professionals through coursework, seminars, workshops and conferences; Provides technical assistance to organizations and individuals to improve their capacity to include all citizens. Disseminates information to families, consumers, community members and professionals via books, monographs, articles, videos, newsletters, the internet and newspapers and consumer forums; engages in collaborative activities and

joint projects with organizations that share common goals. 

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011

‘In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI)”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Next Steps NH - 03/30/2020

“The Next Steps NH project provided professional development and coaching to selected New Hampshire high schools for the purpose of increasing the graduation rate of students with disabilities, and students at risk. This was done through implementing evidence-informed transition planning practices that helped students prepare for college, career, and adult life.

This website was part of the project and housed all tools and resources developed as part of the project. The website is now supported by the NH Department of Education and managed at Keene State College.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

NHWorks Employers - 03/06/2020

“Employers

If you’re an employer, you already know that there’s a lot more to hiring new employees than just finding the right candidate. If you browse within the Employer category, we not only present you with recruitment services, but we also provide information on employment and labor laws, hiring incentives, disability resources and other services and benefits. These services are provided at no cost to you.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations; small business owners; self-employed individuals; part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Consumers of behavioral health services, Comprehensive behavioral health centers, Substance Abuse Prevention providers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Agencies/people who serve pregnant women, Veteran’s service organizations, The disability community, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Hospitals, Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, Post-secondary Educational Institutions, Economic Development Authorities, and Chambers of Commerce.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH’s 13th Annual Transition Summit - 06/13/2019

~~“The New Hampshire Transition Community of Practice organizes the annual Transition Summit, the only statewide conference for training, collaboration, networking, and information focused exclusively on the transition to life after high school for students with disabilities.NH’s 13th Annual Transition SummitFriday, November 22, 20198:00 am – 3:30 pmGrappone Conference Center, Concord, NH ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

2018 Labor Law Training Seminar Offered - 02/26/2018

“The New Hampshire Department of Labor is offering a Labor Law training seminar on how to stay in compliance with NH Labor Laws. The seminar will be offered on 18 dates at a variety of locations throughout the state. These events are free and open to employers, businesses and the public. These seminars are made possible by the generosity of the businesses donating their establishment’s function room to host these events.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual

The New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual provides more in-depth information about the major programs affecting income and benefits for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire.  The Manual is divided into four sections:

1. New Hampshire Adult Assistance Programs

2. Social Security Disability Insurance

3. Supplemental Security Income

4. Medicare

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

WorkReadyNH

Work ReadyNH is a tuition-free workforce development program tailored to meet the needs of job seekers and career builders as well as provide training in the specific skills employers are seeking in their current and future employees.

 

The WorkReadyNH program provides assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. Graduates earn two nationally recognized credentials to add to their resume.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Southern New Hampshire Services Workplace Success Program

~~“The Workplace Success (WPS) Program is funded by the NH Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and represents  a collaboration between the Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies to enable TANF recipients to move from welfare to work. Workplace Success provides participants in the New Hampshire Employment Program (NHEP) with the skills, knowledge, experience, and support needed to obtain paid employment.The program prepares participants to enter the workforce by providing them a broad set of workforce development services starting with an in-depth vocational assessment process leading to a personal Career Plan.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workplace Success

~~“The Workplace Success (WPS) Program is funded by the NH Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and represents a collaboration between the Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies to enable TANF recipients to move from welfare to work. Workplace Success provides participants in the New Hampshire Employment Program (NHEP) with the skills, knowledge, experience, and support needed to obtain paid employment.

The program prepares participants to enter the workforce by providing them a broad set of workforce development services starting with an in-depth vocational assessment process leading to a personal Career Plan. “

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Five Year Plan (2008-2012)

• MIG funds were used during 2002 and 2003 to provide the 13 New Hampshire Employment Security One-Stops with equipment and resource materials (e.g., screen readers, audio “how to” tapes) to make them more accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, training was provided to the staff of One-Stops regarding use of the purchased equipment and resource materials. This initiative with the One-Stops also included staff trainings on disability awareness issues and creation of a resource guide called “Disability Etiquette.”

