New Hampshire

States - Big Screen

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.6%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,342,795
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.58%
Change from
2016 to 2017
84,234
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.87%
Change from
2016 to 2017
36,069
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.59%
Change from
2016 to 2017
42.82%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.76%
Change from
2016 to 2017
83.43%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 1,330,608 1,334,795 1,342,795
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 89,630 88,094 84,234
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 35,390 36,745 36,069
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 622,689 621,838 630,403
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.48% 41.71% 42.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.92% 82.80% 83.43%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.40% 2.80% 2.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.20% 15.70% 15.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 6.90% 6.10% 6.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 82,462 85,334 86,440
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 87,587 82,957 85,164
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 161,605 158,669 163,580
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 3,207 1,282 1,508
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,901 5,225 3,690
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 555
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,052 2,403 1,733
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 3,119 4,781 3,620
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 607 603 530

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,485 1,605 1,659
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 7.70% 8.50% 8.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 48,223 48,091 47,738

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,321 8,500 4,600
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 14,803 15,256 8,125
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 21,476 22,208 14,395
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.70% 38.30% 32.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 14.10% 19.70% 28.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.80% 6.70% 9.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 71.60% 84.60% 85.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,668 2,364 3,375
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 921 808 1,171
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 8,503 10,150 10,148

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,397 2,070 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 13 23
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 16
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 46.00% 70.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.53 0.45 1.20

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,545
1,774
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 126 97 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 386 354 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 501 291 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 740 564 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 455 269 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 337 199 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 26.00% 35.40% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,064 3,943 4,365
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 64,912 65,481 65,474
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 98 96 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 65 92 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $26,068,000 $32,003,000 $37,894,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $50,540 $45,982,000 $43,996,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 38.00% 44.00% 45.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,350 2,248 1,970
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 N/A N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 103.70 120.70 117.80

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 72.34% 72.44% 71.71%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.47% 8.44% 8.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.67% 2.73% 2.88%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 54.67% 56.76% 56.90%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 38.52% 38.89% 29.48%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 67.14% 66.67% 62.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.57% 81.48% 80.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 28.62% 27.78% 32.83%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0 0 0

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

School to Work Transition

VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses
  • Internships   (Page 28)

Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses  (Page 28)

Post–Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury. In an effort to continue discussing these important issues and determine how, as a community, we can better serve our veterans, service members and their families. Mr. Hinson was re–appointed by Governor Margaret Hassan to serve on the Commission on PTSD and TBI. During FY 15, two internal benefits counselors (Portsmouth and Manchester Regional Offices) provided benefit counseling to 386 customers. Seventy–six of those customers who had received internal benefits counseling during the vr process were closed status 26. Our internal benefits counseling staff also continue to jointly partner with the Institute on Disability with respect to the Real Study, a National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) research project designed to provide money coaching and benefits counseling to job seeking and employed individuals with disabilities. 

Extension. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Fiscal year 2011 data on this item was measured against this baseline. In FY 09 eligibility was determined in 60 days or less from application for 89% of the customers who applied for services. In FY 15, the average days to determine eligibility was 34 days. 2.3 Percent of accurate presumptive eligibility decisions for persons eligible for SSI or SSDI. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Target set for 2010 was 90%. During an FY 11 case review the agency achieved a rating of 76% in this area. The Agency is working to reinforce documentation in this area. Case review of FY 12 cases revealed that only relatively small sample of the cases reviewed received SSA benefits and were reviewed on this criterion. Of those 51% of the cases reviewed demonstrated that the presumption of eligibility was documented in case notes. The 2013-2014 review of FY12 cases is the most recent case review to assess this area. In 2014 the Agency began work on changing its case management system to Alliance’s AWARE system. At that time, the Agency decided to revamp case management practices to match the new system. Staff have been learning the new system and strategies and a case review is planned for the end of FY 2016 to determine any additional training needs to help staff meet the requirements of the program. (Page 188)

Career Pathways

Continue to assess business interest in work–based learning and the ideal engagement strategies from the businesses’ perspectives. STRATEGY 4.2.C Determine the most appropriate way(s) to link resources from various programs and partners to offer full spectrum of work–based learning opportunities (e.g. Department of Labor School–to–Work Approved Unpaid Work Sites, Vocational Rehabilitation Work Based Learning program, On–the–job training resources from WIOA and TANF, Office of Apprenticeship services, etc.) This could be a digital infrastructure that offers the ability for businesses and emerging workers to be connected for work–based learning opportunities online. But, it may also be clarifying the message, resources, and roles/responsibilities among partners to support work–based learning connections in New Hampshire. Much mapping of the various assets has already been done and will provide a foundation for Strategy 4.2. (Page 47)

Providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA. 

  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff and other constituents, to ensure the inclusion of students and youth with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring in the schools as a result of the IDEA 2008 and the Rehabilitation Act;
  • providing advocacy for students and youth with disabilities to a variety of constituents;
  • improving connections between NHVR and other transition service agencies;
  • providing information and guidance regarding Labor Laws as they relate to job shadow, internships and work experience for students and youth with disabilities;
  • marketing to school staff, students and families, adult service agencies, etc. in a variety of areas, e.g., employment issues as a result of disability, transition of students with disabilities, availability of adult services, best practices in transition of youth with disabilities, accessing adult services, employer perspectives; develop relationships with other agencies providing services to students and youth with disabilities to maximize services offered;
  • providing technical assistance on grants as they are developed with multiple agencies and programs to ensure the inclusion of all students and youth with disabilities.
  • providing continued support of transition programs for students and youth such as the Earn and Learn program, Project INCOME and Project SEARCH The NHVR staff actively facilitates meetings with school staff, NHVR counselors and school–to–work staff to plan the inclusion of students with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring within the state. (Page 150)

NHVR staff and leadership are working closely together to ensure that changes implemented by WIOA are achieved. The activities these positions cover include: 

  • working with NHVR counselors to improve access and services provided to students and youth with disabilities;
  • working with NHVR counselors to develop best practices and examples of best practices to students and youth with disabilities;
  • providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA.
  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff (Page 151)

Target outreach efforts to support the employment outcomes of underserved populations 

  • Improve vocational rehabilitation services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, and deaf blind communities
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff to develop and improve needed skills regarding services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
    • Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School–to– Work transition program.
    • Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind
    • Collaborate with NHVR Office of Services for Blind and Visually Impaired to improve services to students who are deaf and blind.
    • Improve job development, placement, and retention for customers who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened and deaf blind. (Page 178)
  • Build partnerships with school transition personnel and serve as a resource for career planning
  • Encourage career–focused and work–based experiences during the transition from school to work
  • Identify students with disabilities who have been underserved and develop strategies for engagement
  • Utilize alternative and extended learning opportunities (ELO) for skill acquisition and academic achievement for students who require non–traditional learning environments
  • Support and continue to explore opportunities for sector–based and alternative education, employment and training programs for this targeted group, e.g., ACES, Earn and Learn, Project Search, Project Invest, Project Incomes and CHAMP NHVR, in its RFP process, has asked potential bidders to provide regional consortium responses that will outline how “potentially eligible” students shall be identified and how the services shall be provided. These responses will focus on enhancing NHVR’s relationship with the Bureau of Developmental Services, through its area agencies, and the Bureau of Behavioral Health, through its community mental health centers, and School Administrative Units (SAU’s) to better serve students with disabilities. (Page 179)

This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders. (Page 181)

Including individuals with the most significant disabilities, to secure suitable employment, and financial and personal independence by providing rehabilitation services. The Agency continually assesses the barriers and strategies to reduce barriers that relate to equal access to the state VR program. In planning this year specific input was solicited from the Developmental Disabilities Council; the statewide Independent Living Council; the state MH Planning Council; the Governor’s Commission on Disability; the Autism Council and the executive committee of the Special Education Administrators in the state. In providing a quality customer–focused service delivery system that is timely, effective and responds to the needs of individuals with disabilities throughout the state, the NHVR recognizes the need to expand and improve services to individuals with sensory, cognitive, physical and mental impairments who have traditionally not been served or have been underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program. This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders (Page 183)
  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.   (Page 184)
Work Incentives & Benefits

ABE staff participate in workforce agency partner meetings and NH Works counselors work with students on-site in ABE classes, called “What’s Next”, to introduce career inventories, career pathways, and promote resources available through NH Works. Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receive referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. (Page 27)

The Community College System and CTE work closely together, offering dual credit opportunities for students, sharing funding streams, recruiting at education and job fairs, and promoting career pathways.

  • Collaboration between the Community College System and ABE is very successful, particularly when programs are co-located. For example, at Great Bay Community College, an MOU between ABE and the college allows ABE to teach remedial English and math courses. This better serves students by reserving financial aid or loans for college-level coursework. There is also a referral process in place and ABE programs can assist students with admissions at community colleges, enrollment, preparing for the Accuplacer and sharing scores, determining eligibility for specific job training programs, and more.
  • Collaboration between Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation, with VR counselors attending ABE programs on a monthly basis. This activity is primarily focused on the special education population. (Page 31)

Within this MOU we will seek to partner with agencies participating with Medicaid (The Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health) to assist in enhancing services to customers needing supported employment and competitive integrated employment. We are very fortunate in New Hampshire to have legislation that prohibits subminimum wage payments to individuals with disabilities (SB 47, 2015). We are proud to work with our business partners to ensure at least minimum wage employment for our mutual customers. In the agreement we will weave in our work on career pathways and work-based learning to expand current sectors (Project SEARCH) and increase employment opportunities. (Page 157)

Employer/ Business

Section identified but no detailed information specifically to disability or implementation.  (Page 206)

511

4.2 Percent of cases reviewed for which there is evidence that assistive technology services and assistive technology devices were assessed and used as necessary for individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process. It was identified that current case review data collection did not include this element. It was further identified that this is a training need area for staff. In–service training has included assistive tech services and devices and will continue to target this area as a training need in FY 12 through FY 15. Case review of FY 12 cases identified that that 70% of the time the case documentation showed evidence of an assessment of the need for assistive technology services and devices.   (Page 193)

The CPPOS will play a key role in informing students of opportunities in continued education or entry into the workforce. The CPPOS will list recommended academic courses for students to take for career success. Schools will be able to access relevant documents and guidance on the web and will receive technical assistance on modifying CPPOS’s for local use with students. Documents and guidance will be accessible on the web, including information postsecondary CTE opportunities that are linked to secondary programs. For example, the guidance documents currently tell students which colleges in New Hampshire offer the programs, and on the web they will be able to click on the link and go directly to information on that college program. New Hampshire has a long-term goal of at least implementing one CPPOS in 15 of the career clusters. Also at the end of the five-year period, all secondary CTE centers statewide will need to offer at least one CPPOS opportunity for their students. Competencies for new or updated programs will be required to align with national, state, and local standards. The New Hampshire Department of Education will work with employers and the Community College System to validate the competencies and modify as needed. (Page 219)

Mental Health

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security (Wagner–Peyser, Veterans Services, Farm Workers, Trade Act); Vocational Rehabilitation (people with disabilities, adult basic education); Community Action Agency (WIOA services dislocated workers, displaced homemakers, low–income individuals and connects to CAP services such as Head Start, Fuel Assistance, and other support programs); Older Worker Program (employment and support programs); and Granite State Independent Living (benefit specialists for the disabled) ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co–located, a close relationship and co–enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One–stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English–speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. (Page 84)

Displaying 61 - 63 of 63

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
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New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Governor Chris Sununu Statement on ABLE Savings Accounts - 10/27/2017

~~“Today, Governor Chris Sununu issued the following statement after the Executive Council voted to authorize the ability for New Hampshire to enter into an agreement with the State of Ohio for the establishment and administration of a qualified Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings account program in New Hampshire.

“Today is a great day for New Hampshire,” said Governor Chris Sununu. “We have opened access to opportunities for those with a disability, ensuring increased independence and financial security. I commend Senator Bradley and Representative Ober for their tireless efforts in bringing the ABLE program to New Hampshire, and would like to thank the Executive Council for their approval today.”

Background: In 2014, federal legislation known as the Stephen Beck, Jr. Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 (ABLE Act) was enacted, which allows individuals with qualifying disabilities to establish tax-free savings accounts to cover qualified expenses without impacting the individual's eligibility for benefits programs.  In 2016, under the leadership of Senator Jeb Bradley and Representative Lynne Ober, New Hampshire enacted SB 265 into law. The legislation authorizes the establishment of an ABLE savings account program in New Hampshire.  Those interested in learning more can contact the Governor’s Commission on Disability or the New Hampshire State Treasurer’s office.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Executive Order 2002-9 (Establishing a Governor's Task Force on Employment) - 12/04/2002

“An order establishing the Governor's Task Force on Employment and Economic Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 18 of 18

New Hampshire Closes Jobs Office for Disabled in Lebanon - 11/02/2017

“Lebanon — A state office that helps people with disabilities to find suitable employment is poised to close in December, the latest in a string of closings of state agencies in Lebanon in the past decade.

