New York

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State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New York’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
19,849,399
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.89%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,099,574
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.03%
Change from
2016 to 2017
378,951
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.89%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.46%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.94%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.21%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 19,795,791 19,745,289 19,849,399
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,098,072 1,109,370 1,099,574
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 362,397 367,478 378,951
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 8,529,968 8,522,611 8,610,618
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.00% 33.12% 34.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.93% 75.49% 76.21%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.30% 4.80% 4.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.30% 23.90% 24.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.30% 13.50% 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,021,909 1,022,521 1,040,543
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 1,201,045 1,215,492 1,225,864
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,505,461 1,491,395 1,489,769
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 369,717 377,502 398,388
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 392,152 414,249 436,921
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 11,739 11,469 15,683
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 103,032 114,660 111,566
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 947 971 1,056
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 56,897 64,402 61,213
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 175,161 177,614 188,732

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 20,756 20,841 20,914
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.90% 3.90% 4.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 510,196 502,062 493,907

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 75,276 91,021 84,070
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 151,373 161,606 148,077
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 484,231 483,978 408,787
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.50% 18.80% 20.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.40% 0.50% 0.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.30% 5.40% 5.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50% 1.50% 1.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,864 1,958 1,728
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 22,280 22,895 23,763
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,203 6,314 6,582
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 31,582 23,654 23,355
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 14,023 12,717 8,989
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 5,527 5,428 3,935
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 39.00% 43.00% 44.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 28.13 27.42 19.88

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
18,997
19,594
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 81 81 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,015 1,114 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 3,213 3,136 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 7,680 7,925 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 4,894 5,247 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 2,112 2,091 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.00% 31.40% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 26,744 29,345 28,953
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 863,707 856,201 842,951
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 1,231 1,158 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 951 851 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 17.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 989 2,264 3,105
Number of people served in facility based work. 7,203 6,623 5,768
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 46,158 46,358 46,867
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 37.80 40.50 54.80

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 57.80% 57.98% 58.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.80% 19.82% 19.56%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 6.13% 5.44% 6.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 78.29% 76.50% 90.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 48.12% 40.77% 44.02%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 71.71% 67.25% 69.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.85% 77.75% 80.66%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.59% 26.48% 25.41%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 6,429,710
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 8,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 498,920
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,435,284
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,934,204
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 1,050
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,152
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,202
AbilityOne wages (products). $3,814,358
AbilityOne wages (services). $26,511,843

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 11 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 81 43 43
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 7 1 4
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 99 44 47
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 286 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 9,201 3,950 3,912
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 424 0 247
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 9,911 3,950 4,159

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

Through the Employment First policy, the State seeks to build on important economic development investments to ensure that individuals with disabilities equally benefit from the improving economy and have sustained opportunities to engage in the competitive labor market. Specifically, the State aims to increase the employment rate of individuals with disabilities by 5%; decrease the poverty rate of individuals with disabilities by a comparable 5%; and engage 100 businesses in adopting policies and practices that support the integrated employment of individuals with disabilities. The driving force behind this initiative is the principle that everyone has the right to work.
The Employment First policy commission has made the following recommendations:

  1. Cultural Modeling: New York State agencies can model the integrated employment of individuals with disabilities. Whether through enhancements to the governor’s programs to hire persons/veterans with disabilities (sections 55-b and -c of New York State Civil Service Law), or through community-based organizations directly hiring individuals, a strong culture of employment first must be established.
  2. Energizing the “Demand-Side” of the Equation: Redesign and reinvigorate the New York Business Leadership Network to pursue the aggressive goal of engaging 100 business partners. A business first platform can be established through promoting existing tax credits, supporting businesses to pursue federal contracts, and harnessing the power of New York’s regional economic development efforts.
  3. New York Employment Services System (NYESS): The NYESS system has already distinguished New York as the leader in moving individuals with disabilities into the world of employment as the largest Social Security Administration Ticket to Work (TTW) network in the nation. Ensuring the full adoption of the system across community providers and state agencies will utilize the power of New York’s integrated employment case management system to comprehensively monitor and support employment outcomes in New York State.
  4. Benefits Advisement: Benefits systems are complex and only limited resources are available to help individuals accurately understand eligibility requirements and the impact of employment on benefits. New York State can utilize emerging tools like Disability Benefits 101 (DB101) and a network of “life coaches” to expand benefits advisement. (Pages 99-101)

Consistent with the strategic visions and goals advanced in the Combined Plan, the State is committed to enhancing program alignment and service delivery. The State has established an Interagency Work Group to analyze service delivery strategies and identify opportunities for improvement across all participant populations including Out-of-School Youth (OSY). The work group, in collaboration with the Employment First State Leadership Mentorship Program (EFSLMP), has established a Vision Quest project with the stated goal “to develop alignment between agencies servicing youth to assure quality services and that youth do not fall through the cracks.” The Vision Quest project is initially focused on improving services for youth with disabilities or multiple barriers to employment following the Integrated Resource Team (IRT) model developed under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Project. The State seeks to expand the IRT model to OSY without regard to their disability status and provide the same level of service integration demonstrated in our multiple DEI projects. The WIOA expanded maximum age (up to age 24) of OSY and the increased flexibility in the provision of Youth services found in the Final Regulations increases the opportunity to serve OSY in a Career Center environment and more fully engage the required and optional partners found therein. The State believes that combining the system level intervention of the Interagency Work Group with the customer level coordination of services provided through IRTs creates an optimal service environment for OSY that will lead to improved outcomes. (Page 134)

ACCES–VR has a longstanding working partnership with the Office for People with Development Disabilities (OPWDD). Collaborative projects and initiatives are ongoing. In 2014, NYS established an Employment First policy. This policy outlines several strategies and demonstrates NYS’s full commitment to inclusion for people with disabilities. To accomplish the vision and goals there are collaborative efforts that require participation for all State agencies. Many of these strategies build upon the existing linkages. Over the past several years OPWDD, OMH and ACCES–VR have been providing targeted training to employment staff on the delivery of high quality evidence–based employment services to individuals with disabilities. To more fully support the goals of Employment First, an expansion of this training is being planned. ACCES–VR will continue to work with OMH and OPWDD as well as NYS CB on supported employment guidelines to ensure the appropriate and smooth transitions for individuals with disabilities. (Pages 196-198)

NYSCB will encourage staff to provide in-service presentations for OPWDD and OMH staff regarding blindness, vision rehabilitation therapy, orientation and mobility, as well as job site accommodations. NYSCB recognizes that collaboration with these partner state agencies is integral to the employment success of individuals served by multiple agencies. These partners are currently collaborating on Governor Cuomo’s Employment First initiative and have already begun to address barriers that currently exist in the provision of services between agencies. NYSCB will continue to participate in these initiatives advocating for individuals who are legally blind receiving NYSCB services and will continue to work to provide seamless services to consumers in conjunction with our partner state agencies. (Page 271)

Customized Employment

Additionally, ACCES–VR has initiated outreach activities in conjunction with the July anniversary of the American with Disabilities Act with its downstate IES, City University of New York, and the Mayor’s Office in NYC. There were two “Champions for Change” events held in 2015. Discussion is underway with the State Rehabilitation Council about how they can further support ACCES–VR IESs to establish new relationships with business and enhance customized employment options.

ACCES–VR is also working with our provider agency partners as well as the NYS Department of Labor and NYS Commission for the Blind, to explore additional services, supports, or projects that could engage businesses that have had limited experiences with hiring people with disabilities. (Page 195)

ACCES–VR will include in its new CRS contracts to start in 2017, opportunities and funding for providers to develop customized employment opportunities. Training will also be provided to providers regarding provision of this service. (Page 195-196)
The following themes emerged from the meetings, as well as from other verbal and written information obtained from participants:

  • Employment: need more collaboration of stakeholders, providers and State agencies.
  • Businesses: need to be educated about hiring individuals with disabilities and available financial incentives credits.
  • ACCES–VR: should consider enhancement of the self–employment advisement committee. Recommendation is to explore how local businesses could be further engaged and could share their knowledge.
  • Supported Employment:
    • Effective program, but providers are concerned about the impact of the milestone system. Perhaps a tier system could be considered. Also, need to reevaluate retention measures under the milestone system.
    • Best practices with customized employment should be identified with a focus on replication and more engagement of business in the process. (Page 209)

Scope of Supported Employment Services

  • Supported Employment services are comprised of on–going services, including customized employment, needed to support and maintain an individual with a most significant disability in supported employment, that:
  • Are provided singly or in combination to assist an eligible individual to achieve a competitive integrated employment;
  • Are based on a determination of the needs of the individual and as specified in the IPE; and
  • Are provided by ACCES–VR for up to 24 months, unless an extension necessary to achieve the employment outcome identified in the IPE.

Supported employment services provide all the services necessary to assist the person with:

(Page 269)

NYSCB has also supported and participated in activities being implemented under the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG), and serves on the steering committee to the MIG. Activities under the MIG which will particularly benefit individuals in supported employment are pilots of customized employment approaches, development of a statewide employment data base “New York Employment Services System (NYESS),” and expansion of the availability of work incentives advisement.

NYSCB staff regularly attend the Empire State Association of Persons in Supported Employment (APSE) conference to dialogue with providers, consumers and advocates, and keep abreast of evidence-based practices. (Page 269)

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

Additionally, ACCES-VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects in the upstate NY LWDAs that focus on Employment Networks (ENs) and services related to assessment, benefits advisement, and placement. ACCES-VR liaisons meet periodically with DRCs to better understand and coordinate cross-systems services; to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities; and to increase support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. The DRCs are responsible for providing and improving targeted services to individuals with disabilities, as well as improving the capacity of all workforce staff in their respective sites to provide the best possible services to the disability population. All 13 pilot sites are registered as ENs under the Ticket to Work program, with the intent to get individuals off SSA benefits and back to work.

New York State ACCES-VR jointly conducts a Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) with its State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) every three years to determine the rehabilitation (and other) needs of residents with disabilities and to identify gaps in VR services. ACCES-VR uses this information to shape policy, procedures, training, operations, and practice. The next assessment will be conducted for the FY2017 State Plan. (Page 37)

Consistent with the strategic visions and goals advanced in the Combined Plan, the State is committed to enhancing program alignment and service delivery. The State has established an Interagency Work Group to analyze service delivery strategies and identify opportunities for improvement across all participant populations including Out-of-School Youth (OSY). The work group, in collaboration with the Employment First State Leadership Mentorship Program (EFSLMP), has established a Vision Quest project with the stated goal “to develop alignment between agencies servicing youth to assure quality services and that youth do not fall through the cracks.” The Vision Quest project is initially focused on improving services for youth with disabilities or multiple barriers to employment following the Integrated Resource Team (IRT) model developed under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Project. The State seeks to expand the IRT model to OSY without regard to their disability status and provide the same level of service integration demonstrated in our multiple DEI projects. The WIOA expanded maximum age (up to age 24) of OSY and the increased flexibility in the provision of Youth services found in the Final Regulations increases the opportunity to serve OSY in a Career Center environment and more fully engage the required and optional partners found therein. The State believes that combining the system level intervention of the Interagency Work Group with the customer level coordination of services provided through IRTs creates an optimal service environment for OSY that will lead to improved outcomes. (Page 134)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

7. Support and promote the Business Enterprise Program in order to increase employment opportunities and successful outcomes.

8. Increase provision of work incentives advisement to consumers by training counselors on the impact of work on SSI and SSDI and the importance of benefits advisement and financial literacy (Page 298).

8. Referrals for benefits advisement continue to increase. As a result the number of vendors approved to provide this service increased in FY 15. Select Independent Living Centers provide benefits counseling to active consumers on a pro bono basis thus further increasing the availability and use of the service. In New York City, a financial literacy program for college students was conducted in collaboration with Barclay Bank. NYSCB consumers and District Office Staff attended this program which provided useful information for consumers as they move to enter the workforce. (Page 307)

School to Work Transition

In 2016-17, a variety of professional development programs will continue to be delivered to Literacy Zones to assist in meeting their learners’ academic and personal needs. Literacy Zone professional development will be provided in multiple ways including training for case managers so that they can be resources regarding assessments leading to a NYS HSE diploma, career ladders, one-stop referrals, core partner connections, and the Benefits Toolkit. (Page 30)

In 2016-17 New York State will continue to focus on the ways all funded adult literacy programs work with individuals with disabilities. Many of the 49 Literacy Zones formed partnerships with the Independent Living Centers, which provide one-stop services to families with an individual with a disability. The New York State Education Department developed an electronic universal benefits manual that supports all programs including those that serve individuals with disabilities. This resource is updated annually and provides contemporary support to case managers providing services to individuals with disabilities. (Page 31)

  • Career Centers will all have the MyBenefits (mybenefits.ny.gov) web site short cut icon on all resource room computers and partner staff will be trained on how to promote and use the site with customers. MyBenefits was developed to help increase access and awareness of various public benefit programs. (Page 54-55)

NYSCB entered into a Partnership Plus Agreement, which enables consumers with a Social Security Ticket to Work to obtain VR services from NYSCB, as well as broad access to community providers to assist in the coordination of Social Security payments and other benefits and services.

Eleven non-profit organizations across NYS were approved as vendors to provide benefits advisement and support the development of economic self-sufficiency. The increased access to DRCs and other ENs increases support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services.

NYSCB uses funds to contract with two private agencies for individuals who are blind to provide pre-college programs for NYSCB consumers entering their senior year of high school. The program goal is to provide students the opportunity to refine their academic, social, and independent living skills before beginning college. (Page 57)

Eleven non-profit organizations across NYS were approved as vendors to provide benefits advisement and support the development of economic self-sufficiency. The increased access to DRCs and other ENs increases support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. (Page 57)

Over the next three years, NYESS and NYS DDPC will develop an integrated web-based platform called DB101. This system will be integrated with NYESS, CareerZone, and JobZone to provide accurate, up-to-date information and benefits calculators so participants can better assess how going to work will impact their access to publicly funded healthcare and income support like Supplemental Security Income, Social Security Disability Insurance, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, housing assistance, and other public benefits. (Page 77)

4. Benefits Advisement: Benefits systems are complex and only limited resources are available to help individuals accurately understand eligibility requirements and the impact of employment on benefits. New York State can utilize emerging tools like Disability Benefits 101 (DB101) and a network of “life coaches” to expand benefits advisement.

5. Medicaid Buy-In for Working People with Disabilities (MBI-WPD): New York can integrate the MBI-WPD program into the online New York State of Health application portal, automating and standardizing eligibility determinations and referring applicants who require additional assistance. (Page 100)

  • Disability–related training: including professional conferences in mental health, developmental disabilities, deafness and hearing impairments, the medical and vocational aspects of HIV/AIDS; and substance abuse disorders. Training included post–traumatic stress disorder; traumatic brain injury; epilepsy; mood disorders; personality disorders; autism spectrum disorders; anxiety disorders; addiction; managing challenging behavior; visual acuity; multiple sclerosis; bullying; workforce investment home modifications, and neuropsychology.
  • Supported employment: including professional conferences. Training was provided for supported employment; counseling skills for direct service providers; documentation and record keeping; job retention and career development; and benefits advisement. An initial training program on the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model and recovery from mental illness has evolved into an on–going Recovery–Oriented Vocational Rehabilitation Community of Practice. (Page 204)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities.

ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. The NYESS is a combined data warehouse and information sharing system for state and community agencies and a job matching/labor exchange system for consumers and businesses. (Page 212)

Individuals on SSI/SSDI make up 28 percent of all active cases or 13,882 individuals. Those who were considered to have a most significant disability were 70.9 percent of those served in all VR statuses. While individuals receiving SSI/SSDI were only 23.8 percent of all employment outcomes in FFY 2012, the employment rate for these individuals did increase. ACCES–VR is working with the SRC to examine data on consumers who receive SSI and SSDI, and is increasing the use of benefits planning services as a strategy to increase outcomes. (Page 216)

Individuals who are Deaf, Deaf–Blind, Hard of Hearing or Late Deafened The Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation in the Fifth Edition 2008 Model State Plan (MSP) for Rehabilitation of Persons who are Deaf, Deaf–Blind, Hard of Hearing or Late Deafened report that “Hearing loss is the most prevalent, chronic, physically disabling condition in the United States today.” The National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) reported in June 2010 that approximately 17 percent (36 million) of American adults report some degree of hearing loss; 15 percent (26 million) of Americans between the ages of 20 and 69 have high frequency hearing loss due to exposure to loud sounds or noise at work or in leisure activities and 4,000 new cases of sudden deafness occur each year in the United States. Hearing loss is becoming more prevalent among the general population. These losses can impact the employment status of individuals, depending on the level of loss. In FFY 2012, ACCES–VR served a total of 3,023 (3.3 percent) individuals who had a primary impairment of deafness, hearing loss, other hearing impairment and deaf–blindness, almost one third more than the number served in FFY 2009. Of these, 63.8 percent were considered to have a most significant disability. In FFY 2012, 612 individuals who were deaf, hard of hearing or deaf–blind achieved an employment outcome. This is 5.1 percent of all employment outcomes. (Page 216)

  • Provide benefits counseling at several key points in the VR process.
  • Train ACCES–VR counselors who serve as liaisons to mental health programs on OMH Individual Placement with Supports (IPS) model, implementation and provide on–going technical assistance.
  • Inform training program providers and the postsecondary education sector about incentives for hiring people with disabilities to encourage those entities

This past year ACCES–VR participated in a joint presentation with NYS Department of Labor to discuss financial incentives credits available to business. ACCES–VR is also working to identify federal contractors/subcontractors, and to obtain the most current information regarding the changes in the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) rules, which advance the recruitment of qualified candidates with disabilities. ACCES–VR ensures that key staffs across the state are prepared to provide customized training to the business community on the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities, through their participation in the American Disabilities Act (ADA) Trainer Network. This no–cost service is a valuable resource to businesses as they strive to diversify their workforces with qualified candidates with disabilities. (Page 237)

Partnership Plus

In Spring 2014, NYSCB entered into a Partnership Plus agreement with the Research Foundation for Mental Health. Partnership Plus assures that consumers with a Social Security Ticket to Work are able to obtain the services they need from NYSCB and that as they complete their services with NYSCB, they are given access to broad network of community providers from whom they can select to coordinate issues related to Social Security payments and other benefits and services.

NYS PROMISE Initiative

NYSCB is on the steering committee for New York State PROMISE (Promoting the Readiness of Minors in Supplemental Security Income), a research project developed to improve transition–to–adulthood outcomes for eligible youth who receive supplemental security income (SSI). This five–year initiative strives to increase access to services for eligible youth and their families to improve academic and employment outcomes, increase financial stability, and reduce reliance on SSI. The priority for the steering committee is to engage local and state partners in defining a broad strategic approach that starts to describe a system of person and family centered intervention. NYSCB actively participates in the steering committee to assess services that are provided to legally blind students through other New York State organizations. (Page260)

In 2012 NYSCB began entering into agreements with nonprofit organizations for the provision of benefits advisement services. Fifteen vendors have been approved for the provision of benefits advisement services throughout New York State. Providers of these services include agencies chartered primarily for provision of services to individuals who are blind, independent living centers, and other agencies that have engaged staff who are trained and certified by the Social Security Administration, by the Cornell Institute of Labor Relations, or by Virginia Commonwealth University. Many of these providers offer advisement not only on Social Security benefits, but also on a host of other benefits which may be affected by entering employment. (Page 267)

Further, modeling likelihood of successful case closures for NYSCB consumers receiving public benefits, it was observed that mental health impairments continues to negatively predict successful case closures for this group of individuals. Receipt of vocational training, high tech devices, computer training, job-related services and job placement services were all positively related to successful employment outcomes for individuals receiving public benefits. Despite these positive relationships between the specific services and outcomes, overall only 6-10 percent of consumers receiving public benefits access these services. Other factors identified in the overall model, also continue to predict positive outcomes for NYSCB consumers receiving public benefits. (Page 281)

Further, challenges continue to persist for achieving employment outcomes for clients who receive public benefits. Though many services (e.g., high-tech devices) appear to positively impact outcomes, only small proportions receive such services. It is likely that efforts such as New York State PROMISE initiative will be helpful in highlighting leading practices and service delivery models to inform program and policy development across various service systems.

Having mental health illness as a secondary condition continues to jeopardize the likelihood of success in the current system. This variable impacts both consumers receiving and those not receiving public benefits. This finding indicates a need to build capacity of practitioners in providing services to people with mental health illnesses. (Page 282)

  1. Few received training on job placement, Independent Living (IL), placement services from other agencies, how to target business outreach, and benefits and work incentives counseling. These are also topics on which staff reported needing training. (Page 288)
  2. Increase provision of work incentives advisement to consumers by training counselors on the impact of work on SSI and SSDI and the importance of benefits advisement and financial literacy (Page 298)
  3. By supporting increased use of benefits planning through Independent Living Centers, DRC’s and other qualified resources, NYSCB anticipates that more consumers will choose careers, and work hours, which will allow them to go off SSA benefits and achieve economic self-sufficiency. In addition, NYSCB has signed a Partnership Plus agreement with the OMH Administrative Employment Network. This will increase opportunities for consumers to obtain continued support to maintain their jobs after case closure. NYSCB works with ACCES-VR to allocate contract capacity for Supported Employment services to try to assure the services are available to individuals with the most significant disabilities seeking those services. (Page 302)
  4. Mental health impairment as a secondary condition was identified by the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment CSNA) as in indicator for unsuccessful closure. NYSCB increased relationships with Office of Mental Health (OMH) and the Office for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) on both the local and state level. The receipt of public assistance benefits was also identified as an indicator for unsuccessful case closure. Benefits advisement service referrals and providers were increased and are expected to reduce this gap. The Needs Assessment also found that individuals who received high-tech devices were more likely to be successfully closed. A new adaptive technology center (ATC) contract was implemented. The contract guidelines set high standards for the delivery of ATC evaluation and training services.
  5. NYSCB consumers participated in an employment based medical records program at Baruch College. District Offices have conducted outreach on their own and collaborated with ACCES-VR to expand vocational training opportunities for NYSCB consumers. Both core partners met with Human Resource hiring managers interested in matching consumers with hard to fill positions in their local businesses.
  6. NYSCB reviewed the vocational training programs currently delivered through community rehabilitation partners and determined that two types of vocational skills training are needed; one to support consumers in increasing employability and a second to meet the demands of emerging labor markets. The first type of training is focused on those consumers planning to enter fields such as customer service, office administration, and other clerical occupations and the potential need to acquire advanced skills levels in Braille, keyboarding, note taking, computer applications and other office practices. The second type of vocational skills training is related to meeting the needs of a particular business or business sector and is developed in conjunction with a business or group of businesses representing a sector which is expected to have a high demand for employees over the next five to ten years. NYSCB will continue to develop and explore the need for new programs and training opportunities. (Page 305)
  7. Referrals for benefits advisement continue to increase. As a result the number of vendors approved to provide this service increased in FY 15. Select Independent Living Centers provide benefits counseling to active consumers on a pro bono basis thus further increasing the availability and use of the service. In New York City, a financial literacy program for college students was conducted in collaboration with Barclay Bank. NYSCB consumers and District Office Staff attended this program which provided useful information for consumers as they move to enter the workforce.
  8. Working with the National Industries for the Blind, new call centers and other service sector employment opportunities for NYSCB consumers have been developed this year. A new call center was opened in Brooklyn and actively hired consumers from NYSCB. Management staff at the call centers as well as counselors continually monitor front line staff at these call centers to provide any necessary support to the consumers employed there and to assist them in advancing their employment skills. (Page 307)
Career Pathways

VR Transition Policy ACCES–VR collaborated with the Office of Special Education and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) in 2008 to revise the 421.00 Youth in School – Transition Referral, Planning and Services Policy, to ensure a common understanding of transition requirements and responsibilities and to assist with building a collaborative partnership between transition specialists, school districts and ACCES–VR district offices throughout the state. The policy provides information about the requirements, roles and responsibilities of VR in preparing students with disabilities for successful employment. ACCES–VR, with the SRC, reviews the policy periodically to determine its current relevance. While much of the policy remains up–to–date, a revision is planned for the end of this year to ensure compliance with the requirements under WIOA, including pre–employment transition services and the use of assistive technology. This policy establishes an affirmative role for VRCs working with students in transition from school to work, a critical time for young adults with disabilities. The policy delineates the referral process of students with disabilities two years prior to their expected school exit. (Page 186)

NYSCB and the New York State Education Department collaborate on a regular basis to provide guidance to educational agencies and vocational rehabilitation personnel responsible for facilitating transition services, and to provide information about consultation and technical assistance resources to assist schools and related community support entities in planning for transition of students who are legally blind. At the state level, both agencies have designated personnel that provide oversight and leadership for the development of policies, procedures, interagency training and other state-level partnership activities for transition services. At the local level, VR counselors work closely with school district staff and local school districts have transition to work specialists that collaborate together. NYSCB will continue to work closely with schools to enable the smooth transition of students who are legally blind from school to work. (Page 279)

Work Incentives & Benefits

WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

  • Focusing leadership funds on the key requirements of WIOA through approval of new annual workplans for the RAEN and NRS Accountability specialist and work charges of NYSED state ACCES-Adult Education staff.
  • Continuing to implement a new High School Equivalency diploma for New York that serves as a gateway credential for employment, training, career pathways and postsecondary transition, and providing in-depth training of master teachers and turnkey training for 5,500 adult education teachers.
  • Adapting state and WIOA-funded professional development to support career pathways, postsecondary transition, integrated education, and integrated English literacy and civics education. (Page 34)

Local partnerships, which form the foundation of the workforce delivery system, are especially effective in meeting the workforce needs of New York’s diverse population. Local plans describe how these partnerships will be coordinated to enable all customers to receive the full range of employment and training programs and supportive services, especially those that lead to jobs in high-wage, high-growth occupations along career pathways. The needs of individuals with multiple barriers to employment are being addressed quickly and thoroughly due to the wide spectrum of service providers joined together under the local workforce system. The New York State Office for the Aging, NYSED (including ACCES-VR), the New York State Department of Health (DOH), OCFS (including NYSCB), the Office for Alcohol and Substance Abuse (OASAS), the Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance (OTDA), the State University of New York (SUNY), NYSDOL, and local community based organizations apply knowledge gained through regular communication, partnership collaborations, and cross-training to develop comprehensive service strategies to address the varying needs of our common participants. With the functional alignment approach and common customer flow in the Career Centers, partners are more aware of each agency’s involvement with the participant instead of working in a vacuum. This greatly helps reduce duplication of services to participants. (Page 52)

Employer/ Business

Additionally, ACCES-VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects in the upstate NY LWDAs that focus on Employment Networks (ENs) and services related to assessment, benefits advisement, and placement. ACCES-VR liaisons meet periodically with DRCs to better understand and coordinate cross-systems services; to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities; and to increase support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. The DRCs are responsible for providing and improving targeted services to individuals with disabilities, as well as improving the capacity of all workforce staff in their respective sites to provide the best possible services to the disability population. All 13 pilot sites are registered as ENs under the Ticket to Work program, with the intent to get individuals off SSA benefits and back to work. (Page 37)

New York State continues to be at the forefront in the area of serving individuals with disabilities with the implementation of NYESS and the opportunities the system allows. For example, in February 2012, the federal Social Security Administration announced that NYESS (www.nyess.ny.gov) was designated as the first statewide Employment Network in the United States. ENs are designated by the SSA to assist individuals with disabilities to find competitive jobs. The statewide EN designation allows SSA the ability to collaborate directly with New York to document employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities holding a Ticket-To-Work, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Ticket-To-Work program. As a statewide EN, NYESS creates a network of providers working with multiple state agencies using a single, real-time employment data/case management system. This statewide effort generates thousands of dollars in incentive payments to be reinvested in expanded job supports for individuals with disabilities. (Page 102)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities.

ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. The NYESS is a combined data warehouse and information sharing system for state and community agencies and a job matching/labor exchange system for consumers and businesses. (Page 212)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities. ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. (Page 216)

3. Promote business awareness of NYSCB workforce programs and business services through print, broadcast and electronic media to include social media, and continue to promote awareness of NYSCB through personal face–to–face contacts with businesses.

4. Continue to work with the National Employment Team (NET) of the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and other employment networks to improve employment options for NYSCB consumers.

5. Work to build partnerships with America’s Job Centers as well as the four core partners, to increase access to services needed by NYSCB consumers. (Page 298)

511

The Core Programs are required to regularly report to the Federal government and public on program performance to keep the system accountable and transparent in the pursuit of the State’s workforce vision and goals. Although WIA also required performance reporting, WIOA seeks to improve accountability across all core programs by requiring that they report on a set of uniform measures. At the onset of WIOA implementation, setting of performance goals for programs without an institutional history of these measures or an established method for collecting needed data to report these measures will be a challenge. The Core Programs are working to share existing data collection and analysis methods to identify and establish good data sources and to work through necessary administrative clearances to meet new WIOA requirements. In particular, programs under Titles II and IV of WIOA are in the process of gathering the necessary information to establish valid and reliable data for the required performance measures. The preliminary performance goals that have already been established are included in Table 1 below. (Page 42)

B. DATA-COLLECTION AND REPORTING PROCESSES USED FOR ALL PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES, INCLUDING THOSE PRESENT IN ONE-STOP CENTERS*.