• MIG was instrumental in the development of towo tool kits. The first, a ready-to work toolkit is a curriculum on personal futures planning, resume writing, self-directed job searching techniques, employment interviewing skills, and negotiating workplace culture, politics, and related skills. It’s currently being used by the independent living center’s 6 peer groups. The second, an employer tool kit, was developed to provide information and guidance to employers regarding reasonable workplace accommodations, tax credits, where to get technical assistance, the ticket-to-work program, and the values and benefits of hiring people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Amanda D., et al. v. Hassan, et al. Settlement Fact Sheet

The United States Department of Justice, a coalition of private plaintiff organizations, and the State of New Hampshire, have entered into a comprehensive Settlement Agreement that will transform New Hampshire’s mental health system by significantly expanding and enhancing mental health service capacity in integrated community settings. The Agreement will enable a class of adults with serious mental illness to receive needed services in the community, which will foster their independence and enable them to participate more fully in community life. The expanded and enhanced community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at State mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (“NHH”) (the State’s only psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (a State-owned and -operated nursing facility for people with mental illness). The Agreement requires the State to expand and enhance community services over the next six years. …

For the first time, the State will deliver supported employment services in accordance with the Dartmouth evidence-based model. These services will help enable individuals to obtain and maintain paid, competitive employment in integrated community settings. Over the life of the Agreement, this provision will impact thousands of people.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program

“The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program assists low-income elderly or disabled individuals who are eligible for Medicare (available through the Social Security Administration) by paying for some or all of the associated costs of Medicare, specifically the Medicare Insurance Premiums and deductibles. The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program is also referred to as the Buy-In program….

The Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) program provides payment of Medicare Part A premiums for eligible working individuals with disabilities who are entitled to enroll in Medicare Part A, but who have lost Medicare Part A coverage due to earnings. Individuals eligible for QDWI may not otherwise be eligible for Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

States - Phone

Snapshot

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.01%
Change from
2017 to 2018
1,356,458
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.18%
Change from
2017 to 2018
90,754
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.24%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39,742
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.22%
Change from
2017 to 2018
43.79%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.98%
Change from
2017 to 2018
82.62%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 1,356,458
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 90,754
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 39,742
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 622,874
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 43.79%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.62%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 13.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 6.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 88,766
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 86,025
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 164,932
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 2,726
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 6,614
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 1,387
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,147
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 3,586
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 900

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,700
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 9.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 47,128

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,625
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 10,792
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 16,875
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 33.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 30.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 10.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,789
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,282
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 23
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 16
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 70.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.20

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,156
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 65,173
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $36,193,689
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $53,705,630
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 46.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,254
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 124.76

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 70.81%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.05%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.84%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 71.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.36%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 75.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.87%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The NH Works branding and colocation of services has been very successful in blending resources so customers know if they have any workforce development need, NH Works is the place to go. Workforce activities that are conducted through the NH Works office, for both job-seeker and business customers. (Page 19- 20) Title I

NH BEA, NH Employment Security, and NH DOE will lead and utilize the workforce development system partnerships as described above to ensure all resources are leveraged for education participants in attaining their educational goals. Core and non-core program staff will utilize WIOA, TAA, Vocational Rehabilitation, Pell Grants, public and private grants, and other resources to assist participants in their education goals. Professional development, guided by the PDT, and accurate training program information, provided through the ETP Team, will ensure all program staff are up-to-date with the latest educational resources information (Page 53) Title I

The NH Youth Council is committed to coordinating existing resources and identifying new resources specific to achieving improved outcomes for out-of-school youth. Working with the NH Department of Education (e.g., ABE, CTE, VR and In-school Programs) to strengthen the connections for students who drop out of or leave school without the skills necessary to obtain suitable and sustainable employment, the Council will play a lead role in coordinating and leveraging resources. The work of the Youth Council will be further supported by the NH Works system of partner agencies, which include Job Corps, Youth Build (when an active grant is in place) and the various community based organizations focused on services to youth. Strategies to achieve improved outcomes will include some or all of the following: • Develop and identify clear and concise pathways to achieving individual education/employment goals. (Page 88) Title I
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Job seekers can access an array of services and activities including but not limited to: NH Works Center Services Career Services (Basic, Individual, and Follow-up); Determination of Eligibility; Assessments; Labor Exchange Information; Labor Market Information; Unemployment Insurance Information; FAFSA Assistance; Development of Individual Employment Plan; Group Counseling; Individual Counseling; Career Planning; Internships; Short-Term Per-Vocational Services (soft skills such as communication, punctuality, and personal maintenance skills); Workforce Preparation Activities (i.e., MS office, keyboarding, and Internet); Financial Literacy. (Pages 49 - 50) Title I.

School to Work Transition

~~The NH Youth Council is committed to coordinating existing resources and identifying new resources specific to achieving improved outcomes for out-of-school youth. Working with the NH Department of Education (e.g., ABE, CTE, VR and In-school Programs) to strengthen the connections for students who drop out of or leave school without the skills necessary to obtain suitable and sustainable employment, the Council will play a lead role in coordinating and leveraging resources. The work of the Youth Council will be further supported by the NH Works system of partner agencies, which include Job Corps, Youth Build (when an active grant is in place) and the various community based organizations focused on services to youth. Strategies to achieve improved outcomes will include some or all of the following: • Develop and identify clear and concise pathways to achieving individual education/employment goals. • Connect out-of-school youth with state developed sector training and/or job opportunities. • Encourage credential-granting training options. • Expand work-based learning and training opportunities that allow youth to explore employment options - e.g., Return to Work, OJT, Apprenticeship, Internship, Work experience (paid or unpaid), etc. • Increase co-enrollments in/across core programs to maximize available resources for the provision of comprehensive work and training supports i.e., full complement of wrap around services to support success. (Page 88) Title I

NHVR participates in the State’s transition initiatives in a variety of ways. NHVR counselors across the state are involved in the local and regional partnerships which were developed to implement the activities of grants available. Counselors advocate for the inclusion of students with disabilities and special education staff in the systemic changes occurring in the schools. NHVR understands the need for services to be identified and in place prior to a student leaving the school setting in order to assist the student with a smooth transition to post-school activities which may include postsecondary education, training, employment, and related vocational rehabilitation services which will lead to competitive integrated employment. To assure this planning, the Agency provides for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment while the student is in school and within 90 days of eligibility determination. Local relationships of the VR Counselors and Special Education staff provide opportunities for VR staff to attend the IEP team meetings and assist in the overall transition plan to allow the student to successfully transition to post-secondary education or employment. VR Counselors participate in transition planning activities and IEP meetings to assist in the development of the IPE.  (Pages 131-132) Title II

As mentioned above Business Relations staff work with students and adults with disabilities. The Transition Administrator and the Program Specialist are working closely together to implement individualized pre-employment transition services, including creating programs with multiple partner agencies to provide Work Based Learning opportunities for students.
The Agency has been working with employers and CRPs to develop opportunities for career exploration and work-based learning for students with disabilities. The Agency has focused on developing menu of services and supports to assure that pre-employment transition services are widely available in the state. (Page 136) Title II

o Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
o Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
o Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School-to- Work transition program.
o Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind. (Page 169) Title II

The overall goal of the SCSEP is to place participants in unsubsidized employment for the purpose of sustained self-sufficiency. We aim to achieve this goal through expanded engagement and partnerships with employers, identifying employment opportunities with established career ladders, placing individuals in high growth industries and occupations as well as other industries and occupations that provide substantial employment opportunities for participants, and retention activities once participants enter the workforce. SCSEP staff will work with its network of employers to identify and cultivate appropriate employment opportunities for participants, taking into account the needs of mature workers. Staff will pair the job-ready participants’ interests, employment goals and skills with the requirements of local employers specific to employment vacancies. Unsubsidized placement will be informed by the nature of local industry growth and availability of positions that meet individual criteria in terms of physical requirements, access to transportation, and social needs. Staff will help clients develop their IEP to prepare them for opportunities in high-growth fields such as healthcare, transportation, warehousing and logistics, hospitality and retail, and various customer-service opportunities. These opportunities will primarily be shaped by the participants’ IEP objectives and their expressed desires concerning their work environments. Staff will secure opportunities for participants to gain critical skills for in-demand industries through training with community service providers and other workforce partners. SCSEP staff realize the importance of fostering relationships with local employers. (Page 271) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~NHVR has many relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs that coordinate and collaborate to provide transition services to out-of-school youth. Connections to programs like Project SEARCH, apprenticeship and OJT are examples of these connected services for youth with disabilities. NHVR staff are also a part of national Community of Practice surrounding students and youth with disabilities. (Page 128) Title II