 

The state director of Vocational Rehabilitation, Lisa Hinson-Hatz, announced in an email to staff last week the closure of the Lebanon office responsible for helping people with disabilities overcome barriers — physical or otherwise — to employment"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application, New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services. - 08/11/2017

~~“New Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers.  In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services t hrough a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability Resource Centers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Part B FFY 2014 State Performance Plan/Annual Report on IDEA - 02/01/2016

“New Hampshire has a responsibility, under federal law, to have a system of general supervision that monitors the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by school districts. The general supervision system is accountable for identifying and correcting noncompliance with IDEA and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of Children with Disabilities, as well as for promoting continuous improvement…. The State Performance Plan (SPP) is a blueprint for systems change for special education in New Hampshire. It is a six-year plan and annual report submitted to the USDOE Office of Special Education in February of each year.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Position Statement For New Hampshire’s Regional Service System

We believe that employment, with its powerful and irreplaceable opportunities for autonomy, earned income, self-esteem development, social contacts, structured  activity and life satisfaction, is an import ant ingredient of a fulfilling and valued life for adults in our society. We also recognize that the capacity of adults with any type or degree of developmental disability or acquired brain disorder to participate in employment, in the right setting and with the proper supports, has been amply demonstrated.   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Next Steps New Hampshire - 09/01/2012

“The New Hampshire Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education has been awarded a $3.8 million State Personnel Development Grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs for the next 5 years. The grant will focus on developing and sustaining the skills of New Hampshire school district personnel and families to increase the number of students with disabilities graduating from high school that are college and career ready. The grant will focus on four strategies to achieve this goal: (1) increasing student competency through our state Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs), regional professional development intermediaries, a transition Community of Practice, and the use of technology.

College and career readiness is not only an academic endeavor. Schools, students, and families must plan and work together to ensure successful transition. The outcomes of the grant will remove the state from a compliance focus to a deeper, more comprehensive evidence-based approach to transition planning. These activities will be conducted collaboratively with our partners at New Hampshire Parent Information Centers, New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation, regional intermediaries and other established professional development providers so that the activities are sustained over time.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire” - 12/30/2011

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011

‘In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI)”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

2018 Labor Law Training Seminar Offered - 02/26/2018

“The New Hampshire Department of Labor is offering a Labor Law training seminar on how to stay in compliance with NH Labor Laws. The seminar will be offered on 18 dates at a variety of locations throughout the state. These events are free and open to employers, businesses and the public. These seminars are made possible by the generosity of the businesses donating their establishment’s function room to host these events.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual

The New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual provides more in-depth information about the major programs affecting income and benefits for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire.  The Manual is divided into four sections:

1. New Hampshire Adult Assistance Programs

2. Social Security Disability Insurance

3. Supplemental Security Income

4. Medicare

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Indicator 13 Training 2015-2016 Powerpoint

This powerpoint provides information to help special education professionals best help their students plan and set goals for post-secondary transition.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NH Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - VR Counselor Training and Resources

VR Counselor Training and Resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

WorkReadyNH

Work ReadyNH is a tuition-free workforce development program tailored to meet the needs of job seekers and career builders as well as provide training in the specific skills employers are seeking in their current and future employees.

 

The WorkReadyNH program provides assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. Graduates earn two nationally recognized credentials to add to their resume.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Southern New Hampshire Services Workplace Success Program

 Workplace Success is a partnership between the Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies. The goal of the program is to prepare participants to  enter a volunteer  Work Experience position within a nonprofit, business, or local/state government host site for 20-30 hours per week until they obtain full-time paid employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workplace Success

~~“The Workplace Success (WPS) Program is funded by the NH Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and represents a collaboration between the Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies to enable TANF recipients to move from welfare to work. Workplace Success provides participants in the New Hampshire Employment Program (NHEP) with the skills, knowledge, experience, and support needed to obtain paid employment.

The program prepares participants to enter the workforce by providing them a broad set of workforce development services starting with an in-depth vocational assessment process leading to a personal Career Plan. “

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

NH Department of Education - Secondary Transition Statewide Training

Foundations in Transition - Person Centered Strategies for Students with Disabilities Making the Transition to Adult Life. A NH RESPONDS Grant sponsored a four part training series that included training in practices that have been shown to improve the self determination skills and education outcomes for young people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Customer Guide to NH Vocational Rehabilitation Services

~~“The staff of New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation NHVR is committed to assisting individuals with disabilities to maximize their employment potential  and options. We understand that the uncertainty of not knowing where to turn for assistance in either finding employment or maintaining a current job can be frustrating. If you are found eligible for NHVR services, we can help you determine the career path that is right for you, based on your strengths, interests and abilities.The NHVR Customer "Toolkit" was created to present you with a description of the vocational rehabilitation process."

This packet contains an overview of the entire NHVR process, from application to post-employment services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Five Year Plan (2008-2012)

• MIG funds were used during 2002 and 2003 to provide the 13 New Hampshire Employment Security One-Stops with equipment and resource materials (e.g., screen readers, audio “how to” tapes) to make them more accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, training was provided to the staff of One-Stops regarding use of the purchased equipment and resource materials. This initiative with the One-Stops also included staff trainings on disability awareness issues and creation of a resource guide called “Disability Etiquette.”

• MIG was instrumental in the development of towo tool kits. The first, a ready-to work toolkit is a curriculum on personal futures planning, resume writing, self-directed job searching techniques, employment interviewing skills, and negotiating workplace culture, politics, and related skills. It’s currently being used by the independent living center’s 6 peer groups. The second, an employer tool kit, was developed to provide information and guidance to employers regarding reasonable workplace accommodations, tax credits, where to get technical assistance, the ticket-to-work program, and the values and benefits of hiring people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Amanda D., et al. v. Hassan, et al. Settlement Fact Sheet

The United States Department of Justice, a coalition of private plaintiff organizations, and the State of New Hampshire, have entered into a comprehensive Settlement Agreement that will transform New Hampshire’s mental health system by significantly expanding and enhancing mental health service capacity in integrated community settings. The Agreement will enable a class of adults with serious mental illness to receive needed services in the community, which will foster their independence and enable them to participate more fully in community life. The expanded and enhanced community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at State mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (“NHH”) (the State’s only psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (a State-owned and -operated nursing facility for people with mental illness). The Agreement requires the State to expand and enhance community services over the next six years. …

For the first time, the State will deliver supported employment services in accordance with the Dartmouth evidence-based model. These services will help enable individuals to obtain and maintain paid, competitive employment in integrated community settings. Over the life of the Agreement, this provision will impact thousands of people.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 11 - 11 of 11

Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program

“The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program assists low-income elderly or disabled individuals who are eligible for Medicare (available through the Social Security Administration) by paying for some or all of the associated costs of Medicare, specifically the Medicare Insurance Premiums and deductibles. The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program is also referred to as the Buy-In program….

The Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) program provides payment of Medicare Part A premiums for eligible working individuals with disabilities who are entitled to enroll in Medicare Part A, but who have lost Medicare Part A coverage due to earnings. Individuals eligible for QDWI may not otherwise be eligible for Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.6%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,342,795
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.58%
Change from
2016 to 2017
84,234
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.87%
Change from
2016 to 2017
36,069
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.59%
Change from
2016 to 2017
42.82%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.76%
Change from
2016 to 2017
83.43%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 1,330,608 1,334,795 1,342,795
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 89,630 88,094 84,234
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 35,390 36,745 36,069
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 622,689 621,838 630,403
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.48% 41.71% 42.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.92% 82.80% 83.43%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.40% 2.80% 2.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.20% 15.70% 15.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 6.90% 6.10% 6.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 82,462 85,334 86,440
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 87,587 82,957 85,164
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 161,605 158,669 163,580
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 3,207 1,282 1,508
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,901 5,225 3,690
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 555
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,052 2,403 1,733
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 3,119 4,781 3,620
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 607 603 530

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,485 1,605 1,659
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 7.70% 8.50% 8.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 48,223 48,091 47,738

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,321 8,500 4,600
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 14,803 15,256 8,125
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 21,476 22,208 14,395
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.70% 38.30% 32.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 14.10% 19.70% 28.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.80% 6.70% 9.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 71.60% 84.60% 85.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,668 2,364 3,375
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 921 808 1,171
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 8,503 10,150 10,148

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,397 2,070 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 13 23
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 16
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 46.00% 70.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.53 0.45 1.20

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,545
1,774
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 126 97 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 386 354 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 501 291 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 740 564 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 455 269 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 337 199 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 26.00% 35.40% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,064 3,943 4,365
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 64,912 65,481 65,474
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 98 96 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 65 92 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $26,068,000 $32,003,000 $37,894,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $50,540 $45,982,000 $43,996,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 38.00% 44.00% 45.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,350 2,248 1,970
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 N/A N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 103.70 120.70 117.80

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 72.34% 72.44% 71.71%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.47% 8.44% 8.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.67% 2.73% 2.88%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 54.67% 56.76% 56.90%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 38.52% 38.89% 29.48%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 67.14% 66.67% 62.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.57% 81.48% 80.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 28.62% 27.78% 32.83%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0 0 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

School to Work Transition

VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses
  • Internships   (Page 28)

Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses  (Page 28)

Post–Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury. In an effort to continue discussing these important issues and determine how, as a community, we can better serve our veterans, service members and their families. Mr. Hinson was re–appointed by Governor Margaret Hassan to serve on the Commission on PTSD and TBI. During FY 15, two internal benefits counselors (Portsmouth and Manchester Regional Offices) provided benefit counseling to 386 customers. Seventy–six of those customers who had received internal benefits counseling during the vr process were closed status 26. Our internal benefits counseling staff also continue to jointly partner with the Institute on Disability with respect to the Real Study, a National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) research project designed to provide money coaching and benefits counseling to job seeking and employed individuals with disabilities. 

Extension. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Fiscal year 2011 data on this item was measured against this baseline. In FY 09 eligibility was determined in 60 days or less from application for 89% of the customers who applied for services. In FY 15, the average days to determine eligibility was 34 days. 2.3 Percent of accurate presumptive eligibility decisions for persons eligible for SSI or SSDI. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Target set for 2010 was 90%. During an FY 11 case review the agency achieved a rating of 76% in this area. The Agency is working to reinforce documentation in this area. Case review of FY 12 cases revealed that only relatively small sample of the cases reviewed received SSA benefits and were reviewed on this criterion. Of those 51% of the cases reviewed demonstrated that the presumption of eligibility was documented in case notes. The 2013-2014 review of FY12 cases is the most recent case review to assess this area. In 2014 the Agency began work on changing its case management system to Alliance’s AWARE system. At that time, the Agency decided to revamp case management practices to match the new system. Staff have been learning the new system and strategies and a case review is planned for the end of FY 2016 to determine any additional training needs to help staff meet the requirements of the program. (Page 188)

Career Pathways

Continue to assess business interest in work–based learning and the ideal engagement strategies from the businesses’ perspectives. STRATEGY 4.2.C Determine the most appropriate way(s) to link resources from various programs and partners to offer full spectrum of work–based learning opportunities (e.g. Department of Labor School–to–Work Approved Unpaid Work Sites, Vocational Rehabilitation Work Based Learning program, On–the–job training resources from WIOA and TANF, Office of Apprenticeship services, etc.) This could be a digital infrastructure that offers the ability for businesses and emerging workers to be connected for work–based learning opportunities online. But, it may also be clarifying the message, resources, and roles/responsibilities among partners to support work–based learning connections in New Hampshire. Much mapping of the various assets has already been done and will provide a foundation for Strategy 4.2. (Page 47)

Providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA. 

  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff and other constituents, to ensure the inclusion of students and youth with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring in the schools as a result of the IDEA 2008 and the Rehabilitation Act;
  • providing advocacy for students and youth with disabilities to a variety of constituents;
  • improving connections between NHVR and other transition service agencies;
  • providing information and guidance regarding Labor Laws as they relate to job shadow, internships and work experience for students and youth with disabilities;
  • marketing to school staff, students and families, adult service agencies, etc. in a variety of areas, e.g., employment issues as a result of disability, transition of students with disabilities, availability of adult services, best practices in transition of youth with disabilities, accessing adult services, employer perspectives; develop relationships with other agencies providing services to students and youth with disabilities to maximize services offered;
  • providing technical assistance on grants as they are developed with multiple agencies and programs to ensure the inclusion of all students and youth with disabilities.
  • providing continued support of transition programs for students and youth such as the Earn and Learn program, Project INCOME and Project SEARCH The NHVR staff actively facilitates meetings with school staff, NHVR counselors and school–to–work staff to plan the inclusion of students with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring within the state. (Page 150)

NHVR staff and leadership are working closely together to ensure that changes implemented by WIOA are achieved. The activities these positions cover include: 

  • working with NHVR counselors to improve access and services provided to students and youth with disabilities;
  • working with NHVR counselors to develop best practices and examples of best practices to students and youth with disabilities;
  • providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA.
  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff (Page 151)

Target outreach efforts to support the employment outcomes of underserved populations 

  • Improve vocational rehabilitation services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, and deaf blind communities
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff to develop and improve needed skills regarding services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
    • Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School–to– Work transition program.
    • Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind
    • Collaborate with NHVR Office of Services for Blind and Visually Impaired to improve services to students who are deaf and blind.
    • Improve job development, placement, and retention for customers who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened and deaf blind. (Page 178)
  • Build partnerships with school transition personnel and serve as a resource for career planning
  • Encourage career–focused and work–based experiences during the transition from school to work
  • Identify students with disabilities who have been underserved and develop strategies for engagement
  • Utilize alternative and extended learning opportunities (ELO) for skill acquisition and academic achievement for students who require non–traditional learning environments
  • Support and continue to explore opportunities for sector–based and alternative education, employment and training programs for this targeted group, e.g., ACES, Earn and Learn, Project Search, Project Invest, Project Incomes and CHAMP NHVR, in its RFP process, has asked potential bidders to provide regional consortium responses that will outline how “potentially eligible” students shall be identified and how the services shall be provided. These responses will focus on enhancing NHVR’s relationship with the Bureau of Developmental Services, through its area agencies, and the Bureau of Behavioral Health, through its community mental health centers, and School Administrative Units (SAU’s) to better serve students with disabilities. (Page 179)

This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders. (Page 181)

Including individuals with the most significant disabilities, to secure suitable employment, and financial and personal independence by providing rehabilitation services. The Agency continually assesses the barriers and strategies to reduce barriers that relate to equal access to the state VR program. In planning this year specific input was solicited from the Developmental Disabilities Council; the statewide Independent Living Council; the state MH Planning Council; the Governor’s Commission on Disability; the Autism Council and the executive committee of the Special Education Administrators in the state. In providing a quality customer–focused service delivery system that is timely, effective and responds to the needs of individuals with disabilities throughout the state, the NHVR recognizes the need to expand and improve services to individuals with sensory, cognitive, physical and mental impairments who have traditionally not been served or have been underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program. This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders (Page 183)
  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.   (Page 184)
Work Incentives & Benefits

ABE staff participate in workforce agency partner meetings and NH Works counselors work with students on-site in ABE classes, called “What’s Next”, to introduce career inventories, career pathways, and promote resources available through NH Works. Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receive referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. (Page 27)

The Community College System and CTE work closely together, offering dual credit opportunities for students, sharing funding streams, recruiting at education and job fairs, and promoting career pathways.

  • Collaboration between the Community College System and ABE is very successful, particularly when programs are co-located. For example, at Great Bay Community College, an MOU between ABE and the college allows ABE to teach remedial English and math courses. This better serves students by reserving financial aid or loans for college-level coursework. There is also a referral process in place and ABE programs can assist students with admissions at community colleges, enrollment, preparing for the Accuplacer and sharing scores, determining eligibility for specific job training programs, and more.
  • Collaboration between Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation, with VR counselors attending ABE programs on a monthly basis. This activity is primarily focused on the special education population. (Page 31)

Within this MOU we will seek to partner with agencies participating with Medicaid (The Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health) to assist in enhancing services to customers needing supported employment and competitive integrated employment. We are very fortunate in New Hampshire to have legislation that prohibits subminimum wage payments to individuals with disabilities (SB 47, 2015). We are proud to work with our business partners to ensure at least minimum wage employment for our mutual customers. In the agreement we will weave in our work on career pathways and work-based learning to expand current sectors (Project SEARCH) and increase employment opportunities. (Page 157)

Employer/ Business

Section identified but no detailed information specifically to disability or implementation.  (Page 206)

511

4.2 Percent of cases reviewed for which there is evidence that assistive technology services and assistive technology devices were assessed and used as necessary for individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process. It was identified that current case review data collection did not include this element. It was further identified that this is a training need area for staff. In–service training has included assistive tech services and devices and will continue to target this area as a training need in FY 12 through FY 15. Case review of FY 12 cases identified that that 70% of the time the case documentation showed evidence of an assessment of the need for assistive technology services and devices.   (Page 193)

The CPPOS will play a key role in informing students of opportunities in continued education or entry into the workforce. The CPPOS will list recommended academic courses for students to take for career success. Schools will be able to access relevant documents and guidance on the web and will receive technical assistance on modifying CPPOS’s for local use with students. Documents and guidance will be accessible on the web, including information postsecondary CTE opportunities that are linked to secondary programs. For example, the guidance documents currently tell students which colleges in New Hampshire offer the programs, and on the web they will be able to click on the link and go directly to information on that college program. New Hampshire has a long-term goal of at least implementing one CPPOS in 15 of the career clusters. Also at the end of the five-year period, all secondary CTE centers statewide will need to offer at least one CPPOS opportunity for their students. Competencies for new or updated programs will be required to align with national, state, and local standards. The New Hampshire Department of Education will work with employers and the Community College System to validate the competencies and modify as needed. (Page 219)

Mental Health

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security (Wagner–Peyser, Veterans Services, Farm Workers, Trade Act); Vocational Rehabilitation (people with disabilities, adult basic education); Community Action Agency (WIOA services dislocated workers, displaced homemakers, low–income individuals and connects to CAP services such as Head Start, Fuel Assistance, and other support programs); Older Worker Program (employment and support programs); and Granite State Independent Living (benefit specialists for the disabled) ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co–located, a close relationship and co–enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One–stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English–speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. (Page 84)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 61 - 63 of 63

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Governor Chris Sununu Statement on ABLE Savings Accounts - 10/27/2017

~~“Today, Governor Chris Sununu issued the following statement after the Executive Council voted to authorize the ability for New Hampshire to enter into an agreement with the State of Ohio for the establishment and administration of a qualified Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings account program in New Hampshire.

“Today is a great day for New Hampshire,” said Governor Chris Sununu. “We have opened access to opportunities for those with a disability, ensuring increased independence and financial security. I commend Senator Bradley and Representative Ober for their tireless efforts in bringing the ABLE program to New Hampshire, and would like to thank the Executive Council for their approval today.”

Background: In 2014, federal legislation known as the Stephen Beck, Jr. Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 (ABLE Act) was enacted, which allows individuals with qualifying disabilities to establish tax-free savings accounts to cover qualified expenses without impacting the individual's eligibility for benefits programs.  In 2016, under the leadership of Senator Jeb Bradley and Representative Lynne Ober, New Hampshire enacted SB 265 into law. The legislation authorizes the establishment of an ABLE savings account program in New Hampshire.  Those interested in learning more can contact the Governor’s Commission on Disability or the New Hampshire State Treasurer’s office.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Executive Order 2002-9 (Establishing a Governor's Task Force on Employment) - 12/04/2002

“An order establishing the Governor's Task Force on Employment and Economic Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 18 of 18

New Hampshire Closes Jobs Office for Disabled in Lebanon - 11/02/2017

“Lebanon — A state office that helps people with disabilities to find suitable employment is poised to close in December, the latest in a string of closings of state agencies in Lebanon in the past decade.

 

The state director of Vocational Rehabilitation, Lisa Hinson-Hatz, announced in an email to staff last week the closure of the Lebanon office responsible for helping people with disabilities overcome barriers — physical or otherwise — to employment"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application, New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services. - 08/11/2017

~~“New Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers.  In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services t hrough a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability Resource Centers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Part B FFY 2014 State Performance Plan/Annual Report on IDEA - 02/01/2016

“New Hampshire has a responsibility, under federal law, to have a system of general supervision that monitors the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by school districts. The general supervision system is accountable for identifying and correcting noncompliance with IDEA and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of Children with Disabilities, as well as for promoting continuous improvement…. The State Performance Plan (SPP) is a blueprint for systems change for special education in New Hampshire. It is a six-year plan and annual report submitted to the USDOE Office of Special Education in February of each year.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Position Statement For New Hampshire’s Regional Service System

We believe that employment, with its powerful and irreplaceable opportunities for autonomy, earned income, self-esteem development, social contacts, structured  activity and life satisfaction, is an import ant ingredient of a fulfilling and valued life for adults in our society. We also recognize that the capacity of adults with any type or degree of developmental disability or acquired brain disorder to participate in employment, in the right setting and with the proper supports, has been amply demonstrated.   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Next Steps New Hampshire - 09/01/2012

“The New Hampshire Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education has been awarded a $3.8 million State Personnel Development Grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs for the next 5 years. The grant will focus on developing and sustaining the skills of New Hampshire school district personnel and families to increase the number of students with disabilities graduating from high school that are college and career ready. The grant will focus on four strategies to achieve this goal: (1) increasing student competency through our state Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs), regional professional development intermediaries, a transition Community of Practice, and the use of technology.

College and career readiness is not only an academic endeavor. Schools, students, and families must plan and work together to ensure successful transition. The outcomes of the grant will remove the state from a compliance focus to a deeper, more comprehensive evidence-based approach to transition planning. These activities will be conducted collaboratively with our partners at New Hampshire Parent Information Centers, New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation, regional intermediaries and other established professional development providers so that the activities are sustained over time.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire” - 12/30/2011

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011

‘In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI)”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

2018 Labor Law Training Seminar Offered - 02/26/2018

“The New Hampshire Department of Labor is offering a Labor Law training seminar on how to stay in compliance with NH Labor Laws. The seminar will be offered on 18 dates at a variety of locations throughout the state. These events are free and open to employers, businesses and the public. These seminars are made possible by the generosity of the businesses donating their establishment’s function room to host these events.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual

The New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual provides more in-depth information about the major programs affecting income and benefits for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire.  The Manual is divided into four sections:

1. New Hampshire Adult Assistance Programs

2. Social Security Disability Insurance

3. Supplemental Security Income

4. Medicare

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Indicator 13 Training 2015-2016 Powerpoint

This powerpoint provides information to help special education professionals best help their students plan and set goals for post-secondary transition.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NH Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - VR Counselor Training and Resources

VR Counselor Training and Resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

WorkReadyNH

Work ReadyNH is a tuition-free workforce development program tailored to meet the needs of job seekers and career builders as well as provide training in the specific skills employers are seeking in their current and future employees.

 

The WorkReadyNH program provides assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. Graduates earn two nationally recognized credentials to add to their resume.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Southern New Hampshire Services Workplace Success Program

 Workplace Success is a partnership between the Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies. The goal of the program is to prepare participants to  enter a volunteer  Work Experience position within a nonprofit, business, or local/state government host site for 20-30 hours per week until they obtain full-time paid employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workplace Success

~~“The Workplace Success (WPS) Program is funded by the NH Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and represents a collaboration between the Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies to enable TANF recipients to move from welfare to work. Workplace Success provides participants in the New Hampshire Employment Program (NHEP) with the skills, knowledge, experience, and support needed to obtain paid employment.

The program prepares participants to enter the workforce by providing them a broad set of workforce development services starting with an in-depth vocational assessment process leading to a personal Career Plan. “

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

NH Department of Education - Secondary Transition Statewide Training

Foundations in Transition - Person Centered Strategies for Students with Disabilities Making the Transition to Adult Life. A NH RESPONDS Grant sponsored a four part training series that included training in practices that have been shown to improve the self determination skills and education outcomes for young people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Customer Guide to NH Vocational Rehabilitation Services

~~“The staff of New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation NHVR is committed to assisting individuals with disabilities to maximize their employment potential  and options. We understand that the uncertainty of not knowing where to turn for assistance in either finding employment or maintaining a current job can be frustrating. If you are found eligible for NHVR services, we can help you determine the career path that is right for you, based on your strengths, interests and abilities.The NHVR Customer "Toolkit" was created to present you with a description of the vocational rehabilitation process."

This packet contains an overview of the entire NHVR process, from application to post-employment services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Five Year Plan (2008-2012)

• MIG funds were used during 2002 and 2003 to provide the 13 New Hampshire Employment Security One-Stops with equipment and resource materials (e.g., screen readers, audio “how to” tapes) to make them more accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, training was provided to the staff of One-Stops regarding use of the purchased equipment and resource materials. This initiative with the One-Stops also included staff trainings on disability awareness issues and creation of a resource guide called “Disability Etiquette.”

• MIG was instrumental in the development of towo tool kits. The first, a ready-to work toolkit is a curriculum on personal futures planning, resume writing, self-directed job searching techniques, employment interviewing skills, and negotiating workplace culture, politics, and related skills. It’s currently being used by the independent living center’s 6 peer groups. The second, an employer tool kit, was developed to provide information and guidance to employers regarding reasonable workplace accommodations, tax credits, where to get technical assistance, the ticket-to-work program, and the values and benefits of hiring people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Amanda D., et al. v. Hassan, et al. Settlement Fact Sheet

The United States Department of Justice, a coalition of private plaintiff organizations, and the State of New Hampshire, have entered into a comprehensive Settlement Agreement that will transform New Hampshire’s mental health system by significantly expanding and enhancing mental health service capacity in integrated community settings. The Agreement will enable a class of adults with serious mental illness to receive needed services in the community, which will foster their independence and enable them to participate more fully in community life. The expanded and enhanced community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at State mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (“NHH”) (the State’s only psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (a State-owned and -operated nursing facility for people with mental illness). The Agreement requires the State to expand and enhance community services over the next six years. …

For the first time, the State will deliver supported employment services in accordance with the Dartmouth evidence-based model. These services will help enable individuals to obtain and maintain paid, competitive employment in integrated community settings. Over the life of the Agreement, this provision will impact thousands of people.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 11 - 11 of 11

Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program

“The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program assists low-income elderly or disabled individuals who are eligible for Medicare (available through the Social Security Administration) by paying for some or all of the associated costs of Medicare, specifically the Medicare Insurance Premiums and deductibles. The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program is also referred to as the Buy-In program….

The Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) program provides payment of Medicare Part A premiums for eligible working individuals with disabilities who are entitled to enroll in Medicare Part A, but who have lost Medicare Part A coverage due to earnings. Individuals eligible for QDWI may not otherwise be eligible for Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.6%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,342,795
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.58%
Change from
2016 to 2017
84,234
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.87%
Change from
2016 to 2017
36,069
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.59%
Change from
2016 to 2017
42.82%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.76%
Change from
2016 to 2017
83.43%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 1,330,608 1,334,795 1,342,795
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 89,630 88,094 84,234
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 35,390 36,745 36,069
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 622,689 621,838 630,403
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.48% 41.71% 42.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.92% 82.80% 83.43%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.40% 2.80% 2.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.20% 15.70% 15.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 6.90% 6.10% 6.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 82,462 85,334 86,440
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 87,587 82,957 85,164
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 161,605 158,669 163,580
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 3,207 1,282 1,508
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,901 5,225 3,690
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 555
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,052 2,403 1,733
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 3,119 4,781 3,620
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 607 603 530

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,485 1,605 1,659
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 7.70% 8.50% 8.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 48,223 48,091 47,738

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,321 8,500 4,600
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 14,803 15,256 8,125
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 21,476 22,208 14,395
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.70% 38.30% 32.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 14.10% 19.70% 28.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.80% 6.70% 9.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 71.60% 84.60% 85.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,668 2,364 3,375
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 921 808 1,171
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 8,503 10,150 10,148

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,397 2,070 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 13 23
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 16
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 46.00% 70.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.53 0.45 1.20

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,545
1,774
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 126 97 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 386 354 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 501 291 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 740 564 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 455 269 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 337 199 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 26.00% 35.40% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,064 3,943 4,365
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 64,912 65,481 65,474
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 98 96 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 65 92 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $26,068,000 $32,003,000 $37,894,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $50,540 $45,982,000 $43,996,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 38.00% 44.00% 45.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,350 2,248 1,970
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 N/A N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 103.70 120.70 117.80

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 72.34% 72.44% 71.71%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.47% 8.44% 8.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.67% 2.73% 2.88%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 54.67% 56.76% 56.90%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 38.52% 38.89% 29.48%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 67.14% 66.67% 62.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.57% 81.48% 80.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 28.62% 27.78% 32.83%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0 0 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

School to Work Transition

VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses
  • Internships   (Page 28)

Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses  (Page 28)

Post–Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury. In an effort to continue discussing these important issues and determine how, as a community, we can better serve our veterans, service members and their families. Mr. Hinson was re–appointed by Governor Margaret Hassan to serve on the Commission on PTSD and TBI. During FY 15, two internal benefits counselors (Portsmouth and Manchester Regional Offices) provided benefit counseling to 386 customers. Seventy–six of those customers who had received internal benefits counseling during the vr process were closed status 26. Our internal benefits counseling staff also continue to jointly partner with the Institute on Disability with respect to the Real Study, a National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) research project designed to provide money coaching and benefits counseling to job seeking and employed individuals with disabilities. 

Extension. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Fiscal year 2011 data on this item was measured against this baseline. In FY 09 eligibility was determined in 60 days or less from application for 89% of the customers who applied for services. In FY 15, the average days to determine eligibility was 34 days. 2.3 Percent of accurate presumptive eligibility decisions for persons eligible for SSI or SSDI. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Target set for 2010 was 90%. During an FY 11 case review the agency achieved a rating of 76% in this area. The Agency is working to reinforce documentation in this area. Case review of FY 12 cases revealed that only relatively small sample of the cases reviewed received SSA benefits and were reviewed on this criterion. Of those 51% of the cases reviewed demonstrated that the presumption of eligibility was documented in case notes. The 2013-2014 review of FY12 cases is the most recent case review to assess this area. In 2014 the Agency began work on changing its case management system to Alliance’s AWARE system. At that time, the Agency decided to revamp case management practices to match the new system. Staff have been learning the new system and strategies and a case review is planned for the end of FY 2016 to determine any additional training needs to help staff meet the requirements of the program. (Page 188)

Career Pathways

Continue to assess business interest in work–based learning and the ideal engagement strategies from the businesses’ perspectives. STRATEGY 4.2.C Determine the most appropriate way(s) to link resources from various programs and partners to offer full spectrum of work–based learning opportunities (e.g. Department of Labor School–to–Work Approved Unpaid Work Sites, Vocational Rehabilitation Work Based Learning program, On–the–job training resources from WIOA and TANF, Office of Apprenticeship services, etc.) This could be a digital infrastructure that offers the ability for businesses and emerging workers to be connected for work–based learning opportunities online. But, it may also be clarifying the message, resources, and roles/responsibilities among partners to support work–based learning connections in New Hampshire. Much mapping of the various assets has already been done and will provide a foundation for Strategy 4.2. (Page 47)

Providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA. 

  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff and other constituents, to ensure the inclusion of students and youth with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring in the schools as a result of the IDEA 2008 and the Rehabilitation Act;
  • providing advocacy for students and youth with disabilities to a variety of constituents;
  • improving connections between NHVR and other transition service agencies;
  • providing information and guidance regarding Labor Laws as they relate to job shadow, internships and work experience for students and youth with disabilities;
  • marketing to school staff, students and families, adult service agencies, etc. in a variety of areas, e.g., employment issues as a result of disability, transition of students with disabilities, availability of adult services, best practices in transition of youth with disabilities, accessing adult services, employer perspectives; develop relationships with other agencies providing services to students and youth with disabilities to maximize services offered;
  • providing technical assistance on grants as they are developed with multiple agencies and programs to ensure the inclusion of all students and youth with disabilities.
  • providing continued support of transition programs for students and youth such as the Earn and Learn program, Project INCOME and Project SEARCH The NHVR staff actively facilitates meetings with school staff, NHVR counselors and school–to–work staff to plan the inclusion of students with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring within the state. (Page 150)

NHVR staff and leadership are working closely together to ensure that changes implemented by WIOA are achieved. The activities these positions cover include: 

  • working with NHVR counselors to improve access and services provided to students and youth with disabilities;
  • working with NHVR counselors to develop best practices and examples of best practices to students and youth with disabilities;
  • providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA.
  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff (Page 151)

Target outreach efforts to support the employment outcomes of underserved populations 

  • Improve vocational rehabilitation services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, and deaf blind communities
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff to develop and improve needed skills regarding services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
    • Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School–to– Work transition program.
    • Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind
    • Collaborate with NHVR Office of Services for Blind and Visually Impaired to improve services to students who are deaf and blind.
    • Improve job development, placement, and retention for customers who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened and deaf blind. (Page 178)
  • Build partnerships with school transition personnel and serve as a resource for career planning
  • Encourage career–focused and work–based experiences during the transition from school to work
  • Identify students with disabilities who have been underserved and develop strategies for engagement
  • Utilize alternative and extended learning opportunities (ELO) for skill acquisition and academic achievement for students who require non–traditional learning environments
  • Support and continue to explore opportunities for sector–based and alternative education, employment and training programs for this targeted group, e.g., ACES, Earn and Learn, Project Search, Project Invest, Project Incomes and CHAMP NHVR, in its RFP process, has asked potential bidders to provide regional consortium responses that will outline how “potentially eligible” students shall be identified and how the services shall be provided. These responses will focus on enhancing NHVR’s relationship with the Bureau of Developmental Services, through its area agencies, and the Bureau of Behavioral Health, through its community mental health centers, and School Administrative Units (SAU’s) to better serve students with disabilities. (Page 179)

This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders. (Page 181)

Including individuals with the most significant disabilities, to secure suitable employment, and financial and personal independence by providing rehabilitation services. The Agency continually assesses the barriers and strategies to reduce barriers that relate to equal access to the state VR program. In planning this year specific input was solicited from the Developmental Disabilities Council; the statewide Independent Living Council; the state MH Planning Council; the Governor’s Commission on Disability; the Autism Council and the executive committee of the Special Education Administrators in the state. In providing a quality customer–focused service delivery system that is timely, effective and responds to the needs of individuals with disabilities throughout the state, the NHVR recognizes the need to expand and improve services to individuals with sensory, cognitive, physical and mental impairments who have traditionally not been served or have been underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program. This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders (Page 183)
  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.   (Page 184)
Work Incentives & Benefits

ABE staff participate in workforce agency partner meetings and NH Works counselors work with students on-site in ABE classes, called “What’s Next”, to introduce career inventories, career pathways, and promote resources available through NH Works. Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receive referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. (Page 27)

The Community College System and CTE work closely together, offering dual credit opportunities for students, sharing funding streams, recruiting at education and job fairs, and promoting career pathways.

  • Collaboration between the Community College System and ABE is very successful, particularly when programs are co-located. For example, at Great Bay Community College, an MOU between ABE and the college allows ABE to teach remedial English and math courses. This better serves students by reserving financial aid or loans for college-level coursework. There is also a referral process in place and ABE programs can assist students with admissions at community colleges, enrollment, preparing for the Accuplacer and sharing scores, determining eligibility for specific job training programs, and more.
  • Collaboration between Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation, with VR counselors attending ABE programs on a monthly basis. This activity is primarily focused on the special education population. (Page 31)

Within this MOU we will seek to partner with agencies participating with Medicaid (The Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health) to assist in enhancing services to customers needing supported employment and competitive integrated employment. We are very fortunate in New Hampshire to have legislation that prohibits subminimum wage payments to individuals with disabilities (SB 47, 2015). We are proud to work with our business partners to ensure at least minimum wage employment for our mutual customers. In the agreement we will weave in our work on career pathways and work-based learning to expand current sectors (Project SEARCH) and increase employment opportunities. (Page 157)

Employer/ Business

Section identified but no detailed information specifically to disability or implementation.  (Page 206)

511

4.2 Percent of cases reviewed for which there is evidence that assistive technology services and assistive technology devices were assessed and used as necessary for individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process. It was identified that current case review data collection did not include this element. It was further identified that this is a training need area for staff. In–service training has included assistive tech services and devices and will continue to target this area as a training need in FY 12 through FY 15. Case review of FY 12 cases identified that that 70% of the time the case documentation showed evidence of an assessment of the need for assistive technology services and devices.   (Page 193)

The CPPOS will play a key role in informing students of opportunities in continued education or entry into the workforce. The CPPOS will list recommended academic courses for students to take for career success. Schools will be able to access relevant documents and guidance on the web and will receive technical assistance on modifying CPPOS’s for local use with students. Documents and guidance will be accessible on the web, including information postsecondary CTE opportunities that are linked to secondary programs. For example, the guidance documents currently tell students which colleges in New Hampshire offer the programs, and on the web they will be able to click on the link and go directly to information on that college program. New Hampshire has a long-term goal of at least implementing one CPPOS in 15 of the career clusters. Also at the end of the five-year period, all secondary CTE centers statewide will need to offer at least one CPPOS opportunity for their students. Competencies for new or updated programs will be required to align with national, state, and local standards. The New Hampshire Department of Education will work with employers and the Community College System to validate the competencies and modify as needed. (Page 219)

Mental Health

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security (Wagner–Peyser, Veterans Services, Farm Workers, Trade Act); Vocational Rehabilitation (people with disabilities, adult basic education); Community Action Agency (WIOA services dislocated workers, displaced homemakers, low–income individuals and connects to CAP services such as Head Start, Fuel Assistance, and other support programs); Older Worker Program (employment and support programs); and Granite State Independent Living (benefit specialists for the disabled) ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co–located, a close relationship and co–enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One–stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English–speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. (Page 84)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 61 - 63 of 63

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Governor Chris Sununu Statement on ABLE Savings Accounts - 10/27/2017

~~“Today, Governor Chris Sununu issued the following statement after the Executive Council voted to authorize the ability for New Hampshire to enter into an agreement with the State of Ohio for the establishment and administration of a qualified Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings account program in New Hampshire.

“Today is a great day for New Hampshire,” said Governor Chris Sununu. “We have opened access to opportunities for those with a disability, ensuring increased independence and financial security. I commend Senator Bradley and Representative Ober for their tireless efforts in bringing the ABLE program to New Hampshire, and would like to thank the Executive Council for their approval today.”

Background: In 2014, federal legislation known as the Stephen Beck, Jr. Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 (ABLE Act) was enacted, which allows individuals with qualifying disabilities to establish tax-free savings accounts to cover qualified expenses without impacting the individual's eligibility for benefits programs.  In 2016, under the leadership of Senator Jeb Bradley and Representative Lynne Ober, New Hampshire enacted SB 265 into law. The legislation authorizes the establishment of an ABLE savings account program in New Hampshire.  Those interested in learning more can contact the Governor’s Commission on Disability or the New Hampshire State Treasurer’s office.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Executive Order 2002-9 (Establishing a Governor's Task Force on Employment) - 12/04/2002

“An order establishing the Governor's Task Force on Employment and Economic Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 18 of 18

New Hampshire Closes Jobs Office for Disabled in Lebanon - 11/02/2017

“Lebanon — A state office that helps people with disabilities to find suitable employment is poised to close in December, the latest in a string of closings of state agencies in Lebanon in the past decade.

 

The state director of Vocational Rehabilitation, Lisa Hinson-Hatz, announced in an email to staff last week the closure of the Lebanon office responsible for helping people with disabilities overcome barriers — physical or otherwise — to employment"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application, New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services. - 08/11/2017

~~“New Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers.  In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services t hrough a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability Resource Centers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Part B FFY 2014 State Performance Plan/Annual Report on IDEA - 02/01/2016

“New Hampshire has a responsibility, under federal law, to have a system of general supervision that monitors the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by school districts. The general supervision system is accountable for identifying and correcting noncompliance with IDEA and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of Children with Disabilities, as well as for promoting continuous improvement…. The State Performance Plan (SPP) is a blueprint for systems change for special education in New Hampshire. It is a six-year plan and annual report submitted to the USDOE Office of Special Education in February of each year.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Position Statement For New Hampshire’s Regional Service System

We believe that employment, with its powerful and irreplaceable opportunities for autonomy, earned income, self-esteem development, social contacts, structured  activity and life satisfaction, is an import ant ingredient of a fulfilling and valued life for adults in our society. We also recognize that the capacity of adults with any type or degree of developmental disability or acquired brain disorder to participate in employment, in the right setting and with the proper supports, has been amply demonstrated.   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Next Steps New Hampshire - 09/01/2012

“The New Hampshire Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education has been awarded a $3.8 million State Personnel Development Grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs for the next 5 years. The grant will focus on developing and sustaining the skills of New Hampshire school district personnel and families to increase the number of students with disabilities graduating from high school that are college and career ready. The grant will focus on four strategies to achieve this goal: (1) increasing student competency through our state Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs), regional professional development intermediaries, a transition Community of Practice, and the use of technology.

