Northern Mariana Islands [Territory]

States - Big Screen

"In the Middle of the Sea": Where the hope for competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities is as vast as the sea.

2016 State Population.
2.07%
Change from
2010 to 2016
55,023
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
1,905

General

2010 2016
Population. 53,883 55,023
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,905 N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 32
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 234

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 76
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 104
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 129
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 58.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
76
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 10
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 16
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 28
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 13
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 8
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 814
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 82.16%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 2.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.12%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 10.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.02%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.40%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 50.85%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Placement of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation to the Office of the Governor - 01/01/2019

~~“The Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  is  hereby  transferred  from  the  Department  of  Public  Health  and  placed  under  the  Office  of  the  Governor.  In  accordance  with  the  conditions  and  requirements  of  34  C.F.R.  §  361.13,  the  Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be the Designated State Agency and the Designated State Unit. At [a] minimum, the Director of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be responsible for: (1)  All  decisions  affecting  eligibility  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  the nature and scope of available services, and the provision of these services. (2) The determination to close the record of services of an individual who has achieved an employment outcome in accordance with 34 C.F.R. § 361.56. (3) Policy formulation and implementation. (4) The allocation and expenditure of vocational rehabilitation funds. The responsibility for these functions may not be delegated to any other agency  or  individual.  The  Director  of  the  Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  shall  also have signature authority for any agreements with the federal funding agency, the  state  plan  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  and  any  inter-agency  agreements.”

Systems
  • Other

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Placement of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation to the Office of the Governor - 01/01/2019

~~“The Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  is  hereby  transferred  from  the  Department  of  Public  Health  and  placed  under  the  Office  of  the  Governor.  In  accordance  with  the  conditions  and  requirements  of  34  C.F.R.  §  361.13,  the  Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be the Designated State Agency and the Designated State Unit. At [a] minimum, the Director of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be responsible for: (1)  All  decisions  affecting  eligibility  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  the nature and scope of available services, and the provision of these services. (2) The determination to close the record of services of an individual who has achieved an employment outcome in accordance with 34 C.F.R. § 361.56. (3) Policy formulation and implementation. (4) The allocation and expenditure of vocational rehabilitation funds. The responsibility for these functions may not be delegated to any other agency  or  individual.  The  Director  of  the  Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  shall  also have signature authority for any agreements with the federal funding agency, the  state  plan  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  and  any  inter-agency  agreements.”

Systems
  • Other

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

"In the Middle of the Sea": Where the hope for competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities is as vast as the sea.

2016 State Population.
2.07%
Change from
2010 to 2016
55,023
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
1,905

State Data

General

2010 2016
Population. 53,883 55,023
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,905 N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 32
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 234

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 76
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 104
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 129
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 58.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
76
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 10
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 16
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 28
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 13
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 8
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 814
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 82.16%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 2.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.12%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 10.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.02%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.40%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 50.85%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Placement of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation to the Office of the Governor - 01/01/2019

~~“The Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  is  hereby  transferred  from  the  Department  of  Public  Health  and  placed  under  the  Office  of  the  Governor.  In  accordance  with  the  conditions  and  requirements  of  34  C.F.R.  §  361.13,  the  Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be the Designated State Agency and the Designated State Unit. At [a] minimum, the Director of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be responsible for: (1)  All  decisions  affecting  eligibility  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  the nature and scope of available services, and the provision of these services. (2) The determination to close the record of services of an individual who has achieved an employment outcome in accordance with 34 C.F.R. § 361.56. (3) Policy formulation and implementation. (4) The allocation and expenditure of vocational rehabilitation funds. The responsibility for these functions may not be delegated to any other agency  or  individual.  The  Director  of  the  Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  shall  also have signature authority for any agreements with the federal funding agency, the  state  plan  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  and  any  inter-agency  agreements.”