The Core Programs are working closely together to identify and establish appropriate data sources and gaining the necessary administrative clearances to meet the WIOA requirements. Titles II and IV are in the process of gathering the necessary information to establish valid and reliable data for the required performance measures. (Pages 77-78)

As discussed previously, NYSDOL, in partnership with NYS OMH, developed and implemented NYESS. NYESS is made up of various computer applications and data sets. Employment related data collection is accomplished by all NYESS partners using the existing NYSDOL case management system, OSOS. Legacy data sets from the partners and current data sets, which include but are not limited to, OSOS; vocational rehabilitation agencies; DOH; Social Security Administration (SSA); and others are pulled together in a data warehouse. A web-based reporting portal designed and maintained by OMH will provide cross-agency report card like information to the general public (aggregate data) and to the individual agencies and their contracted partner staff. (Page 84)

  • Provide on–going training for supervisors. Supervisors are brought to a central location at least biannually for a three–day training. The trainings focus on the multiple roles of a supervisor and provide updates on policy, data collection and more to ensure good communication.
  • Improve the quality of supported employment services by training ACCES–VR and supported employment providers on updated supported employment policy, procedures and guidelines to ensure the integrity and effectiveness of the supported employment program.
  • Provide a Management Community of Practice. ACCES–VR is collaborating with Cornell University, Employment Disability Institute for the provision of a community of practice training project for management level staff. (Page 228)

Secondary Data Analysis of Consumer Information System

The primary purpose of analyzing NYSCB’s Consumer Information System is to identify factors related to successful case closures and employment outcomes for NYSCB clients. Specifically this analysis explored the following research questions:

  1. What are the demographic and services-related factors that predict successful employment outcomes for NYSCB consumers? How do these vary by NYSCB district offices? How do local labor market conditions (e.g., county-level employment rate for people with disabilities) impact employment outcomes for NYSCB consumers?
  2. How do these differ between transition-age youth and adult population?
  3. How do these factors impact successful outcomes for NYSCB consumers who receive publicbenefits compared with their non-beneficiary peers? (Page 280)
Mental Health

ADDRESSING THE ACCESSIBILITY OF THE ONE-STOP DELIVERY SYSTEM FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 99)

Accessibility

Accessibility is an important component within the public workforce system. New York State assures that all partners in the workforce development system described in this plan recognize the importance of the physical, programmatic, and communications accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities and English language learners in the Career Centers.

Under WIA, NYSDOL’s Methods of Administration outlined the policies, procedures, and systems NYS designed and put in place in order to provide a reasonable guarantee that NYS and its recipients of Title I WIA funds complied with the Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity requirements of WIA Section 188 and its implementing regulations. It is still available online at http://www.labor.ny.gov/agencyinfo/moa/moa.shtm and will be revised in the coming months to reflect the new WIOA regulations.

Additionally, NYSDOL will revise a Technical Advisory (TA) on the topic of “Accessibility of One-Stop Systems to Individuals with Disabilities.” The TA on this topic, released under WIA on May 16, 2000, will be revised to reflect new accessibility regulations under WIOA. (Page 102)

Displaying 81 - 90 of 94

SWIB Quarterly Meeting Presentation

he slide presentation from this meeting of the New York State Workforce Investment Board includes material on Customized Employment, WIOA, and Work Readiness Credentials.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Talent Development and Training Online Resource Library

This site provides various instructional resources for agencies interested in delivering their own training, as well as resources for individual learners interested in developing their professional education.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

NYESS Funding and Employment

NYESS, an integral part of the Governor’s Employment First Initiative, is the largest employment network for people with disabilities in the United States. To date, $2.4 million from the Social Security Administration has been received by 100 New York State organizations which have assisted 7,755 individuals with disabilities with employment services, helping 1,366 individuals find permanent employment. This webpage includes a breakdown of the 100 organizations in receipt of the funds

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Supported Employment Services

“OPWDD is committed to doubling the number of individuals with developmental disabilities who are working in their communities. Supported Employment Providers are important partners in assisting individuals to achieve their employment goals.     OPWDD’s supported employment services include Supported Employment (SEMP), Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) and the Employment Training Program (ETP). Below you will find links to related program standards, templates for required documentation formats, contact information for our DDSO employment coordinators and information on training opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of your supported employment programs.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NY Disability Employment Initiative Grant Abstract - Round 1

The New York State Department of Labor will utilize their DEI project as their next generation approach building upon their significant commitment to expanded services under their former Disability Program Navigator grant. Collaborative activities include leveraging over $1 million in funds to further support DEI efforts, including $900,000 from the New York State Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities. The project will also be collaborating with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, “New York Makes Work Pay,” with plans to implement a unified case management system to minimize duplication and promote blending and braiding of diverse resources. Asset development activities include the development of expertise in work incentive and benefits planning strategies. The state will host “Asset Development Summits” for stakeholders, beneficiaries of Social Security disability programs, the banking community, and others to discuss and share resources to enhance asset development awareness. The DEI project includes the establishment of approximately 13 Employment Networks in participating workforce investment areas.
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation

NY SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) (2001)

The goal of this project was to develop an IPS guidebook used by vocational staff members who are working with consumers who have expressed a clear interest in seeking employment.   The guidebook unifys clinical, rehabilitation and vocational services under one licensing entity.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Assembly Bill A8111 - 06/09/2015

“AN ACT to amend the civil service law, in relation to establishing a customized employment demonstration program for persons with disabilities...”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

NY Assembly Bill 6516: ABLE Legislation - 03/26/2015

 Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as the "New York achieving a better life experience (NY ABLE) savings account act".

§ 2.  Legislative intent. The legislative intent of this act is to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence and quality of life; and to provide secure funding for disability related expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through existing sources.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

N.Y. Civil Service Law §55-b: Workers with Disabilities Program

Section 55-b of the New York State Civil Service Law authorizes the New York State Civil Service Commission to designate up to 1,200 positions normally filled through competitive examination to be filled through the appointment of qualified persons with disabilities. (Section 55-c authorizes the designation of up to 500 positions in the non-competitive class to be filled by qualified wartime veterans with disabilities.) In general, an entry-level position that is filled only through an open-competitive examination (one open to the public) may be used for a 55-b or 55-c appointment.

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Governor’s Executive Order Number 136 “Establishing the New York Employment First Initiative to Increase Employment of New Yorkers with Disabilities” - 10/03/2014

…”NOW, THEREFORE, I, ANDREW M. CUOMO, Governor of the State of New York, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the State of New York, do hereby order as follows: …

 

B. Employment First Commission 1. There is hereby established the Employment First Commission (the “Commission”) to provide guidance and advice to the Governor regarding the competitive integrated employment of individuals with disabilities.   2. The members of the Commission shall be the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Health; the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Civil Rights; the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Human Services; the Chief Diversity Officer; the Counsel to the Governor; the Director of the Budget; the Commissioner for Developmental Disabilities; the Commissioner of Health; the Commissioner of Mental Health; the Commissioner of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services; the Commissioner of Children and Family Services; the Commissioner of Labor; the Commissioner of Economic Development; the Commissioner of Transportation; the Commissioner of Temporary and Disability Assistance; the Director of Veterans’ Affairs; the Director of the State Office for Aging; and the Executive Director of the Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs. Additional members may be appointed to the Commission at the discretion of the Governor.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 21 - 30 of 30

App. B: Service Documentation Requirements for Enhanced Supported Employment Pilots - 10/01/2011

These are general definitions for services that may be provided to individuals through the Enhanced Supported Employment Pilot Project. They include Person Centered Vocational Planning: Comprehensive discovery process that assists the individual to identify their interests, capacities and strengths particular to the individualized employment planning process.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

2011 Interim Report on OPWDD State Plan - 02/15/2011

The objective of Employment First is to increase the number of people with developmental disabilities who are working in NYS. Many individuals could be successful in paying jobs with the appropriate level of supports, but for various reasons most individuals participate in other day programs. At the end of 2010, OPWDD supported 9,195 individuals in supported employment programs. Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) is one of the projects offering employment opportunities to individuals who would not likely succeed or qualify for traditional supported employment. Individuals receive greater levels of support, which could consist of person-centered planning, job development or job coaching. Currently, 405 individuals participate in ESEMP, with 259 individuals successfully working in the community. OPWDD anticipates that approximately 700 individuals will participate in this pilot.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Start-UP New York - Inclusive Entrepreneurship - 06/01/2010

Adoption of Discovery and Customized Team Planning policies represents an adjustment to the way in which SSIC conducts entrepreneurial awareness. This process now includes an informal assessment of the appropriateness of entrepreneurship for its customers, as well as an orientation to the demands and realities of entrepreneurship. By imbuing their existing processes with the essential characteristics of Discovery (e.g., flexibility, focus on the career seeker, willingness to look beyond formal and formulaic assessments), the process has become more open, inclusive, and effective for all customers of SSIC.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Important Information for Veterans Receiving Payments Under the Compensated Work Therapy Program - 01/01/2009

~~“The Internal Revenue Service has announced that payments made under the Department of Veterans Affairs Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) program are no longer taxable by the federal government, and that veterans who paid federal income tax on these benefits may claim a refund for tax years 2004, 2005, or 2006. As a result, these benefit payments are no longer taxable by New York State.“

Systems
  • Other

New York ACCES-VR Policy 1301.00: Self-Employment Policy - 07/01/1988

“Establishing or maintaining a consumer in self-employment as a rehabilitation outcome allows the consumer to be productive and become financially independent and to contribute to the State's economic growth. Self-employment rehabilitations also allow the ACCES-VR counselor to be creative in the rehabilitation process. This policy defines the parameters of the ACCES-VR/consumer partnership needed to create a successful self-employment venture.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

NYESS Funding and Employment

NYESS, an integral part of the Governor’s Employment First Initiative, is the largest employment network for people with disabilities in the United States. To date, $2.4 million from the Social Security Administration has been received by 100 New York State organizations which have assisted 7,755 individuals with disabilities with employment services, helping 1,366 individuals find permanent employment. This webpage includes a breakdown of the 100 organizations in receipt of the funds

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Supported Employment Services

“OPWDD is committed to doubling the number of individuals with developmental disabilities who are working in their communities. Supported Employment Providers are important partners in assisting individuals to achieve their employment goals.     OPWDD’s supported employment services include Supported Employment (SEMP), Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) and the Employment Training Program (ETP). Below you will find links to related program standards, templates for required documentation formats, contact information for our DDSO employment coordinators and information on training opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of your supported employment programs.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NY State Plan for VR Services and Supplement for Supported Employment Services Program (Attachment 4.8(b)(2))

Goal 1.1.A Youth: Increase the percentage of youth with disabilities (applicants prior to age 22) exiting the VR Program after receiving services that achieve an employment outcome and exceed the national standard of 55.8 percent.    Baseline FFY 2010: 42.5 percent achieved an employment outcome; does not meet the RSA Performance Standard.    Performance for FFY 2011: 46.9 percent achieved an employment outcome; does not meet the RSA Performance Standard.    Performance for FFY 2012: 55.7 percent achieved an employment outcome; does not meet the RSA Performance Standard.    Performance Target: Meet or exceed the RSA Performance Standard of 55.8 percent.    Results: The percentage of youth with disabilities that achieved an employment outcome after receiving VR services has increased by 13.2 percentage points, a significant increase. In FFY 2012 ACCES-VR achieved a performance indicator of 55.7 percent which is just below the national standard of 55.8 percent by one-tenth of one percent.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

New York State Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan - 01/01/2019

~~“The Federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) requires states to submit a 4-year Combined Plan to receive funding for the six WIOA core programs: Adult; Dislocated Worker; Youth; Wagner Peyser Employment; Adult Education and Literacy; and Vocational Rehabilitation.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • WIOA

About NYS CASE - 10/17/2018

~~“The NYS Consortium for Advancing and Supporting Employment (CASE) provides training and technical assistance to employment service providers under contract with the New York State Education Department's Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR).

The NYS CASE is a collaborative involving Cornell University's Yang-Tan Institute, the Center for Human Services Education (CHSE) (a division of Heritage Christian Services), the NYS Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE), and the NY Alliance for Innovation and Inclusion (NY Alliance).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

New York State Expanding Program to Help Individuals with Disabilities find Employment - 01/11/2018

“The New York State Employment First Commission, created by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and chaired by the New York State Office of Mental Health, has announced new resources to help increase employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The new program, called the "Employment First Benefits Advisory System," will provide advice on financial assistance and work incentives for individuals with disabilities who are working or seeking work….

The Benefits Advisory System was developed through a collaborative effort between seven New York State agencies to create a single approach to the coordination of employment supports, and to provide all New Yorkers - regardless of their disability - with a single point of access for all employment-related services, including job matching with the approximately 90,000 jobs currently posted by employers in the New York State Job Bank.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NY Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) Brief - The Entrepreneurship Partners Dialogue Meeting - 11/01/2010

“The Entrepreneurship Partners Dialogue Meeting that convened in Albany, New York on November 1, 2010 was designed to facilitate discussion about challenges and barriers faced by people with disabilities who want to become self–employed. The meeting was one of the many activities funded by New York State’s Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG), New York Makes Work Pay (NYMWP). NYMWP is a statewide initiative intended to dramatically improve the rate of employment among people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NY State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council

~~“About the New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (DDPC)

The federal Developmental Disabilities Act requires that each of the 56 U.S. States and Territories identify a Developmental Disabilities (DD) Council. The New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (DDPC) is the DD Council representing New York State.  Although the DDPC is 100% federally-funded, it operates as a New York State agency under the direction of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo.

The DDPC is not a direct service provider. Our mission is carried out through grant work. The DDPC addresses the needs of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities through the development of demonstration projects around advocacy, systems change, and capacity building efforts that promote self-determination, integration, and inclusion in all facets of life.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New York Inclusive Entrepreneurship Program

“[South Side Innovation Center] SSIC provides services to all interested entrepreneurs, but it also has targeted programs for traditionally underserved entrepreneurial groups including low-income individuals, people with disabilities, women and minorities. “The expansion of Inclusive Entrepreneurship has led to our ability to provide services even to typically hard-to-reach populations, including a contract with the State Commission on the Blind and Visually Handicapped, under which we provide services to blind and visually impaired individuals….’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

NY Disability Employment Initiative Grant Abstract - Round 1

The New York State Department of Labor will utilize their DEI project as their next generation approach building upon their significant commitment to expanded services under their former Disability Program Navigator grant. Collaborative activities include leveraging over $1 million in funds to further support DEI efforts, including $900,000 from the New York State Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities. The project will also be collaborating with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, “New York Makes Work Pay,” with plans to implement a unified case management system to minimize duplication and promote blending and braiding of diverse resources. Asset development activities include the development of expertise in work incentive and benefits planning strategies. The state will host “Asset Development Summits” for stakeholders, beneficiaries of Social Security disability programs, the banking community, and others to discuss and share resources to enhance asset development awareness. The DEI project includes the establishment of approximately 13 Employment Networks in participating workforce investment areas.
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation

NY SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) (2001)

The goal of this project was to develop an IPS guidebook used by vocational staff members who are working with consumers who have expressed a clear interest in seeking employment.   The guidebook unifys clinical, rehabilitation and vocational services under one licensing entity.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

New York Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The… grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Simply Speaking Inclusive Entrepreneurship Guidelines for SBDC Advisors - 05/17/2010

This whitepaper introduces and describes Start-Up NY and its efforts to improve disability employment in the state of New York. It discusses the 4 stage “Start-Up NY Process,” the economic impact, their work with veterans, success stories, and recommended tools, among other topics.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

A 'Primer’ on The StartUP New York 4-Phase Model - 09/28/2009

“START-UP/New York convened a multidisciplinary collaboration of highly skilled partners to provide a customized, intensive, and well-rounded training, technical assistance, counseling, and support program for people with disabilities interested in self-employment. Over the first three years, the project developed an improved model for developing community infrastructure and capacity through public and private investment and collaboration to support and provide technical assistance to individuals with disabilities who seek self-employment in Onondaga County. It was successful in documenting the strengths and weaknesses of the consortium model to assist in the start-up, sustainability, and replicable of successful micro-enterprise and small business ventures launched by individuals with disabilities. The project also succeeded in recruiting participants, including those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits, Veterans, youth and others in Onondaga County, representing a range of disabilities from diverse ethnic and racial groups who have aspirations for self-employment. The START-UP/New York model included developing customized training curricula, informed by Customized, Discovery-based results, personal preferences, and peer advisors.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

New York State Consortium for Advancement of Supported Employment

“The NYS Consortium for Advancement of Supported Employment (CASE) provides training and technical assistance to supported employment service providers under contract with the New York State Education Department's Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation….

The NYS CASE is a multi-faceted strategy that includes a statewide performance baseline, policy and practice goals, training curriculum and organizational development resources, regional and distance training opportunities, organizational development support, and evaluation of training and resources. The training establishes a critical link for supported employment professionals between the learning environment and on-going work with clients.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

New York (ACCES-VR) Workforce Development and Business Relations Department "Adult Career and Continuing Education Services –Vocational Rehabilitation…a basic guide"

What is ACCES? The Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services (ACCES) is part of the New York State Education Department and is comprised of three primary areas: Vocational Rehabilitation (including Independent Living Program Administration), Adult Education, and the Bureau of Proprietary School Supervision. ACCES-VR: • Administers vocational rehabilitation and independent living programs • Provides a wide array of services to assist eligible individuals with disabilities in obtaining employment • Provides services to students, beginning up to 2 years prior to exiting high school • Provides individual consultation, recommendations and training to assist with maintaining a job • Provides information and support to employers

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

New York (ACCES-VR) Workforce Development and Business Relations Department "Hiring Good People Is Good Business"

ACCES-VR can assist businesses with meeting compliance with Federal Laws Assistance for federal contractors/subcontractors in meeting OFCCP requirements. Technical assistance on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). ACCES-VR can lower hiring costs through these services ... Work Tryout ACCES-VR can reimburse an employer for 100% of an employee’s wages for up to 480 hours. This offers the employer the opportunity to evaluate the employee’s ability to satisfactorily perform the job. On the Job Training ACCES-VR can reimburse the worker’s salary, for an agreed upon period of time while he/she is being trained in a new occupation. ACCES-VR’s Partnership with Public Employers... ACCES-VR offers business customers in the public sector a designated point of contact to connect with qualified applicants, resources and support services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

New York ACCES-VR Workforce Development and Business Relations Department "Disability Etiquette Guide"

Everyone Knows Someone with a Disability People with disabilities are the nation’s largest minority and the only one that any person can join at any time. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, 54 million people have disabilities. That is nearly 1 in 5 people. Here are some general tips

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

SWIB Quarterly Meeting Presentation

he slide presentation from this meeting of the New York State Workforce Investment Board includes material on Customized Employment, WIOA, and Work Readiness Credentials.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Talent Development and Training Online Resource Library

This site provides various instructional resources for agencies interested in delivering their own training, as well as resources for individual learners interested in developing their professional education.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 21 - 21 of 21

New York State Medicaid Plan

Medicaid State Plan is an official document that describes the nature and scope of a state's Medicaid program. Each state develops its own Plan, as required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act (Act), which is then approved by the federal Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS). Any changes or amendments to the Plan are similarly developed by the state and approved by DHHS. Each state administers its own Plan and, in doing so, agrees to conform to the requirements of the Act and all other applicable federal statutes and regulations related to the Medicaid program.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Career opportunities for people with disabilities in the Empire State of New York are growing "Ever upwards!" If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New York’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
19,849,399
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.89%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,099,574
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.03%
Change from
2016 to 2017
378,951
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.89%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.46%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.94%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.21%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 19,795,791 19,745,289 19,849,399
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,098,072 1,109,370 1,099,574
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 362,397 367,478 378,951
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 8,529,968 8,522,611 8,610,618
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.00% 33.12% 34.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.93% 75.49% 76.21%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.30% 4.80% 4.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.30% 23.90% 24.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.30% 13.50% 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,021,909 1,022,521 1,040,543
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 1,201,045 1,215,492 1,225,864
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,505,461 1,491,395 1,489,769
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 369,717 377,502 398,388
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 392,152 414,249 436,921
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 11,739 11,469 15,683
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 103,032 114,660 111,566
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 947 971 1,056
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 56,897 64,402 61,213
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 175,161 177,614 188,732

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 20,756 20,841 20,914
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.90% 3.90% 4.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 510,196 502,062 493,907

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 75,276 91,021 84,070
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 151,373 161,606 148,077
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 484,231 483,978 408,787
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.50% 18.80% 20.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.40% 0.50% 0.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.30% 5.40% 5.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50% 1.50% 1.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,864 1,958 1,728
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 22,280 22,895 23,763
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,203 6,314 6,582
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 31,582 23,654 23,355
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 14,023 12,717 8,989
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 5,527 5,428 3,935
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 39.00% 43.00% 44.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 28.13 27.42 19.88

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
18,997
19,594
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 81 81 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,015 1,114 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 3,213 3,136 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 7,680 7,925 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 4,894 5,247 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 2,112 2,091 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.00% 31.40% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 26,744 29,345 28,953
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 863,707 856,201 842,951
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 1,231 1,158 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 951 851 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 17.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 989 2,264 3,105
Number of people served in facility based work. 7,203 6,623 5,768
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 46,158 46,358 46,867
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 37.80 40.50 54.80

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 57.80% 57.98% 58.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.80% 19.82% 19.56%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 6.13% 5.44% 6.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 78.29% 76.50% 90.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 48.12% 40.77% 44.02%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 71.71% 67.25% 69.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.85% 77.75% 80.66%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.59% 26.48% 25.41%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 6,429,710
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 8,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 498,920
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,435,284
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,934,204
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 1,050
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,152
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,202
AbilityOne wages (products). $3,814,358
AbilityOne wages (services). $26,511,843

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 11 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 81 43 43
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 7 1 4
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 99 44 47
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 286 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 9,201 3,950 3,912
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 424 0 247
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 9,911 3,950 4,159

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

Through the Employment First policy, the State seeks to build on important economic development investments to ensure that individuals with disabilities equally benefit from the improving economy and have sustained opportunities to engage in the competitive labor market. Specifically, the State aims to increase the employment rate of individuals with disabilities by 5%; decrease the poverty rate of individuals with disabilities by a comparable 5%; and engage 100 businesses in adopting policies and practices that support the integrated employment of individuals with disabilities. The driving force behind this initiative is the principle that everyone has the right to work.
The Employment First policy commission has made the following recommendations:

  1. Cultural Modeling: New York State agencies can model the integrated employment of individuals with disabilities. Whether through enhancements to the governor’s programs to hire persons/veterans with disabilities (sections 55-b and -c of New York State Civil Service Law), or through community-based organizations directly hiring individuals, a strong culture of employment first must be established.
  2. Energizing the “Demand-Side” of the Equation: Redesign and reinvigorate the New York Business Leadership Network to pursue the aggressive goal of engaging 100 business partners. A business first platform can be established through promoting existing tax credits, supporting businesses to pursue federal contracts, and harnessing the power of New York’s regional economic development efforts.
  3. New York Employment Services System (NYESS): The NYESS system has already distinguished New York as the leader in moving individuals with disabilities into the world of employment as the largest Social Security Administration Ticket to Work (TTW) network in the nation. Ensuring the full adoption of the system across community providers and state agencies will utilize the power of New York’s integrated employment case management system to comprehensively monitor and support employment outcomes in New York State.
  4. Benefits Advisement: Benefits systems are complex and only limited resources are available to help individuals accurately understand eligibility requirements and the impact of employment on benefits. New York State can utilize emerging tools like Disability Benefits 101 (DB101) and a network of “life coaches” to expand benefits advisement. (Pages 99-101)

Consistent with the strategic visions and goals advanced in the Combined Plan, the State is committed to enhancing program alignment and service delivery. The State has established an Interagency Work Group to analyze service delivery strategies and identify opportunities for improvement across all participant populations including Out-of-School Youth (OSY). The work group, in collaboration with the Employment First State Leadership Mentorship Program (EFSLMP), has established a Vision Quest project with the stated goal “to develop alignment between agencies servicing youth to assure quality services and that youth do not fall through the cracks.” The Vision Quest project is initially focused on improving services for youth with disabilities or multiple barriers to employment following the Integrated Resource Team (IRT) model developed under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Project. The State seeks to expand the IRT model to OSY without regard to their disability status and provide the same level of service integration demonstrated in our multiple DEI projects. The WIOA expanded maximum age (up to age 24) of OSY and the increased flexibility in the provision of Youth services found in the Final Regulations increases the opportunity to serve OSY in a Career Center environment and more fully engage the required and optional partners found therein. The State believes that combining the system level intervention of the Interagency Work Group with the customer level coordination of services provided through IRTs creates an optimal service environment for OSY that will lead to improved outcomes. (Page 134)

ACCES–VR has a longstanding working partnership with the Office for People with Development Disabilities (OPWDD). Collaborative projects and initiatives are ongoing. In 2014, NYS established an Employment First policy. This policy outlines several strategies and demonstrates NYS’s full commitment to inclusion for people with disabilities. To accomplish the vision and goals there are collaborative efforts that require participation for all State agencies. Many of these strategies build upon the existing linkages. Over the past several years OPWDD, OMH and ACCES–VR have been providing targeted training to employment staff on the delivery of high quality evidence–based employment services to individuals with disabilities. To more fully support the goals of Employment First, an expansion of this training is being planned. ACCES–VR will continue to work with OMH and OPWDD as well as NYS CB on supported employment guidelines to ensure the appropriate and smooth transitions for individuals with disabilities. (Pages 196-198)

NYSCB will encourage staff to provide in-service presentations for OPWDD and OMH staff regarding blindness, vision rehabilitation therapy, orientation and mobility, as well as job site accommodations. NYSCB recognizes that collaboration with these partner state agencies is integral to the employment success of individuals served by multiple agencies. These partners are currently collaborating on Governor Cuomo’s Employment First initiative and have already begun to address barriers that currently exist in the provision of services between agencies. NYSCB will continue to participate in these initiatives advocating for individuals who are legally blind receiving NYSCB services and will continue to work to provide seamless services to consumers in conjunction with our partner state agencies. (Page 271)

Customized Employment

Additionally, ACCES–VR has initiated outreach activities in conjunction with the July anniversary of the American with Disabilities Act with its downstate IES, City University of New York, and the Mayor’s Office in NYC. There were two “Champions for Change” events held in 2015. Discussion is underway with the State Rehabilitation Council about how they can further support ACCES–VR IESs to establish new relationships with business and enhance customized employment options.

ACCES–VR is also working with our provider agency partners as well as the NYS Department of Labor and NYS Commission for the Blind, to explore additional services, supports, or projects that could engage businesses that have had limited experiences with hiring people with disabilities. (Page 195)

ACCES–VR will include in its new CRS contracts to start in 2017, opportunities and funding for providers to develop customized employment opportunities. Training will also be provided to providers regarding provision of this service. (Page 195-196)
The following themes emerged from the meetings, as well as from other verbal and written information obtained from participants:

  • Employment: need more collaboration of stakeholders, providers and State agencies.
  • Businesses: need to be educated about hiring individuals with disabilities and available financial incentives credits.
  • ACCES–VR: should consider enhancement of the self–employment advisement committee. Recommendation is to explore how local businesses could be further engaged and could share their knowledge.
  • Supported Employment:
    • Effective program, but providers are concerned about the impact of the milestone system. Perhaps a tier system could be considered. Also, need to reevaluate retention measures under the milestone system.
    • Best practices with customized employment should be identified with a focus on replication and more engagement of business in the process. (Page 209)

Scope of Supported Employment Services

  • Supported Employment services are comprised of on–going services, including customized employment, needed to support and maintain an individual with a most significant disability in supported employment, that:
  • Are provided singly or in combination to assist an eligible individual to achieve a competitive integrated employment;
  • Are based on a determination of the needs of the individual and as specified in the IPE; and
  • Are provided by ACCES–VR for up to 24 months, unless an extension necessary to achieve the employment outcome identified in the IPE.

Supported employment services provide all the services necessary to assist the person with:

(Page 269)

NYSCB has also supported and participated in activities being implemented under the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG), and serves on the steering committee to the MIG. Activities under the MIG which will particularly benefit individuals in supported employment are pilots of customized employment approaches, development of a statewide employment data base “New York Employment Services System (NYESS),” and expansion of the availability of work incentives advisement.

NYSCB staff regularly attend the Empire State Association of Persons in Supported Employment (APSE) conference to dialogue with providers, consumers and advocates, and keep abreast of evidence-based practices. (Page 269)

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

Additionally, ACCES-VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects in the upstate NY LWDAs that focus on Employment Networks (ENs) and services related to assessment, benefits advisement, and placement. ACCES-VR liaisons meet periodically with DRCs to better understand and coordinate cross-systems services; to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities; and to increase support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. The DRCs are responsible for providing and improving targeted services to individuals with disabilities, as well as improving the capacity of all workforce staff in their respective sites to provide the best possible services to the disability population. All 13 pilot sites are registered as ENs under the Ticket to Work program, with the intent to get individuals off SSA benefits and back to work.