College and career readiness is not only an academic endeavor. Schools, students, and families must plan and work together to ensure successful transition. The outcomes of the grant will remove the state from a compliance focus to a deeper, more comprehensive evidence-based approach to transition planning. These activities will be conducted collaboratively with our partners at New Hampshire Parent Information Centers, New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation, regional intermediaries and other established professional development providers so that the activities are sustained over time.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire” - 12/30/2011

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011

‘In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI)”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

2018 Labor Law Training Seminar Offered - 02/26/2018

“The New Hampshire Department of Labor is offering a Labor Law training seminar on how to stay in compliance with NH Labor Laws. The seminar will be offered on 18 dates at a variety of locations throughout the state. These events are free and open to employers, businesses and the public. These seminars are made possible by the generosity of the businesses donating their establishment’s function room to host these events.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual

The New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual provides more in-depth information about the major programs affecting income and benefits for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire.  The Manual is divided into four sections:

1. New Hampshire Adult Assistance Programs

2. Social Security Disability Insurance

3. Supplemental Security Income

4. Medicare

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Indicator 13 Training 2015-2016 Powerpoint

This powerpoint provides information to help special education professionals best help their students plan and set goals for post-secondary transition.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NH Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - VR Counselor Training and Resources

VR Counselor Training and Resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

WorkReadyNH

Work ReadyNH is a tuition-free workforce development program tailored to meet the needs of job seekers and career builders as well as provide training in the specific skills employers are seeking in their current and future employees.

 

The WorkReadyNH program provides assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. Graduates earn two nationally recognized credentials to add to their resume.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Southern New Hampshire Services Workplace Success Program

 Workplace Success is a partnership between the Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies. The goal of the program is to prepare participants to  enter a volunteer  Work Experience position within a nonprofit, business, or local/state government host site for 20-30 hours per week until they obtain full-time paid employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workplace Success

~~“The Workplace Success (WPS) Program is funded by the NH Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and represents a collaboration between the Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies to enable TANF recipients to move from welfare to work. Workplace Success provides participants in the New Hampshire Employment Program (NHEP) with the skills, knowledge, experience, and support needed to obtain paid employment.

The program prepares participants to enter the workforce by providing them a broad set of workforce development services starting with an in-depth vocational assessment process leading to a personal Career Plan. “

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

NH Department of Education - Secondary Transition Statewide Training

Foundations in Transition - Person Centered Strategies for Students with Disabilities Making the Transition to Adult Life. A NH RESPONDS Grant sponsored a four part training series that included training in practices that have been shown to improve the self determination skills and education outcomes for young people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Customer Guide to NH Vocational Rehabilitation Services

~~“The staff of New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation NHVR is committed to assisting individuals with disabilities to maximize their employment potential  and options. We understand that the uncertainty of not knowing where to turn for assistance in either finding employment or maintaining a current job can be frustrating. If you are found eligible for NHVR services, we can help you determine the career path that is right for you, based on your strengths, interests and abilities.The NHVR Customer "Toolkit" was created to present you with a description of the vocational rehabilitation process."

This packet contains an overview of the entire NHVR process, from application to post-employment services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Five Year Plan (2008-2012)

• MIG funds were used during 2002 and 2003 to provide the 13 New Hampshire Employment Security One-Stops with equipment and resource materials (e.g., screen readers, audio “how to” tapes) to make them more accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, training was provided to the staff of One-Stops regarding use of the purchased equipment and resource materials. This initiative with the One-Stops also included staff trainings on disability awareness issues and creation of a resource guide called “Disability Etiquette.”

• MIG was instrumental in the development of towo tool kits. The first, a ready-to work toolkit is a curriculum on personal futures planning, resume writing, self-directed job searching techniques, employment interviewing skills, and negotiating workplace culture, politics, and related skills. It’s currently being used by the independent living center’s 6 peer groups. The second, an employer tool kit, was developed to provide information and guidance to employers regarding reasonable workplace accommodations, tax credits, where to get technical assistance, the ticket-to-work program, and the values and benefits of hiring people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Amanda D., et al. v. Hassan, et al. Settlement Fact Sheet

The United States Department of Justice, a coalition of private plaintiff organizations, and the State of New Hampshire, have entered into a comprehensive Settlement Agreement that will transform New Hampshire’s mental health system by significantly expanding and enhancing mental health service capacity in integrated community settings. The Agreement will enable a class of adults with serious mental illness to receive needed services in the community, which will foster their independence and enable them to participate more fully in community life. The expanded and enhanced community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at State mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (“NHH”) (the State’s only psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (a State-owned and -operated nursing facility for people with mental illness). The Agreement requires the State to expand and enhance community services over the next six years. …

For the first time, the State will deliver supported employment services in accordance with the Dartmouth evidence-based model. These services will help enable individuals to obtain and maintain paid, competitive employment in integrated community settings. Over the life of the Agreement, this provision will impact thousands of people.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 11 - 11 of 11

Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program

“The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program assists low-income elderly or disabled individuals who are eligible for Medicare (available through the Social Security Administration) by paying for some or all of the associated costs of Medicare, specifically the Medicare Insurance Premiums and deductibles. The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program is also referred to as the Buy-In program….

The Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) program provides payment of Medicare Part A premiums for eligible working individuals with disabilities who are entitled to enroll in Medicare Part A, but who have lost Medicare Part A coverage due to earnings. Individuals eligible for QDWI may not otherwise be eligible for Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.6%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,342,795
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.58%
Change from
2016 to 2017
84,234
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.87%
Change from
2016 to 2017
36,069
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.59%
Change from
2016 to 2017
42.82%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.76%
Change from
2016 to 2017
83.43%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 1,342,795
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 84,234
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 36,069
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 630,403
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 42.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 83.43%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 15.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 6.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 86,440
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 85,164
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 163,580
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,508
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,690
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 555
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,733
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 3,620
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 530

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,659
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 47,738

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 4,600
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 8,125
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 14,395
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 32.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 28.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 9.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 85.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,375
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,171
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 10,148

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 23
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 16
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 70.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.20

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,365
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 65,474
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $37,894,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $43,996,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 45.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,970
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 117.80

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 71.71%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.88%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 56.90%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 29.48%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 62.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.83%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

School to Work Transition

VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses
  • Internships   (Page 28)

Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses  (Page 28)

Post–Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury. In an effort to continue discussing these important issues and determine how, as a community, we can better serve our veterans, service members and their families. Mr. Hinson was re–appointed by Governor Margaret Hassan to serve on the Commission on PTSD and TBI. During FY 15, two internal benefits counselors (Portsmouth and Manchester Regional Offices) provided benefit counseling to 386 customers. Seventy–six of those customers who had received internal benefits counseling during the vr process were closed status 26. Our internal benefits counseling staff also continue to jointly partner with the Institute on Disability with respect to the Real Study, a National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) research project designed to provide money coaching and benefits counseling to job seeking and employed individuals with disabilities. 

Extension. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Fiscal year 2011 data on this item was measured against this baseline. In FY 09 eligibility was determined in 60 days or less from application for 89% of the customers who applied for services. In FY 15, the average days to determine eligibility was 34 days. 2.3 Percent of accurate presumptive eligibility decisions for persons eligible for SSI or SSDI. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Target set for 2010 was 90%. During an FY 11 case review the agency achieved a rating of 76% in this area. The Agency is working to reinforce documentation in this area. Case review of FY 12 cases revealed that only relatively small sample of the cases reviewed received SSA benefits and were reviewed on this criterion. Of those 51% of the cases reviewed demonstrated that the presumption of eligibility was documented in case notes. The 2013-2014 review of FY12 cases is the most recent case review to assess this area. In 2014 the Agency began work on changing its case management system to Alliance’s AWARE system. At that time, the Agency decided to revamp case management practices to match the new system. Staff have been learning the new system and strategies and a case review is planned for the end of FY 2016 to determine any additional training needs to help staff meet the requirements of the program. (Page 188)

Career Pathways

Continue to assess business interest in work–based learning and the ideal engagement strategies from the businesses’ perspectives. STRATEGY 4.2.C Determine the most appropriate way(s) to link resources from various programs and partners to offer full spectrum of work–based learning opportunities (e.g. Department of Labor School–to–Work Approved Unpaid Work Sites, Vocational Rehabilitation Work Based Learning program, On–the–job training resources from WIOA and TANF, Office of Apprenticeship services, etc.) This could be a digital infrastructure that offers the ability for businesses and emerging workers to be connected for work–based learning opportunities online. But, it may also be clarifying the message, resources, and roles/responsibilities among partners to support work–based learning connections in New Hampshire. Much mapping of the various assets has already been done and will provide a foundation for Strategy 4.2. (Page 47)

Providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA. 

  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff and other constituents, to ensure the inclusion of students and youth with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring in the schools as a result of the IDEA 2008 and the Rehabilitation Act;
  • providing advocacy for students and youth with disabilities to a variety of constituents;
  • improving connections between NHVR and other transition service agencies;
  • providing information and guidance regarding Labor Laws as they relate to job shadow, internships and work experience for students and youth with disabilities;
  • marketing to school staff, students and families, adult service agencies, etc. in a variety of areas, e.g., employment issues as a result of disability, transition of students with disabilities, availability of adult services, best practices in transition of youth with disabilities, accessing adult services, employer perspectives; develop relationships with other agencies providing services to students and youth with disabilities to maximize services offered;
  • providing technical assistance on grants as they are developed with multiple agencies and programs to ensure the inclusion of all students and youth with disabilities.
  • providing continued support of transition programs for students and youth such as the Earn and Learn program, Project INCOME and Project SEARCH The NHVR staff actively facilitates meetings with school staff, NHVR counselors and school–to–work staff to plan the inclusion of students with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring within the state. (Page 150)

NHVR staff and leadership are working closely together to ensure that changes implemented by WIOA are achieved. The activities these positions cover include: 

  • working with NHVR counselors to improve access and services provided to students and youth with disabilities;
  • working with NHVR counselors to develop best practices and examples of best practices to students and youth with disabilities;
  • providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA.
  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff (Page 151)

Target outreach efforts to support the employment outcomes of underserved populations 

  • Improve vocational rehabilitation services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, and deaf blind communities
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff to develop and improve needed skills regarding services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
    • Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School–to– Work transition program.
    • Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind
    • Collaborate with NHVR Office of Services for Blind and Visually Impaired to improve services to students who are deaf and blind.
    • Improve job development, placement, and retention for customers who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened and deaf blind. (Page 178)
  • Build partnerships with school transition personnel and serve as a resource for career planning
  • Encourage career–focused and work–based experiences during the transition from school to work
  • Identify students with disabilities who have been underserved and develop strategies for engagement
  • Utilize alternative and extended learning opportunities (ELO) for skill acquisition and academic achievement for students who require non–traditional learning environments
  • Support and continue to explore opportunities for sector–based and alternative education, employment and training programs for this targeted group, e.g., ACES, Earn and Learn, Project Search, Project Invest, Project Incomes and CHAMP NHVR, in its RFP process, has asked potential bidders to provide regional consortium responses that will outline how “potentially eligible” students shall be identified and how the services shall be provided. These responses will focus on enhancing NHVR’s relationship with the Bureau of Developmental Services, through its area agencies, and the Bureau of Behavioral Health, through its community mental health centers, and School Administrative Units (SAU’s) to better serve students with disabilities. (Page 179)

This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders. (Page 181)

Including individuals with the most significant disabilities, to secure suitable employment, and financial and personal independence by providing rehabilitation services. The Agency continually assesses the barriers and strategies to reduce barriers that relate to equal access to the state VR program. In planning this year specific input was solicited from the Developmental Disabilities Council; the statewide Independent Living Council; the state MH Planning Council; the Governor’s Commission on Disability; the Autism Council and the executive committee of the Special Education Administrators in the state. In providing a quality customer–focused service delivery system that is timely, effective and responds to the needs of individuals with disabilities throughout the state, the NHVR recognizes the need to expand and improve services to individuals with sensory, cognitive, physical and mental impairments who have traditionally not been served or have been underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program. This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders (Page 183)
  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.   (Page 184)
Work Incentives & Benefits

ABE staff participate in workforce agency partner meetings and NH Works counselors work with students on-site in ABE classes, called “What’s Next”, to introduce career inventories, career pathways, and promote resources available through NH Works. Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receive referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. (Page 27)

The Community College System and CTE work closely together, offering dual credit opportunities for students, sharing funding streams, recruiting at education and job fairs, and promoting career pathways.

  • Collaboration between the Community College System and ABE is very successful, particularly when programs are co-located. For example, at Great Bay Community College, an MOU between ABE and the college allows ABE to teach remedial English and math courses. This better serves students by reserving financial aid or loans for college-level coursework. There is also a referral process in place and ABE programs can assist students with admissions at community colleges, enrollment, preparing for the Accuplacer and sharing scores, determining eligibility for specific job training programs, and more.
  • Collaboration between Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation, with VR counselors attending ABE programs on a monthly basis. This activity is primarily focused on the special education population. (Page 31)

Within this MOU we will seek to partner with agencies participating with Medicaid (The Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health) to assist in enhancing services to customers needing supported employment and competitive integrated employment. We are very fortunate in New Hampshire to have legislation that prohibits subminimum wage payments to individuals with disabilities (SB 47, 2015). We are proud to work with our business partners to ensure at least minimum wage employment for our mutual customers. In the agreement we will weave in our work on career pathways and work-based learning to expand current sectors (Project SEARCH) and increase employment opportunities. (Page 157)

Employer/ Business

Section identified but no detailed information specifically to disability or implementation.  (Page 206)

511

4.2 Percent of cases reviewed for which there is evidence that assistive technology services and assistive technology devices were assessed and used as necessary for individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process. It was identified that current case review data collection did not include this element. It was further identified that this is a training need area for staff. In–service training has included assistive tech services and devices and will continue to target this area as a training need in FY 12 through FY 15. Case review of FY 12 cases identified that that 70% of the time the case documentation showed evidence of an assessment of the need for assistive technology services and devices.   (Page 193)

The CPPOS will play a key role in informing students of opportunities in continued education or entry into the workforce. The CPPOS will list recommended academic courses for students to take for career success. Schools will be able to access relevant documents and guidance on the web and will receive technical assistance on modifying CPPOS’s for local use with students. Documents and guidance will be accessible on the web, including information postsecondary CTE opportunities that are linked to secondary programs. For example, the guidance documents currently tell students which colleges in New Hampshire offer the programs, and on the web they will be able to click on the link and go directly to information on that college program. New Hampshire has a long-term goal of at least implementing one CPPOS in 15 of the career clusters. Also at the end of the five-year period, all secondary CTE centers statewide will need to offer at least one CPPOS opportunity for their students. Competencies for new or updated programs will be required to align with national, state, and local standards. The New Hampshire Department of Education will work with employers and the Community College System to validate the competencies and modify as needed. (Page 219)

Mental Health

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security (Wagner–Peyser, Veterans Services, Farm Workers, Trade Act); Vocational Rehabilitation (people with disabilities, adult basic education); Community Action Agency (WIOA services dislocated workers, displaced homemakers, low–income individuals and connects to CAP services such as Head Start, Fuel Assistance, and other support programs); Older Worker Program (employment and support programs); and Granite State Independent Living (benefit specialists for the disabled) ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co–located, a close relationship and co–enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One–stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English–speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. (Page 84)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 61 - 63 of 63

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Governor Chris Sununu Statement on ABLE Savings Accounts - 10/27/2017

~~“Today, Governor Chris Sununu issued the following statement after the Executive Council voted to authorize the ability for New Hampshire to enter into an agreement with the State of Ohio for the establishment and administration of a qualified Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings account program in New Hampshire.

“Today is a great day for New Hampshire,” said Governor Chris Sununu. “We have opened access to opportunities for those with a disability, ensuring increased independence and financial security. I commend Senator Bradley and Representative Ober for their tireless efforts in bringing the ABLE program to New Hampshire, and would like to thank the Executive Council for their approval today.”

Background: In 2014, federal legislation known as the Stephen Beck, Jr. Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 (ABLE Act) was enacted, which allows individuals with qualifying disabilities to establish tax-free savings accounts to cover qualified expenses without impacting the individual's eligibility for benefits programs.  In 2016, under the leadership of Senator Jeb Bradley and Representative Lynne Ober, New Hampshire enacted SB 265 into law. The legislation authorizes the establishment of an ABLE savings account program in New Hampshire.  Those interested in learning more can contact the Governor’s Commission on Disability or the New Hampshire State Treasurer’s office.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Executive Order 2002-9 (Establishing a Governor's Task Force on Employment) - 12/04/2002

“An order establishing the Governor's Task Force on Employment and Economic Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 18 of 18

New Hampshire Closes Jobs Office for Disabled in Lebanon - 11/02/2017

“Lebanon — A state office that helps people with disabilities to find suitable employment is poised to close in December, the latest in a string of closings of state agencies in Lebanon in the past decade.

 

The state director of Vocational Rehabilitation, Lisa Hinson-Hatz, announced in an email to staff last week the closure of the Lebanon office responsible for helping people with disabilities overcome barriers — physical or otherwise — to employment"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application, New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services. - 08/11/2017

~~“New Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers.  In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services t hrough a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability Resource Centers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Part B FFY 2014 State Performance Plan/Annual Report on IDEA - 02/01/2016

“New Hampshire has a responsibility, under federal law, to have a system of general supervision that monitors the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by school districts. The general supervision system is accountable for identifying and correcting noncompliance with IDEA and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of Children with Disabilities, as well as for promoting continuous improvement…. The State Performance Plan (SPP) is a blueprint for systems change for special education in New Hampshire. It is a six-year plan and annual report submitted to the USDOE Office of Special Education in February of each year.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Position Statement For New Hampshire’s Regional Service System

We believe that employment, with its powerful and irreplaceable opportunities for autonomy, earned income, self-esteem development, social contacts, structured  activity and life satisfaction, is an import ant ingredient of a fulfilling and valued life for adults in our society. We also recognize that the capacity of adults with any type or degree of developmental disability or acquired brain disorder to participate in employment, in the right setting and with the proper supports, has been amply demonstrated.   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Next Steps New Hampshire - 09/01/2012

“The New Hampshire Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education has been awarded a $3.8 million State Personnel Development Grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs for the next 5 years. The grant will focus on developing and sustaining the skills of New Hampshire school district personnel and families to increase the number of students with disabilities graduating from high school that are college and career ready. The grant will focus on four strategies to achieve this goal: (1) increasing student competency through our state Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs), regional professional development intermediaries, a transition Community of Practice, and the use of technology.

College and career readiness is not only an academic endeavor. Schools, students, and families must plan and work together to ensure successful transition. The outcomes of the grant will remove the state from a compliance focus to a deeper, more comprehensive evidence-based approach to transition planning. These activities will be conducted collaboratively with our partners at New Hampshire Parent Information Centers, New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation, regional intermediaries and other established professional development providers so that the activities are sustained over time.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire” - 12/30/2011

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011

‘In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI)”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

2018 Labor Law Training Seminar Offered - 02/26/2018

“The New Hampshire Department of Labor is offering a Labor Law training seminar on how to stay in compliance with NH Labor Laws. The seminar will be offered on 18 dates at a variety of locations throughout the state. These events are free and open to employers, businesses and the public. These seminars are made possible by the generosity of the businesses donating their establishment’s function room to host these events.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual

The New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual provides more in-depth information about the major programs affecting income and benefits for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire.  The Manual is divided into four sections:

1. New Hampshire Adult Assistance Programs

2. Social Security Disability Insurance

3. Supplemental Security Income

4. Medicare

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Indicator 13 Training 2015-2016 Powerpoint

This powerpoint provides information to help special education professionals best help their students plan and set goals for post-secondary transition.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NH Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - VR Counselor Training and Resources

VR Counselor Training and Resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

WorkReadyNH

Work ReadyNH is a tuition-free workforce development program tailored to meet the needs of job seekers and career builders as well as provide training in the specific skills employers are seeking in their current and future employees.

 

The WorkReadyNH program provides assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. Graduates earn two nationally recognized credentials to add to their resume.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Southern New Hampshire Services Workplace Success Program

 Workplace Success is a partnership between the Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies. The goal of the program is to prepare participants to  enter a volunteer  Work Experience position within a nonprofit, business, or local/state government host site for 20-30 hours per week until they obtain full-time paid employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workplace Success

~~“The Workplace Success (WPS) Program is funded by the NH Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and represents a collaboration between the Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies to enable TANF recipients to move from welfare to work. Workplace Success provides participants in the New Hampshire Employment Program (NHEP) with the skills, knowledge, experience, and support needed to obtain paid employment.

The program prepares participants to enter the workforce by providing them a broad set of workforce development services starting with an in-depth vocational assessment process leading to a personal Career Plan. “

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

NH Department of Education - Secondary Transition Statewide Training

Foundations in Transition - Person Centered Strategies for Students with Disabilities Making the Transition to Adult Life. A NH RESPONDS Grant sponsored a four part training series that included training in practices that have been shown to improve the self determination skills and education outcomes for young people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Customer Guide to NH Vocational Rehabilitation Services

~~“The staff of New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation NHVR is committed to assisting individuals with disabilities to maximize their employment potential  and options. We understand that the uncertainty of not knowing where to turn for assistance in either finding employment or maintaining a current job can be frustrating. If you are found eligible for NHVR services, we can help you determine the career path that is right for you, based on your strengths, interests and abilities.The NHVR Customer "Toolkit" was created to present you with a description of the vocational rehabilitation process."

This packet contains an overview of the entire NHVR process, from application to post-employment services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Five Year Plan (2008-2012)

• MIG funds were used during 2002 and 2003 to provide the 13 New Hampshire Employment Security One-Stops with equipment and resource materials (e.g., screen readers, audio “how to” tapes) to make them more accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, training was provided to the staff of One-Stops regarding use of the purchased equipment and resource materials. This initiative with the One-Stops also included staff trainings on disability awareness issues and creation of a resource guide called “Disability Etiquette.”

• MIG was instrumental in the development of towo tool kits. The first, a ready-to work toolkit is a curriculum on personal futures planning, resume writing, self-directed job searching techniques, employment interviewing skills, and negotiating workplace culture, politics, and related skills. It’s currently being used by the independent living center’s 6 peer groups. The second, an employer tool kit, was developed to provide information and guidance to employers regarding reasonable workplace accommodations, tax credits, where to get technical assistance, the ticket-to-work program, and the values and benefits of hiring people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Amanda D., et al. v. Hassan, et al. Settlement Fact Sheet

The United States Department of Justice, a coalition of private plaintiff organizations, and the State of New Hampshire, have entered into a comprehensive Settlement Agreement that will transform New Hampshire’s mental health system by significantly expanding and enhancing mental health service capacity in integrated community settings. The Agreement will enable a class of adults with serious mental illness to receive needed services in the community, which will foster their independence and enable them to participate more fully in community life. The expanded and enhanced community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at State mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (“NHH”) (the State’s only psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (a State-owned and -operated nursing facility for people with mental illness). The Agreement requires the State to expand and enhance community services over the next six years. …

For the first time, the State will deliver supported employment services in accordance with the Dartmouth evidence-based model. These services will help enable individuals to obtain and maintain paid, competitive employment in integrated community settings. Over the life of the Agreement, this provision will impact thousands of people.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 11 - 11 of 11

Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program

“The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program assists low-income elderly or disabled individuals who are eligible for Medicare (available through the Social Security Administration) by paying for some or all of the associated costs of Medicare, specifically the Medicare Insurance Premiums and deductibles. The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program is also referred to as the Buy-In program….

The Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) program provides payment of Medicare Part A premiums for eligible working individuals with disabilities who are entitled to enroll in Medicare Part A, but who have lost Medicare Part A coverage due to earnings. Individuals eligible for QDWI may not otherwise be eligible for Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

States - Phone

Snapshot

The motto of the Granite State is "Live Free Or Die," a message that aligns well with New Hampshire's efforts to expand real jobs at real wages for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Hampshire’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.6%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,342,795
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.58%
Change from
2016 to 2017
84,234
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.87%
Change from
2016 to 2017
36,069
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.59%
Change from
2016 to 2017
42.82%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.76%
Change from
2016 to 2017
83.43%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 1,342,795
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 84,234
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 36,069
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 630,403
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 42.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 83.43%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 15.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 6.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 86,440
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 85,164
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 163,580
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,508
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,690
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 555
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,733
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 3,620
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 530

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,659
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 47,738

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 4,600
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 8,125
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 14,395
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 32.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 28.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 9.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 85.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,375
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,171
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 10,148

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,019
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 23
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 16
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 70.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.20

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,365
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 65,474
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $37,894,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $43,996,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 45.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,970
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 117.80

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 71.71%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.88%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 56.90%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 29.48%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 62.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.83%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

School to Work Transition

VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses
  • Internships   (Page 28)

Transition VR operates under the awareness that collaboration with other agencies, community groups, and employers is what makes their services most meaningful for their customers. There has been continued outreach to the business community on benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. VR staff also work to ensure other public workforce system resources are fully accessible, and closely align the personal interests of clients with the current job market, using the labor market information that is available. Currently there are strong relationships with local employers, regional workforce coalitions, community organizations such as Goodwill, and co-enrollment for customers such as On-the-Job-Training programs. Students are able to gain real world work experience through the Extended Learning Opportunity (ELO) program. The NH Department of Education supports and encourages local school districts to adopt policies that encourage ’extended learning’. Extended learning refers to the primary acquisition of knowledge and skills through instruction or study outside of the traditional classroom methodology, including, but not limited, to: 

  • Apprenticeships
  • Community service
  • Independent study
  • Online courses  (Page 28)

Post–Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury. In an effort to continue discussing these important issues and determine how, as a community, we can better serve our veterans, service members and their families. Mr. Hinson was re–appointed by Governor Margaret Hassan to serve on the Commission on PTSD and TBI. During FY 15, two internal benefits counselors (Portsmouth and Manchester Regional Offices) provided benefit counseling to 386 customers. Seventy–six of those customers who had received internal benefits counseling during the vr process were closed status 26. Our internal benefits counseling staff also continue to jointly partner with the Institute on Disability with respect to the Real Study, a National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) research project designed to provide money coaching and benefits counseling to job seeking and employed individuals with disabilities. 

Extension. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Fiscal year 2011 data on this item was measured against this baseline. In FY 09 eligibility was determined in 60 days or less from application for 89% of the customers who applied for services. In FY 15, the average days to determine eligibility was 34 days. 2.3 Percent of accurate presumptive eligibility decisions for persons eligible for SSI or SSDI. A baseline was determined utilizing FY 09 data. Target set for 2010 was 90%. During an FY 11 case review the agency achieved a rating of 76% in this area. The Agency is working to reinforce documentation in this area. Case review of FY 12 cases revealed that only relatively small sample of the cases reviewed received SSA benefits and were reviewed on this criterion. Of those 51% of the cases reviewed demonstrated that the presumption of eligibility was documented in case notes. The 2013-2014 review of FY12 cases is the most recent case review to assess this area. In 2014 the Agency began work on changing its case management system to Alliance’s AWARE system. At that time, the Agency decided to revamp case management practices to match the new system. Staff have been learning the new system and strategies and a case review is planned for the end of FY 2016 to determine any additional training needs to help staff meet the requirements of the program. (Page 188)

Career Pathways

Continue to assess business interest in work–based learning and the ideal engagement strategies from the businesses’ perspectives. STRATEGY 4.2.C Determine the most appropriate way(s) to link resources from various programs and partners to offer full spectrum of work–based learning opportunities (e.g. Department of Labor School–to–Work Approved Unpaid Work Sites, Vocational Rehabilitation Work Based Learning program, On–the–job training resources from WIOA and TANF, Office of Apprenticeship services, etc.) This could be a digital infrastructure that offers the ability for businesses and emerging workers to be connected for work–based learning opportunities online. But, it may also be clarifying the message, resources, and roles/responsibilities among partners to support work–based learning connections in New Hampshire. Much mapping of the various assets has already been done and will provide a foundation for Strategy 4.2. (Page 47)

Providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA. 

  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff and other constituents, to ensure the inclusion of students and youth with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring in the schools as a result of the IDEA 2008 and the Rehabilitation Act;
  • providing advocacy for students and youth with disabilities to a variety of constituents;
  • improving connections between NHVR and other transition service agencies;
  • providing information and guidance regarding Labor Laws as they relate to job shadow, internships and work experience for students and youth with disabilities;
  • marketing to school staff, students and families, adult service agencies, etc. in a variety of areas, e.g., employment issues as a result of disability, transition of students with disabilities, availability of adult services, best practices in transition of youth with disabilities, accessing adult services, employer perspectives; develop relationships with other agencies providing services to students and youth with disabilities to maximize services offered;
  • providing technical assistance on grants as they are developed with multiple agencies and programs to ensure the inclusion of all students and youth with disabilities.
  • providing continued support of transition programs for students and youth such as the Earn and Learn program, Project INCOME and Project SEARCH The NHVR staff actively facilitates meetings with school staff, NHVR counselors and school–to–work staff to plan the inclusion of students with disabilities in the systemic changes occurring within the state. (Page 150)

NHVR staff and leadership are working closely together to ensure that changes implemented by WIOA are achieved. The activities these positions cover include: 

  • working with NHVR counselors to improve access and services provided to students and youth with disabilities;
  • working with NHVR counselors to develop best practices and examples of best practices to students and youth with disabilities;
  • providing training on activities occurring across the state as a result of implementation of WIOA.
  • coordinating efforts with NHVR counselors, school district staff, school–to–work staff (Page 151)

Target outreach efforts to support the employment outcomes of underserved populations 

  • Improve vocational rehabilitation services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, and deaf blind communities
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff to develop and improve needed skills regarding services to the deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Provide appropriate training opportunities as needed for staff on job accommodations, and Assistive Technology (AT) used by person who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, or deaf blind communities.
    • Increase delivery of, awareness of, and coordination of available educational and vocational services among at risk students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind.
    • Develop transition resources and increased opportunities for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind and their parents through collaboration with DOE, and other partner, School–to– Work transition program.
    • Collaborate with the Bureau of Special Education to establish suggested guidelines for the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or other programs that could improve outcomes for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf blind
    • Collaborate with NHVR Office of Services for Blind and Visually Impaired to improve services to students who are deaf and blind.
    • Improve job development, placement, and retention for customers who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened and deaf blind. (Page 178)
  • Build partnerships with school transition personnel and serve as a resource for career planning
  • Encourage career–focused and work–based experiences during the transition from school to work
  • Identify students with disabilities who have been underserved and develop strategies for engagement
  • Utilize alternative and extended learning opportunities (ELO) for skill acquisition and academic achievement for students who require non–traditional learning environments
  • Support and continue to explore opportunities for sector–based and alternative education, employment and training programs for this targeted group, e.g., ACES, Earn and Learn, Project Search, Project Invest, Project Incomes and CHAMP NHVR, in its RFP process, has asked potential bidders to provide regional consortium responses that will outline how “potentially eligible” students shall be identified and how the services shall be provided. These responses will focus on enhancing NHVR’s relationship with the Bureau of Developmental Services, through its area agencies, and the Bureau of Behavioral Health, through its community mental health centers, and School Administrative Units (SAU’s) to better serve students with disabilities. (Page 179)

This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders. (Page 181)

Including individuals with the most significant disabilities, to secure suitable employment, and financial and personal independence by providing rehabilitation services. The Agency continually assesses the barriers and strategies to reduce barriers that relate to equal access to the state VR program. In planning this year specific input was solicited from the Developmental Disabilities Council; the statewide Independent Living Council; the state MH Planning Council; the Governor’s Commission on Disability; the Autism Council and the executive committee of the Special Education Administrators in the state. In providing a quality customer–focused service delivery system that is timely, effective and responds to the needs of individuals with disabilities throughout the state, the NHVR recognizes the need to expand and improve services to individuals with sensory, cognitive, physical and mental impairments who have traditionally not been served or have been underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program. This goal is to be accomplished through: 

  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
  • Seek strategies to improve services to individuals who experience autism spectrum disorders (Page 183)
  • Continue to maintain cooperative working relationships between NH Vocational Rehabilitation and community developmental disabilities organizations (area agencies) and community mental health centers.
  • Continue to collaborate with stakeholder partners and invest in services to address the following needs related to individuals who are considered underserved.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve the provision of supported employment services.
  • Seek and implement strategies to expand and improve services to youth in transition from school to work
  • Seek strategies to improve service for persons with severe and persistent mental illness.
  • Continue the support of the Benefits Specialist staff in Regional Offices.
  • Seek strategies to expand and improve services to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.   (Page 184)
Work Incentives & Benefits

ABE staff participate in workforce agency partner meetings and NH Works counselors work with students on-site in ABE classes, called “What’s Next”, to introduce career inventories, career pathways, and promote resources available through NH Works. Adult students also work with an Adult Career Pathways Coordinator, present in the classroom, who meets with students to discuss goals, challenges, and recalibrate employment expectations. This coordinator also builds bridges with local community colleges, CTE centers, and certificate programs to further facilitate adult students to continue into post-secondary education after completing ABE coursework. ABE staff also receive referrals from workforce partner agencies for customers who do not have a high school diploma or are basic skills deficient. (Page 27)

The Community College System and CTE work closely together, offering dual credit opportunities for students, sharing funding streams, recruiting at education and job fairs, and promoting career pathways.

  • Collaboration between the Community College System and ABE is very successful, particularly when programs are co-located. For example, at Great Bay Community College, an MOU between ABE and the college allows ABE to teach remedial English and math courses. This better serves students by reserving financial aid or loans for college-level coursework. There is also a referral process in place and ABE programs can assist students with admissions at community colleges, enrollment, preparing for the Accuplacer and sharing scores, determining eligibility for specific job training programs, and more.
  • Collaboration between Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation, with VR counselors attending ABE programs on a monthly basis. This activity is primarily focused on the special education population. (Page 31)

Within this MOU we will seek to partner with agencies participating with Medicaid (The Bureau of Developmental Services and the Bureau of Behavioral Health) to assist in enhancing services to customers needing supported employment and competitive integrated employment. We are very fortunate in New Hampshire to have legislation that prohibits subminimum wage payments to individuals with disabilities (SB 47, 2015). We are proud to work with our business partners to ensure at least minimum wage employment for our mutual customers. In the agreement we will weave in our work on career pathways and work-based learning to expand current sectors (Project SEARCH) and increase employment opportunities. (Page 157)

Employer/ Business

Section identified but no detailed information specifically to disability or implementation.  (Page 206)

511

4.2 Percent of cases reviewed for which there is evidence that assistive technology services and assistive technology devices were assessed and used as necessary for individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process. It was identified that current case review data collection did not include this element. It was further identified that this is a training need area for staff. In–service training has included assistive tech services and devices and will continue to target this area as a training need in FY 12 through FY 15. Case review of FY 12 cases identified that that 70% of the time the case documentation showed evidence of an assessment of the need for assistive technology services and devices.   (Page 193)

The CPPOS will play a key role in informing students of opportunities in continued education or entry into the workforce. The CPPOS will list recommended academic courses for students to take for career success. Schools will be able to access relevant documents and guidance on the web and will receive technical assistance on modifying CPPOS’s for local use with students. Documents and guidance will be accessible on the web, including information postsecondary CTE opportunities that are linked to secondary programs. For example, the guidance documents currently tell students which colleges in New Hampshire offer the programs, and on the web they will be able to click on the link and go directly to information on that college program. New Hampshire has a long-term goal of at least implementing one CPPOS in 15 of the career clusters. Also at the end of the five-year period, all secondary CTE centers statewide will need to offer at least one CPPOS opportunity for their students. Competencies for new or updated programs will be required to align with national, state, and local standards. The New Hampshire Department of Education will work with employers and the Community College System to validate the competencies and modify as needed. (Page 219)

Mental Health

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The collaborative partnerships that exist with collocation of partner agency staff from Employment Security (Wagner–Peyser, Veterans Services, Farm Workers, Trade Act); Vocational Rehabilitation (people with disabilities, adult basic education); Community Action Agency (WIOA services dislocated workers, displaced homemakers, low–income individuals and connects to CAP services such as Head Start, Fuel Assistance, and other support programs); Older Worker Program (employment and support programs); and Granite State Independent Living (benefit specialists for the disabled) ensures that the full range of employment and training programs are accessible in one location to meet the needs of specific target populations. In addition, although no longer co–located, a close relationship and co–enrollment exists with the NH Employment Program (TANF recipients). Collectively, these partner agencies form a network of internal and external resources and services accessible to individuals in need of specific and/or specialized assistance in overcoming barriers to employment. In addition, One–stop career centers are fully accessible and offer a variety of specialized equipment and resources to address the needs of people with disabilities, and through the “language line” and access to interpreter services, people with limited English–speaking proficiency are able to access information and services. (Page 84)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 61 - 63 of 63

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

New Hampshire ABLE Legislation (Senate Bill 265) - 03/21/2016

Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014” means the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 which allows individuals with disabilities to establish tax-free 529-A savings accounts to save for medical, housing, transportation, employment training, education and other quality of life expenses.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Hampshire Senate Bill 47 (subminimum wage 14(c) legislation) - 05/11/2015

“This bill prohibits employers from employing individuals with disabilities at an hourly rate lower than the federal minimum wage except for practical experience or training programs and family businesses. This bill is a request of the committee to study the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities, established in HB 1174 (2014, 50).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Hampshire HB 1174 - 05/28/2014

“This bill establishes a committee to identify and recommend changes to New Hampshire laws and rules on the payment of subminimum wages to persons with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Governor Chris Sununu Statement on ABLE Savings Accounts - 10/27/2017

~~“Today, Governor Chris Sununu issued the following statement after the Executive Council voted to authorize the ability for New Hampshire to enter into an agreement with the State of Ohio for the establishment and administration of a qualified Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings account program in New Hampshire.

“Today is a great day for New Hampshire,” said Governor Chris Sununu. “We have opened access to opportunities for those with a disability, ensuring increased independence and financial security. I commend Senator Bradley and Representative Ober for their tireless efforts in bringing the ABLE program to New Hampshire, and would like to thank the Executive Council for their approval today.”

Background: In 2014, federal legislation known as the Stephen Beck, Jr. Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 (ABLE Act) was enacted, which allows individuals with qualifying disabilities to establish tax-free savings accounts to cover qualified expenses without impacting the individual's eligibility for benefits programs.  In 2016, under the leadership of Senator Jeb Bradley and Representative Lynne Ober, New Hampshire enacted SB 265 into law. The legislation authorizes the establishment of an ABLE savings account program in New Hampshire.  Those interested in learning more can contact the Governor’s Commission on Disability or the New Hampshire State Treasurer’s office.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Executive Order 2002-9 (Establishing a Governor's Task Force on Employment) - 12/04/2002

“An order establishing the Governor's Task Force on Employment and Economic Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 18 of 18

New Hampshire Closes Jobs Office for Disabled in Lebanon - 11/02/2017

“Lebanon — A state office that helps people with disabilities to find suitable employment is poised to close in December, the latest in a string of closings of state agencies in Lebanon in the past decade.

 

The state director of Vocational Rehabilitation, Lisa Hinson-Hatz, announced in an email to staff last week the closure of the Lebanon office responsible for helping people with disabilities overcome barriers — physical or otherwise — to employment"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities Five Year Plan Changes 2017 - 10/01/2017

~~“Objective 2.  Provide support and education in best and/or promising practices, from 0-21, including early supports and services, education, transition planning and training as well as possible service gaps between 18 and 21.(1) Training for at least 100 families regarding education, access and support for navigating the early supports and services system and preparation for transition to education system at age 3.(2) The Council will support the implementation of best and/or promising practices in at least 6 programs and the Council will collaborate with the Institute on Disability, the Disabilities Rights Center, and other key stakeholders to educate at least 1000 self-advocates, family members, guardians, and professionals about best transition practices including:a) person centered planningb) employment/vocationalc) secondary and post-secondary education …” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services III: C.5. Person Centered Planning (PCP) and Self-Direction - 09/01/2017

~~“NO WRONG DOOR SYSTEMNew Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers. In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services through a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2018-19 Mental Health Block Grant Application, New Hampshire Bureau of Mental Health Services. - 08/11/2017

~~“New Hampshire’s No Wrong Door (NWD) System represents a collaborative effort of the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to support state efforts to streamline access to Long Term Services & Support (LTSS) options for all populations and all payers.  In a “No Wrong Door” entry system, multiple agencies retain responsibility for their respective services while coordinating with each other to integrate access to those services t hrough a single, standardized entry process that is administered and overseen by a coordinating entity. Aging and Disability Resource Centers.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report - 02/08/2017

“I am pleased to submit the 2016 Annual report on behalf of the New Hampshire State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This has been a year of change, transition and renewal. The NH SRC has continued to pursue meaningful collaborations and partnerships with disability –focused organizations, employers and vocational rehabilitation customers.

Following the passage of the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA) in the summer of 2014 and the subsequent release of the Federal regulations this past June, the NH SRC has worked jointly with the New Hampshire Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (NH DVR) to align its focus with these changes. The Council supports NH DVR’s efforts to review and revise policies, procedures and practices to fulfill its obligations under the Federal changes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Part B FFY 2014 State Performance Plan/Annual Report on IDEA - 02/01/2016

“New Hampshire has a responsibility, under federal law, to have a system of general supervision that monitors the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by school districts. The general supervision system is accountable for identifying and correcting noncompliance with IDEA and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of Children with Disabilities, as well as for promoting continuous improvement…. The State Performance Plan (SPP) is a blueprint for systems change for special education in New Hampshire. It is a six-year plan and annual report submitted to the USDOE Office of Special Education in February of each year.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Position Statement For New Hampshire’s Regional Service System

We believe that employment, with its powerful and irreplaceable opportunities for autonomy, earned income, self-esteem development, social contacts, structured  activity and life satisfaction, is an import ant ingredient of a fulfilling and valued life for adults in our society. We also recognize that the capacity of adults with any type or degree of developmental disability or acquired brain disorder to participate in employment, in the right setting and with the proper supports, has been amply demonstrated.   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD) Five Year Plan (2016-2021), Executive Summary

Goal 2. Quality of Life: Individuals with developmental disabilities living in New Hampshire will have greater opportunities for inclusion through meaningful competitive employment, friendships and relationships, recreation and choice of social activities, increased choice with housing options, and increased transportation options.

Objective 1. Increased opportunities and awareness for vocational training, competitive employment, expanded work hours and increased career options by:

(1) improving vocational programs, policies and practices through support of promising local or statewide initiatives and

(2) advocating for positive work activities

Objective 2. The Council, in collaboration with disability, aging and other organizations, will support the development or improvement of a minimum of 12 community-based programs, policies or practices that promote inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of community life including:

(1) inclusive emergency preparedness and management,

(2) social integration, meaningful relationships and acceptance of differences

(3) and transportation, housing and infrastructure.

 

Objective 3. The NH Council on Developmental Disabilities will collaborate and support local and statewide initiatives that offer choice for the education and support of individuals and their families regarding relationship building and retention of those relationships. Including but not limited to friendships, relationships and family dynamics

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The purpose of State Councils is to ’engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the purpose of the DD Act and; contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered, consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Institute on Disability Receives Opportunity Grant from New Hampshire Endowment for Health - 05/15/2017

“DURHAM, N.H. - The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $10,355 Opportunity Grant by the Endowment for Health to fund the Needs Assessment Workshop on Health and Safety Training for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

[…]

Funding from the Endowment for Health will support the work of the New Hampshire Occupational Health Surveillance Program, in partnership with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California Berkeley,  to conduct a needs assessment on the application of the NIOSH Staying Safe at Work (SSAW) curriculum for workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in New Hampshire.  Stakeholders from vocational rehabilitation programs, occupational health and safety, and nonprofit organizations working with the IDD community will come together to learn about the SSAW training model and to seek feedback on capacity, implementation, and evaluation. This initial project is part of a larger grant proposal submitted to NIOSH to fund a full implementation and evaluation of the curriculum among these key stakeholders in the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Next Steps New Hampshire - 09/01/2012

“The New Hampshire Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education has been awarded a $3.8 million State Personnel Development Grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs for the next 5 years. The grant will focus on developing and sustaining the skills of New Hampshire school district personnel and families to increase the number of students with disabilities graduating from high school that are college and career ready. The grant will focus on four strategies to achieve this goal: (1) increasing student competency through our state Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs), regional professional development intermediaries, a transition Community of Practice, and the use of technology.

College and career readiness is not only an academic endeavor. Schools, students, and families must plan and work together to ensure successful transition. The outcomes of the grant will remove the state from a compliance focus to a deeper, more comprehensive evidence-based approach to transition planning. These activities will be conducted collaboratively with our partners at New Hampshire Parent Information Centers, New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation, regional intermediaries and other established professional development providers so that the activities are sustained over time.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Hampshire” - 12/30/2011

~~“New Hampshire was the first state to participate in the Balancing Incentive Program , joining in April 2012. New Hampshire was awarded $28.6 million through 2% enhanced FMAP on its community LTSS. In addition to supporting the structural changes, the state has used funds to enhance access to care.Mission Analytics conducted a site visit with New Hampshire in May 2016, holding interviews with state staff and contractors and visiting several NWD agencies. This case study summarizes findings from the site visit along with information submitted by New Hampshire through its quarterly progress reports. The case study highlights elements that have enabled New Hampshire to effectively promote community LTSS: 1) establishing a NWD system, 2) engaging the community, and 3) serving specialized populations, such as veterans, service members, and their families and youth with behavioral health needs. Many states can learn from New Hampshire’s experiences because New Hampshire successfully fostered cross-agency collaboration, truly breaking down silos of community LTSS access.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been awarded to approximately 30 states across the country and is the source of funding for NH Granite State Employment Project. This 11-year initiative, which New Hampshire began in 2001, is to create the infrastructure needed to help support competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities by addressing barriers to employment, access to health care services, and integrate the linkages between Medicaid and other employment-related service agencies that will lead to statewide comprehensive employment opportunities (CEO) systems changes.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NH Granite State Employment Project 5 Year Strategic Plan (2008-2012)

The mission of the Granite State Employment Project is to improve employment opportunities for New Hampshire citizens with disabilities so that they may fully participate in and better contribute to their communities.    The vision of the Granite State Employment Project is that:  There is a statewide infrastructure -including well trained staff- that provides high quality employment supports to individuals with disabilities; New Hampshire’s business community is a key partner in creating and improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and meeting the State’s workforce needs;  Schools offer effective secondary transition services that result in employment or post-secondary education that leads to employment for students with disabilities;  Policies, rules and reimbursement regarding employment services are in accord with employment best practices and desired outcomes Goal #1: Create working partnerships between businesses and employment service providers -at both a local and state level- so that individuals with disabilities have access to and retain the jobs that they want. Goal #2: Increase school and community capacity to effectively prepare and support students with disabilities for entrance and mobility in the workforce Goal #3: Develop and use a variety of resources to ensure that employment service provider agency staff are well oriented and trained to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve better employment outcomes, including increasing the number of individuals with jobs Goal #4: Develop and employ a sustainable data system to track employment outcomes; to facilitate decision-making, policy development, and management of resources; and to improve quality of services.  Goal #5: Remove policy, regulation and payment related barriers to creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011

‘In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI)”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

2018 Labor Law Training Seminar Offered - 02/26/2018

“The New Hampshire Department of Labor is offering a Labor Law training seminar on how to stay in compliance with NH Labor Laws. The seminar will be offered on 18 dates at a variety of locations throughout the state. These events are free and open to employers, businesses and the public. These seminars are made possible by the generosity of the businesses donating their establishment’s function room to host these events.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual

The New Hampshire Benefits Planning Manual provides more in-depth information about the major programs affecting income and benefits for individuals with disabilities in New Hampshire.  The Manual is divided into four sections:

1. New Hampshire Adult Assistance Programs

2. Social Security Disability Insurance

3. Supplemental Security Income

4. Medicare

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Indicator 13 Training 2015-2016 Powerpoint

This powerpoint provides information to help special education professionals best help their students plan and set goals for post-secondary transition.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NH Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation - VR Counselor Training and Resources

VR Counselor Training and Resources.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

WorkReadyNH

Work ReadyNH is a tuition-free workforce development program tailored to meet the needs of job seekers and career builders as well as provide training in the specific skills employers are seeking in their current and future employees.

 

The WorkReadyNH program provides assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. Graduates earn two nationally recognized credentials to add to their resume.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Southern New Hampshire Services Workplace Success Program

 Workplace Success is a partnership between the Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies. The goal of the program is to prepare participants to  enter a volunteer  Work Experience position within a nonprofit, business, or local/state government host site for 20-30 hours per week until they obtain full-time paid employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workplace Success

~~“The Workplace Success (WPS) Program is funded by the NH Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and represents a collaboration between the Division of Family Assistance, SNHS, and the other New Hampshire Community Action Agencies to enable TANF recipients to move from welfare to work. Workplace Success provides participants in the New Hampshire Employment Program (NHEP) with the skills, knowledge, experience, and support needed to obtain paid employment.

The program prepares participants to enter the workforce by providing them a broad set of workforce development services starting with an in-depth vocational assessment process leading to a personal Career Plan. “

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

NH Department of Education - Secondary Transition Statewide Training

Foundations in Transition - Person Centered Strategies for Students with Disabilities Making the Transition to Adult Life. A NH RESPONDS Grant sponsored a four part training series that included training in practices that have been shown to improve the self determination skills and education outcomes for young people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Customer Guide to NH Vocational Rehabilitation Services

~~“The staff of New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation NHVR is committed to assisting individuals with disabilities to maximize their employment potential  and options. We understand that the uncertainty of not knowing where to turn for assistance in either finding employment or maintaining a current job can be frustrating. If you are found eligible for NHVR services, we can help you determine the career path that is right for you, based on your strengths, interests and abilities.The NHVR Customer "Toolkit" was created to present you with a description of the vocational rehabilitation process."

This packet contains an overview of the entire NHVR process, from application to post-employment services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

New Hampshire Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Five Year Plan (2008-2012)

• MIG funds were used during 2002 and 2003 to provide the 13 New Hampshire Employment Security One-Stops with equipment and resource materials (e.g., screen readers, audio “how to” tapes) to make them more accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, training was provided to the staff of One-Stops regarding use of the purchased equipment and resource materials. This initiative with the One-Stops also included staff trainings on disability awareness issues and creation of a resource guide called “Disability Etiquette.”

• MIG was instrumental in the development of towo tool kits. The first, a ready-to work toolkit is a curriculum on personal futures planning, resume writing, self-directed job searching techniques, employment interviewing skills, and negotiating workplace culture, politics, and related skills. It’s currently being used by the independent living center’s 6 peer groups. The second, an employer tool kit, was developed to provide information and guidance to employers regarding reasonable workplace accommodations, tax credits, where to get technical assistance, the ticket-to-work program, and the values and benefits of hiring people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Amanda D., et al. v. Hassan, et al. Settlement Fact Sheet

The United States Department of Justice, a coalition of private plaintiff organizations, and the State of New Hampshire, have entered into a comprehensive Settlement Agreement that will transform New Hampshire’s mental health system by significantly expanding and enhancing mental health service capacity in integrated community settings. The Agreement will enable a class of adults with serious mental illness to receive needed services in the community, which will foster their independence and enable them to participate more fully in community life. The expanded and enhanced community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at State mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (“NHH”) (the State’s only psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (a State-owned and -operated nursing facility for people with mental illness). The Agreement requires the State to expand and enhance community services over the next six years. …

For the first time, the State will deliver supported employment services in accordance with the Dartmouth evidence-based model. These services will help enable individuals to obtain and maintain paid, competitive employment in integrated community settings. Over the life of the Agreement, this provision will impact thousands of people.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 11 - 11 of 11

Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program

“The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program assists low-income elderly or disabled individuals who are eligible for Medicare (available through the Social Security Administration) by paying for some or all of the associated costs of Medicare, specifically the Medicare Insurance Premiums and deductibles. The Medicare Beneficiaries Savings Program is also referred to as the Buy-In program….

The Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) program provides payment of Medicare Part A premiums for eligible working individuals with disabilities who are entitled to enroll in Medicare Part A, but who have lost Medicare Part A coverage due to earnings. Individuals eligible for QDWI may not otherwise be eligible for Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security