The Agency will continue to seek ways to identify and meet the needs of individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire including, where appropriate, provision of services to groups of individuals with disabilities through the establishment, development and improvement of collaboration with private vocational rehabilitation service providers including community rehabilitation programs. In an effort to standardize services in the field, all CRP’s will be required to complete ACRE training, prior to receiving referrals from NHVR, in order to meet the minimum requirements to work with people with disabilities. All CRP’s looking to receive Supported Employment referrals, are encouraged to pursue and/or obtain the Certified Employment Support Professional (CESP) credential, in order to demonstrate a sufficient level of knowledge and skill to provide integrated employment supports to a variety of people with disabilities. In addition, the CRP Management Liaison will review their resume and qualifications to ensure they have the knowledge, skills and abilities to work with our customers. Once a CRP is approved by the CRP Management Liaison, the CRP will be placed in NHVR’s “Customer Guide to Job Development Services” and scheduled to attend training on NHVR’s job placement and referral process. Additional OJT will be offered by VR counselors and Rehabilitation Technicians to ensure the CRP understands NHVR’s referral and invoice process. CRP’s are required to meet with the Regional Offices, at least once a year, to review progress being made with each of their customers. At this meeting, CRP’s will ensure their records match with those of the local Regional Office. In addition, they will review NHVR’s “Customer Guide to Job Development Services” to ensure we have their updated contact information and document any additional training. NHVR’s case management system, AWARE, has the capacity to evaluate vendor success rate and report card information that documents the number of referrals for individual services, referrals for job placement, and successful placement outcomes. (Page 134-135) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receives referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. The Bureau also provides refugee service programs. With approximately 500 local employers in refugee resettlement areas, ABE staff work closely with employers and develops programs in partnership to provide employees with on-site English literacy training. The Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) provides assistance to eligible persons with disabilities throughout the state to gain and retain employment outcomes through the provision of direct vocational rehabilitation services, as funded under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. VR is a joint State/Federal program that seeks to empower people to make informed choices, build viable careers, and live more independently in the community. To that end, VR supports the following programs and priorities: • Disability Determination Services • Independent Living • Rehabilitation Services • Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired • Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing • Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. (Page 21) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~There was strong support in the CSNA results to support the services the agency provides to individuals with the most significant disabilities that require on-the-job and other supports to maintain employment through the supplemental Supported Employment Services program. Through informed choice and partnership with the NHVR program, individuals with disabilities are able to maximize their potential and reach their goals of employment within their local communities. Results also demonstrated the need to continue to support and provide services to individuals who experienced the most significant disabilities, including the need for supported employment services. Examples of responses received include the continued need for services in the areas of: transportation, benefits counseling assistance, agency should improve counselors’ knowledge and awareness in the areas of accommodations including rehabilitation technology, continuing education for counselors on disability areas and the continuing research and developments in rehabilitation, better relations with businesses and employers, expanded options for customized and creative solutions for employment, Ticket to Work and expanded options for individuals, continue to build relationships with Mental Health Centers and Area Agencies. (Page 147-148) Title II

NH Vocational Rehabilitation ensures that Counselors are aware of how an individual's cognitive disability might affect his or her ability to participate in the vocational rehabilitation process and the need to provide supports and accommodations to these individuals in the process.• Working with the Bureau of Behavioral Health toward strategies and practices to improve supported employment outcomes.• Exploring long-term funding options such as Partnership Plus, for individuals who need extended supports. (Page 178) Title II
 

Employer/ Business

~~VR continues working with Project RENEW, to bring their person-centered planning approach to VR in our work with students with mental health and emotional and behavioral challenges. The Agency continues to seek ways in which to better serve our customer population with Autism. In 2016 NHVR brought “Autism Employment Advisors” to NH. This program, Employer Connect, seeks to educate business partners on how to work with and manage individuals on the autism spectrum. It also seeks to prepare the students, recently graduated from college, with real interview opportunities with some of NH’s best technology and sector-based companies.
Goal 4---Promote an environment that supports the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor - Customer relationship (Page 180) Title I
 

Data Collection

New Hampshire manages customer data collection and reporting for WIOA Title I Adult and Youth programs through the State Board administered e—TEAMS case management and reporting system. All entities that receive WIOA funds are mandated to use this system consistent with service delivery contractual agreements. The ELMIB has been designated the Performance Accountability and Customer Information Agency (PACIA) by the Governor of New Hampshire and as such performs the necessary performance analysis and reporting functions under WIOA under contract with the Office of Workforce Opportunity. ELMIB generates the performance related items that must be submitted to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) as part of the WIOA Quarterly Summaries and Annual Report. (Page 57) Title I