New York State ACCES-VR jointly conducts a Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) with its State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) every three years to determine the rehabilitation (and other) needs of residents with disabilities and to identify gaps in VR services. ACCES-VR uses this information to shape policy, procedures, training, operations, and practice. The next assessment will be conducted for the FY2017 State Plan. (Page 37)

Consistent with the strategic visions and goals advanced in the Combined Plan, the State is committed to enhancing program alignment and service delivery. The State has established an Interagency Work Group to analyze service delivery strategies and identify opportunities for improvement across all participant populations including Out-of-School Youth (OSY). The work group, in collaboration with the Employment First State Leadership Mentorship Program (EFSLMP), has established a Vision Quest project with the stated goal “to develop alignment between agencies servicing youth to assure quality services and that youth do not fall through the cracks.” The Vision Quest project is initially focused on improving services for youth with disabilities or multiple barriers to employment following the Integrated Resource Team (IRT) model developed under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Project. The State seeks to expand the IRT model to OSY without regard to their disability status and provide the same level of service integration demonstrated in our multiple DEI projects. The WIOA expanded maximum age (up to age 24) of OSY and the increased flexibility in the provision of Youth services found in the Final Regulations increases the opportunity to serve OSY in a Career Center environment and more fully engage the required and optional partners found therein. The State believes that combining the system level intervention of the Interagency Work Group with the customer level coordination of services provided through IRTs creates an optimal service environment for OSY that will lead to improved outcomes. (Page 134)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

7. Support and promote the Business Enterprise Program in order to increase employment opportunities and successful outcomes.

8. Increase provision of work incentives advisement to consumers by training counselors on the impact of work on SSI and SSDI and the importance of benefits advisement and financial literacy (Page 298).

8. Referrals for benefits advisement continue to increase. As a result the number of vendors approved to provide this service increased in FY 15. Select Independent Living Centers provide benefits counseling to active consumers on a pro bono basis thus further increasing the availability and use of the service. In New York City, a financial literacy program for college students was conducted in collaboration with Barclay Bank. NYSCB consumers and District Office Staff attended this program which provided useful information for consumers as they move to enter the workforce. (Page 307)

School to Work Transition

In 2016-17, a variety of professional development programs will continue to be delivered to Literacy Zones to assist in meeting their learners’ academic and personal needs. Literacy Zone professional development will be provided in multiple ways including training for case managers so that they can be resources regarding assessments leading to a NYS HSE diploma, career ladders, one-stop referrals, core partner connections, and the Benefits Toolkit. (Page 30)

In 2016-17 New York State will continue to focus on the ways all funded adult literacy programs work with individuals with disabilities. Many of the 49 Literacy Zones formed partnerships with the Independent Living Centers, which provide one-stop services to families with an individual with a disability. The New York State Education Department developed an electronic universal benefits manual that supports all programs including those that serve individuals with disabilities. This resource is updated annually and provides contemporary support to case managers providing services to individuals with disabilities. (Page 31)

  • Career Centers will all have the MyBenefits (mybenefits.ny.gov) web site short cut icon on all resource room computers and partner staff will be trained on how to promote and use the site with customers. MyBenefits was developed to help increase access and awareness of various public benefit programs. (Page 54-55)

NYSCB entered into a Partnership Plus Agreement, which enables consumers with a Social Security Ticket to Work to obtain VR services from NYSCB, as well as broad access to community providers to assist in the coordination of Social Security payments and other benefits and services.

Eleven non-profit organizations across NYS were approved as vendors to provide benefits advisement and support the development of economic self-sufficiency. The increased access to DRCs and other ENs increases support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services.

NYSCB uses funds to contract with two private agencies for individuals who are blind to provide pre-college programs for NYSCB consumers entering their senior year of high school. The program goal is to provide students the opportunity to refine their academic, social, and independent living skills before beginning college. (Page 57)

Eleven non-profit organizations across NYS were approved as vendors to provide benefits advisement and support the development of economic self-sufficiency. The increased access to DRCs and other ENs increases support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. (Page 57)

Over the next three years, NYESS and NYS DDPC will develop an integrated web-based platform called DB101. This system will be integrated with NYESS, CareerZone, and JobZone to provide accurate, up-to-date information and benefits calculators so participants can better assess how going to work will impact their access to publicly funded healthcare and income support like Supplemental Security Income, Social Security Disability Insurance, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, housing assistance, and other public benefits. (Page 77)

4. Benefits Advisement: Benefits systems are complex and only limited resources are available to help individuals accurately understand eligibility requirements and the impact of employment on benefits. New York State can utilize emerging tools like Disability Benefits 101 (DB101) and a network of “life coaches” to expand benefits advisement.

5. Medicaid Buy-In for Working People with Disabilities (MBI-WPD): New York can integrate the MBI-WPD program into the online New York State of Health application portal, automating and standardizing eligibility determinations and referring applicants who require additional assistance. (Page 100)

  • Disability–related training: including professional conferences in mental health, developmental disabilities, deafness and hearing impairments, the medical and vocational aspects of HIV/AIDS; and substance abuse disorders. Training included post–traumatic stress disorder; traumatic brain injury; epilepsy; mood disorders; personality disorders; autism spectrum disorders; anxiety disorders; addiction; managing challenging behavior; visual acuity; multiple sclerosis; bullying; workforce investment home modifications, and neuropsychology.
  • Supported employment: including professional conferences. Training was provided for supported employment; counseling skills for direct service providers; documentation and record keeping; job retention and career development; and benefits advisement. An initial training program on the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model and recovery from mental illness has evolved into an on–going Recovery–Oriented Vocational Rehabilitation Community of Practice. (Page 204)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities.

ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. The NYESS is a combined data warehouse and information sharing system for state and community agencies and a job matching/labor exchange system for consumers and businesses. (Page 212)

Individuals on SSI/SSDI make up 28 percent of all active cases or 13,882 individuals. Those who were considered to have a most significant disability were 70.9 percent of those served in all VR statuses. While individuals receiving SSI/SSDI were only 23.8 percent of all employment outcomes in FFY 2012, the employment rate for these individuals did increase. ACCES–VR is working with the SRC to examine data on consumers who receive SSI and SSDI, and is increasing the use of benefits planning services as a strategy to increase outcomes. (Page 216)

Individuals who are Deaf, Deaf–Blind, Hard of Hearing or Late Deafened The Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation in the Fifth Edition 2008 Model State Plan (MSP) for Rehabilitation of Persons who are Deaf, Deaf–Blind, Hard of Hearing or Late Deafened report that “Hearing loss is the most prevalent, chronic, physically disabling condition in the United States today.” The National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) reported in June 2010 that approximately 17 percent (36 million) of American adults report some degree of hearing loss; 15 percent (26 million) of Americans between the ages of 20 and 69 have high frequency hearing loss due to exposure to loud sounds or noise at work or in leisure activities and 4,000 new cases of sudden deafness occur each year in the United States. Hearing loss is becoming more prevalent among the general population. These losses can impact the employment status of individuals, depending on the level of loss. In FFY 2012, ACCES–VR served a total of 3,023 (3.3 percent) individuals who had a primary impairment of deafness, hearing loss, other hearing impairment and deaf–blindness, almost one third more than the number served in FFY 2009. Of these, 63.8 percent were considered to have a most significant disability. In FFY 2012, 612 individuals who were deaf, hard of hearing or deaf–blind achieved an employment outcome. This is 5.1 percent of all employment outcomes. (Page 216)

  • Provide benefits counseling at several key points in the VR process.
  • Train ACCES–VR counselors who serve as liaisons to mental health programs on OMH Individual Placement with Supports (IPS) model, implementation and provide on–going technical assistance.
  • Inform training program providers and the postsecondary education sector about incentives for hiring people with disabilities to encourage those entities

This past year ACCES–VR participated in a joint presentation with NYS Department of Labor to discuss financial incentives credits available to business. ACCES–VR is also working to identify federal contractors/subcontractors, and to obtain the most current information regarding the changes in the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) rules, which advance the recruitment of qualified candidates with disabilities. ACCES–VR ensures that key staffs across the state are prepared to provide customized training to the business community on the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities, through their participation in the American Disabilities Act (ADA) Trainer Network. This no–cost service is a valuable resource to businesses as they strive to diversify their workforces with qualified candidates with disabilities. (Page 237)

Partnership Plus

In Spring 2014, NYSCB entered into a Partnership Plus agreement with the Research Foundation for Mental Health. Partnership Plus assures that consumers with a Social Security Ticket to Work are able to obtain the services they need from NYSCB and that as they complete their services with NYSCB, they are given access to broad network of community providers from whom they can select to coordinate issues related to Social Security payments and other benefits and services.

NYS PROMISE Initiative

NYSCB is on the steering committee for New York State PROMISE (Promoting the Readiness of Minors in Supplemental Security Income), a research project developed to improve transition–to–adulthood outcomes for eligible youth who receive supplemental security income (SSI). This five–year initiative strives to increase access to services for eligible youth and their families to improve academic and employment outcomes, increase financial stability, and reduce reliance on SSI. The priority for the steering committee is to engage local and state partners in defining a broad strategic approach that starts to describe a system of person and family centered intervention. NYSCB actively participates in the steering committee to assess services that are provided to legally blind students through other New York State organizations. (Page260)

In 2012 NYSCB began entering into agreements with nonprofit organizations for the provision of benefits advisement services. Fifteen vendors have been approved for the provision of benefits advisement services throughout New York State. Providers of these services include agencies chartered primarily for provision of services to individuals who are blind, independent living centers, and other agencies that have engaged staff who are trained and certified by the Social Security Administration, by the Cornell Institute of Labor Relations, or by Virginia Commonwealth University. Many of these providers offer advisement not only on Social Security benefits, but also on a host of other benefits which may be affected by entering employment. (Page 267)

Further, modeling likelihood of successful case closures for NYSCB consumers receiving public benefits, it was observed that mental health impairments continues to negatively predict successful case closures for this group of individuals. Receipt of vocational training, high tech devices, computer training, job-related services and job placement services were all positively related to successful employment outcomes for individuals receiving public benefits. Despite these positive relationships between the specific services and outcomes, overall only 6-10 percent of consumers receiving public benefits access these services. Other factors identified in the overall model, also continue to predict positive outcomes for NYSCB consumers receiving public benefits. (Page 281)

Further, challenges continue to persist for achieving employment outcomes for clients who receive public benefits. Though many services (e.g., high-tech devices) appear to positively impact outcomes, only small proportions receive such services. It is likely that efforts such as New York State PROMISE initiative will be helpful in highlighting leading practices and service delivery models to inform program and policy development across various service systems.

Having mental health illness as a secondary condition continues to jeopardize the likelihood of success in the current system. This variable impacts both consumers receiving and those not receiving public benefits. This finding indicates a need to build capacity of practitioners in providing services to people with mental health illnesses. (Page 282)

  1. Few received training on job placement, Independent Living (IL), placement services from other agencies, how to target business outreach, and benefits and work incentives counseling. These are also topics on which staff reported needing training. (Page 288)
  2. Increase provision of work incentives advisement to consumers by training counselors on the impact of work on SSI and SSDI and the importance of benefits advisement and financial literacy (Page 298)
  3. By supporting increased use of benefits planning through Independent Living Centers, DRC’s and other qualified resources, NYSCB anticipates that more consumers will choose careers, and work hours, which will allow them to go off SSA benefits and achieve economic self-sufficiency. In addition, NYSCB has signed a Partnership Plus agreement with the OMH Administrative Employment Network. This will increase opportunities for consumers to obtain continued support to maintain their jobs after case closure. NYSCB works with ACCES-VR to allocate contract capacity for Supported Employment services to try to assure the services are available to individuals with the most significant disabilities seeking those services. (Page 302)
  4. Mental health impairment as a secondary condition was identified by the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment CSNA) as in indicator for unsuccessful closure. NYSCB increased relationships with Office of Mental Health (OMH) and the Office for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) on both the local and state level. The receipt of public assistance benefits was also identified as an indicator for unsuccessful case closure. Benefits advisement service referrals and providers were increased and are expected to reduce this gap. The Needs Assessment also found that individuals who received high-tech devices were more likely to be successfully closed. A new adaptive technology center (ATC) contract was implemented. The contract guidelines set high standards for the delivery of ATC evaluation and training services.
  5. NYSCB consumers participated in an employment based medical records program at Baruch College. District Offices have conducted outreach on their own and collaborated with ACCES-VR to expand vocational training opportunities for NYSCB consumers. Both core partners met with Human Resource hiring managers interested in matching consumers with hard to fill positions in their local businesses.
  6. NYSCB reviewed the vocational training programs currently delivered through community rehabilitation partners and determined that two types of vocational skills training are needed; one to support consumers in increasing employability and a second to meet the demands of emerging labor markets. The first type of training is focused on those consumers planning to enter fields such as customer service, office administration, and other clerical occupations and the potential need to acquire advanced skills levels in Braille, keyboarding, note taking, computer applications and other office practices. The second type of vocational skills training is related to meeting the needs of a particular business or business sector and is developed in conjunction with a business or group of businesses representing a sector which is expected to have a high demand for employees over the next five to ten years. NYSCB will continue to develop and explore the need for new programs and training opportunities. (Page 305)
  7. Referrals for benefits advisement continue to increase. As a result the number of vendors approved to provide this service increased in FY 15. Select Independent Living Centers provide benefits counseling to active consumers on a pro bono basis thus further increasing the availability and use of the service. In New York City, a financial literacy program for college students was conducted in collaboration with Barclay Bank. NYSCB consumers and District Office Staff attended this program which provided useful information for consumers as they move to enter the workforce.
  8. Working with the National Industries for the Blind, new call centers and other service sector employment opportunities for NYSCB consumers have been developed this year. A new call center was opened in Brooklyn and actively hired consumers from NYSCB. Management staff at the call centers as well as counselors continually monitor front line staff at these call centers to provide any necessary support to the consumers employed there and to assist them in advancing their employment skills. (Page 307)
Career Pathways

VR Transition Policy ACCES–VR collaborated with the Office of Special Education and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) in 2008 to revise the 421.00 Youth in School – Transition Referral, Planning and Services Policy, to ensure a common understanding of transition requirements and responsibilities and to assist with building a collaborative partnership between transition specialists, school districts and ACCES–VR district offices throughout the state. The policy provides information about the requirements, roles and responsibilities of VR in preparing students with disabilities for successful employment. ACCES–VR, with the SRC, reviews the policy periodically to determine its current relevance. While much of the policy remains up–to–date, a revision is planned for the end of this year to ensure compliance with the requirements under WIOA, including pre–employment transition services and the use of assistive technology. This policy establishes an affirmative role for VRCs working with students in transition from school to work, a critical time for young adults with disabilities. The policy delineates the referral process of students with disabilities two years prior to their expected school exit. (Page 186)

NYSCB and the New York State Education Department collaborate on a regular basis to provide guidance to educational agencies and vocational rehabilitation personnel responsible for facilitating transition services, and to provide information about consultation and technical assistance resources to assist schools and related community support entities in planning for transition of students who are legally blind. At the state level, both agencies have designated personnel that provide oversight and leadership for the development of policies, procedures, interagency training and other state-level partnership activities for transition services. At the local level, VR counselors work closely with school district staff and local school districts have transition to work specialists that collaborate together. NYSCB will continue to work closely with schools to enable the smooth transition of students who are legally blind from school to work. (Page 279)

Work Incentives & Benefits

WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

  • Focusing leadership funds on the key requirements of WIOA through approval of new annual workplans for the RAEN and NRS Accountability specialist and work charges of NYSED state ACCES-Adult Education staff.
  • Continuing to implement a new High School Equivalency diploma for New York that serves as a gateway credential for employment, training, career pathways and postsecondary transition, and providing in-depth training of master teachers and turnkey training for 5,500 adult education teachers.
  • Adapting state and WIOA-funded professional development to support career pathways, postsecondary transition, integrated education, and integrated English literacy and civics education. (Page 34)

Local partnerships, which form the foundation of the workforce delivery system, are especially effective in meeting the workforce needs of New York’s diverse population. Local plans describe how these partnerships will be coordinated to enable all customers to receive the full range of employment and training programs and supportive services, especially those that lead to jobs in high-wage, high-growth occupations along career pathways. The needs of individuals with multiple barriers to employment are being addressed quickly and thoroughly due to the wide spectrum of service providers joined together under the local workforce system. The New York State Office for the Aging, NYSED (including ACCES-VR), the New York State Department of Health (DOH), OCFS (including NYSCB), the Office for Alcohol and Substance Abuse (OASAS), the Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance (OTDA), the State University of New York (SUNY), NYSDOL, and local community based organizations apply knowledge gained through regular communication, partnership collaborations, and cross-training to develop comprehensive service strategies to address the varying needs of our common participants. With the functional alignment approach and common customer flow in the Career Centers, partners are more aware of each agency’s involvement with the participant instead of working in a vacuum. This greatly helps reduce duplication of services to participants. (Page 52)

Employer/ Business

Additionally, ACCES-VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects in the upstate NY LWDAs that focus on Employment Networks (ENs) and services related to assessment, benefits advisement, and placement. ACCES-VR liaisons meet periodically with DRCs to better understand and coordinate cross-systems services; to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities; and to increase support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. The DRCs are responsible for providing and improving targeted services to individuals with disabilities, as well as improving the capacity of all workforce staff in their respective sites to provide the best possible services to the disability population. All 13 pilot sites are registered as ENs under the Ticket to Work program, with the intent to get individuals off SSA benefits and back to work. (Page 37)

New York State continues to be at the forefront in the area of serving individuals with disabilities with the implementation of NYESS and the opportunities the system allows. For example, in February 2012, the federal Social Security Administration announced that NYESS (www.nyess.ny.gov) was designated as the first statewide Employment Network in the United States. ENs are designated by the SSA to assist individuals with disabilities to find competitive jobs. The statewide EN designation allows SSA the ability to collaborate directly with New York to document employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities holding a Ticket-To-Work, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Ticket-To-Work program. As a statewide EN, NYESS creates a network of providers working with multiple state agencies using a single, real-time employment data/case management system. This statewide effort generates thousands of dollars in incentive payments to be reinvested in expanded job supports for individuals with disabilities. (Page 102)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities.

ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. The NYESS is a combined data warehouse and information sharing system for state and community agencies and a job matching/labor exchange system for consumers and businesses. (Page 212)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities. ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. (Page 216)

3. Promote business awareness of NYSCB workforce programs and business services through print, broadcast and electronic media to include social media, and continue to promote awareness of NYSCB through personal face–to–face contacts with businesses.

4. Continue to work with the National Employment Team (NET) of the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and other employment networks to improve employment options for NYSCB consumers.

5. Work to build partnerships with America’s Job Centers as well as the four core partners, to increase access to services needed by NYSCB consumers. (Page 298)

511

The Core Programs are required to regularly report to the Federal government and public on program performance to keep the system accountable and transparent in the pursuit of the State’s workforce vision and goals. Although WIA also required performance reporting, WIOA seeks to improve accountability across all core programs by requiring that they report on a set of uniform measures. At the onset of WIOA implementation, setting of performance goals for programs without an institutional history of these measures or an established method for collecting needed data to report these measures will be a challenge. The Core Programs are working to share existing data collection and analysis methods to identify and establish good data sources and to work through necessary administrative clearances to meet new WIOA requirements. In particular, programs under Titles II and IV of WIOA are in the process of gathering the necessary information to establish valid and reliable data for the required performance measures. The preliminary performance goals that have already been established are included in Table 1 below. (Page 42)

B. DATA-COLLECTION AND REPORTING PROCESSES USED FOR ALL PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES, INCLUDING THOSE PRESENT IN ONE-STOP CENTERS*.

The Core Programs are working closely together to identify and establish appropriate data sources and gaining the necessary administrative clearances to meet the WIOA requirements. Titles II and IV are in the process of gathering the necessary information to establish valid and reliable data for the required performance measures. (Pages 77-78)

As discussed previously, NYSDOL, in partnership with NYS OMH, developed and implemented NYESS. NYESS is made up of various computer applications and data sets. Employment related data collection is accomplished by all NYESS partners using the existing NYSDOL case management system, OSOS. Legacy data sets from the partners and current data sets, which include but are not limited to, OSOS; vocational rehabilitation agencies; DOH; Social Security Administration (SSA); and others are pulled together in a data warehouse. A web-based reporting portal designed and maintained by OMH will provide cross-agency report card like information to the general public (aggregate data) and to the individual agencies and their contracted partner staff. (Page 84)

  • Provide on–going training for supervisors. Supervisors are brought to a central location at least biannually for a three–day training. The trainings focus on the multiple roles of a supervisor and provide updates on policy, data collection and more to ensure good communication.
  • Improve the quality of supported employment services by training ACCES–VR and supported employment providers on updated supported employment policy, procedures and guidelines to ensure the integrity and effectiveness of the supported employment program.
  • Provide a Management Community of Practice. ACCES–VR is collaborating with Cornell University, Employment Disability Institute for the provision of a community of practice training project for management level staff. (Page 228)

Secondary Data Analysis of Consumer Information System

The primary purpose of analyzing NYSCB’s Consumer Information System is to identify factors related to successful case closures and employment outcomes for NYSCB clients. Specifically this analysis explored the following research questions:

  1. What are the demographic and services-related factors that predict successful employment outcomes for NYSCB consumers? How do these vary by NYSCB district offices? How do local labor market conditions (e.g., county-level employment rate for people with disabilities) impact employment outcomes for NYSCB consumers?
  2. How do these differ between transition-age youth and adult population?
  3. How do these factors impact successful outcomes for NYSCB consumers who receive publicbenefits compared with their non-beneficiary peers? (Page 280)
Mental Health

ADDRESSING THE ACCESSIBILITY OF THE ONE-STOP DELIVERY SYSTEM FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 99)

Accessibility

Accessibility is an important component within the public workforce system. New York State assures that all partners in the workforce development system described in this plan recognize the importance of the physical, programmatic, and communications accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities and English language learners in the Career Centers.

Under WIA, NYSDOL’s Methods of Administration outlined the policies, procedures, and systems NYS designed and put in place in order to provide a reasonable guarantee that NYS and its recipients of Title I WIA funds complied with the Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity requirements of WIA Section 188 and its implementing regulations. It is still available online at http://www.labor.ny.gov/agencyinfo/moa/moa.shtm and will be revised in the coming months to reflect the new WIOA regulations.

Additionally, NYSDOL will revise a Technical Advisory (TA) on the topic of “Accessibility of One-Stop Systems to Individuals with Disabilities.” The TA on this topic, released under WIA on May 16, 2000, will be revised to reflect new accessibility regulations under WIOA. (Page 102)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 81 - 90 of 94

SWIB Quarterly Meeting Presentation

he slide presentation from this meeting of the New York State Workforce Investment Board includes material on Customized Employment, WIOA, and Work Readiness Credentials.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Talent Development and Training Online Resource Library

This site provides various instructional resources for agencies interested in delivering their own training, as well as resources for individual learners interested in developing their professional education.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

NYESS Funding and Employment

NYESS, an integral part of the Governor’s Employment First Initiative, is the largest employment network for people with disabilities in the United States. To date, $2.4 million from the Social Security Administration has been received by 100 New York State organizations which have assisted 7,755 individuals with disabilities with employment services, helping 1,366 individuals find permanent employment. This webpage includes a breakdown of the 100 organizations in receipt of the funds

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Supported Employment Services

“OPWDD is committed to doubling the number of individuals with developmental disabilities who are working in their communities. Supported Employment Providers are important partners in assisting individuals to achieve their employment goals.     OPWDD’s supported employment services include Supported Employment (SEMP), Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) and the Employment Training Program (ETP). Below you will find links to related program standards, templates for required documentation formats, contact information for our DDSO employment coordinators and information on training opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of your supported employment programs.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NY Disability Employment Initiative Grant Abstract - Round 1

The New York State Department of Labor will utilize their DEI project as their next generation approach building upon their significant commitment to expanded services under their former Disability Program Navigator grant. Collaborative activities include leveraging over $1 million in funds to further support DEI efforts, including $900,000 from the New York State Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities. The project will also be collaborating with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, “New York Makes Work Pay,” with plans to implement a unified case management system to minimize duplication and promote blending and braiding of diverse resources. Asset development activities include the development of expertise in work incentive and benefits planning strategies. The state will host “Asset Development Summits” for stakeholders, beneficiaries of Social Security disability programs, the banking community, and others to discuss and share resources to enhance asset development awareness. The DEI project includes the establishment of approximately 13 Employment Networks in participating workforce investment areas.
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation

NY SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) (2001)

The goal of this project was to develop an IPS guidebook used by vocational staff members who are working with consumers who have expressed a clear interest in seeking employment.   The guidebook unifys clinical, rehabilitation and vocational services under one licensing entity.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Assembly Bill A8111 - 06/09/2015

“AN ACT to amend the civil service law, in relation to establishing a customized employment demonstration program for persons with disabilities...”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

NY Assembly Bill 6516: ABLE Legislation - 03/26/2015

 Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as the "New York achieving a better life experience (NY ABLE) savings account act".

§ 2.  Legislative intent. The legislative intent of this act is to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence and quality of life; and to provide secure funding for disability related expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through existing sources.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

N.Y. Civil Service Law §55-b: Workers with Disabilities Program

Section 55-b of the New York State Civil Service Law authorizes the New York State Civil Service Commission to designate up to 1,200 positions normally filled through competitive examination to be filled through the appointment of qualified persons with disabilities. (Section 55-c authorizes the designation of up to 500 positions in the non-competitive class to be filled by qualified wartime veterans with disabilities.) In general, an entry-level position that is filled only through an open-competitive examination (one open to the public) may be used for a 55-b or 55-c appointment.

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Governor’s Executive Order Number 136 “Establishing the New York Employment First Initiative to Increase Employment of New Yorkers with Disabilities” - 10/03/2014

…”NOW, THEREFORE, I, ANDREW M. CUOMO, Governor of the State of New York, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the State of New York, do hereby order as follows: …

 

B. Employment First Commission 1. There is hereby established the Employment First Commission (the “Commission”) to provide guidance and advice to the Governor regarding the competitive integrated employment of individuals with disabilities.   2. The members of the Commission shall be the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Health; the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Civil Rights; the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Human Services; the Chief Diversity Officer; the Counsel to the Governor; the Director of the Budget; the Commissioner for Developmental Disabilities; the Commissioner of Health; the Commissioner of Mental Health; the Commissioner of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services; the Commissioner of Children and Family Services; the Commissioner of Labor; the Commissioner of Economic Development; the Commissioner of Transportation; the Commissioner of Temporary and Disability Assistance; the Director of Veterans’ Affairs; the Director of the State Office for Aging; and the Executive Director of the Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs. Additional members may be appointed to the Commission at the discretion of the Governor.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 21 - 30 of 30

App. B: Service Documentation Requirements for Enhanced Supported Employment Pilots - 10/01/2011

These are general definitions for services that may be provided to individuals through the Enhanced Supported Employment Pilot Project. They include Person Centered Vocational Planning: Comprehensive discovery process that assists the individual to identify their interests, capacities and strengths particular to the individualized employment planning process.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

2011 Interim Report on OPWDD State Plan - 02/15/2011

The objective of Employment First is to increase the number of people with developmental disabilities who are working in NYS. Many individuals could be successful in paying jobs with the appropriate level of supports, but for various reasons most individuals participate in other day programs. At the end of 2010, OPWDD supported 9,195 individuals in supported employment programs. Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) is one of the projects offering employment opportunities to individuals who would not likely succeed or qualify for traditional supported employment. Individuals receive greater levels of support, which could consist of person-centered planning, job development or job coaching. Currently, 405 individuals participate in ESEMP, with 259 individuals successfully working in the community. OPWDD anticipates that approximately 700 individuals will participate in this pilot.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Start-UP New York - Inclusive Entrepreneurship - 06/01/2010

Adoption of Discovery and Customized Team Planning policies represents an adjustment to the way in which SSIC conducts entrepreneurial awareness. This process now includes an informal assessment of the appropriateness of entrepreneurship for its customers, as well as an orientation to the demands and realities of entrepreneurship. By imbuing their existing processes with the essential characteristics of Discovery (e.g., flexibility, focus on the career seeker, willingness to look beyond formal and formulaic assessments), the process has become more open, inclusive, and effective for all customers of SSIC.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Important Information for Veterans Receiving Payments Under the Compensated Work Therapy Program - 01/01/2009

~~“The Internal Revenue Service has announced that payments made under the Department of Veterans Affairs Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) program are no longer taxable by the federal government, and that veterans who paid federal income tax on these benefits may claim a refund for tax years 2004, 2005, or 2006. As a result, these benefit payments are no longer taxable by New York State.“

Systems
  • Other

New York ACCES-VR Policy 1301.00: Self-Employment Policy - 07/01/1988

“Establishing or maintaining a consumer in self-employment as a rehabilitation outcome allows the consumer to be productive and become financially independent and to contribute to the State's economic growth. Self-employment rehabilitations also allow the ACCES-VR counselor to be creative in the rehabilitation process. This policy defines the parameters of the ACCES-VR/consumer partnership needed to create a successful self-employment venture.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

NYESS Funding and Employment

NYESS, an integral part of the Governor’s Employment First Initiative, is the largest employment network for people with disabilities in the United States. To date, $2.4 million from the Social Security Administration has been received by 100 New York State organizations which have assisted 7,755 individuals with disabilities with employment services, helping 1,366 individuals find permanent employment. This webpage includes a breakdown of the 100 organizations in receipt of the funds

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Supported Employment Services

“OPWDD is committed to doubling the number of individuals with developmental disabilities who are working in their communities. Supported Employment Providers are important partners in assisting individuals to achieve their employment goals.     OPWDD’s supported employment services include Supported Employment (SEMP), Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) and the Employment Training Program (ETP). Below you will find links to related program standards, templates for required documentation formats, contact information for our DDSO employment coordinators and information on training opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of your supported employment programs.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NY State Plan for VR Services and Supplement for Supported Employment Services Program (Attachment 4.8(b)(2))

Goal 1.1.A Youth: Increase the percentage of youth with disabilities (applicants prior to age 22) exiting the VR Program after receiving services that achieve an employment outcome and exceed the national standard of 55.8 percent.    Baseline FFY 2010: 42.5 percent achieved an employment outcome; does not meet the RSA Performance Standard.    Performance for FFY 2011: 46.9 percent achieved an employment outcome; does not meet the RSA Performance Standard.    Performance for FFY 2012: 55.7 percent achieved an employment outcome; does not meet the RSA Performance Standard.    Performance Target: Meet or exceed the RSA Performance Standard of 55.8 percent.    Results: The percentage of youth with disabilities that achieved an employment outcome after receiving VR services has increased by 13.2 percentage points, a significant increase. In FFY 2012 ACCES-VR achieved a performance indicator of 55.7 percent which is just below the national standard of 55.8 percent by one-tenth of one percent.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

New York State Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan - 01/01/2019

~~“The Federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) requires states to submit a 4-year Combined Plan to receive funding for the six WIOA core programs: Adult; Dislocated Worker; Youth; Wagner Peyser Employment; Adult Education and Literacy; and Vocational Rehabilitation.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • WIOA

About NYS CASE - 10/17/2018

~~“The NYS Consortium for Advancing and Supporting Employment (CASE) provides training and technical assistance to employment service providers under contract with the New York State Education Department's Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR).