Systems
  • Other

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Placement of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation to the Office of the Governor - 01/01/2019

~~“The Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  is  hereby  transferred  from  the  Department  of  Public  Health  and  placed  under  the  Office  of  the  Governor.  In  accordance  with  the  conditions  and  requirements  of  34  C.F.R.  §  361.13,  the  Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be the Designated State Agency and the Designated State Unit. At [a] minimum, the Director of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be responsible for: (1)  All  decisions  affecting  eligibility  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  the nature and scope of available services, and the provision of these services. (2) The determination to close the record of services of an individual who has achieved an employment outcome in accordance with 34 C.F.R. § 361.56. (3) Policy formulation and implementation. (4) The allocation and expenditure of vocational rehabilitation funds. The responsibility for these functions may not be delegated to any other agency  or  individual.  The  Director  of  the  Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  shall  also have signature authority for any agreements with the federal funding agency, the  state  plan  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  and  any  inter-agency  agreements.”

Systems
  • Other

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

"In the Middle of the Sea": Where the hope for competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities is as vast as the sea.

2016 State Population.
2.07%
Change from
2010 to 2016
55,023
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
1,905

State Data

General

2010 2016
Population. 53,883 55,023
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,905 N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 32
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 234

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 76
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 104
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 129
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 58.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
76
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 10
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 16
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 28
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 13
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 8
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 814
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 82.16%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 2.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.12%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 10.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.02%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.40%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 50.85%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Placement of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation to the Office of the Governor - 01/01/2019

~~“The Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  is  hereby  transferred  from  the  Department  of  Public  Health  and  placed  under  the  Office  of  the  Governor.  In  accordance  with  the  conditions  and  requirements  of  34  C.F.R.  §  361.13,  the  Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be the Designated State Agency and the Designated State Unit. At [a] minimum, the Director of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be responsible for: (1)  All  decisions  affecting  eligibility  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  the nature and scope of available services, and the provision of these services. (2) The determination to close the record of services of an individual who has achieved an employment outcome in accordance with 34 C.F.R. § 361.56. (3) Policy formulation and implementation. (4) The allocation and expenditure of vocational rehabilitation funds. The responsibility for these functions may not be delegated to any other agency  or  individual.  The  Director  of  the  Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  shall  also have signature authority for any agreements with the federal funding agency, the  state  plan  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  and  any  inter-agency  agreements.”

Systems
  • Other

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Placement of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation to the Office of the Governor - 01/01/2019

~~“The Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  is  hereby  transferred  from  the  Department  of  Public  Health  and  placed  under  the  Office  of  the  Governor.  In  accordance  with  the  conditions  and  requirements  of  34  C.F.R.  §  361.13,  the  Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be the Designated State Agency and the Designated State Unit. At [a] minimum, the Director of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be responsible for: (1)  All  decisions  affecting  eligibility  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  the nature and scope of available services, and the provision of these services. (2) The determination to close the record of services of an individual who has achieved an employment outcome in accordance with 34 C.F.R. § 361.56. (3) Policy formulation and implementation. (4) The allocation and expenditure of vocational rehabilitation funds. The responsibility for these functions may not be delegated to any other agency  or  individual.  The  Director  of  the  Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  shall  also have signature authority for any agreements with the federal funding agency, the  state  plan  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  and  any  inter-agency  agreements.”

Systems
  • Other

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phablet

Snapshot

"In the Middle of the Sea": Where the hope for competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities is as vast as the sea.

2016 State Population.
2.07%
Change from
2010 to 2016
55,023
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
1,905

State Data

General

2016
Population. 55,023
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 32
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 234

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 76
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 104
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 129
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 58.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
76
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 10
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 16
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 28
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 13
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 8
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 814
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 82.16%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 2.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.12%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 10.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.02%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.40%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 50.85%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Placement of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation to the Office of the Governor - 01/01/2019

~~“The Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  is  hereby  transferred  from  the  Department  of  Public  Health  and  placed  under  the  Office  of  the  Governor.  In  accordance  with  the  conditions  and  requirements  of  34  C.F.R.  §  361.13,  the  Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be the Designated State Agency and the Designated State Unit. At [a] minimum, the Director of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be responsible for: (1)  All  decisions  affecting  eligibility  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  the nature and scope of available services, and the provision of these services. (2) The determination to close the record of services of an individual who has achieved an employment outcome in accordance with 34 C.F.R. § 361.56. (3) Policy formulation and implementation. (4) The allocation and expenditure of vocational rehabilitation funds. The responsibility for these functions may not be delegated to any other agency  or  individual.  The  Director  of  the  Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  shall  also have signature authority for any agreements with the federal funding agency, the  state  plan  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  and  any  inter-agency  agreements.”