NH Vocational Rehabilitation strives to meet all negotiated performance accountability measures. Goal: NHVR will achieve or exceed the established and negotiated common performance measures once identified through the appropriate approval process. This first two years of this plan have been a baseline measurement. (Page 175) Title II

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security; Vocational Rehabilitation; Community Action Agency; Older Worker Program; and Granite State Independent Living ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co—located, a close relationship and co—enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One—stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English—speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. The State will continue to support enhanced services to those with significant barriers to employment through a variety of new and ongoing strategies. Accessibility and quality of service provision will continue to be evaluated affecting greater access to employment opportunities for people with disabilities and will continue to be addressed through the collaborative partnership established through the Governor’s Task Force on People with Disabilities, which is directly linked to One—Stop center activities, and continuous improvement strategies that include staff development and adopting new approaches to service delivery will be planned for and implemented to achieve improved services and outcomes. As referenced earlier, all partners provide employment and training services in response to the needs of individuals with disabilities. One of the NH Works Partners, NH Department of Education, Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation focuses on individuals with significant disabilities. They are co—located at each of the twelve NH Works offices. VR has productive relationships with all of the NH Works partners. Together they assist those mutual customers with disabilities in obtaining necessary services to improve their ability to obtain and maintain employment. (Page 72) Title I

Vets

The State Veteran Services plan defines the veteran priority of service for Wagner-Peyser pursuant to the Jobs for Veterans Act. In the local One-Stop Career Centers veterans receive priority of service from all partner staff. Priority is given to veterans for all new job listings posted on the NHWorks Job Match System by placing new job orders on a twenty-four hour veteran hold during which time the job order is only viewable by staff for the referral of veterans, and on-line the job order can only be viewed by registrants that are identified as veterans. The DVOP specialists and the LVER staff work in daily collaboration with one-stop delivery system partner staff to promote employment, training, placement and other opportunities for veterans. (Page 71) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. (Page 239) Title IV

Twelve New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) offices have been designated American Job Centers called NHWORKS. As identified on the JVSG Staffing Directory (VETS-501), the four full-time and seven part-time DVOP grant-funded positions, and the two full-time and two part-time LVER grant-funded positions are being assigned to American Job Centers (local offices) throughout the State. This planned deployment allows New Hampshire to have a DVOP specialist assigned to eleven of our twelve American Job Centers to provide the delivery of intensive services to targeted veterans. (Page 239) Title IV

Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; • Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and • Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. The LVER’s second primary function is to facilitate employment, training and placement services provided to veterans within the NHWORKS system via capacity building to ensure easier access to the appropriate employment and training services for eligible job-seeking veterans and eligible persons. The LVER, as an integral member of the NHES Business Services Team, will work with the staff to coordinate outreach activities to solicit job orders and promote the hiring of veterans. The LVER staff is responsible for maintaining contact with Federal Contractors and is also involved in the planning and participation in job fairs. Until further guidance is disseminated by USDOL VETS, LVER outreach efforts and other LVER staff activities are monitored locally by NHES managers and the DVET to assure compliance with statutory duties as described in VPL 03-14. (Page 240-241) Tittle IV

The DVOP specialists and the LVER staff work in daily collaboration with New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) staff, WIOA, State Vocational Rehabilitation, and other AJC partners to promote employment, training, placement and other opportunities for veterans. Intra-staff collaboration is also enforced via program updates shared among partners during regularly scheduled staff meetings. In many local offices “5 minute stand up” meetings are held each morning as a daily briefing of the events of the day. During this briefing, all AJC staff share information on new job orders received, employer information received by staff during outreach, training opportunities, and any positive recruitment taking place in the American Job Center. The DVOP specialist position assigned to the Manchester AJC is also assigned the responsibility of Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC). As agreed upon by the DVET, the State Agency and the VA, the ISC spends up to one day per week out-stationed at the VAVR&E office. The DVOP specialists throughout the State work with the VAVR&E program to assist qualified veterans seeking training. VAVR&E, in turn, refer veterans who are completing training programs to the DVOP specialists for job placement assistance. Through an agreement with the NH State Office of Veterans Services, representatives from their agency visit the NHES offices throughout the state at least twice a month to assist veterans with problems or questions regarding Federal or State benefits. The State has three HVRP Grantee, Harbor Homes, Veterans, Inc., and Easter Seals. The DVOP specialists in the Hillsborough County area do outreach on-site and participate in Stand Down activity by Harbor Homes. Representatives from Veterans, Inc. and Easter Seals periodically vist local offices as an additional means of outreach to homeless veterans. Many of the JVSG funded staff are members of Veterans’ Service Organizations (VSOs) in their community or have established working relationships with these groups. NHES is a member of the State Apprenticeship Advisory Council and works closely with the Federal apprenticeship representatives. DVOP staff will continue to conduct outreach to local Veterans’ Service Organizations (VSOs), homeless shelters, VA Medical Centers and Vet Centers, food pantries, correctional institutions and halfway houses in their labor market area to reach out to veterans and inform them of the services available through the American Job Centers. (Page 241) Title IV

One of the LVER’s principal duties is to conduct outreach to employers, employer associations, and business groups to promote the advantages of hiring veterans, to assist veterans in gaining employment, and to develop relationships, jobs, training, or job training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons. To accomplish this, LVERs will participate in appropriate activities such as: Planning and participating in job and career fairs; Conducting employer outreach; Conducting seminars for employers; In conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups; Coordinating with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans; Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts. (Page 245) Title IV

Mental Health

~~The process to determine the need for new, improved or expanded programs will be accomplished through: public forums in six regions to include customers of Vocational Rehabilitation, Vocational Rehabilitation staff, community rehabilitation programs staff, developmental services area agency staff, mental health center staff, and the general public. (Page 133) Title II

A revised Memorandum of Agreement with the Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health was planned for 2016, however due to staffing and coordination issues with the Department of Health and Human Services, this activity is still in progress. As mentioned previously we expect completion of this MOU in mid to late 2018.Individuals with the most significant disabilities to be served under this program will likely have developmental disabilities, acquired brain disorders and/or mental health diagnoses, since these are the groups for which funding is available for long-term support after Vocational Rehabilitation services are completed. (Pages 134-135) Title II

The State Medicaid plan under title XIX of the Social Security Act; The agency will seek to develop and enact a Memorandum of Understanding with this entity during the calendar year 2018 including all partners (mental health, developmental services, adult and elderly services, substance abuse, Division of Children and Youth Services and other Health and Human Services programs) that can assist in providing services for mutual customers. The discussion and process for order of selection will be critical so individuals know how and when they will be served based on their assigned category. (Page 137) Title II

The State agency responsible for providing mental health services: As identified above, the Agency has been working with the Bureau of Behavioral health toward developing a Memorandum of Understanding. The target is to finalize this work in 2018 with the completion of an MOU with the Department of Health and Human Services in 2018. That Department has experienced significant reorganization and staffing changes over the last two years which has slowed the progress on this agreement. The completed MOU will help to identify referral and service provision agreements as well as supported employment strategies and services to increase the successful competitive, integrated employment outcomes for the mutual customers of each system.  (Page 137) Title II

Who Are Our Customers- During Federal Fiscal Year 2017, NH Vocational Rehabilitation…
• Worked with 3,591 eligible clients
• Received 2,340 new applicants
Types of Disabilities
Mental Health 28%Cognitive 34%Blind or Visual Impairment 7%Deafness 2%Hard of Hearing 9%Physical Disability 18%Communicative 3% (page 157)
Goal 1---Quality competitive integrated employment outcomes for persons with disabilities in New HampshireStrategies and Activities:
• Restructure job placement and support activities, and the corresponding menu of services, to be in alignment with new performance accountabilities under WIOA.
- Require CRPs to complete ACRE training in order to meet minimum certification requirements
- Encourage CRPs to pursue and/or obtain CESP credential
- Support training to demonstrate and enhance competencies
• Coordinate with the systems for community mental health centers and community developmental disability organizations to increase the expectations for competitive integrated employment for individuals served under these programs.  (Page 168) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

In order to coordinate these activities at the community level, regular BRS team meetings that include appropriate NH Works staff and partners are conducted. These meeting allow discussion on employer needs, which can then be matched to individual needs of NH Works and partner agency customers thereby creating a more customer-centric workforce system. Support through the NH Works Professional Development Team provides for continued professional development opportunities for BRS staff across agencies to cross train, share information, and maximize resources. The US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship has two staff members assigned to New Hampshire. We have effectively woven the staff with representation at the State Board, Youth Council, Interagency Directors Group, Interagency Business Team and Shared Youth Vision to ensure inclusion of their programs. Furthermore, we have included pre-apprenticeship, work-based learning and Registered Apprenticeship within the partners’ job developers’ tool kit. Whenever an individual is placed (on-the-job training, work experience, or direct placement), the employer and participant is made aware of these programs and encouraged to participate. All of these efforts for coordination, alignment, and services are to ensure that the education and workforce systems increase opportunities for all individuals including individuals with disabilities and/or barriers to employment, on the local level. On the state level the Governor has charged the newly formed Office of Business and Economic Affairs to serve as the State's lead entity for coordinating business activities within the state. The BEA is working to attract new business and new talent to support New Hampshire's growing economy. As well as work with existing businesses from addressing skill shortages to working with employers to promote recovery friendly work environments to support the State's opioid recovery efforts. (Page 51-52) Title II

The Return to Work is one part of the Governor’s NH Working Initiative. The Return to Work initiative is an opportunity for a trainee to get their foot in the door and learn new skills and an opportunity for an employer to train without the accompanying costs. The training must be authorized through the Department of Employment Security prior to the beginning of the training. The training program may be up to six weeks, and a maximum of 24 hours per week per benefit year. Claimants are required to submit paper weekly claims for benefits timely and meet all other unemployment compensation eligibility requirements. Claimants will continue to receive their weekly unemployment compensation benefits during the training program. A Return to Work claimant trainee must be able and available to seek and accept work during this period. A non-claimant trainee is required to complete a weekly status form to NHES. The trainee is covered under a state provided Workers Compensation program. In addition, adult, dislocated worker, NEG, and youth may be enrolled in On-the-Job Training programs. The term “On-the-Job Training” (OJT) means training by an employer that is provided to a participant paid while engaged in productive work in a job that - a) Provides knowledge or skills essential to the full and adequate performance of the job; b) Provides reimbursement to the employer of up to 50% of the participant wage rate for the cost of providing the training and additional supervision related to the training; and c) Is limited in duration as appropriate to the occupation for which the participant is being trained, not exceeding 6 months, and taking into account the content of the training, the prior work experience of the participant, the skills gap between the participant’s education and experience level and the skills required for the job, and the service strategy of the participant, as appropriate. The Job Training fund funded with state unemployment insurance trust funds incumbent workers. Although no customized training programs currently exist, we may pursue this training strategy if circumstances warrant. (Page 83) Title I

New Hampshire makes extensive use of the Worker Profiling and Reemployment Service (WPRS) model for early identification of claimants who are likely to face long-term unemployment. NHES administers a statistical model, to identify qualified UI claimants who will enter the UI Profile Pool. Answers to certain questions during the initial claim process and their resulting score are used to identify potential claimants. On a weekly basis, Employment Service staff in the NH Works Centers specify a number of claimants to be randomly extracted from the pool in their respective service area. A weekly report is produced listing the claimants ranked by their profiling score and who received a first payment in the previous week. Claimants with the highest score in the pool are selected to attend an orientation and receive one-on-one assessment and reemployment services. (Page 100) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 58

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

NH Disability & Public Health Project - 01/01/2017

“The New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) is a collaboration between the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services and its Bona Fide Agent, the Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire. The overarching goal of the collaboration is to improve the health and quality of life of people with disabilities in NH by strengthening the capacity of the state’s public health programs and initiatives to include people with intellectual disabilities and mobility limitations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

REPORT TO GOVERNOR HASSAN: Recommendations on Health Care and Community Support Workforce - 12/16/2016

~~“In April 2016, in recognition of the healthcare and direct support workforce shortage facing New Hampshire, Governor Margaret Wood Hassan issued an Executive Order creating the Commission on Health Care and Community Support Workforce. Comprised of experts from aging and developmental services, nursing, health professions education, primary care,community care, and facility services, the Commission was charged with assessing the scope of the problem and making recommendations to address the State’s long term and short term health care workforce needs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NH BDS Developmental Services (0053.R06.00) - 09/01/2016

~~“Provides  community participation services, residential habilitation/personal care services, respite, service coordination, supported employment, assistive technology support services, community support services (CSS), crisis response services, environmental and vehicle modification services, participant directed and managed services (PDMS) formerly consolidated developmental services, specialty services, wellness coaching for individuals w/autism, DD and ID from 0 - no max age”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire ESEA Flexibility Approval - 06/26/2013

The New Hampshire Department of Education's ESEA flexibility request was approved on June 26, 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
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