The NYS CASE is a collaborative involving Cornell University's Yang-Tan Institute, the Center for Human Services Education (CHSE) (a division of Heritage Christian Services), the NYS Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE), and the NY Alliance for Innovation and Inclusion (NY Alliance).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

New York State Expanding Program to Help Individuals with Disabilities find Employment - 01/11/2018

“The New York State Employment First Commission, created by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and chaired by the New York State Office of Mental Health, has announced new resources to help increase employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The new program, called the "Employment First Benefits Advisory System," will provide advice on financial assistance and work incentives for individuals with disabilities who are working or seeking work….

The Benefits Advisory System was developed through a collaborative effort between seven New York State agencies to create a single approach to the coordination of employment supports, and to provide all New Yorkers - regardless of their disability - with a single point of access for all employment-related services, including job matching with the approximately 90,000 jobs currently posted by employers in the New York State Job Bank.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NY Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) Brief - The Entrepreneurship Partners Dialogue Meeting - 11/01/2010

“The Entrepreneurship Partners Dialogue Meeting that convened in Albany, New York on November 1, 2010 was designed to facilitate discussion about challenges and barriers faced by people with disabilities who want to become self–employed. The meeting was one of the many activities funded by New York State’s Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG), New York Makes Work Pay (NYMWP). NYMWP is a statewide initiative intended to dramatically improve the rate of employment among people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NY State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council

~~“About the New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (DDPC)

The federal Developmental Disabilities Act requires that each of the 56 U.S. States and Territories identify a Developmental Disabilities (DD) Council. The New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (DDPC) is the DD Council representing New York State.  Although the DDPC is 100% federally-funded, it operates as a New York State agency under the direction of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo.

The DDPC is not a direct service provider. Our mission is carried out through grant work. The DDPC addresses the needs of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities through the development of demonstration projects around advocacy, systems change, and capacity building efforts that promote self-determination, integration, and inclusion in all facets of life.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New York Inclusive Entrepreneurship Program

“[South Side Innovation Center] SSIC provides services to all interested entrepreneurs, but it also has targeted programs for traditionally underserved entrepreneurial groups including low-income individuals, people with disabilities, women and minorities. “The expansion of Inclusive Entrepreneurship has led to our ability to provide services even to typically hard-to-reach populations, including a contract with the State Commission on the Blind and Visually Handicapped, under which we provide services to blind and visually impaired individuals….’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

NY Disability Employment Initiative Grant Abstract - Round 1

The New York State Department of Labor will utilize their DEI project as their next generation approach building upon their significant commitment to expanded services under their former Disability Program Navigator grant. Collaborative activities include leveraging over $1 million in funds to further support DEI efforts, including $900,000 from the New York State Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities. The project will also be collaborating with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, “New York Makes Work Pay,” with plans to implement a unified case management system to minimize duplication and promote blending and braiding of diverse resources. Asset development activities include the development of expertise in work incentive and benefits planning strategies. The state will host “Asset Development Summits” for stakeholders, beneficiaries of Social Security disability programs, the banking community, and others to discuss and share resources to enhance asset development awareness. The DEI project includes the establishment of approximately 13 Employment Networks in participating workforce investment areas.
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation

NY SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) (2001)

The goal of this project was to develop an IPS guidebook used by vocational staff members who are working with consumers who have expressed a clear interest in seeking employment.   The guidebook unifys clinical, rehabilitation and vocational services under one licensing entity.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

New York Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The… grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Simply Speaking Inclusive Entrepreneurship Guidelines for SBDC Advisors - 05/17/2010

This whitepaper introduces and describes Start-Up NY and its efforts to improve disability employment in the state of New York. It discusses the 4 stage “Start-Up NY Process,” the economic impact, their work with veterans, success stories, and recommended tools, among other topics.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

A 'Primer’ on The StartUP New York 4-Phase Model - 09/28/2009

“START-UP/New York convened a multidisciplinary collaboration of highly skilled partners to provide a customized, intensive, and well-rounded training, technical assistance, counseling, and support program for people with disabilities interested in self-employment. Over the first three years, the project developed an improved model for developing community infrastructure and capacity through public and private investment and collaboration to support and provide technical assistance to individuals with disabilities who seek self-employment in Onondaga County. It was successful in documenting the strengths and weaknesses of the consortium model to assist in the start-up, sustainability, and replicable of successful micro-enterprise and small business ventures launched by individuals with disabilities. The project also succeeded in recruiting participants, including those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits, Veterans, youth and others in Onondaga County, representing a range of disabilities from diverse ethnic and racial groups who have aspirations for self-employment. The START-UP/New York model included developing customized training curricula, informed by Customized, Discovery-based results, personal preferences, and peer advisors.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

New York State Consortium for Advancement of Supported Employment

“The NYS Consortium for Advancement of Supported Employment (CASE) provides training and technical assistance to supported employment service providers under contract with the New York State Education Department's Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation….

The NYS CASE is a multi-faceted strategy that includes a statewide performance baseline, policy and practice goals, training curriculum and organizational development resources, regional and distance training opportunities, organizational development support, and evaluation of training and resources. The training establishes a critical link for supported employment professionals between the learning environment and on-going work with clients.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

New York (ACCES-VR) Workforce Development and Business Relations Department "Adult Career and Continuing Education Services –Vocational Rehabilitation…a basic guide"

What is ACCES? The Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services (ACCES) is part of the New York State Education Department and is comprised of three primary areas: Vocational Rehabilitation (including Independent Living Program Administration), Adult Education, and the Bureau of Proprietary School Supervision. ACCES-VR: • Administers vocational rehabilitation and independent living programs • Provides a wide array of services to assist eligible individuals with disabilities in obtaining employment • Provides services to students, beginning up to 2 years prior to exiting high school • Provides individual consultation, recommendations and training to assist with maintaining a job • Provides information and support to employers

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

New York (ACCES-VR) Workforce Development and Business Relations Department "Hiring Good People Is Good Business"

ACCES-VR can assist businesses with meeting compliance with Federal Laws Assistance for federal contractors/subcontractors in meeting OFCCP requirements. Technical assistance on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). ACCES-VR can lower hiring costs through these services ... Work Tryout ACCES-VR can reimburse an employer for 100% of an employee’s wages for up to 480 hours. This offers the employer the opportunity to evaluate the employee’s ability to satisfactorily perform the job. On the Job Training ACCES-VR can reimburse the worker’s salary, for an agreed upon period of time while he/she is being trained in a new occupation. ACCES-VR’s Partnership with Public Employers... ACCES-VR offers business customers in the public sector a designated point of contact to connect with qualified applicants, resources and support services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

New York ACCES-VR Workforce Development and Business Relations Department "Disability Etiquette Guide"

Everyone Knows Someone with a Disability People with disabilities are the nation’s largest minority and the only one that any person can join at any time. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, 54 million people have disabilities. That is nearly 1 in 5 people. Here are some general tips

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

SWIB Quarterly Meeting Presentation

he slide presentation from this meeting of the New York State Workforce Investment Board includes material on Customized Employment, WIOA, and Work Readiness Credentials.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Talent Development and Training Online Resource Library

This site provides various instructional resources for agencies interested in delivering their own training, as well as resources for individual learners interested in developing their professional education.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 21 - 21 of 21

New York State Medicaid Plan

Medicaid State Plan is an official document that describes the nature and scope of a state's Medicaid program. Each state develops its own Plan, as required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act (Act), which is then approved by the federal Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS). Any changes or amendments to the Plan are similarly developed by the state and approved by DHHS. Each state administers its own Plan and, in doing so, agrees to conform to the requirements of the Act and all other applicable federal statutes and regulations related to the Medicaid program.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Career opportunities for people with disabilities in the Empire State of New York are growing "Ever upwards!" If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New York’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
19,849,399
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.89%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,099,574
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.03%
Change from
2016 to 2017
378,951
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.89%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.46%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.94%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.21%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 19,795,791 19,745,289 19,849,399
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,098,072 1,109,370 1,099,574
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 362,397 367,478 378,951
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 8,529,968 8,522,611 8,610,618
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.00% 33.12% 34.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.93% 75.49% 76.21%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.30% 4.80% 4.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.30% 23.90% 24.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.30% 13.50% 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,021,909 1,022,521 1,040,543
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 1,201,045 1,215,492 1,225,864
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,505,461 1,491,395 1,489,769
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 369,717 377,502 398,388
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 392,152 414,249 436,921
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 11,739 11,469 15,683
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 103,032 114,660 111,566
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 947 971 1,056
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 56,897 64,402 61,213
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 175,161 177,614 188,732

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 20,756 20,841 20,914
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.90% 3.90% 4.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 510,196 502,062 493,907

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 75,276 91,021 84,070
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 151,373 161,606 148,077
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 484,231 483,978 408,787
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.50% 18.80% 20.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.40% 0.50% 0.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.30% 5.40% 5.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50% 1.50% 1.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,864 1,958 1,728
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 22,280 22,895 23,763
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,203 6,314 6,582
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 31,582 23,654 23,355
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 14,023 12,717 8,989
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 5,527 5,428 3,935
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 39.00% 43.00% 44.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 28.13 27.42 19.88

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
18,997
19,594
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 81 81 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,015 1,114 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 3,213 3,136 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 7,680 7,925 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 4,894 5,247 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 2,112 2,091 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.00% 31.40% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 26,744 29,345 28,953
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 863,707 856,201 842,951
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 1,231 1,158 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 951 851 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 17.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 989 2,264 3,105
Number of people served in facility based work. 7,203 6,623 5,768
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 46,158 46,358 46,867
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 37.80 40.50 54.80

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 57.80% 57.98% 58.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.80% 19.82% 19.56%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 6.13% 5.44% 6.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 78.29% 76.50% 90.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 48.12% 40.77% 44.02%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 71.71% 67.25% 69.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.85% 77.75% 80.66%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.59% 26.48% 25.41%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 6,429,710
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 8,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 498,920
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,435,284
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,934,204
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 1,050
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,152
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,202
AbilityOne wages (products). $3,814,358
AbilityOne wages (services). $26,511,843

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 11 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 81 43 43
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 7 1 4
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 99 44 47
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 286 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 9,201 3,950 3,912
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 424 0 247
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 9,911 3,950 4,159

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

Through the Employment First policy, the State seeks to build on important economic development investments to ensure that individuals with disabilities equally benefit from the improving economy and have sustained opportunities to engage in the competitive labor market. Specifically, the State aims to increase the employment rate of individuals with disabilities by 5%; decrease the poverty rate of individuals with disabilities by a comparable 5%; and engage 100 businesses in adopting policies and practices that support the integrated employment of individuals with disabilities. The driving force behind this initiative is the principle that everyone has the right to work.
The Employment First policy commission has made the following recommendations:

  1. Cultural Modeling: New York State agencies can model the integrated employment of individuals with disabilities. Whether through enhancements to the governor’s programs to hire persons/veterans with disabilities (sections 55-b and -c of New York State Civil Service Law), or through community-based organizations directly hiring individuals, a strong culture of employment first must be established.
  2. Energizing the “Demand-Side” of the Equation: Redesign and reinvigorate the New York Business Leadership Network to pursue the aggressive goal of engaging 100 business partners. A business first platform can be established through promoting existing tax credits, supporting businesses to pursue federal contracts, and harnessing the power of New York’s regional economic development efforts.
  3. New York Employment Services System (NYESS): The NYESS system has already distinguished New York as the leader in moving individuals with disabilities into the world of employment as the largest Social Security Administration Ticket to Work (TTW) network in the nation. Ensuring the full adoption of the system across community providers and state agencies will utilize the power of New York’s integrated employment case management system to comprehensively monitor and support employment outcomes in New York State.
  4. Benefits Advisement: Benefits systems are complex and only limited resources are available to help individuals accurately understand eligibility requirements and the impact of employment on benefits. New York State can utilize emerging tools like Disability Benefits 101 (DB101) and a network of “life coaches” to expand benefits advisement. (Pages 99-101)

Consistent with the strategic visions and goals advanced in the Combined Plan, the State is committed to enhancing program alignment and service delivery. The State has established an Interagency Work Group to analyze service delivery strategies and identify opportunities for improvement across all participant populations including Out-of-School Youth (OSY). The work group, in collaboration with the Employment First State Leadership Mentorship Program (EFSLMP), has established a Vision Quest project with the stated goal “to develop alignment between agencies servicing youth to assure quality services and that youth do not fall through the cracks.” The Vision Quest project is initially focused on improving services for youth with disabilities or multiple barriers to employment following the Integrated Resource Team (IRT) model developed under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Project. The State seeks to expand the IRT model to OSY without regard to their disability status and provide the same level of service integration demonstrated in our multiple DEI projects. The WIOA expanded maximum age (up to age 24) of OSY and the increased flexibility in the provision of Youth services found in the Final Regulations increases the opportunity to serve OSY in a Career Center environment and more fully engage the required and optional partners found therein. The State believes that combining the system level intervention of the Interagency Work Group with the customer level coordination of services provided through IRTs creates an optimal service environment for OSY that will lead to improved outcomes. (Page 134)

ACCES–VR has a longstanding working partnership with the Office for People with Development Disabilities (OPWDD). Collaborative projects and initiatives are ongoing. In 2014, NYS established an Employment First policy. This policy outlines several strategies and demonstrates NYS’s full commitment to inclusion for people with disabilities. To accomplish the vision and goals there are collaborative efforts that require participation for all State agencies. Many of these strategies build upon the existing linkages. Over the past several years OPWDD, OMH and ACCES–VR have been providing targeted training to employment staff on the delivery of high quality evidence–based employment services to individuals with disabilities. To more fully support the goals of Employment First, an expansion of this training is being planned. ACCES–VR will continue to work with OMH and OPWDD as well as NYS CB on supported employment guidelines to ensure the appropriate and smooth transitions for individuals with disabilities. (Pages 196-198)

NYSCB will encourage staff to provide in-service presentations for OPWDD and OMH staff regarding blindness, vision rehabilitation therapy, orientation and mobility, as well as job site accommodations. NYSCB recognizes that collaboration with these partner state agencies is integral to the employment success of individuals served by multiple agencies. These partners are currently collaborating on Governor Cuomo’s Employment First initiative and have already begun to address barriers that currently exist in the provision of services between agencies. NYSCB will continue to participate in these initiatives advocating for individuals who are legally blind receiving NYSCB services and will continue to work to provide seamless services to consumers in conjunction with our partner state agencies. (Page 271)

Customized Employment

Additionally, ACCES–VR has initiated outreach activities in conjunction with the July anniversary of the American with Disabilities Act with its downstate IES, City University of New York, and the Mayor’s Office in NYC. There were two “Champions for Change” events held in 2015. Discussion is underway with the State Rehabilitation Council about how they can further support ACCES–VR IESs to establish new relationships with business and enhance customized employment options.

ACCES–VR is also working with our provider agency partners as well as the NYS Department of Labor and NYS Commission for the Blind, to explore additional services, supports, or projects that could engage businesses that have had limited experiences with hiring people with disabilities. (Page 195)

ACCES–VR will include in its new CRS contracts to start in 2017, opportunities and funding for providers to develop customized employment opportunities. Training will also be provided to providers regarding provision of this service. (Page 195-196)
The following themes emerged from the meetings, as well as from other verbal and written information obtained from participants:

  • Employment: need more collaboration of stakeholders, providers and State agencies.
  • Businesses: need to be educated about hiring individuals with disabilities and available financial incentives credits.
  • ACCES–VR: should consider enhancement of the self–employment advisement committee. Recommendation is to explore how local businesses could be further engaged and could share their knowledge.
  • Supported Employment:
    • Effective program, but providers are concerned about the impact of the milestone system. Perhaps a tier system could be considered. Also, need to reevaluate retention measures under the milestone system.
    • Best practices with customized employment should be identified with a focus on replication and more engagement of business in the process. (Page 209)

Scope of Supported Employment Services

  • Supported Employment services are comprised of on–going services, including customized employment, needed to support and maintain an individual with a most significant disability in supported employment, that:
  • Are provided singly or in combination to assist an eligible individual to achieve a competitive integrated employment;
  • Are based on a determination of the needs of the individual and as specified in the IPE; and
  • Are provided by ACCES–VR for up to 24 months, unless an extension necessary to achieve the employment outcome identified in the IPE.

Supported employment services provide all the services necessary to assist the person with:

(Page 269)

NYSCB has also supported and participated in activities being implemented under the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG), and serves on the steering committee to the MIG. Activities under the MIG which will particularly benefit individuals in supported employment are pilots of customized employment approaches, development of a statewide employment data base “New York Employment Services System (NYESS),” and expansion of the availability of work incentives advisement.

NYSCB staff regularly attend the Empire State Association of Persons in Supported Employment (APSE) conference to dialogue with providers, consumers and advocates, and keep abreast of evidence-based practices. (Page 269)

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

Additionally, ACCES-VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects in the upstate NY LWDAs that focus on Employment Networks (ENs) and services related to assessment, benefits advisement, and placement. ACCES-VR liaisons meet periodically with DRCs to better understand and coordinate cross-systems services; to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities; and to increase support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. The DRCs are responsible for providing and improving targeted services to individuals with disabilities, as well as improving the capacity of all workforce staff in their respective sites to provide the best possible services to the disability population. All 13 pilot sites are registered as ENs under the Ticket to Work program, with the intent to get individuals off SSA benefits and back to work.

New York State ACCES-VR jointly conducts a Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) with its State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) every three years to determine the rehabilitation (and other) needs of residents with disabilities and to identify gaps in VR services. ACCES-VR uses this information to shape policy, procedures, training, operations, and practice. The next assessment will be conducted for the FY2017 State Plan. (Page 37)

Consistent with the strategic visions and goals advanced in the Combined Plan, the State is committed to enhancing program alignment and service delivery. The State has established an Interagency Work Group to analyze service delivery strategies and identify opportunities for improvement across all participant populations including Out-of-School Youth (OSY). The work group, in collaboration with the Employment First State Leadership Mentorship Program (EFSLMP), has established a Vision Quest project with the stated goal “to develop alignment between agencies servicing youth to assure quality services and that youth do not fall through the cracks.” The Vision Quest project is initially focused on improving services for youth with disabilities or multiple barriers to employment following the Integrated Resource Team (IRT) model developed under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Project. The State seeks to expand the IRT model to OSY without regard to their disability status and provide the same level of service integration demonstrated in our multiple DEI projects. The WIOA expanded maximum age (up to age 24) of OSY and the increased flexibility in the provision of Youth services found in the Final Regulations increases the opportunity to serve OSY in a Career Center environment and more fully engage the required and optional partners found therein. The State believes that combining the system level intervention of the Interagency Work Group with the customer level coordination of services provided through IRTs creates an optimal service environment for OSY that will lead to improved outcomes. (Page 134)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

7. Support and promote the Business Enterprise Program in order to increase employment opportunities and successful outcomes.

8. Increase provision of work incentives advisement to consumers by training counselors on the impact of work on SSI and SSDI and the importance of benefits advisement and financial literacy (Page 298).

8. Referrals for benefits advisement continue to increase. As a result the number of vendors approved to provide this service increased in FY 15. Select Independent Living Centers provide benefits counseling to active consumers on a pro bono basis thus further increasing the availability and use of the service. In New York City, a financial literacy program for college students was conducted in collaboration with Barclay Bank. NYSCB consumers and District Office Staff attended this program which provided useful information for consumers as they move to enter the workforce. (Page 307)

School to Work Transition

In 2016-17, a variety of professional development programs will continue to be delivered to Literacy Zones to assist in meeting their learners’ academic and personal needs. Literacy Zone professional development will be provided in multiple ways including training for case managers so that they can be resources regarding assessments leading to a NYS HSE diploma, career ladders, one-stop referrals, core partner connections, and the Benefits Toolkit. (Page 30)

In 2016-17 New York State will continue to focus on the ways all funded adult literacy programs work with individuals with disabilities. Many of the 49 Literacy Zones formed partnerships with the Independent Living Centers, which provide one-stop services to families with an individual with a disability. The New York State Education Department developed an electronic universal benefits manual that supports all programs including those that serve individuals with disabilities. This resource is updated annually and provides contemporary support to case managers providing services to individuals with disabilities. (Page 31)

  • Career Centers will all have the MyBenefits (mybenefits.ny.gov) web site short cut icon on all resource room computers and partner staff will be trained on how to promote and use the site with customers. MyBenefits was developed to help increase access and awareness of various public benefit programs. (Page 54-55)

NYSCB entered into a Partnership Plus Agreement, which enables consumers with a Social Security Ticket to Work to obtain VR services from NYSCB, as well as broad access to community providers to assist in the coordination of Social Security payments and other benefits and services.

Eleven non-profit organizations across NYS were approved as vendors to provide benefits advisement and support the development of economic self-sufficiency. The increased access to DRCs and other ENs increases support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services.

NYSCB uses funds to contract with two private agencies for individuals who are blind to provide pre-college programs for NYSCB consumers entering their senior year of high school. The program goal is to provide students the opportunity to refine their academic, social, and independent living skills before beginning college. (Page 57)

Eleven non-profit organizations across NYS were approved as vendors to provide benefits advisement and support the development of economic self-sufficiency. The increased access to DRCs and other ENs increases support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. (Page 57)

Over the next three years, NYESS and NYS DDPC will develop an integrated web-based platform called DB101. This system will be integrated with NYESS, CareerZone, and JobZone to provide accurate, up-to-date information and benefits calculators so participants can better assess how going to work will impact their access to publicly funded healthcare and income support like Supplemental Security Income, Social Security Disability Insurance, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, housing assistance, and other public benefits. (Page 77)

4. Benefits Advisement: Benefits systems are complex and only limited resources are available to help individuals accurately understand eligibility requirements and the impact of employment on benefits. New York State can utilize emerging tools like Disability Benefits 101 (DB101) and a network of “life coaches” to expand benefits advisement.

5. Medicaid Buy-In for Working People with Disabilities (MBI-WPD): New York can integrate the MBI-WPD program into the online New York State of Health application portal, automating and standardizing eligibility determinations and referring applicants who require additional assistance. (Page 100)

  • Disability–related training: including professional conferences in mental health, developmental disabilities, deafness and hearing impairments, the medical and vocational aspects of HIV/AIDS; and substance abuse disorders. Training included post–traumatic stress disorder; traumatic brain injury; epilepsy; mood disorders; personality disorders; autism spectrum disorders; anxiety disorders; addiction; managing challenging behavior; visual acuity; multiple sclerosis; bullying; workforce investment home modifications, and neuropsychology.
  • Supported employment: including professional conferences. Training was provided for supported employment; counseling skills for direct service providers; documentation and record keeping; job retention and career development; and benefits advisement. An initial training program on the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model and recovery from mental illness has evolved into an on–going Recovery–Oriented Vocational Rehabilitation Community of Practice. (Page 204)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities.

ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. The NYESS is a combined data warehouse and information sharing system for state and community agencies and a job matching/labor exchange system for consumers and businesses. (Page 212)

Individuals on SSI/SSDI make up 28 percent of all active cases or 13,882 individuals. Those who were considered to have a most significant disability were 70.9 percent of those served in all VR statuses. While individuals receiving SSI/SSDI were only 23.8 percent of all employment outcomes in FFY 2012, the employment rate for these individuals did increase. ACCES–VR is working with the SRC to examine data on consumers who receive SSI and SSDI, and is increasing the use of benefits planning services as a strategy to increase outcomes. (Page 216)

Individuals who are Deaf, Deaf–Blind, Hard of Hearing or Late Deafened The Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation in the Fifth Edition 2008 Model State Plan (MSP) for Rehabilitation of Persons who are Deaf, Deaf–Blind, Hard of Hearing or Late Deafened report that “Hearing loss is the most prevalent, chronic, physically disabling condition in the United States today.” The National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) reported in June 2010 that approximately 17 percent (36 million) of American adults report some degree of hearing loss; 15 percent (26 million) of Americans between the ages of 20 and 69 have high frequency hearing loss due to exposure to loud sounds or noise at work or in leisure activities and 4,000 new cases of sudden deafness occur each year in the United States. Hearing loss is becoming more prevalent among the general population. These losses can impact the employment status of individuals, depending on the level of loss. In FFY 2012, ACCES–VR served a total of 3,023 (3.3 percent) individuals who had a primary impairment of deafness, hearing loss, other hearing impairment and deaf–blindness, almost one third more than the number served in FFY 2009. Of these, 63.8 percent were considered to have a most significant disability. In FFY 2012, 612 individuals who were deaf, hard of hearing or deaf–blind achieved an employment outcome. This is 5.1 percent of all employment outcomes. (Page 216)

  • Provide benefits counseling at several key points in the VR process.
  • Train ACCES–VR counselors who serve as liaisons to mental health programs on OMH Individual Placement with Supports (IPS) model, implementation and provide on–going technical assistance.
  • Inform training program providers and the postsecondary education sector about incentives for hiring people with disabilities to encourage those entities

This past year ACCES–VR participated in a joint presentation with NYS Department of Labor to discuss financial incentives credits available to business. ACCES–VR is also working to identify federal contractors/subcontractors, and to obtain the most current information regarding the changes in the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) rules, which advance the recruitment of qualified candidates with disabilities. ACCES–VR ensures that key staffs across the state are prepared to provide customized training to the business community on the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities, through their participation in the American Disabilities Act (ADA) Trainer Network. This no–cost service is a valuable resource to businesses as they strive to diversify their workforces with qualified candidates with disabilities. (Page 237)

Partnership Plus

In Spring 2014, NYSCB entered into a Partnership Plus agreement with the Research Foundation for Mental Health. Partnership Plus assures that consumers with a Social Security Ticket to Work are able to obtain the services they need from NYSCB and that as they complete their services with NYSCB, they are given access to broad network of community providers from whom they can select to coordinate issues related to Social Security payments and other benefits and services.

NYS PROMISE Initiative

NYSCB is on the steering committee for New York State PROMISE (Promoting the Readiness of Minors in Supplemental Security Income), a research project developed to improve transition–to–adulthood outcomes for eligible youth who receive supplemental security income (SSI). This five–year initiative strives to increase access to services for eligible youth and their families to improve academic and employment outcomes, increase financial stability, and reduce reliance on SSI. The priority for the steering committee is to engage local and state partners in defining a broad strategic approach that starts to describe a system of person and family centered intervention. NYSCB actively participates in the steering committee to assess services that are provided to legally blind students through other New York State organizations. (Page260)

In 2012 NYSCB began entering into agreements with nonprofit organizations for the provision of benefits advisement services. Fifteen vendors have been approved for the provision of benefits advisement services throughout New York State. Providers of these services include agencies chartered primarily for provision of services to individuals who are blind, independent living centers, and other agencies that have engaged staff who are trained and certified by the Social Security Administration, by the Cornell Institute of Labor Relations, or by Virginia Commonwealth University. Many of these providers offer advisement not only on Social Security benefits, but also on a host of other benefits which may be affected by entering employment. (Page 267)

Further, modeling likelihood of successful case closures for NYSCB consumers receiving public benefits, it was observed that mental health impairments continues to negatively predict successful case closures for this group of individuals. Receipt of vocational training, high tech devices, computer training, job-related services and job placement services were all positively related to successful employment outcomes for individuals receiving public benefits. Despite these positive relationships between the specific services and outcomes, overall only 6-10 percent of consumers receiving public benefits access these services. Other factors identified in the overall model, also continue to predict positive outcomes for NYSCB consumers receiving public benefits. (Page 281)

Further, challenges continue to persist for achieving employment outcomes for clients who receive public benefits. Though many services (e.g., high-tech devices) appear to positively impact outcomes, only small proportions receive such services. It is likely that efforts such as New York State PROMISE initiative will be helpful in highlighting leading practices and service delivery models to inform program and policy development across various service systems.

Having mental health illness as a secondary condition continues to jeopardize the likelihood of success in the current system. This variable impacts both consumers receiving and those not receiving public benefits. This finding indicates a need to build capacity of practitioners in providing services to people with mental health illnesses. (Page 282)

  1. Few received training on job placement, Independent Living (IL), placement services from other agencies, how to target business outreach, and benefits and work incentives counseling. These are also topics on which staff reported needing training. (Page 288)
  2. Increase provision of work incentives advisement to consumers by training counselors on the impact of work on SSI and SSDI and the importance of benefits advisement and financial literacy (Page 298)
  3. By supporting increased use of benefits planning through Independent Living Centers, DRC’s and other qualified resources, NYSCB anticipates that more consumers will choose careers, and work hours, which will allow them to go off SSA benefits and achieve economic self-sufficiency. In addition, NYSCB has signed a Partnership Plus agreement with the OMH Administrative Employment Network. This will increase opportunities for consumers to obtain continued support to maintain their jobs after case closure. NYSCB works with ACCES-VR to allocate contract capacity for Supported Employment services to try to assure the services are available to individuals with the most significant disabilities seeking those services. (Page 302)
  4. Mental health impairment as a secondary condition was identified by the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment CSNA) as in indicator for unsuccessful closure. NYSCB increased relationships with Office of Mental Health (OMH) and the Office for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) on both the local and state level. The receipt of public assistance benefits was also identified as an indicator for unsuccessful case closure. Benefits advisement service referrals and providers were increased and are expected to reduce this gap. The Needs Assessment also found that individuals who received high-tech devices were more likely to be successfully closed. A new adaptive technology center (ATC) contract was implemented. The contract guidelines set high standards for the delivery of ATC evaluation and training services.
  5. NYSCB consumers participated in an employment based medical records program at Baruch College. District Offices have conducted outreach on their own and collaborated with ACCES-VR to expand vocational training opportunities for NYSCB consumers. Both core partners met with Human Resource hiring managers interested in matching consumers with hard to fill positions in their local businesses.
  6. NYSCB reviewed the vocational training programs currently delivered through community rehabilitation partners and determined that two types of vocational skills training are needed; one to support consumers in increasing employability and a second to meet the demands of emerging labor markets. The first type of training is focused on those consumers planning to enter fields such as customer service, office administration, and other clerical occupations and the potential need to acquire advanced skills levels in Braille, keyboarding, note taking, computer applications and other office practices. The second type of vocational skills training is related to meeting the needs of a particular business or business sector and is developed in conjunction with a business or group of businesses representing a sector which is expected to have a high demand for employees over the next five to ten years. NYSCB will continue to develop and explore the need for new programs and training opportunities. (Page 305)
  7. Referrals for benefits advisement continue to increase. As a result the number of vendors approved to provide this service increased in FY 15. Select Independent Living Centers provide benefits counseling to active consumers on a pro bono basis thus further increasing the availability and use of the service. In New York City, a financial literacy program for college students was conducted in collaboration with Barclay Bank. NYSCB consumers and District Office Staff attended this program which provided useful information for consumers as they move to enter the workforce.
  8. Working with the National Industries for the Blind, new call centers and other service sector employment opportunities for NYSCB consumers have been developed this year. A new call center was opened in Brooklyn and actively hired consumers from NYSCB. Management staff at the call centers as well as counselors continually monitor front line staff at these call centers to provide any necessary support to the consumers employed there and to assist them in advancing their employment skills. (Page 307)
Career Pathways

VR Transition Policy ACCES–VR collaborated with the Office of Special Education and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) in 2008 to revise the 421.00 Youth in School – Transition Referral, Planning and Services Policy, to ensure a common understanding of transition requirements and responsibilities and to assist with building a collaborative partnership between transition specialists, school districts and ACCES–VR district offices throughout the state. The policy provides information about the requirements, roles and responsibilities of VR in preparing students with disabilities for successful employment. ACCES–VR, with the SRC, reviews the policy periodically to determine its current relevance. While much of the policy remains up–to–date, a revision is planned for the end of this year to ensure compliance with the requirements under WIOA, including pre–employment transition services and the use of assistive technology. This policy establishes an affirmative role for VRCs working with students in transition from school to work, a critical time for young adults with disabilities. The policy delineates the referral process of students with disabilities two years prior to their expected school exit. (Page 186)

NYSCB and the New York State Education Department collaborate on a regular basis to provide guidance to educational agencies and vocational rehabilitation personnel responsible for facilitating transition services, and to provide information about consultation and technical assistance resources to assist schools and related community support entities in planning for transition of students who are legally blind. At the state level, both agencies have designated personnel that provide oversight and leadership for the development of policies, procedures, interagency training and other state-level partnership activities for transition services. At the local level, VR counselors work closely with school district staff and local school districts have transition to work specialists that collaborate together. NYSCB will continue to work closely with schools to enable the smooth transition of students who are legally blind from school to work. (Page 279)

Work Incentives & Benefits

WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

  • Focusing leadership funds on the key requirements of WIOA through approval of new annual workplans for the RAEN and NRS Accountability specialist and work charges of NYSED state ACCES-Adult Education staff.
  • Continuing to implement a new High School Equivalency diploma for New York that serves as a gateway credential for employment, training, career pathways and postsecondary transition, and providing in-depth training of master teachers and turnkey training for 5,500 adult education teachers.
  • Adapting state and WIOA-funded professional development to support career pathways, postsecondary transition, integrated education, and integrated English literacy and civics education. (Page 34)

Local partnerships, which form the foundation of the workforce delivery system, are especially effective in meeting the workforce needs of New York’s diverse population. Local plans describe how these partnerships will be coordinated to enable all customers to receive the full range of employment and training programs and supportive services, especially those that lead to jobs in high-wage, high-growth occupations along career pathways. The needs of individuals with multiple barriers to employment are being addressed quickly and thoroughly due to the wide spectrum of service providers joined together under the local workforce system. The New York State Office for the Aging, NYSED (including ACCES-VR), the New York State Department of Health (DOH), OCFS (including NYSCB), the Office for Alcohol and Substance Abuse (OASAS), the Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance (OTDA), the State University of New York (SUNY), NYSDOL, and local community based organizations apply knowledge gained through regular communication, partnership collaborations, and cross-training to develop comprehensive service strategies to address the varying needs of our common participants. With the functional alignment approach and common customer flow in the Career Centers, partners are more aware of each agency’s involvement with the participant instead of working in a vacuum. This greatly helps reduce duplication of services to participants. (Page 52)

Employer/ Business

Additionally, ACCES-VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects in the upstate NY LWDAs that focus on Employment Networks (ENs) and services related to assessment, benefits advisement, and placement. ACCES-VR liaisons meet periodically with DRCs to better understand and coordinate cross-systems services; to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities; and to increase support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. The DRCs are responsible for providing and improving targeted services to individuals with disabilities, as well as improving the capacity of all workforce staff in their respective sites to provide the best possible services to the disability population. All 13 pilot sites are registered as ENs under the Ticket to Work program, with the intent to get individuals off SSA benefits and back to work. (Page 37)

New York State continues to be at the forefront in the area of serving individuals with disabilities with the implementation of NYESS and the opportunities the system allows. For example, in February 2012, the federal Social Security Administration announced that NYESS (www.nyess.ny.gov) was designated as the first statewide Employment Network in the United States. ENs are designated by the SSA to assist individuals with disabilities to find competitive jobs. The statewide EN designation allows SSA the ability to collaborate directly with New York to document employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities holding a Ticket-To-Work, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Ticket-To-Work program. As a statewide EN, NYESS creates a network of providers working with multiple state agencies using a single, real-time employment data/case management system. This statewide effort generates thousands of dollars in incentive payments to be reinvested in expanded job supports for individuals with disabilities. (Page 102)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities.

ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. The NYESS is a combined data warehouse and information sharing system for state and community agencies and a job matching/labor exchange system for consumers and businesses. (Page 212)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities. ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. (Page 216)

3. Promote business awareness of NYSCB workforce programs and business services through print, broadcast and electronic media to include social media, and continue to promote awareness of NYSCB through personal face–to–face contacts with businesses.

4. Continue to work with the National Employment Team (NET) of the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and other employment networks to improve employment options for NYSCB consumers.

5. Work to build partnerships with America’s Job Centers as well as the four core partners, to increase access to services needed by NYSCB consumers. (Page 298)

511

The Core Programs are required to regularly report to the Federal government and public on program performance to keep the system accountable and transparent in the pursuit of the State’s workforce vision and goals. Although WIA also required performance reporting, WIOA seeks to improve accountability across all core programs by requiring that they report on a set of uniform measures. At the onset of WIOA implementation, setting of performance goals for programs without an institutional history of these measures or an established method for collecting needed data to report these measures will be a challenge. The Core Programs are working to share existing data collection and analysis methods to identify and establish good data sources and to work through necessary administrative clearances to meet new WIOA requirements. In particular, programs under Titles II and IV of WIOA are in the process of gathering the necessary information to establish valid and reliable data for the required performance measures. The preliminary performance goals that have already been established are included in Table 1 below. (Page 42)

B. DATA-COLLECTION AND REPORTING PROCESSES USED FOR ALL PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES, INCLUDING THOSE PRESENT IN ONE-STOP CENTERS*.

The Core Programs are working closely together to identify and establish appropriate data sources and gaining the necessary administrative clearances to meet the WIOA requirements. Titles II and IV are in the process of gathering the necessary information to establish valid and reliable data for the required performance measures. (Pages 77-78)

As discussed previously, NYSDOL, in partnership with NYS OMH, developed and implemented NYESS. NYESS is made up of various computer applications and data sets. Employment related data collection is accomplished by all NYESS partners using the existing NYSDOL case management system, OSOS. Legacy data sets from the partners and current data sets, which include but are not limited to, OSOS; vocational rehabilitation agencies; DOH; Social Security Administration (SSA); and others are pulled together in a data warehouse. A web-based reporting portal designed and maintained by OMH will provide cross-agency report card like information to the general public (aggregate data) and to the individual agencies and their contracted partner staff. (Page 84)

  • Provide on–going training for supervisors. Supervisors are brought to a central location at least biannually for a three–day training. The trainings focus on the multiple roles of a supervisor and provide updates on policy, data collection and more to ensure good communication.
  • Improve the quality of supported employment services by training ACCES–VR and supported employment providers on updated supported employment policy, procedures and guidelines to ensure the integrity and effectiveness of the supported employment program.
  • Provide a Management Community of Practice. ACCES–VR is collaborating with Cornell University, Employment Disability Institute for the provision of a community of practice training project for management level staff. (Page 228)

Secondary Data Analysis of Consumer Information System

The primary purpose of analyzing NYSCB’s Consumer Information System is to identify factors related to successful case closures and employment outcomes for NYSCB clients. Specifically this analysis explored the following research questions:

  1. What are the demographic and services-related factors that predict successful employment outcomes for NYSCB consumers? How do these vary by NYSCB district offices? How do local labor market conditions (e.g., county-level employment rate for people with disabilities) impact employment outcomes for NYSCB consumers?
  2. How do these differ between transition-age youth and adult population?
  3. How do these factors impact successful outcomes for NYSCB consumers who receive publicbenefits compared with their non-beneficiary peers? (Page 280)
Mental Health

ADDRESSING THE ACCESSIBILITY OF THE ONE-STOP DELIVERY SYSTEM FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 99)

Accessibility

Accessibility is an important component within the public workforce system. New York State assures that all partners in the workforce development system described in this plan recognize the importance of the physical, programmatic, and communications accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities and English language learners in the Career Centers.

Under WIA, NYSDOL’s Methods of Administration outlined the policies, procedures, and systems NYS designed and put in place in order to provide a reasonable guarantee that NYS and its recipients of Title I WIA funds complied with the Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity requirements of WIA Section 188 and its implementing regulations. It is still available online at http://www.labor.ny.gov/agencyinfo/moa/moa.shtm and will be revised in the coming months to reflect the new WIOA regulations.

Additionally, NYSDOL will revise a Technical Advisory (TA) on the topic of “Accessibility of One-Stop Systems to Individuals with Disabilities.” The TA on this topic, released under WIA on May 16, 2000, will be revised to reflect new accessibility regulations under WIOA. (Page 102)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 81 - 90 of 94

SWIB Quarterly Meeting Presentation

he slide presentation from this meeting of the New York State Workforce Investment Board includes material on Customized Employment, WIOA, and Work Readiness Credentials.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Talent Development and Training Online Resource Library

This site provides various instructional resources for agencies interested in delivering their own training, as well as resources for individual learners interested in developing their professional education.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

NYESS Funding and Employment

NYESS, an integral part of the Governor’s Employment First Initiative, is the largest employment network for people with disabilities in the United States. To date, $2.4 million from the Social Security Administration has been received by 100 New York State organizations which have assisted 7,755 individuals with disabilities with employment services, helping 1,366 individuals find permanent employment. This webpage includes a breakdown of the 100 organizations in receipt of the funds

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Supported Employment Services

“OPWDD is committed to doubling the number of individuals with developmental disabilities who are working in their communities. Supported Employment Providers are important partners in assisting individuals to achieve their employment goals.     OPWDD’s supported employment services include Supported Employment (SEMP), Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) and the Employment Training Program (ETP). Below you will find links to related program standards, templates for required documentation formats, contact information for our DDSO employment coordinators and information on training opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of your supported employment programs.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NY Disability Employment Initiative Grant Abstract - Round 1

The New York State Department of Labor will utilize their DEI project as their next generation approach building upon their significant commitment to expanded services under their former Disability Program Navigator grant. Collaborative activities include leveraging over $1 million in funds to further support DEI efforts, including $900,000 from the New York State Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities. The project will also be collaborating with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, “New York Makes Work Pay,” with plans to implement a unified case management system to minimize duplication and promote blending and braiding of diverse resources. Asset development activities include the development of expertise in work incentive and benefits planning strategies. The state will host “Asset Development Summits” for stakeholders, beneficiaries of Social Security disability programs, the banking community, and others to discuss and share resources to enhance asset development awareness. The DEI project includes the establishment of approximately 13 Employment Networks in participating workforce investment areas.
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation

NY SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) (2001)

The goal of this project was to develop an IPS guidebook used by vocational staff members who are working with consumers who have expressed a clear interest in seeking employment.   The guidebook unifys clinical, rehabilitation and vocational services under one licensing entity.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Assembly Bill A8111 - 06/09/2015

“AN ACT to amend the civil service law, in relation to establishing a customized employment demonstration program for persons with disabilities...”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

NY Assembly Bill 6516: ABLE Legislation - 03/26/2015

 Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as the "New York achieving a better life experience (NY ABLE) savings account act".

§ 2.  Legislative intent. The legislative intent of this act is to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence and quality of life; and to provide secure funding for disability related expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through existing sources.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

N.Y. Civil Service Law §55-b: Workers with Disabilities Program

Section 55-b of the New York State Civil Service Law authorizes the New York State Civil Service Commission to designate up to 1,200 positions normally filled through competitive examination to be filled through the appointment of qualified persons with disabilities. (Section 55-c authorizes the designation of up to 500 positions in the non-competitive class to be filled by qualified wartime veterans with disabilities.) In general, an entry-level position that is filled only through an open-competitive examination (one open to the public) may be used for a 55-b or 55-c appointment.

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Governor’s Executive Order Number 136 “Establishing the New York Employment First Initiative to Increase Employment of New Yorkers with Disabilities” - 10/03/2014

…”NOW, THEREFORE, I, ANDREW M. CUOMO, Governor of the State of New York, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the State of New York, do hereby order as follows: …

 

B. Employment First Commission 1. There is hereby established the Employment First Commission (the “Commission”) to provide guidance and advice to the Governor regarding the competitive integrated employment of individuals with disabilities.   2. The members of the Commission shall be the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Health; the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Civil Rights; the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Human Services; the Chief Diversity Officer; the Counsel to the Governor; the Director of the Budget; the Commissioner for Developmental Disabilities; the Commissioner of Health; the Commissioner of Mental Health; the Commissioner of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services; the Commissioner of Children and Family Services; the Commissioner of Labor; the Commissioner of Economic Development; the Commissioner of Transportation; the Commissioner of Temporary and Disability Assistance; the Director of Veterans’ Affairs; the Director of the State Office for Aging; and the Executive Director of the Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs. Additional members may be appointed to the Commission at the discretion of the Governor.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 21 - 30 of 30

App. B: Service Documentation Requirements for Enhanced Supported Employment Pilots - 10/01/2011

These are general definitions for services that may be provided to individuals through the Enhanced Supported Employment Pilot Project. They include Person Centered Vocational Planning: Comprehensive discovery process that assists the individual to identify their interests, capacities and strengths particular to the individualized employment planning process.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

2011 Interim Report on OPWDD State Plan - 02/15/2011

The objective of Employment First is to increase the number of people with developmental disabilities who are working in NYS. Many individuals could be successful in paying jobs with the appropriate level of supports, but for various reasons most individuals participate in other day programs. At the end of 2010, OPWDD supported 9,195 individuals in supported employment programs. Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) is one of the projects offering employment opportunities to individuals who would not likely succeed or qualify for traditional supported employment. Individuals receive greater levels of support, which could consist of person-centered planning, job development or job coaching. Currently, 405 individuals participate in ESEMP, with 259 individuals successfully working in the community. OPWDD anticipates that approximately 700 individuals will participate in this pilot.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Start-UP New York - Inclusive Entrepreneurship - 06/01/2010

Adoption of Discovery and Customized Team Planning policies represents an adjustment to the way in which SSIC conducts entrepreneurial awareness. This process now includes an informal assessment of the appropriateness of entrepreneurship for its customers, as well as an orientation to the demands and realities of entrepreneurship. By imbuing their existing processes with the essential characteristics of Discovery (e.g., flexibility, focus on the career seeker, willingness to look beyond formal and formulaic assessments), the process has become more open, inclusive, and effective for all customers of SSIC.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Important Information for Veterans Receiving Payments Under the Compensated Work Therapy Program - 01/01/2009

~~“The Internal Revenue Service has announced that payments made under the Department of Veterans Affairs Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) program are no longer taxable by the federal government, and that veterans who paid federal income tax on these benefits may claim a refund for tax years 2004, 2005, or 2006. As a result, these benefit payments are no longer taxable by New York State.“

Systems
  • Other

New York ACCES-VR Policy 1301.00: Self-Employment Policy - 07/01/1988

“Establishing or maintaining a consumer in self-employment as a rehabilitation outcome allows the consumer to be productive and become financially independent and to contribute to the State's economic growth. Self-employment rehabilitations also allow the ACCES-VR counselor to be creative in the rehabilitation process. This policy defines the parameters of the ACCES-VR/consumer partnership needed to create a successful self-employment venture.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

NYESS Funding and Employment

NYESS, an integral part of the Governor’s Employment First Initiative, is the largest employment network for people with disabilities in the United States. To date, $2.4 million from the Social Security Administration has been received by 100 New York State organizations which have assisted 7,755 individuals with disabilities with employment services, helping 1,366 individuals find permanent employment. This webpage includes a breakdown of the 100 organizations in receipt of the funds

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Supported Employment Services

“OPWDD is committed to doubling the number of individuals with developmental disabilities who are working in their communities. Supported Employment Providers are important partners in assisting individuals to achieve their employment goals.     OPWDD’s supported employment services include Supported Employment (SEMP), Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) and the Employment Training Program (ETP). Below you will find links to related program standards, templates for required documentation formats, contact information for our DDSO employment coordinators and information on training opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of your supported employment programs.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NY State Plan for VR Services and Supplement for Supported Employment Services Program (Attachment 4.8(b)(2))

Goal 1.1.A Youth: Increase the percentage of youth with disabilities (applicants prior to age 22) exiting the VR Program after receiving services that achieve an employment outcome and exceed the national standard of 55.8 percent.    Baseline FFY 2010: 42.5 percent achieved an employment outcome; does not meet the RSA Performance Standard.    Performance for FFY 2011: 46.9 percent achieved an employment outcome; does not meet the RSA Performance Standard.    Performance for FFY 2012: 55.7 percent achieved an employment outcome; does not meet the RSA Performance Standard.    Performance Target: Meet or exceed the RSA Performance Standard of 55.8 percent.    Results: The percentage of youth with disabilities that achieved an employment outcome after receiving VR services has increased by 13.2 percentage points, a significant increase. In FFY 2012 ACCES-VR achieved a performance indicator of 55.7 percent which is just below the national standard of 55.8 percent by one-tenth of one percent.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

New York State Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan - 01/01/2019

~~“The Federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) requires states to submit a 4-year Combined Plan to receive funding for the six WIOA core programs: Adult; Dislocated Worker; Youth; Wagner Peyser Employment; Adult Education and Literacy; and Vocational Rehabilitation.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • WIOA

About NYS CASE - 10/17/2018

~~“The NYS Consortium for Advancing and Supporting Employment (CASE) provides training and technical assistance to employment service providers under contract with the New York State Education Department's Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR).

The NYS CASE is a collaborative involving Cornell University's Yang-Tan Institute, the Center for Human Services Education (CHSE) (a division of Heritage Christian Services), the NYS Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE), and the NY Alliance for Innovation and Inclusion (NY Alliance).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

New York State Expanding Program to Help Individuals with Disabilities find Employment - 01/11/2018

“The New York State Employment First Commission, created by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and chaired by the New York State Office of Mental Health, has announced new resources to help increase employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The new program, called the "Employment First Benefits Advisory System," will provide advice on financial assistance and work incentives for individuals with disabilities who are working or seeking work….

The Benefits Advisory System was developed through a collaborative effort between seven New York State agencies to create a single approach to the coordination of employment supports, and to provide all New Yorkers - regardless of their disability - with a single point of access for all employment-related services, including job matching with the approximately 90,000 jobs currently posted by employers in the New York State Job Bank.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NY Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) Brief - The Entrepreneurship Partners Dialogue Meeting - 11/01/2010

“The Entrepreneurship Partners Dialogue Meeting that convened in Albany, New York on November 1, 2010 was designed to facilitate discussion about challenges and barriers faced by people with disabilities who want to become self–employed. The meeting was one of the many activities funded by New York State’s Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG), New York Makes Work Pay (NYMWP). NYMWP is a statewide initiative intended to dramatically improve the rate of employment among people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NY State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council

~~“About the New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (DDPC)

The federal Developmental Disabilities Act requires that each of the 56 U.S. States and Territories identify a Developmental Disabilities (DD) Council. The New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (DDPC) is the DD Council representing New York State.  Although the DDPC is 100% federally-funded, it operates as a New York State agency under the direction of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo.

The DDPC is not a direct service provider. Our mission is carried out through grant work. The DDPC addresses the needs of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities through the development of demonstration projects around advocacy, systems change, and capacity building efforts that promote self-determination, integration, and inclusion in all facets of life.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New York Inclusive Entrepreneurship Program

“[South Side Innovation Center] SSIC provides services to all interested entrepreneurs, but it also has targeted programs for traditionally underserved entrepreneurial groups including low-income individuals, people with disabilities, women and minorities. “The expansion of Inclusive Entrepreneurship has led to our ability to provide services even to typically hard-to-reach populations, including a contract with the State Commission on the Blind and Visually Handicapped, under which we provide services to blind and visually impaired individuals….’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

NY Disability Employment Initiative Grant Abstract - Round 1

The New York State Department of Labor will utilize their DEI project as their next generation approach building upon their significant commitment to expanded services under their former Disability Program Navigator grant. Collaborative activities include leveraging over $1 million in funds to further support DEI efforts, including $900,000 from the New York State Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities. The project will also be collaborating with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, “New York Makes Work Pay,” with plans to implement a unified case management system to minimize duplication and promote blending and braiding of diverse resources. Asset development activities include the development of expertise in work incentive and benefits planning strategies. The state will host “Asset Development Summits” for stakeholders, beneficiaries of Social Security disability programs, the banking community, and others to discuss and share resources to enhance asset development awareness. The DEI project includes the establishment of approximately 13 Employment Networks in participating workforce investment areas.
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation

NY SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) (2001)

The goal of this project was to develop an IPS guidebook used by vocational staff members who are working with consumers who have expressed a clear interest in seeking employment.   The guidebook unifys clinical, rehabilitation and vocational services under one licensing entity.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

New York Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The… grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Simply Speaking Inclusive Entrepreneurship Guidelines for SBDC Advisors - 05/17/2010

This whitepaper introduces and describes Start-Up NY and its efforts to improve disability employment in the state of New York. It discusses the 4 stage “Start-Up NY Process,” the economic impact, their work with veterans, success stories, and recommended tools, among other topics.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

A 'Primer’ on The StartUP New York 4-Phase Model - 09/28/2009

“START-UP/New York convened a multidisciplinary collaboration of highly skilled partners to provide a customized, intensive, and well-rounded training, technical assistance, counseling, and support program for people with disabilities interested in self-employment. Over the first three years, the project developed an improved model for developing community infrastructure and capacity through public and private investment and collaboration to support and provide technical assistance to individuals with disabilities who seek self-employment in Onondaga County. It was successful in documenting the strengths and weaknesses of the consortium model to assist in the start-up, sustainability, and replicable of successful micro-enterprise and small business ventures launched by individuals with disabilities. The project also succeeded in recruiting participants, including those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits, Veterans, youth and others in Onondaga County, representing a range of disabilities from diverse ethnic and racial groups who have aspirations for self-employment. The START-UP/New York model included developing customized training curricula, informed by Customized, Discovery-based results, personal preferences, and peer advisors.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

New York State Consortium for Advancement of Supported Employment

“The NYS Consortium for Advancement of Supported Employment (CASE) provides training and technical assistance to supported employment service providers under contract with the New York State Education Department's Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation….

The NYS CASE is a multi-faceted strategy that includes a statewide performance baseline, policy and practice goals, training curriculum and organizational development resources, regional and distance training opportunities, organizational development support, and evaluation of training and resources. The training establishes a critical link for supported employment professionals between the learning environment and on-going work with clients.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

New York (ACCES-VR) Workforce Development and Business Relations Department "Adult Career and Continuing Education Services –Vocational Rehabilitation…a basic guide"

What is ACCES? The Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services (ACCES) is part of the New York State Education Department and is comprised of three primary areas: Vocational Rehabilitation (including Independent Living Program Administration), Adult Education, and the Bureau of Proprietary School Supervision. ACCES-VR: • Administers vocational rehabilitation and independent living programs • Provides a wide array of services to assist eligible individuals with disabilities in obtaining employment • Provides services to students, beginning up to 2 years prior to exiting high school • Provides individual consultation, recommendations and training to assist with maintaining a job • Provides information and support to employers

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

New York (ACCES-VR) Workforce Development and Business Relations Department "Hiring Good People Is Good Business"

ACCES-VR can assist businesses with meeting compliance with Federal Laws Assistance for federal contractors/subcontractors in meeting OFCCP requirements. Technical assistance on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). ACCES-VR can lower hiring costs through these services ... Work Tryout ACCES-VR can reimburse an employer for 100% of an employee’s wages for up to 480 hours. This offers the employer the opportunity to evaluate the employee’s ability to satisfactorily perform the job. On the Job Training ACCES-VR can reimburse the worker’s salary, for an agreed upon period of time while he/she is being trained in a new occupation. ACCES-VR’s Partnership with Public Employers... ACCES-VR offers business customers in the public sector a designated point of contact to connect with qualified applicants, resources and support services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

New York ACCES-VR Workforce Development and Business Relations Department "Disability Etiquette Guide"

Everyone Knows Someone with a Disability People with disabilities are the nation’s largest minority and the only one that any person can join at any time. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, 54 million people have disabilities. That is nearly 1 in 5 people. Here are some general tips

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

SWIB Quarterly Meeting Presentation

he slide presentation from this meeting of the New York State Workforce Investment Board includes material on Customized Employment, WIOA, and Work Readiness Credentials.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Talent Development and Training Online Resource Library

This site provides various instructional resources for agencies interested in delivering their own training, as well as resources for individual learners interested in developing their professional education.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 21 - 21 of 21

New York State Medicaid Plan

Medicaid State Plan is an official document that describes the nature and scope of a state's Medicaid program. Each state develops its own Plan, as required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act (Act), which is then approved by the federal Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS). Any changes or amendments to the Plan are similarly developed by the state and approved by DHHS. Each state administers its own Plan and, in doing so, agrees to conform to the requirements of the Act and all other applicable federal statutes and regulations related to the Medicaid program.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

Career opportunities for people with disabilities in the Empire State of New York are growing "Ever upwards!" If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New York’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
19,849,399
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.89%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,099,574
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.03%
Change from
2016 to 2017
378,951
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.89%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.46%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.94%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.21%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 19,849,399
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,099,574
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 378,951
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 8,610,618
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.21%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,040,543
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 1,225,864
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,489,769
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 398,388
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 436,921
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 15,683
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 111,566
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,056
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 61,213
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 188,732

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 20,914
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 493,907

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 84,070
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 148,077
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 408,787
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,728
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 23,763
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,582
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 23,355
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 8,989
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 3,935
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 44.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 19.88

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 28,953
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 842,951
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,105
Number of people served in facility based work. 5,768
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 46,867
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 54.80

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 58.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.56%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 6.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 90.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 44.02%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 69.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.66%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 25.41%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 6,429,710
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 8,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 498,920
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,435,284
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,934,204
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 1,050
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,152
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,202
AbilityOne wages (products). $3,814,358
AbilityOne wages (services). $26,511,843

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 43
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 4
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 47
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,912
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 247
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,159

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

Through the Employment First policy, the State seeks to build on important economic development investments to ensure that individuals with disabilities equally benefit from the improving economy and have sustained opportunities to engage in the competitive labor market. Specifically, the State aims to increase the employment rate of individuals with disabilities by 5%; decrease the poverty rate of individuals with disabilities by a comparable 5%; and engage 100 businesses in adopting policies and practices that support the integrated employment of individuals with disabilities. The driving force behind this initiative is the principle that everyone has the right to work.
The Employment First policy commission has made the following recommendations:

  1. Cultural Modeling: New York State agencies can model the integrated employment of individuals with disabilities. Whether through enhancements to the governor’s programs to hire persons/veterans with disabilities (sections 55-b and -c of New York State Civil Service Law), or through community-based organizations directly hiring individuals, a strong culture of employment first must be established.
  2. Energizing the “Demand-Side” of the Equation: Redesign and reinvigorate the New York Business Leadership Network to pursue the aggressive goal of engaging 100 business partners. A business first platform can be established through promoting existing tax credits, supporting businesses to pursue federal contracts, and harnessing the power of New York’s regional economic development efforts.
  3. New York Employment Services System (NYESS): The NYESS system has already distinguished New York as the leader in moving individuals with disabilities into the world of employment as the largest Social Security Administration Ticket to Work (TTW) network in the nation. Ensuring the full adoption of the system across community providers and state agencies will utilize the power of New York’s integrated employment case management system to comprehensively monitor and support employment outcomes in New York State.
  4. Benefits Advisement: Benefits systems are complex and only limited resources are available to help individuals accurately understand eligibility requirements and the impact of employment on benefits. New York State can utilize emerging tools like Disability Benefits 101 (DB101) and a network of “life coaches” to expand benefits advisement. (Pages 99-101)

Consistent with the strategic visions and goals advanced in the Combined Plan, the State is committed to enhancing program alignment and service delivery. The State has established an Interagency Work Group to analyze service delivery strategies and identify opportunities for improvement across all participant populations including Out-of-School Youth (OSY). The work group, in collaboration with the Employment First State Leadership Mentorship Program (EFSLMP), has established a Vision Quest project with the stated goal “to develop alignment between agencies servicing youth to assure quality services and that youth do not fall through the cracks.” The Vision Quest project is initially focused on improving services for youth with disabilities or multiple barriers to employment following the Integrated Resource Team (IRT) model developed under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Project. The State seeks to expand the IRT model to OSY without regard to their disability status and provide the same level of service integration demonstrated in our multiple DEI projects. The WIOA expanded maximum age (up to age 24) of OSY and the increased flexibility in the provision of Youth services found in the Final Regulations increases the opportunity to serve OSY in a Career Center environment and more fully engage the required and optional partners found therein. The State believes that combining the system level intervention of the Interagency Work Group with the customer level coordination of services provided through IRTs creates an optimal service environment for OSY that will lead to improved outcomes. (Page 134)

ACCES–VR has a longstanding working partnership with the Office for People with Development Disabilities (OPWDD). Collaborative projects and initiatives are ongoing. In 2014, NYS established an Employment First policy. This policy outlines several strategies and demonstrates NYS’s full commitment to inclusion for people with disabilities. To accomplish the vision and goals there are collaborative efforts that require participation for all State agencies. Many of these strategies build upon the existing linkages. Over the past several years OPWDD, OMH and ACCES–VR have been providing targeted training to employment staff on the delivery of high quality evidence–based employment services to individuals with disabilities. To more fully support the goals of Employment First, an expansion of this training is being planned. ACCES–VR will continue to work with OMH and OPWDD as well as NYS CB on supported employment guidelines to ensure the appropriate and smooth transitions for individuals with disabilities. (Pages 196-198)

NYSCB will encourage staff to provide in-service presentations for OPWDD and OMH staff regarding blindness, vision rehabilitation therapy, orientation and mobility, as well as job site accommodations. NYSCB recognizes that collaboration with these partner state agencies is integral to the employment success of individuals served by multiple agencies. These partners are currently collaborating on Governor Cuomo’s Employment First initiative and have already begun to address barriers that currently exist in the provision of services between agencies. NYSCB will continue to participate in these initiatives advocating for individuals who are legally blind receiving NYSCB services and will continue to work to provide seamless services to consumers in conjunction with our partner state agencies. (Page 271)

Customized Employment

Additionally, ACCES–VR has initiated outreach activities in conjunction with the July anniversary of the American with Disabilities Act with its downstate IES, City University of New York, and the Mayor’s Office in NYC. There were two “Champions for Change” events held in 2015. Discussion is underway with the State Rehabilitation Council about how they can further support ACCES–VR IESs to establish new relationships with business and enhance customized employment options.

ACCES–VR is also working with our provider agency partners as well as the NYS Department of Labor and NYS Commission for the Blind, to explore additional services, supports, or projects that could engage businesses that have had limited experiences with hiring people with disabilities. (Page 195)

ACCES–VR will include in its new CRS contracts to start in 2017, opportunities and funding for providers to develop customized employment opportunities. Training will also be provided to providers regarding provision of this service. (Page 195-196)
The following themes emerged from the meetings, as well as from other verbal and written information obtained from participants:

  • Employment: need more collaboration of stakeholders, providers and State agencies.
  • Businesses: need to be educated about hiring individuals with disabilities and available financial incentives credits.
  • ACCES–VR: should consider enhancement of the self–employment advisement committee. Recommendation is to explore how local businesses could be further engaged and could share their knowledge.
  • Supported Employment:
    • Effective program, but providers are concerned about the impact of the milestone system. Perhaps a tier system could be considered. Also, need to reevaluate retention measures under the milestone system.
    • Best practices with customized employment should be identified with a focus on replication and more engagement of business in the process. (Page 209)

Scope of Supported Employment Services

  • Supported Employment services are comprised of on–going services, including customized employment, needed to support and maintain an individual with a most significant disability in supported employment, that:
  • Are provided singly or in combination to assist an eligible individual to achieve a competitive integrated employment;
  • Are based on a determination of the needs of the individual and as specified in the IPE; and
  • Are provided by ACCES–VR for up to 24 months, unless an extension necessary to achieve the employment outcome identified in the IPE.

Supported employment services provide all the services necessary to assist the person with:

(Page 269)

NYSCB has also supported and participated in activities being implemented under the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG), and serves on the steering committee to the MIG. Activities under the MIG which will particularly benefit individuals in supported employment are pilots of customized employment approaches, development of a statewide employment data base “New York Employment Services System (NYESS),” and expansion of the availability of work incentives advisement.

NYSCB staff regularly attend the Empire State Association of Persons in Supported Employment (APSE) conference to dialogue with providers, consumers and advocates, and keep abreast of evidence-based practices. (Page 269)

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

Additionally, ACCES-VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects in the upstate NY LWDAs that focus on Employment Networks (ENs) and services related to assessment, benefits advisement, and placement. ACCES-VR liaisons meet periodically with DRCs to better understand and coordinate cross-systems services; to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities; and to increase support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. The DRCs are responsible for providing and improving targeted services to individuals with disabilities, as well as improving the capacity of all workforce staff in their respective sites to provide the best possible services to the disability population. All 13 pilot sites are registered as ENs under the Ticket to Work program, with the intent to get individuals off SSA benefits and back to work.

New York State ACCES-VR jointly conducts a Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) with its State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) every three years to determine the rehabilitation (and other) needs of residents with disabilities and to identify gaps in VR services. ACCES-VR uses this information to shape policy, procedures, training, operations, and practice. The next assessment will be conducted for the FY2017 State Plan. (Page 37)

Consistent with the strategic visions and goals advanced in the Combined Plan, the State is committed to enhancing program alignment and service delivery. The State has established an Interagency Work Group to analyze service delivery strategies and identify opportunities for improvement across all participant populations including Out-of-School Youth (OSY). The work group, in collaboration with the Employment First State Leadership Mentorship Program (EFSLMP), has established a Vision Quest project with the stated goal “to develop alignment between agencies servicing youth to assure quality services and that youth do not fall through the cracks.” The Vision Quest project is initially focused on improving services for youth with disabilities or multiple barriers to employment following the Integrated Resource Team (IRT) model developed under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Project. The State seeks to expand the IRT model to OSY without regard to their disability status and provide the same level of service integration demonstrated in our multiple DEI projects. The WIOA expanded maximum age (up to age 24) of OSY and the increased flexibility in the provision of Youth services found in the Final Regulations increases the opportunity to serve OSY in a Career Center environment and more fully engage the required and optional partners found therein. The State believes that combining the system level intervention of the Interagency Work Group with the customer level coordination of services provided through IRTs creates an optimal service environment for OSY that will lead to improved outcomes. (Page 134)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

7. Support and promote the Business Enterprise Program in order to increase employment opportunities and successful outcomes.

8. Increase provision of work incentives advisement to consumers by training counselors on the impact of work on SSI and SSDI and the importance of benefits advisement and financial literacy (Page 298).

8. Referrals for benefits advisement continue to increase. As a result the number of vendors approved to provide this service increased in FY 15. Select Independent Living Centers provide benefits counseling to active consumers on a pro bono basis thus further increasing the availability and use of the service. In New York City, a financial literacy program for college students was conducted in collaboration with Barclay Bank. NYSCB consumers and District Office Staff attended this program which provided useful information for consumers as they move to enter the workforce. (Page 307)

School to Work Transition

In 2016-17, a variety of professional development programs will continue to be delivered to Literacy Zones to assist in meeting their learners’ academic and personal needs. Literacy Zone professional development will be provided in multiple ways including training for case managers so that they can be resources regarding assessments leading to a NYS HSE diploma, career ladders, one-stop referrals, core partner connections, and the Benefits Toolkit. (Page 30)

In 2016-17 New York State will continue to focus on the ways all funded adult literacy programs work with individuals with disabilities. Many of the 49 Literacy Zones formed partnerships with the Independent Living Centers, which provide one-stop services to families with an individual with a disability. The New York State Education Department developed an electronic universal benefits manual that supports all programs including those that serve individuals with disabilities. This resource is updated annually and provides contemporary support to case managers providing services to individuals with disabilities. (Page 31)

  • Career Centers will all have the MyBenefits (mybenefits.ny.gov) web site short cut icon on all resource room computers and partner staff will be trained on how to promote and use the site with customers. MyBenefits was developed to help increase access and awareness of various public benefit programs. (Page 54-55)

NYSCB entered into a Partnership Plus Agreement, which enables consumers with a Social Security Ticket to Work to obtain VR services from NYSCB, as well as broad access to community providers to assist in the coordination of Social Security payments and other benefits and services.

Eleven non-profit organizations across NYS were approved as vendors to provide benefits advisement and support the development of economic self-sufficiency. The increased access to DRCs and other ENs increases support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services.

NYSCB uses funds to contract with two private agencies for individuals who are blind to provide pre-college programs for NYSCB consumers entering their senior year of high school. The program goal is to provide students the opportunity to refine their academic, social, and independent living skills before beginning college. (Page 57)

Eleven non-profit organizations across NYS were approved as vendors to provide benefits advisement and support the development of economic self-sufficiency. The increased access to DRCs and other ENs increases support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. (Page 57)

Over the next three years, NYESS and NYS DDPC will develop an integrated web-based platform called DB101. This system will be integrated with NYESS, CareerZone, and JobZone to provide accurate, up-to-date information and benefits calculators so participants can better assess how going to work will impact their access to publicly funded healthcare and income support like Supplemental Security Income, Social Security Disability Insurance, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, housing assistance, and other public benefits. (Page 77)

4. Benefits Advisement: Benefits systems are complex and only limited resources are available to help individuals accurately understand eligibility requirements and the impact of employment on benefits. New York State can utilize emerging tools like Disability Benefits 101 (DB101) and a network of “life coaches” to expand benefits advisement.

5. Medicaid Buy-In for Working People with Disabilities (MBI-WPD): New York can integrate the MBI-WPD program into the online New York State of Health application portal, automating and standardizing eligibility determinations and referring applicants who require additional assistance. (Page 100)

  • Disability–related training: including professional conferences in mental health, developmental disabilities, deafness and hearing impairments, the medical and vocational aspects of HIV/AIDS; and substance abuse disorders. Training included post–traumatic stress disorder; traumatic brain injury; epilepsy; mood disorders; personality disorders; autism spectrum disorders; anxiety disorders; addiction; managing challenging behavior; visual acuity; multiple sclerosis; bullying; workforce investment home modifications, and neuropsychology.
  • Supported employment: including professional conferences. Training was provided for supported employment; counseling skills for direct service providers; documentation and record keeping; job retention and career development; and benefits advisement. An initial training program on the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model and recovery from mental illness has evolved into an on–going Recovery–Oriented Vocational Rehabilitation Community of Practice. (Page 204)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities.

ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. The NYESS is a combined data warehouse and information sharing system for state and community agencies and a job matching/labor exchange system for consumers and businesses. (Page 212)

Individuals on SSI/SSDI make up 28 percent of all active cases or 13,882 individuals. Those who were considered to have a most significant disability were 70.9 percent of those served in all VR statuses. While individuals receiving SSI/SSDI were only 23.8 percent of all employment outcomes in FFY 2012, the employment rate for these individuals did increase. ACCES–VR is working with the SRC to examine data on consumers who receive SSI and SSDI, and is increasing the use of benefits planning services as a strategy to increase outcomes. (Page 216)

Individuals who are Deaf, Deaf–Blind, Hard of Hearing or Late Deafened The Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation in the Fifth Edition 2008 Model State Plan (MSP) for Rehabilitation of Persons who are Deaf, Deaf–Blind, Hard of Hearing or Late Deafened report that “Hearing loss is the most prevalent, chronic, physically disabling condition in the United States today.” The National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) reported in June 2010 that approximately 17 percent (36 million) of American adults report some degree of hearing loss; 15 percent (26 million) of Americans between the ages of 20 and 69 have high frequency hearing loss due to exposure to loud sounds or noise at work or in leisure activities and 4,000 new cases of sudden deafness occur each year in the United States. Hearing loss is becoming more prevalent among the general population. These losses can impact the employment status of individuals, depending on the level of loss. In FFY 2012, ACCES–VR served a total of 3,023 (3.3 percent) individuals who had a primary impairment of deafness, hearing loss, other hearing impairment and deaf–blindness, almost one third more than the number served in FFY 2009. Of these, 63.8 percent were considered to have a most significant disability. In FFY 2012, 612 individuals who were deaf, hard of hearing or deaf–blind achieved an employment outcome. This is 5.1 percent of all employment outcomes. (Page 216)

  • Provide benefits counseling at several key points in the VR process.
  • Train ACCES–VR counselors who serve as liaisons to mental health programs on OMH Individual Placement with Supports (IPS) model, implementation and provide on–going technical assistance.
  • Inform training program providers and the postsecondary education sector about incentives for hiring people with disabilities to encourage those entities

This past year ACCES–VR participated in a joint presentation with NYS Department of Labor to discuss financial incentives credits available to business. ACCES–VR is also working to identify federal contractors/subcontractors, and to obtain the most current information regarding the changes in the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) rules, which advance the recruitment of qualified candidates with disabilities. ACCES–VR ensures that key staffs across the state are prepared to provide customized training to the business community on the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities, through their participation in the American Disabilities Act (ADA) Trainer Network. This no–cost service is a valuable resource to businesses as they strive to diversify their workforces with qualified candidates with disabilities. (Page 237)

Partnership Plus

In Spring 2014, NYSCB entered into a Partnership Plus agreement with the Research Foundation for Mental Health. Partnership Plus assures that consumers with a Social Security Ticket to Work are able to obtain the services they need from NYSCB and that as they complete their services with NYSCB, they are given access to broad network of community providers from whom they can select to coordinate issues related to Social Security payments and other benefits and services.

NYS PROMISE Initiative

NYSCB is on the steering committee for New York State PROMISE (Promoting the Readiness of Minors in Supplemental Security Income), a research project developed to improve transition–to–adulthood outcomes for eligible youth who receive supplemental security income (SSI). This five–year initiative strives to increase access to services for eligible youth and their families to improve academic and employment outcomes, increase financial stability, and reduce reliance on SSI. The priority for the steering committee is to engage local and state partners in defining a broad strategic approach that starts to describe a system of person and family centered intervention. NYSCB actively participates in the steering committee to assess services that are provided to legally blind students through other New York State organizations. (Page260)

In 2012 NYSCB began entering into agreements with nonprofit organizations for the provision of benefits advisement services. Fifteen vendors have been approved for the provision of benefits advisement services throughout New York State. Providers of these services include agencies chartered primarily for provision of services to individuals who are blind, independent living centers, and other agencies that have engaged staff who are trained and certified by the Social Security Administration, by the Cornell Institute of Labor Relations, or by Virginia Commonwealth University. Many of these providers offer advisement not only on Social Security benefits, but also on a host of other benefits which may be affected by entering employment. (Page 267)

Further, modeling likelihood of successful case closures for NYSCB consumers receiving public benefits, it was observed that mental health impairments continues to negatively predict successful case closures for this group of individuals. Receipt of vocational training, high tech devices, computer training, job-related services and job placement services were all positively related to successful employment outcomes for individuals receiving public benefits. Despite these positive relationships between the specific services and outcomes, overall only 6-10 percent of consumers receiving public benefits access these services. Other factors identified in the overall model, also continue to predict positive outcomes for NYSCB consumers receiving public benefits. (Page 281)

Further, challenges continue to persist for achieving employment outcomes for clients who receive public benefits. Though many services (e.g., high-tech devices) appear to positively impact outcomes, only small proportions receive such services. It is likely that efforts such as New York State PROMISE initiative will be helpful in highlighting leading practices and service delivery models to inform program and policy development across various service systems.

Having mental health illness as a secondary condition continues to jeopardize the likelihood of success in the current system. This variable impacts both consumers receiving and those not receiving public benefits. This finding indicates a need to build capacity of practitioners in providing services to people with mental health illnesses. (Page 282)

  1. Few received training on job placement, Independent Living (IL), placement services from other agencies, how to target business outreach, and benefits and work incentives counseling. These are also topics on which staff reported needing training. (Page 288)
  2. Increase provision of work incentives advisement to consumers by training counselors on the impact of work on SSI and SSDI and the importance of benefits advisement and financial literacy (Page 298)
  3. By supporting increased use of benefits planning through Independent Living Centers, DRC’s and other qualified resources, NYSCB anticipates that more consumers will choose careers, and work hours, which will allow them to go off SSA benefits and achieve economic self-sufficiency. In addition, NYSCB has signed a Partnership Plus agreement with the OMH Administrative Employment Network. This will increase opportunities for consumers to obtain continued support to maintain their jobs after case closure. NYSCB works with ACCES-VR to allocate contract capacity for Supported Employment services to try to assure the services are available to individuals with the most significant disabilities seeking those services. (Page 302)
  4. Mental health impairment as a secondary condition was identified by the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment CSNA) as in indicator for unsuccessful closure. NYSCB increased relationships with Office of Mental Health (OMH) and the Office for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) on both the local and state level. The receipt of public assistance benefits was also identified as an indicator for unsuccessful case closure. Benefits advisement service referrals and providers were increased and are expected to reduce this gap. The Needs Assessment also found that individuals who received high-tech devices were more likely to be successfully closed. A new adaptive technology center (ATC) contract was implemented. The contract guidelines set high standards for the delivery of ATC evaluation and training services.
  5. NYSCB consumers participated in an employment based medical records program at Baruch College. District Offices have conducted outreach on their own and collaborated with ACCES-VR to expand vocational training opportunities for NYSCB consumers. Both core partners met with Human Resource hiring managers interested in matching consumers with hard to fill positions in their local businesses.
  6. NYSCB reviewed the vocational training programs currently delivered through community rehabilitation partners and determined that two types of vocational skills training are needed; one to support consumers in increasing employability and a second to meet the demands of emerging labor markets. The first type of training is focused on those consumers planning to enter fields such as customer service, office administration, and other clerical occupations and the potential need to acquire advanced skills levels in Braille, keyboarding, note taking, computer applications and other office practices. The second type of vocational skills training is related to meeting the needs of a particular business or business sector and is developed in conjunction with a business or group of businesses representing a sector which is expected to have a high demand for employees over the next five to ten years. NYSCB will continue to develop and explore the need for new programs and training opportunities. (Page 305)
  7. Referrals for benefits advisement continue to increase. As a result the number of vendors approved to provide this service increased in FY 15. Select Independent Living Centers provide benefits counseling to active consumers on a pro bono basis thus further increasing the availability and use of the service. In New York City, a financial literacy program for college students was conducted in collaboration with Barclay Bank. NYSCB consumers and District Office Staff attended this program which provided useful information for consumers as they move to enter the workforce.
  8. Working with the National Industries for the Blind, new call centers and other service sector employment opportunities for NYSCB consumers have been developed this year. A new call center was opened in Brooklyn and actively hired consumers from NYSCB. Management staff at the call centers as well as counselors continually monitor front line staff at these call centers to provide any necessary support to the consumers employed there and to assist them in advancing their employment skills. (Page 307)
Career Pathways

VR Transition Policy ACCES–VR collaborated with the Office of Special Education and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) in 2008 to revise the 421.00 Youth in School – Transition Referral, Planning and Services Policy, to ensure a common understanding of transition requirements and responsibilities and to assist with building a collaborative partnership between transition specialists, school districts and ACCES–VR district offices throughout the state. The policy provides information about the requirements, roles and responsibilities of VR in preparing students with disabilities for successful employment. ACCES–VR, with the SRC, reviews the policy periodically to determine its current relevance. While much of the policy remains up–to–date, a revision is planned for the end of this year to ensure compliance with the requirements under WIOA, including pre–employment transition services and the use of assistive technology. This policy establishes an affirmative role for VRCs working with students in transition from school to work, a critical time for young adults with disabilities. The policy delineates the referral process of students with disabilities two years prior to their expected school exit. (Page 186)

NYSCB and the New York State Education Department collaborate on a regular basis to provide guidance to educational agencies and vocational rehabilitation personnel responsible for facilitating transition services, and to provide information about consultation and technical assistance resources to assist schools and related community support entities in planning for transition of students who are legally blind. At the state level, both agencies have designated personnel that provide oversight and leadership for the development of policies, procedures, interagency training and other state-level partnership activities for transition services. At the local level, VR counselors work closely with school district staff and local school districts have transition to work specialists that collaborate together. NYSCB will continue to work closely with schools to enable the smooth transition of students who are legally blind from school to work. (Page 279)

Work Incentives & Benefits

WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

  • Focusing leadership funds on the key requirements of WIOA through approval of new annual workplans for the RAEN and NRS Accountability specialist and work charges of NYSED state ACCES-Adult Education staff.
  • Continuing to implement a new High School Equivalency diploma for New York that serves as a gateway credential for employment, training, career pathways and postsecondary transition, and providing in-depth training of master teachers and turnkey training for 5,500 adult education teachers.
  • Adapting state and WIOA-funded professional development to support career pathways, postsecondary transition, integrated education, and integrated English literacy and civics education. (Page 34)

Local partnerships, which form the foundation of the workforce delivery system, are especially effective in meeting the workforce needs of New York’s diverse population. Local plans describe how these partnerships will be coordinated to enable all customers to receive the full range of employment and training programs and supportive services, especially those that lead to jobs in high-wage, high-growth occupations along career pathways. The needs of individuals with multiple barriers to employment are being addressed quickly and thoroughly due to the wide spectrum of service providers joined together under the local workforce system. The New York State Office for the Aging, NYSED (including ACCES-VR), the New York State Department of Health (DOH), OCFS (including NYSCB), the Office for Alcohol and Substance Abuse (OASAS), the Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance (OTDA), the State University of New York (SUNY), NYSDOL, and local community based organizations apply knowledge gained through regular communication, partnership collaborations, and cross-training to develop comprehensive service strategies to address the varying needs of our common participants. With the functional alignment approach and common customer flow in the Career Centers, partners are more aware of each agency’s involvement with the participant instead of working in a vacuum. This greatly helps reduce duplication of services to participants. (Page 52)

Employer/ Business

Additionally, ACCES-VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects in the upstate NY LWDAs that focus on Employment Networks (ENs) and services related to assessment, benefits advisement, and placement. ACCES-VR liaisons meet periodically with DRCs to better understand and coordinate cross-systems services; to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities; and to increase support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. The DRCs are responsible for providing and improving targeted services to individuals with disabilities, as well as improving the capacity of all workforce staff in their respective sites to provide the best possible services to the disability population. All 13 pilot sites are registered as ENs under the Ticket to Work program, with the intent to get individuals off SSA benefits and back to work. (Page 37)

New York State continues to be at the forefront in the area of serving individuals with disabilities with the implementation of NYESS and the opportunities the system allows. For example, in February 2012, the federal Social Security Administration announced that NYESS (www.nyess.ny.gov) was designated as the first statewide Employment Network in the United States. ENs are designated by the SSA to assist individuals with disabilities to find competitive jobs. The statewide EN designation allows SSA the ability to collaborate directly with New York to document employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities holding a Ticket-To-Work, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Ticket-To-Work program. As a statewide EN, NYESS creates a network of providers working with multiple state agencies using a single, real-time employment data/case management system. This statewide effort generates thousands of dollars in incentive payments to be reinvested in expanded job supports for individuals with disabilities. (Page 102)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities.

ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. The NYESS is a combined data warehouse and information sharing system for state and community agencies and a job matching/labor exchange system for consumers and businesses. (Page 212)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities. ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. (Page 216)

3. Promote business awareness of NYSCB workforce programs and business services through print, broadcast and electronic media to include social media, and continue to promote awareness of NYSCB through personal face–to–face contacts with businesses.

4. Continue to work with the National Employment Team (NET) of the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and other employment networks to improve employment options for NYSCB consumers.

5. Work to build partnerships with America’s Job Centers as well as the four core partners, to increase access to services needed by NYSCB consumers. (Page 298)

511

The Core Programs are required to regularly report to the Federal government and public on program performance to keep the system accountable and transparent in the pursuit of the State’s workforce vision and goals. Although WIA also required performance reporting, WIOA seeks to improve accountability across all core programs by requiring that they report on a set of uniform measures. At the onset of WIOA implementation, setting of performance goals for programs without an institutional history of these measures or an established method for collecting needed data to report these measures will be a challenge. The Core Programs are working to share existing data collection and analysis methods to identify and establish good data sources and to work through necessary administrative clearances to meet new WIOA requirements. In particular, programs under Titles II and IV of WIOA are in the process of gathering the necessary information to establish valid and reliable data for the required performance measures. The preliminary performance goals that have already been established are included in Table 1 below. (Page 42)

B. DATA-COLLECTION AND REPORTING PROCESSES USED FOR ALL PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES, INCLUDING THOSE PRESENT IN ONE-STOP CENTERS*.

The Core Programs are working closely together to identify and establish appropriate data sources and gaining the necessary administrative clearances to meet the WIOA requirements. Titles II and IV are in the process of gathering the necessary information to establish valid and reliable data for the required performance measures. (Pages 77-78)

As discussed previously, NYSDOL, in partnership with NYS OMH, developed and implemented NYESS. NYESS is made up of various computer applications and data sets. Employment related data collection is accomplished by all NYESS partners using the existing NYSDOL case management system, OSOS. Legacy data sets from the partners and current data sets, which include but are not limited to, OSOS; vocational rehabilitation agencies; DOH; Social Security Administration (SSA); and others are pulled together in a data warehouse. A web-based reporting portal designed and maintained by OMH will provide cross-agency report card like information to the general public (aggregate data) and to the individual agencies and their contracted partner staff. (Page 84)

  • Provide on–going training for supervisors. Supervisors are brought to a central location at least biannually for a three–day training. The trainings focus on the multiple roles of a supervisor and provide updates on policy, data collection and more to ensure good communication.
  • Improve the quality of supported employment services by training ACCES–VR and supported employment providers on updated supported employment policy, procedures and guidelines to ensure the integrity and effectiveness of the supported employment program.
  • Provide a Management Community of Practice. ACCES–VR is collaborating with Cornell University, Employment Disability Institute for the provision of a community of practice training project for management level staff. (Page 228)

Secondary Data Analysis of Consumer Information System

The primary purpose of analyzing NYSCB’s Consumer Information System is to identify factors related to successful case closures and employment outcomes for NYSCB clients. Specifically this analysis explored the following research questions:

  1. What are the demographic and services-related factors that predict successful employment outcomes for NYSCB consumers? How do these vary by NYSCB district offices? How do local labor market conditions (e.g., county-level employment rate for people with disabilities) impact employment outcomes for NYSCB consumers?
  2. How do these differ between transition-age youth and adult population?
  3. How do these factors impact successful outcomes for NYSCB consumers who receive publicbenefits compared with their non-beneficiary peers? (Page 280)
Mental Health

ADDRESSING THE ACCESSIBILITY OF THE ONE-STOP DELIVERY SYSTEM FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 99)

Accessibility

Accessibility is an important component within the public workforce system. New York State assures that all partners in the workforce development system described in this plan recognize the importance of the physical, programmatic, and communications accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities and English language learners in the Career Centers.

Under WIA, NYSDOL’s Methods of Administration outlined the policies, procedures, and systems NYS designed and put in place in order to provide a reasonable guarantee that NYS and its recipients of Title I WIA funds complied with the Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity requirements of WIA Section 188 and its implementing regulations. It is still available online at http://www.labor.ny.gov/agencyinfo/moa/moa.shtm and will be revised in the coming months to reflect the new WIOA regulations.

Additionally, NYSDOL will revise a Technical Advisory (TA) on the topic of “Accessibility of One-Stop Systems to Individuals with Disabilities.” The TA on this topic, released under WIA on May 16, 2000, will be revised to reflect new accessibility regulations under WIOA. (Page 102)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 81 - 90 of 94

SWIB Quarterly Meeting Presentation

he slide presentation from this meeting of the New York State Workforce Investment Board includes material on Customized Employment, WIOA, and Work Readiness Credentials.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Talent Development and Training Online Resource Library

This site provides various instructional resources for agencies interested in delivering their own training, as well as resources for individual learners interested in developing their professional education.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

NYESS Funding and Employment

NYESS, an integral part of the Governor’s Employment First Initiative, is the largest employment network for people with disabilities in the United States. To date, $2.4 million from the Social Security Administration has been received by 100 New York State organizations which have assisted 7,755 individuals with disabilities with employment services, helping 1,366 individuals find permanent employment. This webpage includes a breakdown of the 100 organizations in receipt of the funds

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Supported Employment Services

“OPWDD is committed to doubling the number of individuals with developmental disabilities who are working in their communities. Supported Employment Providers are important partners in assisting individuals to achieve their employment goals.     OPWDD’s supported employment services include Supported Employment (SEMP), Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) and the Employment Training Program (ETP). Below you will find links to related program standards, templates for required documentation formats, contact information for our DDSO employment coordinators and information on training opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of your supported employment programs.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NY Disability Employment Initiative Grant Abstract - Round 1

The New York State Department of Labor will utilize their DEI project as their next generation approach building upon their significant commitment to expanded services under their former Disability Program Navigator grant. Collaborative activities include leveraging over $1 million in funds to further support DEI efforts, including $900,000 from the New York State Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities. The project will also be collaborating with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, “New York Makes Work Pay,” with plans to implement a unified case management system to minimize duplication and promote blending and braiding of diverse resources. Asset development activities include the development of expertise in work incentive and benefits planning strategies. The state will host “Asset Development Summits” for stakeholders, beneficiaries of Social Security disability programs, the banking community, and others to discuss and share resources to enhance asset development awareness. The DEI project includes the establishment of approximately 13 Employment Networks in participating workforce investment areas.
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation

NY SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) (2001)

The goal of this project was to develop an IPS guidebook used by vocational staff members who are working with consumers who have expressed a clear interest in seeking employment.   The guidebook unifys clinical, rehabilitation and vocational services under one licensing entity.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Assembly Bill A8111 - 06/09/2015

“AN ACT to amend the civil service law, in relation to establishing a customized employment demonstration program for persons with disabilities...”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

NY Assembly Bill 6516: ABLE Legislation - 03/26/2015

 Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as the "New York achieving a better life experience (NY ABLE) savings account act".

§ 2.  Legislative intent. The legislative intent of this act is to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence and quality of life; and to provide secure funding for disability related expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through existing sources.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

N.Y. Civil Service Law §55-b: Workers with Disabilities Program

Section 55-b of the New York State Civil Service Law authorizes the New York State Civil Service Commission to designate up to 1,200 positions normally filled through competitive examination to be filled through the appointment of qualified persons with disabilities. (Section 55-c authorizes the designation of up to 500 positions in the non-competitive class to be filled by qualified wartime veterans with disabilities.) In general, an entry-level position that is filled only through an open-competitive examination (one open to the public) may be used for a 55-b or 55-c appointment.

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Governor’s Executive Order Number 136 “Establishing the New York Employment First Initiative to Increase Employment of New Yorkers with Disabilities” - 10/03/2014

…”NOW, THEREFORE, I, ANDREW M. CUOMO, Governor of the State of New York, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the State of New York, do hereby order as follows: …

 

B. Employment First Commission 1. There is hereby established the Employment First Commission (the “Commission”) to provide guidance and advice to the Governor regarding the competitive integrated employment of individuals with disabilities.   2. The members of the Commission shall be the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Health; the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Civil Rights; the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Human Services; the Chief Diversity Officer; the Counsel to the Governor; the Director of the Budget; the Commissioner for Developmental Disabilities; the Commissioner of Health; the Commissioner of Mental Health; the Commissioner of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services; the Commissioner of Children and Family Services; the Commissioner of Labor; the Commissioner of Economic Development; the Commissioner of Transportation; the Commissioner of Temporary and Disability Assistance; the Director of Veterans’ Affairs; the Director of the State Office for Aging; and the Executive Director of the Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs. Additional members may be appointed to the Commission at the discretion of the Governor.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 21 - 30 of 30

App. B: Service Documentation Requirements for Enhanced Supported Employment Pilots - 10/01/2011

These are general definitions for services that may be provided to individuals through the Enhanced Supported Employment Pilot Project. They include Person Centered Vocational Planning: Comprehensive discovery process that assists the individual to identify their interests, capacities and strengths particular to the individualized employment planning process.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

2011 Interim Report on OPWDD State Plan - 02/15/2011

The objective of Employment First is to increase the number of people with developmental disabilities who are working in NYS. Many individuals could be successful in paying jobs with the appropriate level of supports, but for various reasons most individuals participate in other day programs. At the end of 2010, OPWDD supported 9,195 individuals in supported employment programs. Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) is one of the projects offering employment opportunities to individuals who would not likely succeed or qualify for traditional supported employment. Individuals receive greater levels of support, which could consist of person-centered planning, job development or job coaching. Currently, 405 individuals participate in ESEMP, with 259 individuals successfully working in the community. OPWDD anticipates that approximately 700 individuals will participate in this pilot.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Start-UP New York - Inclusive Entrepreneurship - 06/01/2010

Adoption of Discovery and Customized Team Planning policies represents an adjustment to the way in which SSIC conducts entrepreneurial awareness. This process now includes an informal assessment of the appropriateness of entrepreneurship for its customers, as well as an orientation to the demands and realities of entrepreneurship. By imbuing their existing processes with the essential characteristics of Discovery (e.g., flexibility, focus on the career seeker, willingness to look beyond formal and formulaic assessments), the process has become more open, inclusive, and effective for all customers of SSIC.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Important Information for Veterans Receiving Payments Under the Compensated Work Therapy Program - 01/01/2009

~~“The Internal Revenue Service has announced that payments made under the Department of Veterans Affairs Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) program are no longer taxable by the federal government, and that veterans who paid federal income tax on these benefits may claim a refund for tax years 2004, 2005, or 2006. As a result, these benefit payments are no longer taxable by New York State.“

Systems
  • Other

New York ACCES-VR Policy 1301.00: Self-Employment Policy - 07/01/1988

“Establishing or maintaining a consumer in self-employment as a rehabilitation outcome allows the consumer to be productive and become financially independent and to contribute to the State's economic growth. Self-employment rehabilitations also allow the ACCES-VR counselor to be creative in the rehabilitation process. This policy defines the parameters of the ACCES-VR/consumer partnership needed to create a successful self-employment venture.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

NYESS Funding and Employment

NYESS, an integral part of the Governor’s Employment First Initiative, is the largest employment network for people with disabilities in the United States. To date, $2.4 million from the Social Security Administration has been received by 100 New York State organizations which have assisted 7,755 individuals with disabilities with employment services, helping 1,366 individuals find permanent employment. This webpage includes a breakdown of the 100 organizations in receipt of the funds

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Supported Employment Services

“OPWDD is committed to doubling the number of individuals with developmental disabilities who are working in their communities. Supported Employment Providers are important partners in assisting individuals to achieve their employment goals.     OPWDD’s supported employment services include Supported Employment (SEMP), Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) and the Employment Training Program (ETP). Below you will find links to related program standards, templates for required documentation formats, contact information for our DDSO employment coordinators and information on training opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of your supported employment programs.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NY State Plan for VR Services and Supplement for Supported Employment Services Program (Attachment 4.8(b)(2))

Goal 1.1.A Youth: Increase the percentage of youth with disabilities (applicants prior to age 22) exiting the VR Program after receiving services that achieve an employment outcome and exceed the national standard of 55.8 percent.    Baseline FFY 2010: 42.5 percent achieved an employment outcome; does not meet the RSA Performance Standard.    Performance for FFY 2011: 46.9 percent achieved an employment outcome; does not meet the RSA Performance Standard.    Performance for FFY 2012: 55.7 percent achieved an employment outcome; does not meet the RSA Performance Standard.    Performance Target: Meet or exceed the RSA Performance Standard of 55.8 percent.    Results: The percentage of youth with disabilities that achieved an employment outcome after receiving VR services has increased by 13.2 percentage points, a significant increase. In FFY 2012 ACCES-VR achieved a performance indicator of 55.7 percent which is just below the national standard of 55.8 percent by one-tenth of one percent.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

New York State Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan - 01/01/2019

~~“The Federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) requires states to submit a 4-year Combined Plan to receive funding for the six WIOA core programs: Adult; Dislocated Worker; Youth; Wagner Peyser Employment; Adult Education and Literacy; and Vocational Rehabilitation.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • WIOA

About NYS CASE - 10/17/2018

~~“The NYS Consortium for Advancing and Supporting Employment (CASE) provides training and technical assistance to employment service providers under contract with the New York State Education Department's Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR).

The NYS CASE is a collaborative involving Cornell University's Yang-Tan Institute, the Center for Human Services Education (CHSE) (a division of Heritage Christian Services), the NYS Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE), and the NY Alliance for Innovation and Inclusion (NY Alliance).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

New York State Expanding Program to Help Individuals with Disabilities find Employment - 01/11/2018

“The New York State Employment First Commission, created by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and chaired by the New York State Office of Mental Health, has announced new resources to help increase employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The new program, called the "Employment First Benefits Advisory System," will provide advice on financial assistance and work incentives for individuals with disabilities who are working or seeking work….

The Benefits Advisory System was developed through a collaborative effort between seven New York State agencies to create a single approach to the coordination of employment supports, and to provide all New Yorkers - regardless of their disability - with a single point of access for all employment-related services, including job matching with the approximately 90,000 jobs currently posted by employers in the New York State Job Bank.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NY Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) Brief - The Entrepreneurship Partners Dialogue Meeting - 11/01/2010

“The Entrepreneurship Partners Dialogue Meeting that convened in Albany, New York on November 1, 2010 was designed to facilitate discussion about challenges and barriers faced by people with disabilities who want to become self–employed. The meeting was one of the many activities funded by New York State’s Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG), New York Makes Work Pay (NYMWP). NYMWP is a statewide initiative intended to dramatically improve the rate of employment among people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NY State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council

~~“About the New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (DDPC)

The federal Developmental Disabilities Act requires that each of the 56 U.S. States and Territories identify a Developmental Disabilities (DD) Council. The New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (DDPC) is the DD Council representing New York State.  Although the DDPC is 100% federally-funded, it operates as a New York State agency under the direction of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo.

The DDPC is not a direct service provider. Our mission is carried out through grant work. The DDPC addresses the needs of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities through the development of demonstration projects around advocacy, systems change, and capacity building efforts that promote self-determination, integration, and inclusion in all facets of life.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New York Inclusive Entrepreneurship Program

“[South Side Innovation Center] SSIC provides services to all interested entrepreneurs, but it also has targeted programs for traditionally underserved entrepreneurial groups including low-income individuals, people with disabilities, women and minorities. “The expansion of Inclusive Entrepreneurship has led to our ability to provide services even to typically hard-to-reach populations, including a contract with the State Commission on the Blind and Visually Handicapped, under which we provide services to blind and visually impaired individuals….’”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

NY Disability Employment Initiative Grant Abstract - Round 1

The New York State Department of Labor will utilize their DEI project as their next generation approach building upon their significant commitment to expanded services under their former Disability Program Navigator grant. Collaborative activities include leveraging over $1 million in funds to further support DEI efforts, including $900,000 from the New York State Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities. The project will also be collaborating with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, “New York Makes Work Pay,” with plans to implement a unified case management system to minimize duplication and promote blending and braiding of diverse resources. Asset development activities include the development of expertise in work incentive and benefits planning strategies. The state will host “Asset Development Summits” for stakeholders, beneficiaries of Social Security disability programs, the banking community, and others to discuss and share resources to enhance asset development awareness. The DEI project includes the establishment of approximately 13 Employment Networks in participating workforce investment areas.
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation

NY SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) (2001)

The goal of this project was to develop an IPS guidebook used by vocational staff members who are working with consumers who have expressed a clear interest in seeking employment.   The guidebook unifys clinical, rehabilitation and vocational services under one licensing entity.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

New York Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The… grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Simply Speaking Inclusive Entrepreneurship Guidelines for SBDC Advisors - 05/17/2010

This whitepaper introduces and describes Start-Up NY and its efforts to improve disability employment in the state of New York. It discusses the 4 stage “Start-Up NY Process,” the economic impact, their work with veterans, success stories, and recommended tools, among other topics.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

A 'Primer’ on The StartUP New York 4-Phase Model - 09/28/2009

“START-UP/New York convened a multidisciplinary collaboration of highly skilled partners to provide a customized, intensive, and well-rounded training, technical assistance, counseling, and support program for people with disabilities interested in self-employment. Over the first three years, the project developed an improved model for developing community infrastructure and capacity through public and private investment and collaboration to support and provide technical assistance to individuals with disabilities who seek self-employment in Onondaga County. It was successful in documenting the strengths and weaknesses of the consortium model to assist in the start-up, sustainability, and replicable of successful micro-enterprise and small business ventures launched by individuals with disabilities. The project also succeeded in recruiting participants, including those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits, Veterans, youth and others in Onondaga County, representing a range of disabilities from diverse ethnic and racial groups who have aspirations for self-employment. The START-UP/New York model included developing customized training curricula, informed by Customized, Discovery-based results, personal preferences, and peer advisors.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

New York State Consortium for Advancement of Supported Employment

“The NYS Consortium for Advancement of Supported Employment (CASE) provides training and technical assistance to supported employment service providers under contract with the New York State Education Department's Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation….

The NYS CASE is a multi-faceted strategy that includes a statewide performance baseline, policy and practice goals, training curriculum and organizational development resources, regional and distance training opportunities, organizational development support, and evaluation of training and resources. The training establishes a critical link for supported employment professionals between the learning environment and on-going work with clients.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

New York (ACCES-VR) Workforce Development and Business Relations Department "Adult Career and Continuing Education Services –Vocational Rehabilitation…a basic guide"

What is ACCES? The Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services (ACCES) is part of the New York State Education Department and is comprised of three primary areas: Vocational Rehabilitation (including Independent Living Program Administration), Adult Education, and the Bureau of Proprietary School Supervision. ACCES-VR: • Administers vocational rehabilitation and independent living programs • Provides a wide array of services to assist eligible individuals with disabilities in obtaining employment • Provides services to students, beginning up to 2 years prior to exiting high school • Provides individual consultation, recommendations and training to assist with maintaining a job • Provides information and support to employers

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

New York (ACCES-VR) Workforce Development and Business Relations Department "Hiring Good People Is Good Business"

ACCES-VR can assist businesses with meeting compliance with Federal Laws Assistance for federal contractors/subcontractors in meeting OFCCP requirements. Technical assistance on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). ACCES-VR can lower hiring costs through these services ... Work Tryout ACCES-VR can reimburse an employer for 100% of an employee’s wages for up to 480 hours. This offers the employer the opportunity to evaluate the employee’s ability to satisfactorily perform the job. On the Job Training ACCES-VR can reimburse the worker’s salary, for an agreed upon period of time while he/she is being trained in a new occupation. ACCES-VR’s Partnership with Public Employers... ACCES-VR offers business customers in the public sector a designated point of contact to connect with qualified applicants, resources and support services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

New York ACCES-VR Workforce Development and Business Relations Department "Disability Etiquette Guide"

Everyone Knows Someone with a Disability People with disabilities are the nation’s largest minority and the only one that any person can join at any time. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, 54 million people have disabilities. That is nearly 1 in 5 people. Here are some general tips

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

SWIB Quarterly Meeting Presentation

he slide presentation from this meeting of the New York State Workforce Investment Board includes material on Customized Employment, WIOA, and Work Readiness Credentials.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Talent Development and Training Online Resource Library

This site provides various instructional resources for agencies interested in delivering their own training, as well as resources for individual learners interested in developing their professional education.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 21 - 21 of 21

New York State Medicaid Plan

Medicaid State Plan is an official document that describes the nature and scope of a state's Medicaid program. Each state develops its own Plan, as required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act (Act), which is then approved by the federal Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS). Any changes or amendments to the Plan are similarly developed by the state and approved by DHHS. Each state administers its own Plan and, in doing so, agrees to conform to the requirements of the Act and all other applicable federal statutes and regulations related to the Medicaid program.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

Career opportunities for people with disabilities in the Empire State of New York are growing "Ever upwards!" If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New York’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.52%
Change from
2016 to 2017
19,849,399
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.89%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,099,574
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.03%
Change from
2016 to 2017
378,951
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.89%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.46%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.94%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.21%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 19,849,399
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,099,574
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 378,951
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 8,610,618
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.21%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.70%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,040,543
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 1,225,864
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,489,769
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 398,388
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 436,921
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 15,683
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 111,566
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,056
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 61,213
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 188,732

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 20,914
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 493,907

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 84,070
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 148,077
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 408,787
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,728
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 23,763
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,582
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 23,355
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 8,989
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 3,935
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 44.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 19.88

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 28,953
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 842,951
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,105
Number of people served in facility based work. 5,768
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 46,867
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 54.80

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 58.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.56%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 6.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 90.23%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 44.02%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 69.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.66%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 25.41%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 6,429,710
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 8,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 498,920
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,435,284
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,934,204
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 1,050
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,152
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,202
AbilityOne wages (products). $3,814,358
AbilityOne wages (services). $26,511,843

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 43
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 4
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 47
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,912
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 247
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,159

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

Through the Employment First policy, the State seeks to build on important economic development investments to ensure that individuals with disabilities equally benefit from the improving economy and have sustained opportunities to engage in the competitive labor market. Specifically, the State aims to increase the employment rate of individuals with disabilities by 5%; decrease the poverty rate of individuals with disabilities by a comparable 5%; and engage 100 businesses in adopting policies and practices that support the integrated employment of individuals with disabilities. The driving force behind this initiative is the principle that everyone has the right to work.
The Employment First policy commission has made the following recommendations:

  1. Cultural Modeling: New York State agencies can model the integrated employment of individuals with disabilities. Whether through enhancements to the governor’s programs to hire persons/veterans with disabilities (sections 55-b and -c of New York State Civil Service Law), or through community-based organizations directly hiring individuals, a strong culture of employment first must be established.
  2. Energizing the “Demand-Side” of the Equation: Redesign and reinvigorate the New York Business Leadership Network to pursue the aggressive goal of engaging 100 business partners. A business first platform can be established through promoting existing tax credits, supporting businesses to pursue federal contracts, and harnessing the power of New York’s regional economic development efforts.
  3. New York Employment Services System (NYESS): The NYESS system has already distinguished New York as the leader in moving individuals with disabilities into the world of employment as the largest Social Security Administration Ticket to Work (TTW) network in the nation. Ensuring the full adoption of the system across community providers and state agencies will utilize the power of New York’s integrated employment case management system to comprehensively monitor and support employment outcomes in New York State.
  4. Benefits Advisement: Benefits systems are complex and only limited resources are available to help individuals accurately understand eligibility requirements and the impact of employment on benefits. New York State can utilize emerging tools like Disability Benefits 101 (DB101) and a network of “life coaches” to expand benefits advisement. (Pages 99-101)

Consistent with the strategic visions and goals advanced in the Combined Plan, the State is committed to enhancing program alignment and service delivery. The State has established an Interagency Work Group to analyze service delivery strategies and identify opportunities for improvement across all participant populations including Out-of-School Youth (OSY). The work group, in collaboration with the Employment First State Leadership Mentorship Program (EFSLMP), has established a Vision Quest project with the stated goal “to develop alignment between agencies servicing youth to assure quality services and that youth do not fall through the cracks.” The Vision Quest project is initially focused on improving services for youth with disabilities or multiple barriers to employment following the Integrated Resource Team (IRT) model developed under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Project. The State seeks to expand the IRT model to OSY without regard to their disability status and provide the same level of service integration demonstrated in our multiple DEI projects. The WIOA expanded maximum age (up to age 24) of OSY and the increased flexibility in the provision of Youth services found in the Final Regulations increases the opportunity to serve OSY in a Career Center environment and more fully engage the required and optional partners found therein. The State believes that combining the system level intervention of the Interagency Work Group with the customer level coordination of services provided through IRTs creates an optimal service environment for OSY that will lead to improved outcomes. (Page 134)

ACCES–VR has a longstanding working partnership with the Office for People with Development Disabilities (OPWDD). Collaborative projects and initiatives are ongoing. In 2014, NYS established an Employment First policy. This policy outlines several strategies and demonstrates NYS’s full commitment to inclusion for people with disabilities. To accomplish the vision and goals there are collaborative efforts that require participation for all State agencies. Many of these strategies build upon the existing linkages. Over the past several years OPWDD, OMH and ACCES–VR have been providing targeted training to employment staff on the delivery of high quality evidence–based employment services to individuals with disabilities. To more fully support the goals of Employment First, an expansion of this training is being planned. ACCES–VR will continue to work with OMH and OPWDD as well as NYS CB on supported employment guidelines to ensure the appropriate and smooth transitions for individuals with disabilities. (Pages 196-198)

NYSCB will encourage staff to provide in-service presentations for OPWDD and OMH staff regarding blindness, vision rehabilitation therapy, orientation and mobility, as well as job site accommodations. NYSCB recognizes that collaboration with these partner state agencies is integral to the employment success of individuals served by multiple agencies. These partners are currently collaborating on Governor Cuomo’s Employment First initiative and have already begun to address barriers that currently exist in the provision of services between agencies. NYSCB will continue to participate in these initiatives advocating for individuals who are legally blind receiving NYSCB services and will continue to work to provide seamless services to consumers in conjunction with our partner state agencies. (Page 271)

Customized Employment

Additionally, ACCES–VR has initiated outreach activities in conjunction with the July anniversary of the American with Disabilities Act with its downstate IES, City University of New York, and the Mayor’s Office in NYC. There were two “Champions for Change” events held in 2015. Discussion is underway with the State Rehabilitation Council about how they can further support ACCES–VR IESs to establish new relationships with business and enhance customized employment options.

ACCES–VR is also working with our provider agency partners as well as the NYS Department of Labor and NYS Commission for the Blind, to explore additional services, supports, or projects that could engage businesses that have had limited experiences with hiring people with disabilities. (Page 195)

ACCES–VR will include in its new CRS contracts to start in 2017, opportunities and funding for providers to develop customized employment opportunities. Training will also be provided to providers regarding provision of this service. (Page 195-196)
The following themes emerged from the meetings, as well as from other verbal and written information obtained from participants:

  • Employment: need more collaboration of stakeholders, providers and State agencies.
  • Businesses: need to be educated about hiring individuals with disabilities and available financial incentives credits.
  • ACCES–VR: should consider enhancement of the self–employment advisement committee. Recommendation is to explore how local businesses could be further engaged and could share their knowledge.
  • Supported Employment:
    • Effective program, but providers are concerned about the impact of the milestone system. Perhaps a tier system could be considered. Also, need to reevaluate retention measures under the milestone system.
    • Best practices with customized employment should be identified with a focus on replication and more engagement of business in the process. (Page 209)

Scope of Supported Employment Services

  • Supported Employment services are comprised of on–going services, including customized employment, needed to support and maintain an individual with a most significant disability in supported employment, that:
  • Are provided singly or in combination to assist an eligible individual to achieve a competitive integrated employment;
  • Are based on a determination of the needs of the individual and as specified in the IPE; and
  • Are provided by ACCES–VR for up to 24 months, unless an extension necessary to achieve the employment outcome identified in the IPE.

Supported employment services provide all the services necessary to assist the person with:

(Page 269)

NYSCB has also supported and participated in activities being implemented under the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG), and serves on the steering committee to the MIG. Activities under the MIG which will particularly benefit individuals in supported employment are pilots of customized employment approaches, development of a statewide employment data base “New York Employment Services System (NYESS),” and expansion of the availability of work incentives advisement.

NYSCB staff regularly attend the Empire State Association of Persons in Supported Employment (APSE) conference to dialogue with providers, consumers and advocates, and keep abreast of evidence-based practices. (Page 269)

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

Additionally, ACCES-VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects in the upstate NY LWDAs that focus on Employment Networks (ENs) and services related to assessment, benefits advisement, and placement. ACCES-VR liaisons meet periodically with DRCs to better understand and coordinate cross-systems services; to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities; and to increase support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. The DRCs are responsible for providing and improving targeted services to individuals with disabilities, as well as improving the capacity of all workforce staff in their respective sites to provide the best possible services to the disability population. All 13 pilot sites are registered as ENs under the Ticket to Work program, with the intent to get individuals off SSA benefits and back to work.

New York State ACCES-VR jointly conducts a Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) with its State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) every three years to determine the rehabilitation (and other) needs of residents with disabilities and to identify gaps in VR services. ACCES-VR uses this information to shape policy, procedures, training, operations, and practice. The next assessment will be conducted for the FY2017 State Plan. (Page 37)

Consistent with the strategic visions and goals advanced in the Combined Plan, the State is committed to enhancing program alignment and service delivery. The State has established an Interagency Work Group to analyze service delivery strategies and identify opportunities for improvement across all participant populations including Out-of-School Youth (OSY). The work group, in collaboration with the Employment First State Leadership Mentorship Program (EFSLMP), has established a Vision Quest project with the stated goal “to develop alignment between agencies servicing youth to assure quality services and that youth do not fall through the cracks.” The Vision Quest project is initially focused on improving services for youth with disabilities or multiple barriers to employment following the Integrated Resource Team (IRT) model developed under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Project. The State seeks to expand the IRT model to OSY without regard to their disability status and provide the same level of service integration demonstrated in our multiple DEI projects. The WIOA expanded maximum age (up to age 24) of OSY and the increased flexibility in the provision of Youth services found in the Final Regulations increases the opportunity to serve OSY in a Career Center environment and more fully engage the required and optional partners found therein. The State believes that combining the system level intervention of the Interagency Work Group with the customer level coordination of services provided through IRTs creates an optimal service environment for OSY that will lead to improved outcomes. (Page 134)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

7. Support and promote the Business Enterprise Program in order to increase employment opportunities and successful outcomes.

8. Increase provision of work incentives advisement to consumers by training counselors on the impact of work on SSI and SSDI and the importance of benefits advisement and financial literacy (Page 298).

8. Referrals for benefits advisement continue to increase. As a result the number of vendors approved to provide this service increased in FY 15. Select Independent Living Centers provide benefits counseling to active consumers on a pro bono basis thus further increasing the availability and use of the service. In New York City, a financial literacy program for college students was conducted in collaboration with Barclay Bank. NYSCB consumers and District Office Staff attended this program which provided useful information for consumers as they move to enter the workforce. (Page 307)

School to Work Transition

In 2016-17, a variety of professional development programs will continue to be delivered to Literacy Zones to assist in meeting their learners’ academic and personal needs. Literacy Zone professional development will be provided in multiple ways including training for case managers so that they can be resources regarding assessments leading to a NYS HSE diploma, career ladders, one-stop referrals, core partner connections, and the Benefits Toolkit. (Page 30)

In 2016-17 New York State will continue to focus on the ways all funded adult literacy programs work with individuals with disabilities. Many of the 49 Literacy Zones formed partnerships with the Independent Living Centers, which provide one-stop services to families with an individual with a disability. The New York State Education Department developed an electronic universal benefits manual that supports all programs including those that serve individuals with disabilities. This resource is updated annually and provides contemporary support to case managers providing services to individuals with disabilities. (Page 31)

  • Career Centers will all have the MyBenefits (mybenefits.ny.gov) web site short cut icon on all resource room computers and partner staff will be trained on how to promote and use the site with customers. MyBenefits was developed to help increase access and awareness of various public benefit programs. (Page 54-55)

NYSCB entered into a Partnership Plus Agreement, which enables consumers with a Social Security Ticket to Work to obtain VR services from NYSCB, as well as broad access to community providers to assist in the coordination of Social Security payments and other benefits and services.

Eleven non-profit organizations across NYS were approved as vendors to provide benefits advisement and support the development of economic self-sufficiency. The increased access to DRCs and other ENs increases support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services.

NYSCB uses funds to contract with two private agencies for individuals who are blind to provide pre-college programs for NYSCB consumers entering their senior year of high school. The program goal is to provide students the opportunity to refine their academic, social, and independent living skills before beginning college. (Page 57)

Eleven non-profit organizations across NYS were approved as vendors to provide benefits advisement and support the development of economic self-sufficiency. The increased access to DRCs and other ENs increases support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. (Page 57)

Over the next three years, NYESS and NYS DDPC will develop an integrated web-based platform called DB101. This system will be integrated with NYESS, CareerZone, and JobZone to provide accurate, up-to-date information and benefits calculators so participants can better assess how going to work will impact their access to publicly funded healthcare and income support like Supplemental Security Income, Social Security Disability Insurance, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, housing assistance, and other public benefits. (Page 77)

4. Benefits Advisement: Benefits systems are complex and only limited resources are available to help individuals accurately understand eligibility requirements and the impact of employment on benefits. New York State can utilize emerging tools like Disability Benefits 101 (DB101) and a network of “life coaches” to expand benefits advisement.

5. Medicaid Buy-In for Working People with Disabilities (MBI-WPD): New York can integrate the MBI-WPD program into the online New York State of Health application portal, automating and standardizing eligibility determinations and referring applicants who require additional assistance. (Page 100)

  • Disability–related training: including professional conferences in mental health, developmental disabilities, deafness and hearing impairments, the medical and vocational aspects of HIV/AIDS; and substance abuse disorders. Training included post–traumatic stress disorder; traumatic brain injury; epilepsy; mood disorders; personality disorders; autism spectrum disorders; anxiety disorders; addiction; managing challenging behavior; visual acuity; multiple sclerosis; bullying; workforce investment home modifications, and neuropsychology.
  • Supported employment: including professional conferences. Training was provided for supported employment; counseling skills for direct service providers; documentation and record keeping; job retention and career development; and benefits advisement. An initial training program on the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model and recovery from mental illness has evolved into an on–going Recovery–Oriented Vocational Rehabilitation Community of Practice. (Page 204)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities.

ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. The NYESS is a combined data warehouse and information sharing system for state and community agencies and a job matching/labor exchange system for consumers and businesses. (Page 212)

Individuals on SSI/SSDI make up 28 percent of all active cases or 13,882 individuals. Those who were considered to have a most significant disability were 70.9 percent of those served in all VR statuses. While individuals receiving SSI/SSDI were only 23.8 percent of all employment outcomes in FFY 2012, the employment rate for these individuals did increase. ACCES–VR is working with the SRC to examine data on consumers who receive SSI and SSDI, and is increasing the use of benefits planning services as a strategy to increase outcomes. (Page 216)

Individuals who are Deaf, Deaf–Blind, Hard of Hearing or Late Deafened The Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation in the Fifth Edition 2008 Model State Plan (MSP) for Rehabilitation of Persons who are Deaf, Deaf–Blind, Hard of Hearing or Late Deafened report that “Hearing loss is the most prevalent, chronic, physically disabling condition in the United States today.” The National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) reported in June 2010 that approximately 17 percent (36 million) of American adults report some degree of hearing loss; 15 percent (26 million) of Americans between the ages of 20 and 69 have high frequency hearing loss due to exposure to loud sounds or noise at work or in leisure activities and 4,000 new cases of sudden deafness occur each year in the United States. Hearing loss is becoming more prevalent among the general population. These losses can impact the employment status of individuals, depending on the level of loss. In FFY 2012, ACCES–VR served a total of 3,023 (3.3 percent) individuals who had a primary impairment of deafness, hearing loss, other hearing impairment and deaf–blindness, almost one third more than the number served in FFY 2009. Of these, 63.8 percent were considered to have a most significant disability. In FFY 2012, 612 individuals who were deaf, hard of hearing or deaf–blind achieved an employment outcome. This is 5.1 percent of all employment outcomes. (Page 216)

  • Provide benefits counseling at several key points in the VR process.
  • Train ACCES–VR counselors who serve as liaisons to mental health programs on OMH Individual Placement with Supports (IPS) model, implementation and provide on–going technical assistance.
  • Inform training program providers and the postsecondary education sector about incentives for hiring people with disabilities to encourage those entities

This past year ACCES–VR participated in a joint presentation with NYS Department of Labor to discuss financial incentives credits available to business. ACCES–VR is also working to identify federal contractors/subcontractors, and to obtain the most current information regarding the changes in the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) rules, which advance the recruitment of qualified candidates with disabilities. ACCES–VR ensures that key staffs across the state are prepared to provide customized training to the business community on the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities, through their participation in the American Disabilities Act (ADA) Trainer Network. This no–cost service is a valuable resource to businesses as they strive to diversify their workforces with qualified candidates with disabilities. (Page 237)

Partnership Plus

In Spring 2014, NYSCB entered into a Partnership Plus agreement with the Research Foundation for Mental Health. Partnership Plus assures that consumers with a Social Security Ticket to Work are able to obtain the services they need from NYSCB and that as they complete their services with NYSCB, they are given access to broad network of community providers from whom they can select to coordinate issues related to Social Security payments and other benefits and services.

NYS PROMISE Initiative

NYSCB is on the steering committee for New York State PROMISE (Promoting the Readiness of Minors in Supplemental Security Income), a research project developed to improve transition–to–adulthood outcomes for eligible youth who receive supplemental security income (SSI). This five–year initiative strives to increase access to services for eligible youth and their families to improve academic and employment outcomes, increase financial stability, and reduce reliance on SSI. The priority for the steering committee is to engage local and state partners in defining a broad strategic approach that starts to describe a system of person and family centered intervention. NYSCB actively participates in the steering committee to assess services that are provided to legally blind students through other New York State organizations. (Page260)

In 2012 NYSCB began entering into agreements with nonprofit organizations for the provision of benefits advisement services. Fifteen vendors have been approved for the provision of benefits advisement services throughout New York State. Providers of these services include agencies chartered primarily for provision of services to individuals who are blind, independent living centers, and other agencies that have engaged staff who are trained and certified by the Social Security Administration, by the Cornell Institute of Labor Relations, or by Virginia Commonwealth University. Many of these providers offer advisement not only on Social Security benefits, but also on a host of other benefits which may be affected by entering employment. (Page 267)

Further, modeling likelihood of successful case closures for NYSCB consumers receiving public benefits, it was observed that mental health impairments continues to negatively predict successful case closures for this group of individuals. Receipt of vocational training, high tech devices, computer training, job-related services and job placement services were all positively related to successful employment outcomes for individuals receiving public benefits. Despite these positive relationships between the specific services and outcomes, overall only 6-10 percent of consumers receiving public benefits access these services. Other factors identified in the overall model, also continue to predict positive outcomes for NYSCB consumers receiving public benefits. (Page 281)

Further, challenges continue to persist for achieving employment outcomes for clients who receive public benefits. Though many services (e.g., high-tech devices) appear to positively impact outcomes, only small proportions receive such services. It is likely that efforts such as New York State PROMISE initiative will be helpful in highlighting leading practices and service delivery models to inform program and policy development across various service systems.

Having mental health illness as a secondary condition continues to jeopardize the likelihood of success in the current system. This variable impacts both consumers receiving and those not receiving public benefits. This finding indicates a need to build capacity of practitioners in providing services to people with mental health illnesses. (Page 282)

  1. Few received training on job placement, Independent Living (IL), placement services from other agencies, how to target business outreach, and benefits and work incentives counseling. These are also topics on which staff reported needing training. (Page 288)
  2. Increase provision of work incentives advisement to consumers by training counselors on the impact of work on SSI and SSDI and the importance of benefits advisement and financial literacy (Page 298)
  3. By supporting increased use of benefits planning through Independent Living Centers, DRC’s and other qualified resources, NYSCB anticipates that more consumers will choose careers, and work hours, which will allow them to go off SSA benefits and achieve economic self-sufficiency. In addition, NYSCB has signed a Partnership Plus agreement with the OMH Administrative Employment Network. This will increase opportunities for consumers to obtain continued support to maintain their jobs after case closure. NYSCB works with ACCES-VR to allocate contract capacity for Supported Employment services to try to assure the services are available to individuals with the most significant disabilities seeking those services. (Page 302)
  4. Mental health impairment as a secondary condition was identified by the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment CSNA) as in indicator for unsuccessful closure. NYSCB increased relationships with Office of Mental Health (OMH) and the Office for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) on both the local and state level. The receipt of public assistance benefits was also identified as an indicator for unsuccessful case closure. Benefits advisement service referrals and providers were increased and are expected to reduce this gap. The Needs Assessment also found that individuals who received high-tech devices were more likely to be successfully closed. A new adaptive technology center (ATC) contract was implemented. The contract guidelines set high standards for the delivery of ATC evaluation and training services.
  5. NYSCB consumers participated in an employment based medical records program at Baruch College. District Offices have conducted outreach on their own and collaborated with ACCES-VR to expand vocational training opportunities for NYSCB consumers. Both core partners met with Human Resource hiring managers interested in matching consumers with hard to fill positions in their local businesses.
  6. NYSCB reviewed the vocational training programs currently delivered through community rehabilitation partners and determined that two types of vocational skills training are needed; one to support consumers in increasing employability and a second to meet the demands of emerging labor markets. The first type of training is focused on those consumers planning to enter fields such as customer service, office administration, and other clerical occupations and the potential need to acquire advanced skills levels in Braille, keyboarding, note taking, computer applications and other office practices. The second type of vocational skills training is related to meeting the needs of a particular business or business sector and is developed in conjunction with a business or group of businesses representing a sector which is expected to have a high demand for employees over the next five to ten years. NYSCB will continue to develop and explore the need for new programs and training opportunities. (Page 305)
  7. Referrals for benefits advisement continue to increase. As a result the number of vendors approved to provide this service increased in FY 15. Select Independent Living Centers provide benefits counseling to active consumers on a pro bono basis thus further increasing the availability and use of the service. In New York City, a financial literacy program for college students was conducted in collaboration with Barclay Bank. NYSCB consumers and District Office Staff attended this program which provided useful information for consumers as they move to enter the workforce.
  8. Working with the National Industries for the Blind, new call centers and other service sector employment opportunities for NYSCB consumers have been developed this year. A new call center was opened in Brooklyn and actively hired consumers from NYSCB. Management staff at the call centers as well as counselors continually monitor front line staff at these call centers to provide any necessary support to the consumers employed there and to assist them in advancing their employment skills. (Page 307)
Career Pathways

VR Transition Policy ACCES–VR collaborated with the Office of Special Education and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) in 2008 to revise the 421.00 Youth in School – Transition Referral, Planning and Services Policy, to ensure a common understanding of transition requirements and responsibilities and to assist with building a collaborative partnership between transition specialists, school districts and ACCES–VR district offices throughout the state. The policy provides information about the requirements, roles and responsibilities of VR in preparing students with disabilities for successful employment. ACCES–VR, with the SRC, reviews the policy periodically to determine its current relevance. While much of the policy remains up–to–date, a revision is planned for the end of this year to ensure compliance with the requirements under WIOA, including pre–employment transition services and the use of assistive technology. This policy establishes an affirmative role for VRCs working with students in transition from school to work, a critical time for young adults with disabilities. The policy delineates the referral process of students with disabilities two years prior to their expected school exit. (Page 186)

NYSCB and the New York State Education Department collaborate on a regular basis to provide guidance to educational agencies and vocational rehabilitation personnel responsible for facilitating transition services, and to provide information about consultation and technical assistance resources to assist schools and related community support entities in planning for transition of students who are legally blind. At the state level, both agencies have designated personnel that provide oversight and leadership for the development of policies, procedures, interagency training and other state-level partnership activities for transition services. At the local level, VR counselors work closely with school district staff and local school districts have transition to work specialists that collaborate together. NYSCB will continue to work closely with schools to enable the smooth transition of students who are legally blind from school to work. (Page 279)

Work Incentives & Benefits

WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

  • Focusing leadership funds on the key requirements of WIOA through approval of new annual workplans for the RAEN and NRS Accountability specialist and work charges of NYSED state ACCES-Adult Education staff.
  • Continuing to implement a new High School Equivalency diploma for New York that serves as a gateway credential for employment, training, career pathways and postsecondary transition, and providing in-depth training of master teachers and turnkey training for 5,500 adult education teachers.
  • Adapting state and WIOA-funded professional development to support career pathways, postsecondary transition, integrated education, and integrated English literacy and civics education. (Page 34)

Local partnerships, which form the foundation of the workforce delivery system, are especially effective in meeting the workforce needs of New York’s diverse population. Local plans describe how these partnerships will be coordinated to enable all customers to receive the full range of employment and training programs and supportive services, especially those that lead to jobs in high-wage, high-growth occupations along career pathways. The needs of individuals with multiple barriers to employment are being addressed quickly and thoroughly due to the wide spectrum of service providers joined together under the local workforce system. The New York State Office for the Aging, NYSED (including ACCES-VR), the New York State Department of Health (DOH), OCFS (including NYSCB), the Office for Alcohol and Substance Abuse (OASAS), the Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance (OTDA), the State University of New York (SUNY), NYSDOL, and local community based organizations apply knowledge gained through regular communication, partnership collaborations, and cross-training to develop comprehensive service strategies to address the varying needs of our common participants. With the functional alignment approach and common customer flow in the Career Centers, partners are more aware of each agency’s involvement with the participant instead of working in a vacuum. This greatly helps reduce duplication of services to participants. (Page 52)

Employer/ Business

Additionally, ACCES-VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects in the upstate NY LWDAs that focus on Employment Networks (ENs) and services related to assessment, benefits advisement, and placement. ACCES-VR liaisons meet periodically with DRCs to better understand and coordinate cross-systems services; to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities; and to increase support in maintaining employment after a consumer’s closure from VR services. The DRCs are responsible for providing and improving targeted services to individuals with disabilities, as well as improving the capacity of all workforce staff in their respective sites to provide the best possible services to the disability population. All 13 pilot sites are registered as ENs under the Ticket to Work program, with the intent to get individuals off SSA benefits and back to work. (Page 37)

New York State continues to be at the forefront in the area of serving individuals with disabilities with the implementation of NYESS and the opportunities the system allows. For example, in February 2012, the federal Social Security Administration announced that NYESS (www.nyess.ny.gov) was designated as the first statewide Employment Network in the United States. ENs are designated by the SSA to assist individuals with disabilities to find competitive jobs. The statewide EN designation allows SSA the ability to collaborate directly with New York to document employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities holding a Ticket-To-Work, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Ticket-To-Work program. As a statewide EN, NYESS creates a network of providers working with multiple state agencies using a single, real-time employment data/case management system. This statewide effort generates thousands of dollars in incentive payments to be reinvested in expanded job supports for individuals with disabilities. (Page 102)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities.

ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. The NYESS is a combined data warehouse and information sharing system for state and community agencies and a job matching/labor exchange system for consumers and businesses. (Page 212)

ACCES–VR continues to develop local strategies to increase access to employment services for individuals with disabilities. There are 13 Disability Employment Initiative Projects at the upstate NY local workforce areas that focus on Employment Networks and services for VR consumers related to assessment, benefits advisement and placement. ACCES–VR liaisons meet periodically with the Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to better understand and coordinate cross–systems services and to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities. ACCES–VR and the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), representing OMH, have signed a Partnership Plus Memorandum of Agreement. Through this agreement, ACCES–VR can coordinate the Ticket to Work assignment with RFMH, which is acting as a statewide administrative employment network. ACCES–VR is also negotiating the data sharing agreement provided by OMH as part of their collaboration with DOL to transform the One–Stop Operating System into a data and case services system. The system includes all the components of the New York Interagency Supported Employment Reporting Data System (NYISER) that was replaced in 2012 by the New York Employment Services System (NYESS) for its supported employment providers. (Page 216)

3. Promote business awareness of NYSCB workforce programs and business services through print, broadcast and electronic media to include social media, and continue to promote awareness of NYSCB through personal face–to–face contacts with businesses.

4. Continue to work with the National Employment Team (NET) of the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and other employment networks to improve employment options for NYSCB consumers.

5. Work to build partnerships with America’s Job Centers as well as the four core partners, to increase access to services needed by NYSCB consumers. (Page 298)

511

The Core Programs are required to regularly report to the Federal government and public on program performance to keep the system accountable and transparent in the pursuit of the State’s workforce vision and goals. Although WIA also required performance reporting, WIOA seeks to improve accountability across all core programs by requiring that they report on a set of uniform measures. At the onset of WIOA implementation, setting of performance goals for programs without an institutional history of these measures or an established method for collecting needed data to report these measures will be a challenge. The Core Programs are working to share existing data collection and analysis methods to identify and establish good data sources and to work through necessary administrative clearances to meet new WIOA requirements. In particular, programs under Titles II and IV of WIOA are in the process of gathering the necessary information to establish valid and reliable data for the required performance measures. The preliminary performance goals that have already been established are included in Table 1 below. (Page 42)

B. DATA-COLLECTION AND REPORTING PROCESSES USED FOR ALL PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES, INCLUDING THOSE PRESENT IN ONE-STOP CENTERS*.

The Core Programs are working closely together to identify and establish appropriate data sources and gaining the necessary administrative clearances to meet the WIOA requirements. Titles II and IV are in the process of gathering the necessary information to establish valid and reliable data for the required performance measures. (Pages 77-78)

As discussed previously, NYSDOL, in partnership with NYS OMH, developed and implemented NYESS. NYESS is made up of various computer applications and data sets. Employment related data collection is accomplished by all NYESS partners using the existing NYSDOL case management system, OSOS. Legacy data sets from the partners and current data sets, which include but are not limited to, OSOS; vocational rehabilitation agencies; DOH; Social Security Administration (SSA); and others are pulled together in a data warehouse. A web-based reporting portal designed and maintained by OMH will provide cross-agency report card like information to the general public (aggregate data) and to the individual agencies and their contracted partner staff. (Page 84)

  • Provide on–going training for supervisors. Supervisors are brought to a central location at least biannually for a three–day training. The trainings focus on the multiple roles of a supervisor and provide updates on policy, data collection and more to ensure good communication.
  • Improve the quality of supported employment services by training ACCES–VR and supported employment providers on updated supported employment policy, procedures and guidelines to ensure the integrity and effectiveness of the supported employment program.
  • Provide a Management Community of Practice. ACCES–VR is collaborating with Cornell University, Employment Disability Institute for the provision of a community of practice training project for management level staff. (Page 228)

Secondary Data Analysis of Consumer Information System

The primary purpose of analyzing NYSCB’s Consumer Information System is to identify factors related to successful case closures and employment outcomes for NYSCB clients. Specifically this analysis explored the following research questions:

  1. What are the demographic and services-related factors that predict successful employment outcomes for NYSCB consumers? How do these vary by NYSCB district offices? How do local labor market conditions (e.g., county-level employment rate for people with disabilities) impact employment outcomes for NYSCB consumers?
  2. How do these differ between transition-age youth and adult population?
  3. How do these factors impact successful outcomes for NYSCB consumers who receive publicbenefits compared with their non-beneficiary peers? (Page 280)
Mental Health

ADDRESSING THE ACCESSIBILITY OF THE ONE-STOP DELIVERY SYSTEM FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 99)

Accessibility

Accessibility is an important component within the public workforce system. New York State assures that all partners in the workforce development system described in this plan recognize the importance of the physical, programmatic, and communications accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities and English language learners in the Career Centers.

Under WIA, NYSDOL’s Methods of Administration outlined the policies, procedures, and systems NYS designed and put in place in order to provide a reasonable guarantee that NYS and its recipients of Title I WIA funds complied with the Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity requirements of WIA Section 188 and its implementing regulations. It is still available online at http://www.labor.ny.gov/agencyinfo/moa/moa.shtm and will be revised in the coming months to reflect the new WIOA regulations.

Additionally, NYSDOL will revise a Technical Advisory (TA) on the topic of “Accessibility of One-Stop Systems to Individuals with Disabilities.” The TA on this topic, released under WIA on May 16, 2000, will be revised to reflect new accessibility regulations under WIOA. (Page 102)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 81 - 90 of 94

SWIB Quarterly Meeting Presentation

he slide presentation from this meeting of the New York State Workforce Investment Board includes material on Customized Employment, WIOA, and Work Readiness Credentials.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Talent Development and Training Online Resource Library

This site provides various instructional resources for agencies interested in delivering their own training, as well as resources for individual learners interested in developing their professional education.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

NYESS Funding and Employment

NYESS, an integral part of the Governor’s Employment First Initiative, is the largest employment network for people with disabilities in the United States. To date, $2.4 million from the Social Security Administration has been received by 100 New York State organizations which have assisted 7,755 individuals with disabilities with employment services, helping 1,366 individuals find permanent employment. This webpage includes a breakdown of the 100 organizations in receipt of the funds

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

OPWDD Supported Employment Services

“OPWDD is committed to doubling the number of individuals with developmental disabilities who are working in their communities. Supported Employment Providers are important partners in assisting individuals to achieve their employment goals.     OPWDD’s supported employment services include Supported Employment (SEMP), Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) and the Employment Training Program (ETP). Below you will find links to related program standards, templates for required documentation formats, contact information for our DDSO employment coordinators and information on training opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of your supported employment programs.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NY Disability Employment Initiative Grant Abstract - Round 1

The New York State Department of Labor will utilize their DEI project as their next generation approach building upon their significant commitment to expanded services under their former Disability Program Navigator grant. Collaborative activities include leveraging over $1 million in funds to further support DEI efforts, including $900,000 from the New York State Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities. The project will also be collaborating with the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, “New York Makes Work Pay,” with plans to implement a unified case management system to minimize duplication and promote blending and braiding of diverse resources. Asset development activities include the development of expertise in work incentive and benefits planning strategies. The state will host “Asset Development Summits” for stakeholders, beneficiaries of Social Security disability programs, the banking community, and others to discuss and share resources to enhance asset development awareness. The DEI project includes the establishment of approximately 13 Employment Networks in participating workforce investment areas.
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Provider Transformation

NY SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) (2001)

The goal of this project was to develop an IPS guidebook used by vocational staff members who are working with consumers who have expressed a clear interest in seeking employment.   The guidebook unifys clinical, rehabilitation and vocational services under one licensing entity.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Assembly Bill A8111 - 06/09/2015

“AN ACT to amend the civil service law, in relation to establishing a customized employment demonstration program for persons with disabilities...”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

NY Assembly Bill 6516: ABLE Legislation - 03/26/2015

 Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as the "New York achieving a better life experience (NY ABLE) savings account act".

§ 2.  Legislative intent. The legislative intent of this act is to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence and quality of life; and to provide secure funding for disability related expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through existing sources.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

N.Y. Civil Service Law §55-b: Workers with Disabilities Program

Section 55-b of the New York State Civil Service Law authorizes the New York State Civil Service Commission to designate up to 1,200 positions normally filled through competitive examination to be filled through the appointment of qualified persons with disabilities. (Section 55-c authorizes the designation of up to 500 positions in the non-competitive class to be filled by qualified wartime veterans with disabilities.) In general, an entry-level position that is filled only through an open-competitive examination (one open to the public) may be used for a 55-b or 55-c appointment.

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Governor’s Executive Order Number 136 “Establishing the New York Employment First Initiative to Increase Employment of New Yorkers with Disabilities” - 10/03/2014

…”NOW, THEREFORE, I, ANDREW M. CUOMO, Governor of the State of New York, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the State of New York, do hereby order as follows: …

 

B. Employment First Commission 1. There is hereby established the Employment First Commission (the “Commission”) to provide guidance and advice to the Governor regarding the competitive integrated employment of individuals with disabilities.   2. The members of the Commission shall be the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Health; the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Civil Rights; the Governor’s Deputy Secretary for Human Services; the Chief Diversity Officer; the Counsel to the Governor; the Director of the Budget; the Commissioner for Developmental Disabilities; the Commissioner of Health; the Commissioner of Mental Health; the Commissioner of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services; the Commissioner of Children and Family Services; the Commissioner of Labor; the Commissioner of Economic Development; the Commissioner of Transportation; the Commissioner of Temporary and Disability Assistance; the Director of Veterans’ Affairs; the Director of the State Office for Aging; and the Executive Director of the Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs. Additional members may be appointed to the Commission at the discretion of the Governor.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 21 - 30 of 30

App. B: Service Documentation Requirements for Enhanced Supported Employment Pilots - 10/01/2011

These are general definitions for services that may be provided to individuals through the Enhanced Supported Employment Pilot Project. They include Person Centered Vocational Planning: Comprehensive discovery process that assists the individual to identify their interests, capacities and strengths particular to the individualized employment planning process.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

2011 Interim Report on OPWDD State Plan - 02/15/2011

The objective of Employment First is to increase the number of people with developmental disabilities who are working in NYS. Many individuals could be successful in paying jobs with the appropriate level of supports, but for various reasons most individuals participate in other day programs. At the end of 2010, OPWDD supported 9,195 individuals in supported employment programs. Enhanced Supported Employment (ESEMP) is one of the projects offering employment opportunities to individuals who would not likely succeed or qualify for traditional supported employment. Individuals receive greater levels of support, which could consist of person-centered planning, job development or job coaching. Currently, 405 individuals participate in ESEMP, with 259 individuals successfully working in the community. OPWDD anticipates that approximately 700 individuals will participate in this pilot.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Start-UP New York - Inclusive Entrepreneurship - 06/01/2010

Adoption of Discovery and Customized Team Planning policies represents an adjustment to the way in which SSIC conducts entrepreneurial awareness. This process now includes an informal assessment of the appropriateness of entrepreneurship for its customers, as well as an orientation to the demands and realities of entrepreneurship. By imbuing their existing processes with the essential characteristics of Discovery (e.g., flexibility, focus on the career seeker, willingness to look beyond formal and formulaic assessments), the process has become more open, inclusive, and effective for all customers of SSIC.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Important Information for Veterans Receiving Payments Under the Compensated Work Therapy Program - 01/01/2009

~~“The Internal Revenue Service has announced that payments made under the Department of Veterans Affairs Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) program are no longer taxable by the federal government, and that veterans who paid federal income tax on these benefits may claim a refund for tax years 2004, 2005, or 2006. As a result, these benefit payments are no longer taxable by New York State.“

Systems
  • Other

New York ACCES-VR Policy 1301.00: Self-Employment Policy - 07/01/1988

“Establishing or maintaining a consumer in self-employment as a rehabilitation outcome allows the consumer to be productive and become financially independent and to contribute to the State's economic growth. Self-employment rehabilitations also allow the ACCES-VR counselor to be creative in the rehabilitation process. This policy defines the parameters of the ACCES-VR/consumer partnership needed to create a successful self-employment venture.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

NYESS Funding and Employment

NYESS, an integral part of the Governor’s Employment First Initiative, is the largest employment network for people with disabilities in the United States. To date, $2.4 million from the Social Security Administration has been received by 100 New York State organizations which have assisted 7,755 individuals with disabilities with employment services, helping 1,366 individuals find permanent employment. This webpage includes a breakdown of the 100 organizations in receipt of the funds

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Various Person Centered Planning Methodologies

“Person-centered planning supports people with disabilities to express their needs, wishes, and goals with methods that reflect their individual culture and communication style. The person centered planning process helps to generate opportunities for social inclusion (e.g., community membership, employment, personalized living arrangements, etc.) through inclusion and participation.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Understanding Person Centered Planning

“Person centered planning is the first step towards ensuring the delivery of person centered supports. Person centered planning promotes the belief that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are people first. They have valuable gifts and contributions to bring to relationships with family and friends, and the community as a whole. Person centered planning views the entire person; not just the portion of the person that has identified needs. In simple terms, person centered planning is an approach to forming life plans that are centered on the individual for whom they are built.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
Citations