Systems
  • Other

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Placement of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation to the Office of the Governor - 01/01/2019

~~“The Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  is  hereby  transferred  from  the  Department  of  Public  Health  and  placed  under  the  Office  of  the  Governor.  In  accordance  with  the  conditions  and  requirements  of  34  C.F.R.  §  361.13,  the  Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be the Designated State Agency and the Designated State Unit. At [a] minimum, the Director of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be responsible for: (1)  All  decisions  affecting  eligibility  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  the nature and scope of available services, and the provision of these services. (2) The determination to close the record of services of an individual who has achieved an employment outcome in accordance with 34 C.F.R. § 361.56. (3) Policy formulation and implementation. (4) The allocation and expenditure of vocational rehabilitation funds. The responsibility for these functions may not be delegated to any other agency  or  individual.  The  Director  of  the  Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  shall  also have signature authority for any agreements with the federal funding agency, the  state  plan  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  and  any  inter-agency  agreements.”

Systems
  • Other

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phone

Snapshot

"In the Middle of the Sea": Where the hope for competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities is as vast as the sea.

2016 State Population.
2.07%
Change from
2010 to 2016
55,023
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
1,905

State Data

General

2016
Population. 55,023
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 32
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 234

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 76
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 104
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 129
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 58.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
76
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 10
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 16
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 28
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 13
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 8
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 814
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 82.16%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 2.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.12%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 10.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.02%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.40%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 50.85%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Placement of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation to the Office of the Governor - 01/01/2019

~~“The Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  is  hereby  transferred  from  the  Department  of  Public  Health  and  placed  under  the  Office  of  the  Governor.  In  accordance  with  the  conditions  and  requirements  of  34  C.F.R.  §  361.13,  the  Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be the Designated State Agency and the Designated State Unit. At [a] minimum, the Director of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be responsible for: (1)  All  decisions  affecting  eligibility  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  the nature and scope of available services, and the provision of these services. (2) The determination to close the record of services of an individual who has achieved an employment outcome in accordance with 34 C.F.R. § 361.56. (3) Policy formulation and implementation. (4) The allocation and expenditure of vocational rehabilitation funds. The responsibility for these functions may not be delegated to any other agency  or  individual.  The  Director  of  the  Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  shall  also have signature authority for any agreements with the federal funding agency, the  state  plan  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  and  any  inter-agency  agreements.”

Systems
  • Other

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Placement of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation to the Office of the Governor - 01/01/2019

~~“The Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  is  hereby  transferred  from  the  Department  of  Public  Health  and  placed  under  the  Office  of  the  Governor.  In  accordance  with  the  conditions  and  requirements  of  34  C.F.R.  §  361.13,  the  Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be the Designated State Agency and the Designated State Unit. At [a] minimum, the Director of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation shall be responsible for: (1)  All  decisions  affecting  eligibility  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  the nature and scope of available services, and the provision of these services. (2) The determination to close the record of services of an individual who has achieved an employment outcome in accordance with 34 C.F.R. § 361.56. (3) Policy formulation and implementation. (4) The allocation and expenditure of vocational rehabilitation funds. The responsibility for these functions may not be delegated to any other agency  or  individual.  The  Director  of  the  Office  of  Vocational  Rehabilitation  shall  also have signature authority for any agreements with the federal funding agency, the  state  plan  for  vocational  rehabilitation  services,  and  any  inter-agency  agreements.”

Systems
  • Other

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies