Ohio

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 In Ohio Employment First is for "Every person. Every talent. Every opportunity

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Ohio’s Vocational VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.17%
Change from
2014 to 2015
11,613,423
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.87%
Change from
2014 to 2015
847,932
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.55%
Change from
2014 to 2015
298,233
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.71%
Change from
2014 to 2015
35.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.85%
Change from
2014 to 2015
77.69%

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 11,570,808 11,594,163 11,613,423
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 838,715 840,550 847,932
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 281,190 290,618 298,233
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,731,444 4,791,851 4,814,281
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.53% 34.57% 35.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.90% 77.03% 77.69%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.50% 5.70% 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.40% 24.50% 23.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.60% 14.40% 13.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 757,422 757,995 758,987
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 797,926 826,926 834,325
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,280,507 1,299,416 1,310,817
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 213,961 219,636 215,042
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 38,208 43,002 42,867
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,711 5,074 4,523
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 11,488 13,582 12,705
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 507
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 35,647 37,460 40,094
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 8,602 9,550 9,624

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 17,636 17,715 18,435
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.90% 5.90% 6.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 391,634 356,270 356,826

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 15,173 13,078 10,079
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 45,183 37,954 28,199
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 101,112 61,441 47,662
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.00% 21.30% 21.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.00% 2.40% 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.70% 0.20% 2.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,195 2,684 3,450
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,866 228 3,037
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,029 1,747 719
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.00 0.02 0.00

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 124 114 135
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 78 80 85
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00% 70.00% 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.68 0.69 0.73

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
9,219
N/A
12,039
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 702 N/A 908
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 375 N/A 760
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,592 N/A 2,252
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 220 N/A 3,533
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 3,369 N/A 3,718
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 979 N/A 868
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 15.70% 20.40% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 10,447 10,377
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 565,019 570,448
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 375 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 537 684 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $94,107,000 $95,953,000 $91,872,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $152,373,000 $141,254,000 $132,663,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $505,222,000 $522,830,000 $539,890,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 22.00% 21.00% 22.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 17,686 18,591 17,902
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 13,707 14,218 13,537
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 60.90 63.40 64.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 62.00% 62.81% 63.92%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.70% 11.83% 11.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.10% 4.33% 4.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.50% 99.26% 99.34%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 34.80% 33.70% 29.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 70.60% 69.87% 66.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 79.30% 78.38% 81.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.80% 36.17% 37.18%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,552,533
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 4,128
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 175,646
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 500,082
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 675,727
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 233
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 531
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 764
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,787,410
AbilityOne wages (services). $6,697,054

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 124 62
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 64
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 21
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 8,076
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 8,097

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Employment First, Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities, Assistive Technology of Ohio, and the Ohio Departments of Aging, Developmental Disabilities, Job and Family Services, Medicaid, and Mental Health and Addiction Services collaborated on the creation of the site. (Page 46)

Transition services are funded by the various state agencies that serve the individual youth in accordance with requirements under WIOA, IDEA and other pertinent laws. In addition to the Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Ohio’s Employment First Task Force works across multiple systems to align policies and practices and issues guidance to the field as needed to ensure that students receive the services needed to ensure achievement of employment and other post-secondary outcomes. (Page 150)

In FFY 2013, OOD in partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) established a dual certification program as part of the Employment First Partnership Agreement. This dual certification program is designed to ensure continuity of services and allow for more successful transition from time–limited to long–term supports. In addition, it is designed to better respond to the needs of individuals served by the program as well as our business partners.151-allowing them to provide VR services to individuals being served by OOD in the Employment First Partnership. Performance–based job development is utilized to ensure a more outcome–focused method of service provision. Staff providing services under this waiver must pass an online course and attend mandatory trainings on VR services, fee schedules, billing, and reporting expectations before they can begin providing services. They must also attend in–person trainings on employer engagement and on–the–job supports within one year of passing the online supported employment web course to continue providing services. (Page 151-152)

As mentioned previously, OOD partners with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) to expand vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to individuals with developmental disabilities as part of the state’s overall Employment First Initiative. It also should be noted that DODD is the lead agency for Ohio’s Employment First initiative, which was signed by Governor Kasich in March 2012. OOD is an active member of the Employment First Task Force, which is examining existing practices in the state system to identify and address barriers to employment for people with developmental and other disabilities. (Page 157)

In 2015 and continuing into 2016, Ohio has been selected as a core state in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. Through this grant, which is funded through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), the Employment First Taskforce has identified action steps that each agency will complete to promote the core principles for transition in Ohio:

  • Competitive, integrated employment is expectation for all youth with disabilities;
  • Transition planning for youth requires multi–agency collaboration;
  • Early dialogue with individuals and families is critical to ensuring employment outcomes;
  • There are multiple pathways to employment; and
  • Person–centered planning is key to the development of effective services and supports for transition–age youth. (Page 158)

OOD will provide targeted training to enhance personnel development. This will include targeted training on Employment First, supported employment, eligibility, transition procedures and clarification of roles and responsibilities of OOD and school personnel. (Page 160)

Mental health: OOD’s service provision is higher for individuals with psychosocial and cognitive impairments. This is most likely explained by the fact that OOD in the past four years has concentrated efforts through focused contracts with local Mental Health and Drug Addiction boards, local Developmental Disabilities boards, and most recently through the Ohio Department Developmental Disabilities funding for Employment First. Each of these populations also has an organized representative presence through established county public agencies across the state. (Page 169)

OOD has several Interagency Agreements that are designed to implement service delivery models that will increase outcomes for specific populations served by the VR program. The Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and the Ohio Transition Support Program with the Ohio Department of Education are both examples of this. (Page 179)

Employment First Partnership Agreement: OOD has continued its Employment First (EF) Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities. OOD has expanded the number of VR counselors providing services under the agreement from 15 to 25 counselors during this time period. In FFY 2015, the EF program exceeded all performance goals. This includes exceeding its rehabilitation goal by 150 percent and its plan development goal by 200 percent. (Page184) and (Page 186)

Employment (second and fourth Quarter after exit): Adult and Dislocated Worker: Historical WIA data exists for these cohorts for us to use in calculations and projections. Applying the employed second quarter after exit to the historical WIA population yields only a modest difference between WIA’s entered employment first quarter after exit and WIOA’s employment second quarter after exit for these two cohorts. Therefore, we propose using the PY 2015 WIA common measure level as a starting point for establishing a performance history for the second quarter after exit measure. For the fourth quarter after exit, (Page 310)

Customized Employment

Other VR or support services needed to ensure success in community employment;

  • Follow–up and monitoring of job performance during the stabilization process;
  • Discrete post–employment services not commonly available from those who provide extended services;
  • Identification and development/facilitation of natural supports; and
  • Customized employment. (Page 188)
Braiding/Blending Resources

Disability resource coordinator staff in OhioMeansJobs centers implemented Ohio’s strategic components, which included deploying integrated resource teams, leveraging partner funds and resources, customized employment, and asset development. Through this initiative OhioMeansAccessibility.com was added to OhioMeansJob.com. (Page 284)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

How the local board will facilitate access to services provided through the OhioMeansJobs delivery system through the use of technology and other means;

  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities. (Page 348)
  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities;
  • How the local board will coordinate with the regional JobsOhio; and
  • The roles and resource contributions of the OhioMeansJobs center partners. 351 Ohio’s standards for OhioMeansJobs center certification also will include requirements to not only comply with the ADA, but also Sec 188 of WIOA. Certification will require OhioMeansJobs staff to receive training to understand and better serve individuals with disabilities. Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Pages 84-85)
DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

One In 2011, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) received a three–year Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) demonstration grant project to improve the education, training, and employment opportunities and outcomes for adults who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Three OhioMeansJobs centers in Cleveland, Portsmouth and Toledo operated the DEI grant project. Disability resource coordinator staff in OhioMeansJobs centers implemented Ohio’s strategic components, which included deploying integrated resource teams, leveraging partner funds and resources, customized employment, and asset development. Through this initiative OhioMeansAccessibility.com was added to OhioMeansJobs.com. (Page 248)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

OOD projects a continued need to hire VR staff in the above referenced classifications over the course of this Combined State Plan. OOD prioritizes the use of available resources to hire direct service personnel and therefore, the greatest area of need will likely continue to be VR counselors and caseload assistants as well as supervisory staff. OOD has been aggressively pursuing strategies to improve the cost effectiveness of the VR program. Identified cost savings are reinvested strategically to further improve performance for the VR program. A projected area of increased need over the course of this plan will likely be for staff hired to provide “in–house” job development and/or work incentives counseling services. OOD has been piloting these new service delivery models during FFY 2015 and, based upon the success of the pilots, is poised to increase investments in this area. (Page 160)

In FFY 2015, OOD piloted the provision of both job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning) services through “in–house” personnel. OOD is currently in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots to determine the extent to which they resulted in increased outcomes and reduced time to placement. It is anticipated that OOD will expand the use of this service delivery model over the course of this Combined State Plan. (Page 179)In–House Service Delivery: In FFY 2015, OOD conducted in–house service delivery pilots in the areas of job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning). OOD is in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots and expects to expand this service delivery model in FFY 2016. (Page 184)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Follow–up services for not less than 12 months;

  • Comprehensive guidance and counseling;
  • Financial literacy education;
  • Entrepreneurial skills training;
  • Labor market and employment information; and
  • Activities to prepare for and transition to post–secondary education and training.

These services will be made available and/or will be provided through the procured youth provider. Assurance that all local workforce development areas and the lead agency are making the 14 program elements available and implemented will be done through the state monitoring program. (Page 101)

Through collaboration with local workforce development partners and alignment with the regional or local plan, ABLE programs will assist English language learners with career goals by offering integrated English literacy and civics education concurrently with integrated education and training as part of a career pathway. Integrated education and training will focus on in–demand occupations that lead to economic self–sufficiency. Successful career pathways, leading to educational and career advancement for ABLE students, will require coordinated design, delivery, and evaluation amongst all local workforce development partners In PY2016, ODHE will plan and coordinate with state-level workforce development partners to provide guidance and technical assistance to eligible providers who seek to implement, beginning PY2017, an IELCE program in combination with integrated education and training under section 243. (Page 136)

Benefits

Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence;

  • Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross–agency planning and earlier career preparation; and
  • Improves strategies to ensure that students with disabilities secure employment prior to graduation and connect with long–term supports services when needed and available to ensure long term success.
  • Educates parents and youth on work incentives planning by comparing benefits of work versus SSI. (Page 37)

OOD has traditionally relied fully on fee for service purchasing of VR services from Community Rehabilitation Programs. In FFY 2015, OOD piloted the provision of both job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning) services through “in–house” personnel. OOD is currently in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots to determine the extent to which they resulted in increased outcomes and reduced time to placement. It is anticipated that OOD will expand the use of this service delivery model over the course of this Combined State Plan. (Page 179)

School to Work Transition

Under WIA, the vocational rehabilitation (VR) program was evaluated by standards and indicators unique to the VR program. OOD has met compliance with program standards and indicators, which relate to the number and quality of employment outcomes achieved by the program. As noted previously, OOD is currently in the process of making changes in its case management system to align with the common measures under WIOA. In addition baseline data related to the common measures is being established and evaluated. It should be noted that for newly required data elements, such as skill gains and attainment, a period of data collection will be required to establish this baseline data. (Page 147)

Data Collection

Under Title IV’s OhioMeansJobs Center partner program, OOD’s vocational rehabilitation program’s case management system – AWARE – is used by approximately 37 state vocational rehabilitation agencies nationwide. OOD also partners with ODJFS to obtain Ohio employment verification and wage data. It should be noted that access to only Ohio wage information limits the VR program from accurately identifying the full population of individuals employed after receiving services (i.e., individuals who may be employed out of state with a federal agency or as an independent contractor are not in the Ohio wage file). OOD will continue to research opportunities to develop additional data collection activities that will support the accurate identification of the full population of individuals employed after receiving vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 62)

Under Title II’s OhioMeansJobs partner program, the ABLELink system is ABLE’s online student information management system. The system collects student information for local program (Page 62)

The vocational rehabilitation program, in accordance with WIOA requirements, is currently in the process of making changes to its case management system and data collection activities to align with common measures. In addition, OOD is collecting and evaluating baseline performance data to prepare for the negotiation of performance levels with the Rehabilitation Services Administration. (Page 69)

Under WIA, the vocational rehabilitation (VR) program was evaluated by standards and indicators unique to the VR program. OOD has met compliance with program standards and indicators, which relate to the number and quality of employment outcomes achieved by the program. As noted previously, OOD is currently in the process of making changes in its case management system to align with the common measures under WIOA. In addition baseline data related to the common measures is being established and evaluated. It should be noted that for newly required data elements, such as skill gains and attainment, a period of data collection will be required to establish this baseline data. (Page 73)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Using the vision of a workforce system that is driven by the needs of business, adaptive to rapid change, innovative and integrated in design and delivery, and entrepreneurial in spirit as its starting point, through OWT, the state prioritized its work into goals for preparing an educated and skilled workforce, including youth and individuals with barriers to employment and other populations, and the goals for meeting the skilled workforce needs of employers. The state established three strategic goals to accomplish WIOA’s primary purposes: (Page 36)

How the local board will strategize to implement the goals and reform principles of the Combined State Plan.

5.The examination of how the local board will coordinate local workforce developmentactivities with regional economic development activities that are carried out in the localarea and how the local board will promote entrepreneurial skills training andmicroenterprise services.

6. An explanation of the OhioMeansJobs delivery system in the local area, including:

  • How the local board will ensure the continuous improvement of eligible providers ofservices through the system and that such providers will meet the employment needs oflocal employers, workers, and jobseekers (Page 348)
  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities;
  • How the local board will coordinate with the regional JobsOhio; and
  • The roles and resource contributions of the OhioMeansJobs center partners. (Page 351)

Ohio’s standards for OhioMeansJobs center certification also will include requirements to not only comply with the ADA, but also Sec 188 of WIOA. Certification will require OhioMeansJobs staff to receive training to understand and better serve individuals with disabilities. Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Pages 84-85)

Many small businesses get their start and/or are supported by local business incubators, chambers of commerce and small business development centers. ODA and Ohio’s SCSEP operators will continue to cultivate relationships with these organizations at the local and state levels and where appropriate develop host–agency relationships. By serving as host agencies and utilizing SCSEP participates these organizations can highlight the benefits of older workers to their members and constituencies and make the SCSEP program a referral source for unsubsidized employment. (Page 278)

Career Pathways

ABLE is Ohio’s front–line program to help adults without a high school diploma or equivalency. ABLE is the foundation on which workforce education is built, therefore providing the fundamental skills for individuals to be successful in job training and employment. Remedial services provided through ABLE are contextualized to meet the diverse needs of individuals’ career pathways. The single biggest challenge the ABLE program faces in Ohio is a lack of awareness about what ABLE is and the wide–range of free services the program provides. (Pages 27-28)

Ohio’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) program is aligning its on–the–job training strategy and policies with Title I employment and training and Trade Adjustment Assistance programs for seamless service delivery for businesses. The VR program also is working to increase utilization and access to the Workforce Inventory of Education and Training – Ohio’s eligible training provider system – which includes connection with apprenticeship programs. To further that connection, VR is working with Ohio’s Apprenticeship Council to develop career pathways for transitioning youth to enter into the programs. (Page 32)

  • All state-approved secondary career-technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS);
  • Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state-approved career-technical program and for state weighted career-technical funding.
  • The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS.
  • A secondary program that operates under a state-approved POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria;
  • Once all secondary programs operate under a state-approved POS and meet QPS, all programs can also be identified as Tech Prep programs;
  • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students;
  • Effective academic/career counseling and effective Individual Education Plan (IEP) development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs;
  • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success;
  • High expectations will be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers;”
    • A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high level academic and technical achievement.
    • A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. (Page 249)
Employment Networks

Aligning and implementing the best practices of the current and future Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects. Commerce, ICCB, and Department of Human Services Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) have worked with regional and local partners to increase the participation of individuals with disabilities (aged 18 and above) in integrated career pathway and academic programs through community colleges and non-profit organizations in cooperation with American Job Centers, Local Workforce Innovation Boards (LWIB), employment networks and other regional partners. (Page 135)

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2017 Transformation Series: Building Innovative Service Models - 05/01/2017

“Ohio's continued efforts to assist every individual of working age to gain community-based employment is largely supported by provider agencies across the state. These agencies are collectively working through a systems change process that will enable the strengthening and support of community-based service options for individuals with disabilities. The 2017 Transformation Series provides an opportunity for provider agencies to gather and share ideas, strategies, and practices that will assist them as they move through the systems change process and help improve person-centered planning and employment opportunities for individuals across Ohio.

Efforts are focused on two face-to-face events in the spring of 2017:

Phase 1: Provider Agency Site Visits

Phase 2: 2017 Transformation Summit”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

DOL - 08/03/2016

WIASRD elements for IWT: Waiver to allow states to discontinue collection of 7 WIASRD data elements for incumbent workers. requested: 9/12 decided: 12/12 expires: 6/17

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Citations

Ohio 2016-2017 Budget: Historic Investments for Ohioans with Developmental Disabilities - 07/01/2016

"Governor Kasich’s historic budget invests $286 million ($116.5 million State share) over the next two years to increase opportunities for Ohioans with disabilities to live and work in the community. The initiatives in this budget expand supports for those who are waiting for services, increase opportunities for community participation, and improve the experience for those who are receiving services by modernizing our programs and strengthening the direct care force….

The budget continues to prioritize funding to reflect the growing demand for Home and Community-Based Services. Funding will allow DODD to add nursing services to the IO waiver to enable people with medical needs to live in community settings, provide for much-deserved increase for direct care staff, increase the availability of add-on services for individuals with complex needs and behavioral challenges, provide training for those who receive, plan, and deliver waiver services, and strengthen oversight and quality assurance efforts so the person-centered plan is delivering meaningful outcomes."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Rights OH, National Federation of the Blind, and Autistic Self Advocacy Network Celebrate Landmark Decision Ordering Fair Pay - 02/03/2016

COLUMBUS, OHIO – In a precedent-setting opinion issued by an administrative law judge from the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL), three clients have been awarded minimum wage going forward and back pay from Seneca Re-Ad, a sheltered workshop run by the Seneca County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The original petition was filed by Disability Rights Ohio (DRO), the National Federation of the Blind, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and the Baltimore law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Fair Pay from Sheltered Workshops (2016) - 02/02/2016

This case arises under Section 214(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act ("Act"), 29 U.S.C. §214(c). Ralph ("Joe") Magers, Pamela Steward and Mark Felton ("Petitioners") are employees of Seneca Re-Ad Industries ("Respondent"), which is located in Fostoria, Ohio. Each of the Petitioners has been diagnosed with one or more developmental disabilities and each receives services from the Seneca County (Ohio) Board of Developmental Disabilities ("DD").  Employment at Respondent's Fostoria manufacturing facility is one of the services provided by DD.  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Employment First Project Update (February 2016) - 02/01/2016

“As part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Transition plan, services and rates are being updated for Adult Day waiver services. Input was gathered from community forums and stakeholder workgroups throughout 2014 and 2015. These new services will be focused on person centered planning and individual outcomes. New services will start being used on October 1, 2016.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio VR Provider Manual - 11/23/2015

The VR Provider Manual provides service descriptions and requirements for services including career exploration, job development, retention, job seeking skills training, and customized employment, among others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio HB 155 - 10/15/2015

A bill to amend section 2329.66 and to enact sections 113.50, 113.51, 113.52, 113.53, 113.54, 113.55, and 113.56 of the Revised Code to require the Treasurer of State to create a program [ABLE] offering federally tax-advantaged savings accounts used to pay for a person's qualified disability expenses and to disregard the value of and income from that account in determining whether that person is eligible for state or local means-tested public assistance.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Ohio HB 155 - 10/15/2015

A bill to amend section 2329.66 and to enact sections 113.50, 113.51, 113.52, 113.53, 113.54, 113.55, and 113.56 of the Revised Code to require the Treasurer of State to create a program [ABLE] offering federally tax-advantaged savings accounts used to pay for a person's qualified disability expenses and to disregard the value of and income from that account in determining whether that person is eligible for state or local means-tested public assistance.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Ohio SB 316: IEP and Post-secondary Transition Requirements - 09/24/2012

Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is fourteen years of age, and update annually thereafter, a statement describing:

Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills; Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described in divisions (H)(1) and (2) of this section.

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Rev. Code §5126.05: County Board - Powers & Duties - 09/24/2012

“Implement an employment first policy that clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age who receives services from the board…”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

5123.022 OH State Policy Regarding Community Employment for Disabled - 09/24/2012

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of this state that employment services for individuals with developmental disabilities be directed at community employment. Every individual with a developmental disability is presumed capable of community employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OH Rev. Code Ann. §§123.152 - Encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program. - 09/29/2005

As used in this section, "EDGE business enterprise" means a sole proprietorship, association, partnership, corporation, limited liability corporation, or joint venture certified as a participant in the encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program by the director of administrative services under this section of the Revised Code.   Social disadvantage based on any of the following:  - A rebuttable presumption when the business owner or owners demonstrate membership in a racial minority group or show personal disadvantage due to color, ethnic origin, gender, physical disability, long-term residence in an environment isolated from the mainstream of American society, location in an area of high unemployment;   
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Ohio Employment First Executive Order - 03/19/2012

All state agencies providing supports and services to Ohio’s individuals with developmental disabilities are required to align policies and procedures to support community employment and fulfill the Employment First requirement that community employment is the preferred outcome for working-age adults.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Ohio 2016-2017 Budget: Historic Investments for Ohioans with Developmental Disabilities - 07/01/2016

"Governor Kasich’s historic budget invests $286 million ($116.5 million State share) over the next two years to increase opportunities for Ohioans with disabilities to live and work in the community. The initiatives in this budget expand supports for those who are waiting for services, increase opportunities for community participation, and improve the experience for those who are receiving services by modernizing our programs and strengthening the direct care force….

The budget continues to prioritize funding to reflect the growing demand for Home and Community-Based Services. Funding will allow DODD to add nursing services to the IO waiver to enable people with medical needs to live in community settings, provide for much-deserved increase for direct care staff, increase the availability of add-on services for individuals with complex needs and behavioral challenges, provide training for those who receive, plan, and deliver waiver services, and strengthen oversight and quality assurance efforts so the person-centered plan is delivering meaningful outcomes."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment First Project Update (February 2016) - 02/01/2016

“As part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Transition plan, services and rates are being updated for Adult Day waiver services. Input was gathered from community forums and stakeholder workgroups throughout 2014 and 2015. These new services will be focused on person centered planning and individual outcomes. New services will start being used on October 1, 2016.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio VR Provider Manual - 11/23/2015

The VR Provider Manual provides service descriptions and requirements for services including career exploration, job development, retention, job seeking skills training, and customized employment, among others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

OH Vocational Rehabilitation Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment - 09/30/2015

“Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD), Division of Performance and Innovation (DPI), produced this 2015 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) building upon the framework methodology developed from the 2012 CSNA, which was designed to assess the vocational rehabilitation (VR) service needs of individuals related to six primary disability categories. These disabilities include visual impairments, hearing impairments, communicative impairments, physical impairments, psychosocial impairments and cognitive impairments. This methodology focuses on penetration rates (of the extent to which OOD was serving prospective jobseekers with disabilities), and proportionality (how well OOD is balanced in serving the cross-section of individuals with disabilities who are seeking employment).” The VR sets forth 9 recommendations to be set as priorities over the next year in order to improve integrated employment opportunities and community inclusion.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan (VR Rehabilitation Services Program) - FY 2015 - 09/30/2014

The State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program: Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 states that staff should build competencies on, and promote the employment practices such as customized employment, self-employment, and supported employment, among others.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Guide to Policy and Procedure Development - 07/31/2014

"The Employment First Rule, 5123: 2-2-05, requires county boards to adopt and implement a local Employment First Policy which clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age. The following is guidance developed in response to multiple requests from county boards."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Funding System Re-Design for Ohio’s Employment First Initiative: Review of Promising Models from Other States - 06/02/2014

This report aims to provide DODD with a comparison of funding structures from multiple states with high rates of integrated employment, including at least one state with a local tax base funding structure. The first 3 Key Principles for establishing a funding system to support Employment First uphold that, “The system should be based upon a presumption of competency, employability and ‘zero reject’ for each person with a disability, regardless of complexity; The system should reward providers for best practice implementation of Individual Supported Employment; [and] The system should require provider standards and staff training/certification to assure equal statewide access to and opportunity for Individual Supported Employment.” There are 9 principles in total that guide that together guide the structure and implementation of Employment First.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Administrative Rule (5123: 2-2-05) - 04/01/2014

“The purpose of this rule is to implement the employment first policy in accordance with section 5123.022 of the Revised Code… This rule applies to county boards of developmental disabilities and providers responsible for planning, coordinating, or providing employment services, regardless of funding source, to individuals with developmental disabilities.”

·       Community Employment is competitive employment that takes place in an integrated setting

·       Every individual of working age will have a person-centered planning process to identify their desired employment outcome and their place on the path to community employment

·       Services and supports will be provided to help the individual move along the path to community employment

·       County boards are required to develop and implement an Employment First policy, set benchmarks to increase community employment outcomes, partner with schools to enhance transition planning, share information with individuals, families, schools, employers, providers and others in the community about Medicaid Buy-In, and collect employment data on individuals served

·       Providers are required to submit progress reports at least every 12 months to ensure the individual is moving along the path to community employment and collect employment data on individuals served

   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio's Path to Employment First - 02/01/2014

“Successful implementation of Employment First requires a multi-pronged approach and a long-term commitment to systems change…. A comprehensive approach must focus on key strategies; all designed to work synergistically to impact a service structure that better supports people to achieve community employment and directs more resources toward that preferred outcome.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio - “New Requirements for Secondary Transition Services for Students with Disabilities: Frequently Asked Questions” - 09/19/2012

The New Requirements state that IEPs must start at age 14, update annually and contain,

“Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills;  Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; and The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described [above]…”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP) - 09/01/2015

"The Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities are partnering to improve post-secondary outcomes for students with disabilities, beginning at age 14. This innovative collaboration will change the nature and impact of transition services for students with disabilities in Ohio. The new model will help students with disabilities get a head start on becoming job ready and better prepared to enter the workforce with the skills necessary to be successful in today’s workforce."

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

People First of OH comments in response to "Ohio's Draft Plan to Comply with New Federal Horne and Community-Based Services Requirements” - 01/20/2015

ORO is submitting these comments to "Ohio's Draft Plan to Comply with New Federal Home and Community-Based Services Requirements," which was released to the public o n December 15, 2014.   The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ("CMS") has issued new rules for states'1915( c) home and community-based services (" HCBS") waiver programs ("waiver programs"), defining for the first time "home and community-based settings" eligible for continued federal waiver funding. CMS has required states to create transition plans specifying how they will comply with these new rules and to allow the public to provide input on their proposed plans before they are finalized.”   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

People First of Ohio Call to Action: “Blazing New Trails to Employment” - 04/25/2012

“People First's employment "Call to Action" and its regional forums brought together hundreds of self-advocates, family members, county board staff, providers, and staff from the Rehabilitation Services Commission and the Ohio Legal Rights Service, to understand Ohio's transition and job service systems; hear about the types of jobs and training people with developmental and intellectual disabilities (DD/ID) want; and plan for more job opportunities, and better wages and benefits for people with disabilities. People First fully supports the Governor's Executive Order 2012-0SK to make Ohio an "Employment First" state.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

VR SE Partnership

This booklet outlines implementation strategies for collaboration between local offices of state vocational rehabilitation (VR) services and mental health service organizations that provide Supported Employment, the evidence-based practice (SE-EBP), to consumers who have a severe mental illness. Strategies for the VR and SE partnership are organized into three stages of collaboration.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Mental Illness/Developmental Disabilities (MIDD) Coordinating Center of Excellence

“The MIDD CCOE promotes clinical best practices for individuals with mental illness and developmental disabilities. It is a collaborate effort involving ODMH, the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, and the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.  With the goal of providing appropriate treatment for individuals with co-occurring mental illness and developmental disabilities, the CCOE assists local systems throughout Ohio to increase their service capacity and foster collaboration.”   Supported Employment “Supported Employment/Individual Placement and Support (SE/IPS) is an evidence-based practice that helps people with mental illness and other disabilities identify and acquire part-time or full-time jobs of their choice in the community with rapid job-search and placement services. It emphasizes that employment is not the result of treatment and recovery but integral to both. SE/IPS is different from traditional vocational rehabilitation. It emphasizes consumer choice and utilizes rapid job-search and placement services, time-unlimited and individualized follow-along services, and many other important strategies.”  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio NAMI Supported Employment Family Advocacy Project

“This collaboration between NAMI Ohio and the Ohio Department of Mental Health engages families of individuals with mental illness to advocate for, create and expand high-quality Individual Placement and Support (IPS) programs. Family involvement can strengthen the partnerships between providers, family members and consumers around SE services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Partnership for Employment First Guide

The Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, in partnership with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities Agency, has announced a statewide initiative to expand community employment services for people with developmental disabilities. This opportunity will allow the state to maximize resources to support more people on their path to community employment, build system capacity, and strengthen the relationship between the developmental disability and vocational rehabilitation systems in Ohio.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Ohio Employment First Taskforce Common Principles

“The Ohio Employment First Taskforce agencies agree that community employment should be the first option for all working age adults and transition-age youth with developmental disabilities. Employment First is a philosophy of service that presumes that all Ohioans with significant disabilities can and should have opportunities to work in the community”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Mental Health and Addiction Services (Ohio MHAS) Supported Employment Project - 07/01/2014

"Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services (MHAS) and its partners are implementing the Supported Employment Project. This project reduces the high unemployment rates for young adults and adults with a severe and persistent mental illness who may have co-occurring substance use disorders.

Two local sites are implementing new programs, and a committee will oversee statewide training, policy changes, and evaluation. The evidence-based practice of Individual Placement and Support employment is being shared statewide through training and technical assistance."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Workplace Initiative Ohio - 11/01/2013

"The Central Ohio Workplace Initiative has been renamed the Workplace initiative of Ohio (WIO) to reflect the expansion of the family foundation funded project across the state.  The purpose of the Workplace Initiative of Ohio (WIO) is to create demand among Ohio businesses for talented career seekers with disabilities in healthcare, hospitality, distribution, banking, retail, and other industries. Employers benefit from streamlined candidate sourcing, pre-screening, training assistance and more.

On November 1, 2013, OHBLN and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) began working on a project funded by a grant from a private foundation concerned about the high unemployment rate of individuals with disabilities. The purpose of WIO is to work with businesses to create demand for qualified job seekers with disabilities in distribution, retail, health care and other industries."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OCALI Customized Employment Project - 03/01/2009

"With funding from the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), OCALI launched a customized employment project in March 2009 for two school based transition teams, Claymont High School with Tuscarawas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and Huber Heights High School with Montgomery County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The goal of the project was to increase community employment outcomes for transition aged youth using customized employment strategies and processes. Team members received training and consultation in the CE process, Social Security Work Incentives and working with employers. Teams included school, developmental disability, and vocational rehabilitation staff, plus a parent mentor. In November of 2009 the project received additional funding from DODD to add another team from Lucas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and to provide up to 40 paid internships for youth with disabilities using customized employment strategies and processes in the Lucas County and Montgomery County sites. The Tuscarawas County site obtained funding from DODD, “We Go To Work Grants” to fund resource ownership as an employment strategy."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Disability Employment Initiative

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2011, was awarded a Round 2 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This grant ended in 2014.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Ohio Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The…grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities”. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 40,500 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2013.  The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

2017 Transformation Series: Building Innovative Service Models - 05/01/2017

“Ohio's continued efforts to assist every individual of working age to gain community-based employment is largely supported by provider agencies across the state. These agencies are collectively working through a systems change process that will enable the strengthening and support of community-based service options for individuals with disabilities. The 2017 Transformation Series provides an opportunity for provider agencies to gather and share ideas, strategies, and practices that will assist them as they move through the systems change process and help improve person-centered planning and employment opportunities for individuals across Ohio.

Efforts are focused on two face-to-face events in the spring of 2017:

Phase 1: Provider Agency Site Visits

Phase 2: 2017 Transformation Summit”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio RSC Customized Employment, Griffin Hammis Associates, LLC - 01/25/2012

This video on the Ohio RSC Customized Employment Project includes testimonials from staff, leaders, and job seekers and business owners who have benefited from the program. It is both an interesting description of, and a compelling case for, Customized Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Ohio Employment First Transition Framework

"Ohio Employment First Transition Framework is a critical component to the Ohio Employment First structure and is intended to address barriers to transition planning and services in order to achieve meaningful adult outcomes. The Framework was developed by stakeholders from multiple agencies to create processes and highlight practices that can be used by all agencies. These common processes assist professionals to plan, prepare, empower, educate, and connect across systems so as to consistently assist youth with disabilities to realize meaningful, community employment and other valued aspects of adult life.

The Framework is built on three non-negotiable foundational elements that together create a 'filter' to examine the practices and procedures used when working and supporting transition youth. The foundational elements for the activity and practices of the Framework are:

Person-centered. The youth is where the team efforts begin and end. Policies and practices must be flexible enough to respond to individual strengths and needs. Agency-neutral. As agencies come together to collaborate, activity should occur in a manner where all involved see value for the youth and no single agency policies or procedures are considered the priority. Outcome-focused. The common focus of the collaborative efforts are the meaningful adult life outcomes."
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Loop Ohio

"Welcome to Loop Ohio, Ohio’s virtual Community of Practice! This online community is dedicated to facilitating statewide and local, cross system collaboration and learning, with a focus on promoting best practices in community development and inclusion for people with disabilities. Ohio is a national leader in these efforts, primarily because of the innovative work being done all across the state, throughout our local communities. Loop Ohio provides a platform for community members and professionals to share ideas and resources, solve problems, break down barriers, connect across distance, and engage in ongoing learning. Loop Ohio is multi-functional, enabling people to have live virtual conversations, share resources, post events, lead and participate in webinars, use discussion boards, have online chat time with subject matter experts and more."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

OH Job Seekers Toolkit

"The Job Seekers Guide will help you learn how to get a job and will give you some tools that will help along the way."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Livin’ the Dream Toolkit

"Employment among people with mental illness is very low despite research that strongly supports the critical impact that work plays in promoting recovery. The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) is committed to helping individuals find and keep jobs that help them become independent and productive. Toward this goal, OhioMHAS supports technical assistance, consultation and training to provider organizations and consumer-operated peer centers.

The Main Place, a Consumer Operated Services (COS) organization, developed a non-proprietary curriculum and training materials that can be used by COS organizations statewide to address issues related the impact of poverty on the recovery of adults experiencing serious and persistent mental illness, as well as encourage consumers in obtaining employment. The working title for the Tool Kit is "Livin' the Dream". The Main Place trained staff and consumer volunteers as facilitators to implement the curriculum in Licking and Knox Counties. Consumers throughout the state can now have access to the workbooks for programming and services in their own communities."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Customized Employment Training Series

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services and Griffin-Hammis Associates are sponsoring classroom training, on-line instruction, special topics webinars, and technical assistance on Customized Employment for designated Job Center staff and partners, to support individuals with significant disabilities and complex barriers to employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Orientation to Supported Employment Web Course

This Web-based training is an introduction to the competencies for effective supported employment. Please follow this link to register:

https://trn-store.com/trn-courses/entry/OHIntroductionRegister.php

Seven lessons will cover the following topics:

Values, Definitions, History Legislation, Funding, Ohio’s Employment First Roles and Rights Supported Employment Process and Benefits Career Planning, Discovery, Vocational Profile Marketing and Job Development Job Design and Training, Natural Supports
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Customized Employment Guide

“This guide provides a look at the strategies used in Customized Employment (CE) and links to more information and resources for those who are just beginning to explore CE. It explains how CE might benefit individuals with disabilities seeking employment and students in transition from school to work. CE is based on several evidence based transition practices such as self-determination, using self-advocacy strategies, and providing community based instruction. Learn about OCALI’s experience with three teams in Ohio that served transition age youth. In addition to traditional funding sources these teams had access to funding for internships and resource ownership.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Customized Employment: Best Practice of Today

This presentation intertwines Customized Employment into Employment First as a key component to the state’s efforts in promoting community-based, integrated employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Disability Rights OH, National Federation of the Blind, and Autistic Self Advocacy Network Celebrate Landmark Decision Ordering Fair Pay - 02/03/2016

COLUMBUS, OHIO – In a precedent-setting opinion issued by an administrative law judge from the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL), three clients have been awarded minimum wage going forward and back pay from Seneca Re-Ad, a sheltered workshop run by the Seneca County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The original petition was filed by Disability Rights Ohio (DRO), the National Federation of the Blind, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and the Baltimore law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Fair Pay from Sheltered Workshops (2016) - 02/02/2016

This case arises under Section 214(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act ("Act"), 29 U.S.C. §214(c). Ralph ("Joe") Magers, Pamela Steward and Mark Felton ("Petitioners") are employees of Seneca Re-Ad Industries ("Respondent"), which is located in Fostoria, Ohio. Each of the Petitioners has been diagnosed with one or more developmental disabilities and each receives services from the Seneca County (Ohio) Board of Developmental Disabilities ("DD").  Employment at Respondent's Fostoria manufacturing facility is one of the services provided by DD.  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

DOL - 08/03/2016

WIASRD elements for IWT: Waiver to allow states to discontinue collection of 7 WIASRD data elements for incumbent workers. requested: 9/12 decided: 12/12 expires: 6/17

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Citations

Ohio ESEA Flexibility Request - 08/21/2015

“By submitting this updated ESEA flexibility request, the SEA renews its request for flexibility through waivers of the nine ESEA requirements listed below and their associated regulatory, administrative, and reporting requirements, as well as any optional waivers the SEA has chosen to request under ESEA flexibility…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio’s HCBS Transition Plan - 03/13/2015

“Governor John Kasich created the Office of Health Transformation (OHT) to lead the Administration’s efforts to modernize Medicaid and streamline health and human services programs. Using an innovative approach that involves collaboration among multiple state agency partners and a set of shared guiding principles, reform initiatives are improving services, thus enabling seniors and people with disabilities to live with dignity in the setting they prefer, especially their own home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Balancing Incentives Program - 06/15/2013

"The Ohio Department of Medicaid is committed to removing barriers and expanding access to long-term care received in home and community-based settings. In conjunction with the Governor’s Office of Health Transformation and additional state agencies, Ohio Medicaid is an active participant in the Balancing Incentive Program.

In June 2013, the Ohio Department of Medicaid was awarded more than $169 million in additional federal medical assistance percentage (FMAP) for its commitment to direct half of all Medicaid long-term care funding to home and community-based services (HCBS) by September 30, 2015."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Buy-in for Workers with Disabilities - 04/01/2008

"Medicaid Buy-In for Workers with Disabilities (MBIWD) is an Ohio Medicaid program that provides health care coverage to working Ohioans with disabilities. Historically, people with disabilities were often discouraged from working because their earnings made them ineligible for Medicaid coverage. MBIWD was created to enable Ohioans with disabilities to work and still keep their health care coverage."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Ohio Medicaid State Plan

The State Plan is a comprehensive written statement that describes the nature and scope of the Ohio Medicaid program and assures that it is administered in conformity with federal requirements and regulations.  The information provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and ODM disclaims any obligation or liability based upon its use. The formally adopted state plan, statutes, and rules governing the Ohio Medicaid program prevail over any conflicting information provided here.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 40,500 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2013.  The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Ohio until 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

How Does Work Impact My Benefits?

“If you are receiving benefits from the government (money, services, staff, medical care), you may be worried that if you work, you will not get those services. This page can help you learn what will change as you start to make your own money. You will also learn about some special benefits for workers!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

 In Ohio Employment First is for "Every person. Every talent. Every opportunity

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Ohio’s Vocational VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.17%
Change from
2014 to 2015
11,613,423
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.87%
Change from
2014 to 2015
847,932
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.55%
Change from
2014 to 2015
298,233
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.71%
Change from
2014 to 2015
35.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.85%
Change from
2014 to 2015
77.69%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 11,570,808 11,594,163 11,613,423
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 838,715 840,550 847,932
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 281,190 290,618 298,233
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,731,444 4,791,851 4,814,281
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.53% 34.57% 35.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.90% 77.03% 77.69%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.50% 5.70% 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.40% 24.50% 23.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.60% 14.40% 13.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 757,422 757,995 758,987
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 797,926 826,926 834,325
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,280,507 1,299,416 1,310,817
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 213,961 219,636 215,042
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 38,208 43,002 42,867
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,711 5,074 4,523
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 11,488 13,582 12,705
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 507
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 35,647 37,460 40,094
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 8,602 9,550 9,624

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 17,636 17,715 18,435
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.90% 5.90% 6.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 391,634 356,270 356,826

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 15,173 13,078 10,079
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 45,183 37,954 28,199
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 101,112 61,441 47,662
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.00% 21.30% 21.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.00% 2.40% 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.70% 0.20% 2.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,195 2,684 3,450
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,866 228 3,037
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,029 1,747 719
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.00 0.02 0.00

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 124 114 135
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 78 80 85
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00% 70.00% 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.68 0.69 0.73

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
9,219
N/A
12,039
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 702 N/A 908
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 375 N/A 760
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,592 N/A 2,252
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 220 N/A 3,533
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 3,369 N/A 3,718
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 979 N/A 868
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 15.70% 20.40% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 10,447 10,377
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 565,019 570,448
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 375 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 537 684 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $94,107,000 $95,953,000 $91,872,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $152,373,000 $141,254,000 $132,663,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $505,222,000 $522,830,000 $539,890,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 22.00% 21.00% 22.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 17,686 18,591 17,902
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 13,707 14,218 13,537
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 60.90 63.40 64.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 62.00% 62.81% 63.92%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.70% 11.83% 11.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.10% 4.33% 4.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.50% 99.26% 99.34%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 34.80% 33.70% 29.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 70.60% 69.87% 66.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 79.30% 78.38% 81.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.80% 36.17% 37.18%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,552,533
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 4,128
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 175,646
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 500,082
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 675,727
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 233
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 531
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 764
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,787,410
AbilityOne wages (services). $6,697,054

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 124 62
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 64
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 21
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 8,076
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 8,097

 

WIOA Proflie

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Employment First, Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities, Assistive Technology of Ohio, and the Ohio Departments of Aging, Developmental Disabilities, Job and Family Services, Medicaid, and Mental Health and Addiction Services collaborated on the creation of the site. (Page 46)

Transition services are funded by the various state agencies that serve the individual youth in accordance with requirements under WIOA, IDEA and other pertinent laws. In addition to the Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Ohio’s Employment First Task Force works across multiple systems to align policies and practices and issues guidance to the field as needed to ensure that students receive the services needed to ensure achievement of employment and other post-secondary outcomes. (Page 150)

In FFY 2013, OOD in partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) established a dual certification program as part of the Employment First Partnership Agreement. This dual certification program is designed to ensure continuity of services and allow for more successful transition from time–limited to long–term supports. In addition, it is designed to better respond to the needs of individuals served by the program as well as our business partners.151-allowing them to provide VR services to individuals being served by OOD in the Employment First Partnership. Performance–based job development is utilized to ensure a more outcome–focused method of service provision. Staff providing services under this waiver must pass an online course and attend mandatory trainings on VR services, fee schedules, billing, and reporting expectations before they can begin providing services. They must also attend in–person trainings on employer engagement and on–the–job supports within one year of passing the online supported employment web course to continue providing services. (Page 151-152)

As mentioned previously, OOD partners with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) to expand vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to individuals with developmental disabilities as part of the state’s overall Employment First Initiative. It also should be noted that DODD is the lead agency for Ohio’s Employment First initiative, which was signed by Governor Kasich in March 2012. OOD is an active member of the Employment First Task Force, which is examining existing practices in the state system to identify and address barriers to employment for people with developmental and other disabilities. (Page 157)

In 2015 and continuing into 2016, Ohio has been selected as a core state in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. Through this grant, which is funded through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), the Employment First Taskforce has identified action steps that each agency will complete to promote the core principles for transition in Ohio:

  • Competitive, integrated employment is expectation for all youth with disabilities;
  • Transition planning for youth requires multi–agency collaboration;
  • Early dialogue with individuals and families is critical to ensuring employment outcomes;
  • There are multiple pathways to employment; and
  • Person–centered planning is key to the development of effective services and supports for transition–age youth. (Page 158)

OOD will provide targeted training to enhance personnel development. This will include targeted training on Employment First, supported employment, eligibility, transition procedures and clarification of roles and responsibilities of OOD and school personnel. (Page 160)

Mental health: OOD’s service provision is higher for individuals with psychosocial and cognitive impairments. This is most likely explained by the fact that OOD in the past four years has concentrated efforts through focused contracts with local Mental Health and Drug Addiction boards, local Developmental Disabilities boards, and most recently through the Ohio Department Developmental Disabilities funding for Employment First. Each of these populations also has an organized representative presence through established county public agencies across the state. (Page 169)

OOD has several Interagency Agreements that are designed to implement service delivery models that will increase outcomes for specific populations served by the VR program. The Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and the Ohio Transition Support Program with the Ohio Department of Education are both examples of this. (Page 179)

Employment First Partnership Agreement: OOD has continued its Employment First (EF) Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities. OOD has expanded the number of VR counselors providing services under the agreement from 15 to 25 counselors during this time period. In FFY 2015, the EF program exceeded all performance goals. This includes exceeding its rehabilitation goal by 150 percent and its plan development goal by 200 percent. (Page184) and (Page 186)

Employment (second and fourth Quarter after exit): Adult and Dislocated Worker: Historical WIA data exists for these cohorts for us to use in calculations and projections. Applying the employed second quarter after exit to the historical WIA population yields only a modest difference between WIA’s entered employment first quarter after exit and WIOA’s employment second quarter after exit for these two cohorts. Therefore, we propose using the PY 2015 WIA common measure level as a starting point for establishing a performance history for the second quarter after exit measure. For the fourth quarter after exit, (Page 310)

Customized Employment

Other VR or support services needed to ensure success in community employment;

  • Follow–up and monitoring of job performance during the stabilization process;
  • Discrete post–employment services not commonly available from those who provide extended services;
  • Identification and development/facilitation of natural supports; and
  • Customized employment. (Page 188)
Braiding/Blending Resources

Disability resource coordinator staff in OhioMeansJobs centers implemented Ohio’s strategic components, which included deploying integrated resource teams, leveraging partner funds and resources, customized employment, and asset development. Through this initiative OhioMeansAccessibility.com was added to OhioMeansJob.com. (Page 284)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

How the local board will facilitate access to services provided through the OhioMeansJobs delivery system through the use of technology and other means;

  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities. (Page 348)
  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities;
  • How the local board will coordinate with the regional JobsOhio; and
  • The roles and resource contributions of the OhioMeansJobs center partners. 351 Ohio’s standards for OhioMeansJobs center certification also will include requirements to not only comply with the ADA, but also Sec 188 of WIOA. Certification will require OhioMeansJobs staff to receive training to understand and better serve individuals with disabilities. Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Pages 84-85)
DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

One In 2011, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) received a three–year Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) demonstration grant project to improve the education, training, and employment opportunities and outcomes for adults who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Three OhioMeansJobs centers in Cleveland, Portsmouth and Toledo operated the DEI grant project. Disability resource coordinator staff in OhioMeansJobs centers implemented Ohio’s strategic components, which included deploying integrated resource teams, leveraging partner funds and resources, customized employment, and asset development. Through this initiative OhioMeansAccessibility.com was added to OhioMeansJobs.com. (Page 248)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

OOD projects a continued need to hire VR staff in the above referenced classifications over the course of this Combined State Plan. OOD prioritizes the use of available resources to hire direct service personnel and therefore, the greatest area of need will likely continue to be VR counselors and caseload assistants as well as supervisory staff. OOD has been aggressively pursuing strategies to improve the cost effectiveness of the VR program. Identified cost savings are reinvested strategically to further improve performance for the VR program. A projected area of increased need over the course of this plan will likely be for staff hired to provide “in–house” job development and/or work incentives counseling services. OOD has been piloting these new service delivery models during FFY 2015 and, based upon the success of the pilots, is poised to increase investments in this area. (Page 160)

In FFY 2015, OOD piloted the provision of both job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning) services through “in–house” personnel. OOD is currently in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots to determine the extent to which they resulted in increased outcomes and reduced time to placement. It is anticipated that OOD will expand the use of this service delivery model over the course of this Combined State Plan. (Page 179)In–House Service Delivery: In FFY 2015, OOD conducted in–house service delivery pilots in the areas of job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning). OOD is in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots and expects to expand this service delivery model in FFY 2016. (Page 184)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Follow–up services for not less than 12 months;

  • Comprehensive guidance and counseling;
  • Financial literacy education;
  • Entrepreneurial skills training;
  • Labor market and employment information; and
  • Activities to prepare for and transition to post–secondary education and training.

These services will be made available and/or will be provided through the procured youth provider. Assurance that all local workforce development areas and the lead agency are making the 14 program elements available and implemented will be done through the state monitoring program. (Page 101)

Through collaboration with local workforce development partners and alignment with the regional or local plan, ABLE programs will assist English language learners with career goals by offering integrated English literacy and civics education concurrently with integrated education and training as part of a career pathway. Integrated education and training will focus on in–demand occupations that lead to economic self–sufficiency. Successful career pathways, leading to educational and career advancement for ABLE students, will require coordinated design, delivery, and evaluation amongst all local workforce development partners In PY2016, ODHE will plan and coordinate with state-level workforce development partners to provide guidance and technical assistance to eligible providers who seek to implement, beginning PY2017, an IELCE program in combination with integrated education and training under section 243. (Page 136)

Benefits

Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence;

  • Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross–agency planning and earlier career preparation; and
  • Improves strategies to ensure that students with disabilities secure employment prior to graduation and connect with long–term supports services when needed and available to ensure long term success.
  • Educates parents and youth on work incentives planning by comparing benefits of work versus SSI. (Page 37)

OOD has traditionally relied fully on fee for service purchasing of VR services from Community Rehabilitation Programs. In FFY 2015, OOD piloted the provision of both job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning) services through “in–house” personnel. OOD is currently in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots to determine the extent to which they resulted in increased outcomes and reduced time to placement. It is anticipated that OOD will expand the use of this service delivery model over the course of this Combined State Plan. (Page 179)

School to Work Transition

Under WIA, the vocational rehabilitation (VR) program was evaluated by standards and indicators unique to the VR program. OOD has met compliance with program standards and indicators, which relate to the number and quality of employment outcomes achieved by the program. As noted previously, OOD is currently in the process of making changes in its case management system to align with the common measures under WIOA. In addition baseline data related to the common measures is being established and evaluated. It should be noted that for newly required data elements, such as skill gains and attainment, a period of data collection will be required to establish this baseline data. (Page 147)

Data Collection

Under Title IV’s OhioMeansJobs Center partner program, OOD’s vocational rehabilitation program’s case management system – AWARE – is used by approximately 37 state vocational rehabilitation agencies nationwide. OOD also partners with ODJFS to obtain Ohio employment verification and wage data. It should be noted that access to only Ohio wage information limits the VR program from accurately identifying the full population of individuals employed after receiving services (i.e., individuals who may be employed out of state with a federal agency or as an independent contractor are not in the Ohio wage file). OOD will continue to research opportunities to develop additional data collection activities that will support the accurate identification of the full population of individuals employed after receiving vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 62)

Under Title II’s OhioMeansJobs partner program, the ABLELink system is ABLE’s online student information management system. The system collects student information for local program (Page 62)

The vocational rehabilitation program, in accordance with WIOA requirements, is currently in the process of making changes to its case management system and data collection activities to align with common measures. In addition, OOD is collecting and evaluating baseline performance data to prepare for the negotiation of performance levels with the Rehabilitation Services Administration. (Page 69)

Under WIA, the vocational rehabilitation (VR) program was evaluated by standards and indicators unique to the VR program. OOD has met compliance with program standards and indicators, which relate to the number and quality of employment outcomes achieved by the program. As noted previously, OOD is currently in the process of making changes in its case management system to align with the common measures under WIOA. In addition baseline data related to the common measures is being established and evaluated. It should be noted that for newly required data elements, such as skill gains and attainment, a period of data collection will be required to establish this baseline data. (Page 73)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Using the vision of a workforce system that is driven by the needs of business, adaptive to rapid change, innovative and integrated in design and delivery, and entrepreneurial in spirit as its starting point, through OWT, the state prioritized its work into goals for preparing an educated and skilled workforce, including youth and individuals with barriers to employment and other populations, and the goals for meeting the skilled workforce needs of employers. The state established three strategic goals to accomplish WIOA’s primary purposes: (Page 36)

How the local board will strategize to implement the goals and reform principles of the Combined State Plan.

5.The examination of how the local board will coordinate local workforce developmentactivities with regional economic development activities that are carried out in the localarea and how the local board will promote entrepreneurial skills training andmicroenterprise services.

6. An explanation of the OhioMeansJobs delivery system in the local area, including:

  • How the local board will ensure the continuous improvement of eligible providers ofservices through the system and that such providers will meet the employment needs oflocal employers, workers, and jobseekers (Page 348)
  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities;
  • How the local board will coordinate with the regional JobsOhio; and
  • The roles and resource contributions of the OhioMeansJobs center partners. (Page 351)

Ohio’s standards for OhioMeansJobs center certification also will include requirements to not only comply with the ADA, but also Sec 188 of WIOA. Certification will require OhioMeansJobs staff to receive training to understand and better serve individuals with disabilities. Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Pages 84-85)

Many small businesses get their start and/or are supported by local business incubators, chambers of commerce and small business development centers. ODA and Ohio’s SCSEP operators will continue to cultivate relationships with these organizations at the local and state levels and where appropriate develop host–agency relationships. By serving as host agencies and utilizing SCSEP participates these organizations can highlight the benefits of older workers to their members and constituencies and make the SCSEP program a referral source for unsubsidized employment. (Page 278)

Career Pathways

ABLE is Ohio’s front–line program to help adults without a high school diploma or equivalency. ABLE is the foundation on which workforce education is built, therefore providing the fundamental skills for individuals to be successful in job training and employment. Remedial services provided through ABLE are contextualized to meet the diverse needs of individuals’ career pathways. The single biggest challenge the ABLE program faces in Ohio is a lack of awareness about what ABLE is and the wide–range of free services the program provides. (Pages 27-28)

Ohio’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) program is aligning its on–the–job training strategy and policies with Title I employment and training and Trade Adjustment Assistance programs for seamless service delivery for businesses. The VR program also is working to increase utilization and access to the Workforce Inventory of Education and Training – Ohio’s eligible training provider system – which includes connection with apprenticeship programs. To further that connection, VR is working with Ohio’s Apprenticeship Council to develop career pathways for transitioning youth to enter into the programs. (Page 32)

  • All state-approved secondary career-technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS);
  • Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state-approved career-technical program and for state weighted career-technical funding.
  • The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS.
  • A secondary program that operates under a state-approved POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria;
  • Once all secondary programs operate under a state-approved POS and meet QPS, all programs can also be identified as Tech Prep programs;
  • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students;
  • Effective academic/career counseling and effective Individual Education Plan (IEP) development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs;
  • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success;
  • High expectations will be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers;”
    • A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high level academic and technical achievement.
    • A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. (Page 249)
Employment Networks

Aligning and implementing the best practices of the current and future Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects. Commerce, ICCB, and Department of Human Services Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) have worked with regional and local partners to increase the participation of individuals with disabilities (aged 18 and above) in integrated career pathway and academic programs through community colleges and non-profit organizations in cooperation with American Job Centers, Local Workforce Innovation Boards (LWIB), employment networks and other regional partners. (Page 135)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 68

2017 Transformation Series: Building Innovative Service Models - 05/01/2017

“Ohio's continued efforts to assist every individual of working age to gain community-based employment is largely supported by provider agencies across the state. These agencies are collectively working through a systems change process that will enable the strengthening and support of community-based service options for individuals with disabilities. The 2017 Transformation Series provides an opportunity for provider agencies to gather and share ideas, strategies, and practices that will assist them as they move through the systems change process and help improve person-centered planning and employment opportunities for individuals across Ohio.

Efforts are focused on two face-to-face events in the spring of 2017:

Phase 1: Provider Agency Site Visits

Phase 2: 2017 Transformation Summit”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

DOL - 08/03/2016

WIASRD elements for IWT: Waiver to allow states to discontinue collection of 7 WIASRD data elements for incumbent workers. requested: 9/12 decided: 12/12 expires: 6/17

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Citations

Ohio 2016-2017 Budget: Historic Investments for Ohioans with Developmental Disabilities - 07/01/2016

"Governor Kasich’s historic budget invests $286 million ($116.5 million State share) over the next two years to increase opportunities for Ohioans with disabilities to live and work in the community. The initiatives in this budget expand supports for those who are waiting for services, increase opportunities for community participation, and improve the experience for those who are receiving services by modernizing our programs and strengthening the direct care force….

The budget continues to prioritize funding to reflect the growing demand for Home and Community-Based Services. Funding will allow DODD to add nursing services to the IO waiver to enable people with medical needs to live in community settings, provide for much-deserved increase for direct care staff, increase the availability of add-on services for individuals with complex needs and behavioral challenges, provide training for those who receive, plan, and deliver waiver services, and strengthen oversight and quality assurance efforts so the person-centered plan is delivering meaningful outcomes."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Rights OH, National Federation of the Blind, and Autistic Self Advocacy Network Celebrate Landmark Decision Ordering Fair Pay - 02/03/2016

COLUMBUS, OHIO – In a precedent-setting opinion issued by an administrative law judge from the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL), three clients have been awarded minimum wage going forward and back pay from Seneca Re-Ad, a sheltered workshop run by the Seneca County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The original petition was filed by Disability Rights Ohio (DRO), the National Federation of the Blind, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and the Baltimore law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Fair Pay from Sheltered Workshops (2016) - 02/02/2016

This case arises under Section 214(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act ("Act"), 29 U.S.C. §214(c). Ralph ("Joe") Magers, Pamela Steward and Mark Felton ("Petitioners") are employees of Seneca Re-Ad Industries ("Respondent"), which is located in Fostoria, Ohio. Each of the Petitioners has been diagnosed with one or more developmental disabilities and each receives services from the Seneca County (Ohio) Board of Developmental Disabilities ("DD").  Employment at Respondent's Fostoria manufacturing facility is one of the services provided by DD.  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Employment First Project Update (February 2016) - 02/01/2016

“As part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Transition plan, services and rates are being updated for Adult Day waiver services. Input was gathered from community forums and stakeholder workgroups throughout 2014 and 2015. These new services will be focused on person centered planning and individual outcomes. New services will start being used on October 1, 2016.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio VR Provider Manual - 11/23/2015

The VR Provider Manual provides service descriptions and requirements for services including career exploration, job development, retention, job seeking skills training, and customized employment, among others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio HB 155 - 10/15/2015

A bill to amend section 2329.66 and to enact sections 113.50, 113.51, 113.52, 113.53, 113.54, 113.55, and 113.56 of the Revised Code to require the Treasurer of State to create a program [ABLE] offering federally tax-advantaged savings accounts used to pay for a person's qualified disability expenses and to disregard the value of and income from that account in determining whether that person is eligible for state or local means-tested public assistance.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Ohio HB 155 - 10/15/2015

A bill to amend section 2329.66 and to enact sections 113.50, 113.51, 113.52, 113.53, 113.54, 113.55, and 113.56 of the Revised Code to require the Treasurer of State to create a program [ABLE] offering federally tax-advantaged savings accounts used to pay for a person's qualified disability expenses and to disregard the value of and income from that account in determining whether that person is eligible for state or local means-tested public assistance.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Ohio SB 316: IEP and Post-secondary Transition Requirements - 09/24/2012

Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is fourteen years of age, and update annually thereafter, a statement describing:

Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills; Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described in divisions (H)(1) and (2) of this section.

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Rev. Code §5126.05: County Board - Powers & Duties - 09/24/2012

“Implement an employment first policy that clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age who receives services from the board…”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

5123.022 OH State Policy Regarding Community Employment for Disabled - 09/24/2012

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of this state that employment services for individuals with developmental disabilities be directed at community employment. Every individual with a developmental disability is presumed capable of community employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OH Rev. Code Ann. §§123.152 - Encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program. - 09/29/2005

As used in this section, "EDGE business enterprise" means a sole proprietorship, association, partnership, corporation, limited liability corporation, or joint venture certified as a participant in the encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program by the director of administrative services under this section of the Revised Code.   Social disadvantage based on any of the following:  - A rebuttable presumption when the business owner or owners demonstrate membership in a racial minority group or show personal disadvantage due to color, ethnic origin, gender, physical disability, long-term residence in an environment isolated from the mainstream of American society, location in an area of high unemployment;   
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Ohio Employment First Executive Order - 03/19/2012

All state agencies providing supports and services to Ohio’s individuals with developmental disabilities are required to align policies and procedures to support community employment and fulfill the Employment First requirement that community employment is the preferred outcome for working-age adults.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Ohio 2016-2017 Budget: Historic Investments for Ohioans with Developmental Disabilities - 07/01/2016

"Governor Kasich’s historic budget invests $286 million ($116.5 million State share) over the next two years to increase opportunities for Ohioans with disabilities to live and work in the community. The initiatives in this budget expand supports for those who are waiting for services, increase opportunities for community participation, and improve the experience for those who are receiving services by modernizing our programs and strengthening the direct care force….

The budget continues to prioritize funding to reflect the growing demand for Home and Community-Based Services. Funding will allow DODD to add nursing services to the IO waiver to enable people with medical needs to live in community settings, provide for much-deserved increase for direct care staff, increase the availability of add-on services for individuals with complex needs and behavioral challenges, provide training for those who receive, plan, and deliver waiver services, and strengthen oversight and quality assurance efforts so the person-centered plan is delivering meaningful outcomes."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment First Project Update (February 2016) - 02/01/2016

“As part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Transition plan, services and rates are being updated for Adult Day waiver services. Input was gathered from community forums and stakeholder workgroups throughout 2014 and 2015. These new services will be focused on person centered planning and individual outcomes. New services will start being used on October 1, 2016.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio VR Provider Manual - 11/23/2015

The VR Provider Manual provides service descriptions and requirements for services including career exploration, job development, retention, job seeking skills training, and customized employment, among others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

OH Vocational Rehabilitation Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment - 09/30/2015

“Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD), Division of Performance and Innovation (DPI), produced this 2015 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) building upon the framework methodology developed from the 2012 CSNA, which was designed to assess the vocational rehabilitation (VR) service needs of individuals related to six primary disability categories. These disabilities include visual impairments, hearing impairments, communicative impairments, physical impairments, psychosocial impairments and cognitive impairments. This methodology focuses on penetration rates (of the extent to which OOD was serving prospective jobseekers with disabilities), and proportionality (how well OOD is balanced in serving the cross-section of individuals with disabilities who are seeking employment).” The VR sets forth 9 recommendations to be set as priorities over the next year in order to improve integrated employment opportunities and community inclusion.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan (VR Rehabilitation Services Program) - FY 2015 - 09/30/2014

The State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program: Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 states that staff should build competencies on, and promote the employment practices such as customized employment, self-employment, and supported employment, among others.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Guide to Policy and Procedure Development - 07/31/2014

"The Employment First Rule, 5123: 2-2-05, requires county boards to adopt and implement a local Employment First Policy which clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age. The following is guidance developed in response to multiple requests from county boards."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Funding System Re-Design for Ohio’s Employment First Initiative: Review of Promising Models from Other States - 06/02/2014

This report aims to provide DODD with a comparison of funding structures from multiple states with high rates of integrated employment, including at least one state with a local tax base funding structure. The first 3 Key Principles for establishing a funding system to support Employment First uphold that, “The system should be based upon a presumption of competency, employability and ‘zero reject’ for each person with a disability, regardless of complexity; The system should reward providers for best practice implementation of Individual Supported Employment; [and] The system should require provider standards and staff training/certification to assure equal statewide access to and opportunity for Individual Supported Employment.” There are 9 principles in total that guide that together guide the structure and implementation of Employment First.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Administrative Rule (5123: 2-2-05) - 04/01/2014

“The purpose of this rule is to implement the employment first policy in accordance with section 5123.022 of the Revised Code… This rule applies to county boards of developmental disabilities and providers responsible for planning, coordinating, or providing employment services, regardless of funding source, to individuals with developmental disabilities.”

·       Community Employment is competitive employment that takes place in an integrated setting

·       Every individual of working age will have a person-centered planning process to identify their desired employment outcome and their place on the path to community employment

·       Services and supports will be provided to help the individual move along the path to community employment

·       County boards are required to develop and implement an Employment First policy, set benchmarks to increase community employment outcomes, partner with schools to enhance transition planning, share information with individuals, families, schools, employers, providers and others in the community about Medicaid Buy-In, and collect employment data on individuals served

·       Providers are required to submit progress reports at least every 12 months to ensure the individual is moving along the path to community employment and collect employment data on individuals served

   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio's Path to Employment First - 02/01/2014

“Successful implementation of Employment First requires a multi-pronged approach and a long-term commitment to systems change…. A comprehensive approach must focus on key strategies; all designed to work synergistically to impact a service structure that better supports people to achieve community employment and directs more resources toward that preferred outcome.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio - “New Requirements for Secondary Transition Services for Students with Disabilities: Frequently Asked Questions” - 09/19/2012

The New Requirements state that IEPs must start at age 14, update annually and contain,

“Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills;  Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; and The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described [above]…”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP) - 09/01/2015

"The Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities are partnering to improve post-secondary outcomes for students with disabilities, beginning at age 14. This innovative collaboration will change the nature and impact of transition services for students with disabilities in Ohio. The new model will help students with disabilities get a head start on becoming job ready and better prepared to enter the workforce with the skills necessary to be successful in today’s workforce."

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

People First of OH comments in response to "Ohio's Draft Plan to Comply with New Federal Horne and Community-Based Services Requirements” - 01/20/2015

ORO is submitting these comments to "Ohio's Draft Plan to Comply with New Federal Home and Community-Based Services Requirements," which was released to the public o n December 15, 2014.   The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ("CMS") has issued new rules for states'1915( c) home and community-based services (" HCBS") waiver programs ("waiver programs"), defining for the first time "home and community-based settings" eligible for continued federal waiver funding. CMS has required states to create transition plans specifying how they will comply with these new rules and to allow the public to provide input on their proposed plans before they are finalized.”   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

People First of Ohio Call to Action: “Blazing New Trails to Employment” - 04/25/2012

“People First's employment "Call to Action" and its regional forums brought together hundreds of self-advocates, family members, county board staff, providers, and staff from the Rehabilitation Services Commission and the Ohio Legal Rights Service, to understand Ohio's transition and job service systems; hear about the types of jobs and training people with developmental and intellectual disabilities (DD/ID) want; and plan for more job opportunities, and better wages and benefits for people with disabilities. People First fully supports the Governor's Executive Order 2012-0SK to make Ohio an "Employment First" state.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

VR SE Partnership

This booklet outlines implementation strategies for collaboration between local offices of state vocational rehabilitation (VR) services and mental health service organizations that provide Supported Employment, the evidence-based practice (SE-EBP), to consumers who have a severe mental illness. Strategies for the VR and SE partnership are organized into three stages of collaboration.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Mental Illness/Developmental Disabilities (MIDD) Coordinating Center of Excellence

“The MIDD CCOE promotes clinical best practices for individuals with mental illness and developmental disabilities. It is a collaborate effort involving ODMH, the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, and the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.  With the goal of providing appropriate treatment for individuals with co-occurring mental illness and developmental disabilities, the CCOE assists local systems throughout Ohio to increase their service capacity and foster collaboration.”   Supported Employment “Supported Employment/Individual Placement and Support (SE/IPS) is an evidence-based practice that helps people with mental illness and other disabilities identify and acquire part-time or full-time jobs of their choice in the community with rapid job-search and placement services. It emphasizes that employment is not the result of treatment and recovery but integral to both. SE/IPS is different from traditional vocational rehabilitation. It emphasizes consumer choice and utilizes rapid job-search and placement services, time-unlimited and individualized follow-along services, and many other important strategies.”  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio NAMI Supported Employment Family Advocacy Project

“This collaboration between NAMI Ohio and the Ohio Department of Mental Health engages families of individuals with mental illness to advocate for, create and expand high-quality Individual Placement and Support (IPS) programs. Family involvement can strengthen the partnerships between providers, family members and consumers around SE services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Partnership for Employment First Guide

The Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, in partnership with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities Agency, has announced a statewide initiative to expand community employment services for people with developmental disabilities. This opportunity will allow the state to maximize resources to support more people on their path to community employment, build system capacity, and strengthen the relationship between the developmental disability and vocational rehabilitation systems in Ohio.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Ohio Employment First Taskforce Common Principles

“The Ohio Employment First Taskforce agencies agree that community employment should be the first option for all working age adults and transition-age youth with developmental disabilities. Employment First is a philosophy of service that presumes that all Ohioans with significant disabilities can and should have opportunities to work in the community”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Mental Health and Addiction Services (Ohio MHAS) Supported Employment Project - 07/01/2014

"Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services (MHAS) and its partners are implementing the Supported Employment Project. This project reduces the high unemployment rates for young adults and adults with a severe and persistent mental illness who may have co-occurring substance use disorders.

Two local sites are implementing new programs, and a committee will oversee statewide training, policy changes, and evaluation. The evidence-based practice of Individual Placement and Support employment is being shared statewide through training and technical assistance."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Workplace Initiative Ohio - 11/01/2013

"The Central Ohio Workplace Initiative has been renamed the Workplace initiative of Ohio (WIO) to reflect the expansion of the family foundation funded project across the state.  The purpose of the Workplace Initiative of Ohio (WIO) is to create demand among Ohio businesses for talented career seekers with disabilities in healthcare, hospitality, distribution, banking, retail, and other industries. Employers benefit from streamlined candidate sourcing, pre-screening, training assistance and more.

On November 1, 2013, OHBLN and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) began working on a project funded by a grant from a private foundation concerned about the high unemployment rate of individuals with disabilities. The purpose of WIO is to work with businesses to create demand for qualified job seekers with disabilities in distribution, retail, health care and other industries."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OCALI Customized Employment Project - 03/01/2009

"With funding from the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), OCALI launched a customized employment project in March 2009 for two school based transition teams, Claymont High School with Tuscarawas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and Huber Heights High School with Montgomery County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The goal of the project was to increase community employment outcomes for transition aged youth using customized employment strategies and processes. Team members received training and consultation in the CE process, Social Security Work Incentives and working with employers. Teams included school, developmental disability, and vocational rehabilitation staff, plus a parent mentor. In November of 2009 the project received additional funding from DODD to add another team from Lucas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and to provide up to 40 paid internships for youth with disabilities using customized employment strategies and processes in the Lucas County and Montgomery County sites. The Tuscarawas County site obtained funding from DODD, “We Go To Work Grants” to fund resource ownership as an employment strategy."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Disability Employment Initiative

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2011, was awarded a Round 2 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This grant ended in 2014.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Ohio Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The…grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities”. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 40,500 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2013.  The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

2017 Transformation Series: Building Innovative Service Models - 05/01/2017

“Ohio's continued efforts to assist every individual of working age to gain community-based employment is largely supported by provider agencies across the state. These agencies are collectively working through a systems change process that will enable the strengthening and support of community-based service options for individuals with disabilities. The 2017 Transformation Series provides an opportunity for provider agencies to gather and share ideas, strategies, and practices that will assist them as they move through the systems change process and help improve person-centered planning and employment opportunities for individuals across Ohio.

Efforts are focused on two face-to-face events in the spring of 2017:

Phase 1: Provider Agency Site Visits

Phase 2: 2017 Transformation Summit”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio RSC Customized Employment, Griffin Hammis Associates, LLC - 01/25/2012

This video on the Ohio RSC Customized Employment Project includes testimonials from staff, leaders, and job seekers and business owners who have benefited from the program. It is both an interesting description of, and a compelling case for, Customized Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Ohio Employment First Transition Framework

"Ohio Employment First Transition Framework is a critical component to the Ohio Employment First structure and is intended to address barriers to transition planning and services in order to achieve meaningful adult outcomes. The Framework was developed by stakeholders from multiple agencies to create processes and highlight practices that can be used by all agencies. These common processes assist professionals to plan, prepare, empower, educate, and connect across systems so as to consistently assist youth with disabilities to realize meaningful, community employment and other valued aspects of adult life.

The Framework is built on three non-negotiable foundational elements that together create a 'filter' to examine the practices and procedures used when working and supporting transition youth. The foundational elements for the activity and practices of the Framework are:

Person-centered. The youth is where the team efforts begin and end. Policies and practices must be flexible enough to respond to individual strengths and needs. Agency-neutral. As agencies come together to collaborate, activity should occur in a manner where all involved see value for the youth and no single agency policies or procedures are considered the priority. Outcome-focused. The common focus of the collaborative efforts are the meaningful adult life outcomes."
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Loop Ohio

"Welcome to Loop Ohio, Ohio’s virtual Community of Practice! This online community is dedicated to facilitating statewide and local, cross system collaboration and learning, with a focus on promoting best practices in community development and inclusion for people with disabilities. Ohio is a national leader in these efforts, primarily because of the innovative work being done all across the state, throughout our local communities. Loop Ohio provides a platform for community members and professionals to share ideas and resources, solve problems, break down barriers, connect across distance, and engage in ongoing learning. Loop Ohio is multi-functional, enabling people to have live virtual conversations, share resources, post events, lead and participate in webinars, use discussion boards, have online chat time with subject matter experts and more."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

OH Job Seekers Toolkit

"The Job Seekers Guide will help you learn how to get a job and will give you some tools that will help along the way."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Livin’ the Dream Toolkit

"Employment among people with mental illness is very low despite research that strongly supports the critical impact that work plays in promoting recovery. The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) is committed to helping individuals find and keep jobs that help them become independent and productive. Toward this goal, OhioMHAS supports technical assistance, consultation and training to provider organizations and consumer-operated peer centers.

The Main Place, a Consumer Operated Services (COS) organization, developed a non-proprietary curriculum and training materials that can be used by COS organizations statewide to address issues related the impact of poverty on the recovery of adults experiencing serious and persistent mental illness, as well as encourage consumers in obtaining employment. The working title for the Tool Kit is "Livin' the Dream". The Main Place trained staff and consumer volunteers as facilitators to implement the curriculum in Licking and Knox Counties. Consumers throughout the state can now have access to the workbooks for programming and services in their own communities."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Customized Employment Training Series

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services and Griffin-Hammis Associates are sponsoring classroom training, on-line instruction, special topics webinars, and technical assistance on Customized Employment for designated Job Center staff and partners, to support individuals with significant disabilities and complex barriers to employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Orientation to Supported Employment Web Course

This Web-based training is an introduction to the competencies for effective supported employment. Please follow this link to register:

https://trn-store.com/trn-courses/entry/OHIntroductionRegister.php

Seven lessons will cover the following topics:

Values, Definitions, History Legislation, Funding, Ohio’s Employment First Roles and Rights Supported Employment Process and Benefits Career Planning, Discovery, Vocational Profile Marketing and Job Development Job Design and Training, Natural Supports
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Customized Employment Guide

“This guide provides a look at the strategies used in Customized Employment (CE) and links to more information and resources for those who are just beginning to explore CE. It explains how CE might benefit individuals with disabilities seeking employment and students in transition from school to work. CE is based on several evidence based transition practices such as self-determination, using self-advocacy strategies, and providing community based instruction. Learn about OCALI’s experience with three teams in Ohio that served transition age youth. In addition to traditional funding sources these teams had access to funding for internships and resource ownership.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Customized Employment: Best Practice of Today

This presentation intertwines Customized Employment into Employment First as a key component to the state’s efforts in promoting community-based, integrated employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Disability Rights OH, National Federation of the Blind, and Autistic Self Advocacy Network Celebrate Landmark Decision Ordering Fair Pay - 02/03/2016

COLUMBUS, OHIO – In a precedent-setting opinion issued by an administrative law judge from the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL), three clients have been awarded minimum wage going forward and back pay from Seneca Re-Ad, a sheltered workshop run by the Seneca County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The original petition was filed by Disability Rights Ohio (DRO), the National Federation of the Blind, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and the Baltimore law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Fair Pay from Sheltered Workshops (2016) - 02/02/2016

This case arises under Section 214(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act ("Act"), 29 U.S.C. §214(c). Ralph ("Joe") Magers, Pamela Steward and Mark Felton ("Petitioners") are employees of Seneca Re-Ad Industries ("Respondent"), which is located in Fostoria, Ohio. Each of the Petitioners has been diagnosed with one or more developmental disabilities and each receives services from the Seneca County (Ohio) Board of Developmental Disabilities ("DD").  Employment at Respondent's Fostoria manufacturing facility is one of the services provided by DD.  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

DOL - 08/03/2016

WIASRD elements for IWT: Waiver to allow states to discontinue collection of 7 WIASRD data elements for incumbent workers. requested: 9/12 decided: 12/12 expires: 6/17

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Citations

Ohio ESEA Flexibility Request - 08/21/2015

“By submitting this updated ESEA flexibility request, the SEA renews its request for flexibility through waivers of the nine ESEA requirements listed below and their associated regulatory, administrative, and reporting requirements, as well as any optional waivers the SEA has chosen to request under ESEA flexibility…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio’s HCBS Transition Plan - 03/13/2015

“Governor John Kasich created the Office of Health Transformation (OHT) to lead the Administration’s efforts to modernize Medicaid and streamline health and human services programs. Using an innovative approach that involves collaboration among multiple state agency partners and a set of shared guiding principles, reform initiatives are improving services, thus enabling seniors and people with disabilities to live with dignity in the setting they prefer, especially their own home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Balancing Incentives Program - 06/15/2013

"The Ohio Department of Medicaid is committed to removing barriers and expanding access to long-term care received in home and community-based settings. In conjunction with the Governor’s Office of Health Transformation and additional state agencies, Ohio Medicaid is an active participant in the Balancing Incentive Program.

In June 2013, the Ohio Department of Medicaid was awarded more than $169 million in additional federal medical assistance percentage (FMAP) for its commitment to direct half of all Medicaid long-term care funding to home and community-based services (HCBS) by September 30, 2015."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Buy-in for Workers with Disabilities - 04/01/2008

"Medicaid Buy-In for Workers with Disabilities (MBIWD) is an Ohio Medicaid program that provides health care coverage to working Ohioans with disabilities. Historically, people with disabilities were often discouraged from working because their earnings made them ineligible for Medicaid coverage. MBIWD was created to enable Ohioans with disabilities to work and still keep their health care coverage."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Ohio Medicaid State Plan

The State Plan is a comprehensive written statement that describes the nature and scope of the Ohio Medicaid program and assures that it is administered in conformity with federal requirements and regulations.  The information provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and ODM disclaims any obligation or liability based upon its use. The formally adopted state plan, statutes, and rules governing the Ohio Medicaid program prevail over any conflicting information provided here.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 40,500 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2013.  The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Ohio until 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

How Does Work Impact My Benefits?

“If you are receiving benefits from the government (money, services, staff, medical care), you may be worried that if you work, you will not get those services. This page can help you learn what will change as you start to make your own money. You will also learn about some special benefits for workers!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

 In Ohio Employment First is for "Every person. Every talent. Every opportunity

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Ohio’s Vocational VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.17%
Change from
2014 to 2015
11,613,423
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.87%
Change from
2014 to 2015
847,932
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.55%
Change from
2014 to 2015
298,233
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.71%
Change from
2014 to 2015
35.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.85%
Change from
2014 to 2015
77.69%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 11,570,808 11,594,163 11,613,423
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 838,715 840,550 847,932
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 281,190 290,618 298,233
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,731,444 4,791,851 4,814,281
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.53% 34.57% 35.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.90% 77.03% 77.69%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.50% 5.70% 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.40% 24.50% 23.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.60% 14.40% 13.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 757,422 757,995 758,987
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 797,926 826,926 834,325
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,280,507 1,299,416 1,310,817
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 213,961 219,636 215,042
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 38,208 43,002 42,867
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,711 5,074 4,523
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 11,488 13,582 12,705
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 507
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 35,647 37,460 40,094
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 8,602 9,550 9,624

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 17,636 17,715 18,435
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.90% 5.90% 6.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 391,634 356,270 356,826

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 15,173 13,078 10,079
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 45,183 37,954 28,199
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 101,112 61,441 47,662
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.00% 21.30% 21.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.00% 2.40% 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.70% 0.20% 2.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,195 2,684 3,450
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,866 228 3,037
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,029 1,747 719
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.00 0.02 0.00

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 124 114 135
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 78 80 85
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00% 70.00% 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.68 0.69 0.73

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
9,219
N/A
12,039
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 702 N/A 908
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 375 N/A 760
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,592 N/A 2,252
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 220 N/A 3,533
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 3,369 N/A 3,718
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 979 N/A 868
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 15.70% 20.40% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 10,447 10,377
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 565,019 570,448
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 375 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 537 684 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $94,107,000 $95,953,000 $91,872,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $152,373,000 $141,254,000 $132,663,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $505,222,000 $522,830,000 $539,890,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 22.00% 21.00% 22.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 17,686 18,591 17,902
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 13,707 14,218 13,537
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 60.90 63.40 64.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 62.00% 62.81% 63.92%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.70% 11.83% 11.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.10% 4.33% 4.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.50% 99.26% 99.34%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 34.80% 33.70% 29.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 70.60% 69.87% 66.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 79.30% 78.38% 81.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.80% 36.17% 37.18%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,552,533
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 4,128
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 175,646
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 500,082
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 675,727
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 233
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 531
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 764
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,787,410
AbilityOne wages (services). $6,697,054

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 124 62
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 64
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 21
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 8,076
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 8,097

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Employment First, Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities, Assistive Technology of Ohio, and the Ohio Departments of Aging, Developmental Disabilities, Job and Family Services, Medicaid, and Mental Health and Addiction Services collaborated on the creation of the site. (Page 46)

Transition services are funded by the various state agencies that serve the individual youth in accordance with requirements under WIOA, IDEA and other pertinent laws. In addition to the Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Ohio’s Employment First Task Force works across multiple systems to align policies and practices and issues guidance to the field as needed to ensure that students receive the services needed to ensure achievement of employment and other post-secondary outcomes. (Page 150)

In FFY 2013, OOD in partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) established a dual certification program as part of the Employment First Partnership Agreement. This dual certification program is designed to ensure continuity of services and allow for more successful transition from time–limited to long–term supports. In addition, it is designed to better respond to the needs of individuals served by the program as well as our business partners.151-allowing them to provide VR services to individuals being served by OOD in the Employment First Partnership. Performance–based job development is utilized to ensure a more outcome–focused method of service provision. Staff providing services under this waiver must pass an online course and attend mandatory trainings on VR services, fee schedules, billing, and reporting expectations before they can begin providing services. They must also attend in–person trainings on employer engagement and on–the–job supports within one year of passing the online supported employment web course to continue providing services. (Page 151-152)

As mentioned previously, OOD partners with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) to expand vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to individuals with developmental disabilities as part of the state’s overall Employment First Initiative. It also should be noted that DODD is the lead agency for Ohio’s Employment First initiative, which was signed by Governor Kasich in March 2012. OOD is an active member of the Employment First Task Force, which is examining existing practices in the state system to identify and address barriers to employment for people with developmental and other disabilities. (Page 157)

In 2015 and continuing into 2016, Ohio has been selected as a core state in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. Through this grant, which is funded through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), the Employment First Taskforce has identified action steps that each agency will complete to promote the core principles for transition in Ohio:

  • Competitive, integrated employment is expectation for all youth with disabilities;
  • Transition planning for youth requires multi–agency collaboration;
  • Early dialogue with individuals and families is critical to ensuring employment outcomes;
  • There are multiple pathways to employment; and
  • Person–centered planning is key to the development of effective services and supports for transition–age youth. (Page 158)

OOD will provide targeted training to enhance personnel development. This will include targeted training on Employment First, supported employment, eligibility, transition procedures and clarification of roles and responsibilities of OOD and school personnel. (Page 160)

Mental health: OOD’s service provision is higher for individuals with psychosocial and cognitive impairments. This is most likely explained by the fact that OOD in the past four years has concentrated efforts through focused contracts with local Mental Health and Drug Addiction boards, local Developmental Disabilities boards, and most recently through the Ohio Department Developmental Disabilities funding for Employment First. Each of these populations also has an organized representative presence through established county public agencies across the state. (Page 169)

OOD has several Interagency Agreements that are designed to implement service delivery models that will increase outcomes for specific populations served by the VR program. The Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and the Ohio Transition Support Program with the Ohio Department of Education are both examples of this. (Page 179)

Employment First Partnership Agreement: OOD has continued its Employment First (EF) Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities. OOD has expanded the number of VR counselors providing services under the agreement from 15 to 25 counselors during this time period. In FFY 2015, the EF program exceeded all performance goals. This includes exceeding its rehabilitation goal by 150 percent and its plan development goal by 200 percent. (Page184) and (Page 186)

Employment (second and fourth Quarter after exit): Adult and Dislocated Worker: Historical WIA data exists for these cohorts for us to use in calculations and projections. Applying the employed second quarter after exit to the historical WIA population yields only a modest difference between WIA’s entered employment first quarter after exit and WIOA’s employment second quarter after exit for these two cohorts. Therefore, we propose using the PY 2015 WIA common measure level as a starting point for establishing a performance history for the second quarter after exit measure. For the fourth quarter after exit, (Page 310)

Customized Employment

Other VR or support services needed to ensure success in community employment;

  • Follow–up and monitoring of job performance during the stabilization process;
  • Discrete post–employment services not commonly available from those who provide extended services;
  • Identification and development/facilitation of natural supports; and
  • Customized employment. (Page 188)
Braiding/Blending Resources

Disability resource coordinator staff in OhioMeansJobs centers implemented Ohio’s strategic components, which included deploying integrated resource teams, leveraging partner funds and resources, customized employment, and asset development. Through this initiative OhioMeansAccessibility.com was added to OhioMeansJob.com. (Page 284)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

How the local board will facilitate access to services provided through the OhioMeansJobs delivery system through the use of technology and other means;

  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities. (Page 348)
  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities;
  • How the local board will coordinate with the regional JobsOhio; and
  • The roles and resource contributions of the OhioMeansJobs center partners. 351 Ohio’s standards for OhioMeansJobs center certification also will include requirements to not only comply with the ADA, but also Sec 188 of WIOA. Certification will require OhioMeansJobs staff to receive training to understand and better serve individuals with disabilities. Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Pages 84-85)
DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

One In 2011, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) received a three–year Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) demonstration grant project to improve the education, training, and employment opportunities and outcomes for adults who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Three OhioMeansJobs centers in Cleveland, Portsmouth and Toledo operated the DEI grant project. Disability resource coordinator staff in OhioMeansJobs centers implemented Ohio’s strategic components, which included deploying integrated resource teams, leveraging partner funds and resources, customized employment, and asset development. Through this initiative OhioMeansAccessibility.com was added to OhioMeansJobs.com. (Page 248)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

OOD projects a continued need to hire VR staff in the above referenced classifications over the course of this Combined State Plan. OOD prioritizes the use of available resources to hire direct service personnel and therefore, the greatest area of need will likely continue to be VR counselors and caseload assistants as well as supervisory staff. OOD has been aggressively pursuing strategies to improve the cost effectiveness of the VR program. Identified cost savings are reinvested strategically to further improve performance for the VR program. A projected area of increased need over the course of this plan will likely be for staff hired to provide “in–house” job development and/or work incentives counseling services. OOD has been piloting these new service delivery models during FFY 2015 and, based upon the success of the pilots, is poised to increase investments in this area. (Page 160)

In FFY 2015, OOD piloted the provision of both job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning) services through “in–house” personnel. OOD is currently in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots to determine the extent to which they resulted in increased outcomes and reduced time to placement. It is anticipated that OOD will expand the use of this service delivery model over the course of this Combined State Plan. (Page 179)In–House Service Delivery: In FFY 2015, OOD conducted in–house service delivery pilots in the areas of job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning). OOD is in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots and expects to expand this service delivery model in FFY 2016. (Page 184)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Follow–up services for not less than 12 months;

  • Comprehensive guidance and counseling;
  • Financial literacy education;
  • Entrepreneurial skills training;
  • Labor market and employment information; and
  • Activities to prepare for and transition to post–secondary education and training.

These services will be made available and/or will be provided through the procured youth provider. Assurance that all local workforce development areas and the lead agency are making the 14 program elements available and implemented will be done through the state monitoring program. (Page 101)

Through collaboration with local workforce development partners and alignment with the regional or local plan, ABLE programs will assist English language learners with career goals by offering integrated English literacy and civics education concurrently with integrated education and training as part of a career pathway. Integrated education and training will focus on in–demand occupations that lead to economic self–sufficiency. Successful career pathways, leading to educational and career advancement for ABLE students, will require coordinated design, delivery, and evaluation amongst all local workforce development partners In PY2016, ODHE will plan and coordinate with state-level workforce development partners to provide guidance and technical assistance to eligible providers who seek to implement, beginning PY2017, an IELCE program in combination with integrated education and training under section 243. (Page 136)

Benefits

Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence;

  • Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross–agency planning and earlier career preparation; and
  • Improves strategies to ensure that students with disabilities secure employment prior to graduation and connect with long–term supports services when needed and available to ensure long term success.
  • Educates parents and youth on work incentives planning by comparing benefits of work versus SSI. (Page 37)

OOD has traditionally relied fully on fee for service purchasing of VR services from Community Rehabilitation Programs. In FFY 2015, OOD piloted the provision of both job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning) services through “in–house” personnel. OOD is currently in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots to determine the extent to which they resulted in increased outcomes and reduced time to placement. It is anticipated that OOD will expand the use of this service delivery model over the course of this Combined State Plan. (Page 179)

School to Work Transition

Under WIA, the vocational rehabilitation (VR) program was evaluated by standards and indicators unique to the VR program. OOD has met compliance with program standards and indicators, which relate to the number and quality of employment outcomes achieved by the program. As noted previously, OOD is currently in the process of making changes in its case management system to align with the common measures under WIOA. In addition baseline data related to the common measures is being established and evaluated. It should be noted that for newly required data elements, such as skill gains and attainment, a period of data collection will be required to establish this baseline data. (Page 147)

Data Collection

Under Title IV’s OhioMeansJobs Center partner program, OOD’s vocational rehabilitation program’s case management system – AWARE – is used by approximately 37 state vocational rehabilitation agencies nationwide. OOD also partners with ODJFS to obtain Ohio employment verification and wage data. It should be noted that access to only Ohio wage information limits the VR program from accurately identifying the full population of individuals employed after receiving services (i.e., individuals who may be employed out of state with a federal agency or as an independent contractor are not in the Ohio wage file). OOD will continue to research opportunities to develop additional data collection activities that will support the accurate identification of the full population of individuals employed after receiving vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 62)

Under Title II’s OhioMeansJobs partner program, the ABLELink system is ABLE’s online student information management system. The system collects student information for local program (Page 62)

The vocational rehabilitation program, in accordance with WIOA requirements, is currently in the process of making changes to its case management system and data collection activities to align with common measures. In addition, OOD is collecting and evaluating baseline performance data to prepare for the negotiation of performance levels with the Rehabilitation Services Administration. (Page 69)

Under WIA, the vocational rehabilitation (VR) program was evaluated by standards and indicators unique to the VR program. OOD has met compliance with program standards and indicators, which relate to the number and quality of employment outcomes achieved by the program. As noted previously, OOD is currently in the process of making changes in its case management system to align with the common measures under WIOA. In addition baseline data related to the common measures is being established and evaluated. It should be noted that for newly required data elements, such as skill gains and attainment, a period of data collection will be required to establish this baseline data. (Page 73)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Using the vision of a workforce system that is driven by the needs of business, adaptive to rapid change, innovative and integrated in design and delivery, and entrepreneurial in spirit as its starting point, through OWT, the state prioritized its work into goals for preparing an educated and skilled workforce, including youth and individuals with barriers to employment and other populations, and the goals for meeting the skilled workforce needs of employers. The state established three strategic goals to accomplish WIOA’s primary purposes: (Page 36)

How the local board will strategize to implement the goals and reform principles of the Combined State Plan.

5.The examination of how the local board will coordinate local workforce developmentactivities with regional economic development activities that are carried out in the localarea and how the local board will promote entrepreneurial skills training andmicroenterprise services.

6. An explanation of the OhioMeansJobs delivery system in the local area, including:

  • How the local board will ensure the continuous improvement of eligible providers ofservices through the system and that such providers will meet the employment needs oflocal employers, workers, and jobseekers (Page 348)
  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities;
  • How the local board will coordinate with the regional JobsOhio; and
  • The roles and resource contributions of the OhioMeansJobs center partners. (Page 351)

Ohio’s standards for OhioMeansJobs center certification also will include requirements to not only comply with the ADA, but also Sec 188 of WIOA. Certification will require OhioMeansJobs staff to receive training to understand and better serve individuals with disabilities. Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Pages 84-85)

Many small businesses get their start and/or are supported by local business incubators, chambers of commerce and small business development centers. ODA and Ohio’s SCSEP operators will continue to cultivate relationships with these organizations at the local and state levels and where appropriate develop host–agency relationships. By serving as host agencies and utilizing SCSEP participates these organizations can highlight the benefits of older workers to their members and constituencies and make the SCSEP program a referral source for unsubsidized employment. (Page 278)

Career Pathways

ABLE is Ohio’s front–line program to help adults without a high school diploma or equivalency. ABLE is the foundation on which workforce education is built, therefore providing the fundamental skills for individuals to be successful in job training and employment. Remedial services provided through ABLE are contextualized to meet the diverse needs of individuals’ career pathways. The single biggest challenge the ABLE program faces in Ohio is a lack of awareness about what ABLE is and the wide–range of free services the program provides. (Pages 27-28)

Ohio’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) program is aligning its on–the–job training strategy and policies with Title I employment and training and Trade Adjustment Assistance programs for seamless service delivery for businesses. The VR program also is working to increase utilization and access to the Workforce Inventory of Education and Training – Ohio’s eligible training provider system – which includes connection with apprenticeship programs. To further that connection, VR is working with Ohio’s Apprenticeship Council to develop career pathways for transitioning youth to enter into the programs. (Page 32)

  • All state-approved secondary career-technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS);
  • Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state-approved career-technical program and for state weighted career-technical funding.
  • The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS.
  • A secondary program that operates under a state-approved POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria;
  • Once all secondary programs operate under a state-approved POS and meet QPS, all programs can also be identified as Tech Prep programs;
  • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students;
  • Effective academic/career counseling and effective Individual Education Plan (IEP) development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs;
  • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success;
  • High expectations will be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers;”
    • A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high level academic and technical achievement.
    • A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. (Page 249)
Employment Networks

Aligning and implementing the best practices of the current and future Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects. Commerce, ICCB, and Department of Human Services Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) have worked with regional and local partners to increase the participation of individuals with disabilities (aged 18 and above) in integrated career pathway and academic programs through community colleges and non-profit organizations in cooperation with American Job Centers, Local Workforce Innovation Boards (LWIB), employment networks and other regional partners. (Page 135)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 68

2017 Transformation Series: Building Innovative Service Models - 05/01/2017

“Ohio's continued efforts to assist every individual of working age to gain community-based employment is largely supported by provider agencies across the state. These agencies are collectively working through a systems change process that will enable the strengthening and support of community-based service options for individuals with disabilities. The 2017 Transformation Series provides an opportunity for provider agencies to gather and share ideas, strategies, and practices that will assist them as they move through the systems change process and help improve person-centered planning and employment opportunities for individuals across Ohio.

Efforts are focused on two face-to-face events in the spring of 2017:

Phase 1: Provider Agency Site Visits

Phase 2: 2017 Transformation Summit”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

DOL - 08/03/2016

WIASRD elements for IWT: Waiver to allow states to discontinue collection of 7 WIASRD data elements for incumbent workers. requested: 9/12 decided: 12/12 expires: 6/17

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Citations

Ohio 2016-2017 Budget: Historic Investments for Ohioans with Developmental Disabilities - 07/01/2016

"Governor Kasich’s historic budget invests $286 million ($116.5 million State share) over the next two years to increase opportunities for Ohioans with disabilities to live and work in the community. The initiatives in this budget expand supports for those who are waiting for services, increase opportunities for community participation, and improve the experience for those who are receiving services by modernizing our programs and strengthening the direct care force….

The budget continues to prioritize funding to reflect the growing demand for Home and Community-Based Services. Funding will allow DODD to add nursing services to the IO waiver to enable people with medical needs to live in community settings, provide for much-deserved increase for direct care staff, increase the availability of add-on services for individuals with complex needs and behavioral challenges, provide training for those who receive, plan, and deliver waiver services, and strengthen oversight and quality assurance efforts so the person-centered plan is delivering meaningful outcomes."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Rights OH, National Federation of the Blind, and Autistic Self Advocacy Network Celebrate Landmark Decision Ordering Fair Pay - 02/03/2016

COLUMBUS, OHIO – In a precedent-setting opinion issued by an administrative law judge from the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL), three clients have been awarded minimum wage going forward and back pay from Seneca Re-Ad, a sheltered workshop run by the Seneca County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The original petition was filed by Disability Rights Ohio (DRO), the National Federation of the Blind, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and the Baltimore law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Fair Pay from Sheltered Workshops (2016) - 02/02/2016

This case arises under Section 214(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act ("Act"), 29 U.S.C. §214(c). Ralph ("Joe") Magers, Pamela Steward and Mark Felton ("Petitioners") are employees of Seneca Re-Ad Industries ("Respondent"), which is located in Fostoria, Ohio. Each of the Petitioners has been diagnosed with one or more developmental disabilities and each receives services from the Seneca County (Ohio) Board of Developmental Disabilities ("DD").  Employment at Respondent's Fostoria manufacturing facility is one of the services provided by DD.  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Employment First Project Update (February 2016) - 02/01/2016

“As part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Transition plan, services and rates are being updated for Adult Day waiver services. Input was gathered from community forums and stakeholder workgroups throughout 2014 and 2015. These new services will be focused on person centered planning and individual outcomes. New services will start being used on October 1, 2016.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio VR Provider Manual - 11/23/2015

The VR Provider Manual provides service descriptions and requirements for services including career exploration, job development, retention, job seeking skills training, and customized employment, among others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio HB 155 - 10/15/2015

A bill to amend section 2329.66 and to enact sections 113.50, 113.51, 113.52, 113.53, 113.54, 113.55, and 113.56 of the Revised Code to require the Treasurer of State to create a program [ABLE] offering federally tax-advantaged savings accounts used to pay for a person's qualified disability expenses and to disregard the value of and income from that account in determining whether that person is eligible for state or local means-tested public assistance.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Ohio HB 155 - 10/15/2015

A bill to amend section 2329.66 and to enact sections 113.50, 113.51, 113.52, 113.53, 113.54, 113.55, and 113.56 of the Revised Code to require the Treasurer of State to create a program [ABLE] offering federally tax-advantaged savings accounts used to pay for a person's qualified disability expenses and to disregard the value of and income from that account in determining whether that person is eligible for state or local means-tested public assistance.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Ohio SB 316: IEP and Post-secondary Transition Requirements - 09/24/2012

Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is fourteen years of age, and update annually thereafter, a statement describing:

Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills; Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described in divisions (H)(1) and (2) of this section.

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Rev. Code §5126.05: County Board - Powers & Duties - 09/24/2012

“Implement an employment first policy that clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age who receives services from the board…”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

5123.022 OH State Policy Regarding Community Employment for Disabled - 09/24/2012

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of this state that employment services for individuals with developmental disabilities be directed at community employment. Every individual with a developmental disability is presumed capable of community employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OH Rev. Code Ann. §§123.152 - Encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program. - 09/29/2005

As used in this section, "EDGE business enterprise" means a sole proprietorship, association, partnership, corporation, limited liability corporation, or joint venture certified as a participant in the encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program by the director of administrative services under this section of the Revised Code.   Social disadvantage based on any of the following:  - A rebuttable presumption when the business owner or owners demonstrate membership in a racial minority group or show personal disadvantage due to color, ethnic origin, gender, physical disability, long-term residence in an environment isolated from the mainstream of American society, location in an area of high unemployment;   
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Ohio Employment First Executive Order - 03/19/2012

All state agencies providing supports and services to Ohio’s individuals with developmental disabilities are required to align policies and procedures to support community employment and fulfill the Employment First requirement that community employment is the preferred outcome for working-age adults.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Ohio 2016-2017 Budget: Historic Investments for Ohioans with Developmental Disabilities - 07/01/2016

"Governor Kasich’s historic budget invests $286 million ($116.5 million State share) over the next two years to increase opportunities for Ohioans with disabilities to live and work in the community. The initiatives in this budget expand supports for those who are waiting for services, increase opportunities for community participation, and improve the experience for those who are receiving services by modernizing our programs and strengthening the direct care force….

The budget continues to prioritize funding to reflect the growing demand for Home and Community-Based Services. Funding will allow DODD to add nursing services to the IO waiver to enable people with medical needs to live in community settings, provide for much-deserved increase for direct care staff, increase the availability of add-on services for individuals with complex needs and behavioral challenges, provide training for those who receive, plan, and deliver waiver services, and strengthen oversight and quality assurance efforts so the person-centered plan is delivering meaningful outcomes."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment First Project Update (February 2016) - 02/01/2016

“As part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Transition plan, services and rates are being updated for Adult Day waiver services. Input was gathered from community forums and stakeholder workgroups throughout 2014 and 2015. These new services will be focused on person centered planning and individual outcomes. New services will start being used on October 1, 2016.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio VR Provider Manual - 11/23/2015

The VR Provider Manual provides service descriptions and requirements for services including career exploration, job development, retention, job seeking skills training, and customized employment, among others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

OH Vocational Rehabilitation Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment - 09/30/2015

“Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD), Division of Performance and Innovation (DPI), produced this 2015 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) building upon the framework methodology developed from the 2012 CSNA, which was designed to assess the vocational rehabilitation (VR) service needs of individuals related to six primary disability categories. These disabilities include visual impairments, hearing impairments, communicative impairments, physical impairments, psychosocial impairments and cognitive impairments. This methodology focuses on penetration rates (of the extent to which OOD was serving prospective jobseekers with disabilities), and proportionality (how well OOD is balanced in serving the cross-section of individuals with disabilities who are seeking employment).” The VR sets forth 9 recommendations to be set as priorities over the next year in order to improve integrated employment opportunities and community inclusion.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan (VR Rehabilitation Services Program) - FY 2015 - 09/30/2014

The State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program: Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 states that staff should build competencies on, and promote the employment practices such as customized employment, self-employment, and supported employment, among others.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Guide to Policy and Procedure Development - 07/31/2014

"The Employment First Rule, 5123: 2-2-05, requires county boards to adopt and implement a local Employment First Policy which clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age. The following is guidance developed in response to multiple requests from county boards."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Funding System Re-Design for Ohio’s Employment First Initiative: Review of Promising Models from Other States - 06/02/2014

This report aims to provide DODD with a comparison of funding structures from multiple states with high rates of integrated employment, including at least one state with a local tax base funding structure. The first 3 Key Principles for establishing a funding system to support Employment First uphold that, “The system should be based upon a presumption of competency, employability and ‘zero reject’ for each person with a disability, regardless of complexity; The system should reward providers for best practice implementation of Individual Supported Employment; [and] The system should require provider standards and staff training/certification to assure equal statewide access to and opportunity for Individual Supported Employment.” There are 9 principles in total that guide that together guide the structure and implementation of Employment First.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Administrative Rule (5123: 2-2-05) - 04/01/2014

“The purpose of this rule is to implement the employment first policy in accordance with section 5123.022 of the Revised Code… This rule applies to county boards of developmental disabilities and providers responsible for planning, coordinating, or providing employment services, regardless of funding source, to individuals with developmental disabilities.”

·       Community Employment is competitive employment that takes place in an integrated setting

·       Every individual of working age will have a person-centered planning process to identify their desired employment outcome and their place on the path to community employment

·       Services and supports will be provided to help the individual move along the path to community employment

·       County boards are required to develop and implement an Employment First policy, set benchmarks to increase community employment outcomes, partner with schools to enhance transition planning, share information with individuals, families, schools, employers, providers and others in the community about Medicaid Buy-In, and collect employment data on individuals served

·       Providers are required to submit progress reports at least every 12 months to ensure the individual is moving along the path to community employment and collect employment data on individuals served

   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio's Path to Employment First - 02/01/2014

“Successful implementation of Employment First requires a multi-pronged approach and a long-term commitment to systems change…. A comprehensive approach must focus on key strategies; all designed to work synergistically to impact a service structure that better supports people to achieve community employment and directs more resources toward that preferred outcome.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio - “New Requirements for Secondary Transition Services for Students with Disabilities: Frequently Asked Questions” - 09/19/2012

The New Requirements state that IEPs must start at age 14, update annually and contain,

“Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills;  Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; and The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described [above]…”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP) - 09/01/2015

"The Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities are partnering to improve post-secondary outcomes for students with disabilities, beginning at age 14. This innovative collaboration will change the nature and impact of transition services for students with disabilities in Ohio. The new model will help students with disabilities get a head start on becoming job ready and better prepared to enter the workforce with the skills necessary to be successful in today’s workforce."

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

People First of OH comments in response to "Ohio's Draft Plan to Comply with New Federal Horne and Community-Based Services Requirements” - 01/20/2015

ORO is submitting these comments to "Ohio's Draft Plan to Comply with New Federal Home and Community-Based Services Requirements," which was released to the public o n December 15, 2014.   The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ("CMS") has issued new rules for states'1915( c) home and community-based services (" HCBS") waiver programs ("waiver programs"), defining for the first time "home and community-based settings" eligible for continued federal waiver funding. CMS has required states to create transition plans specifying how they will comply with these new rules and to allow the public to provide input on their proposed plans before they are finalized.”   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

People First of Ohio Call to Action: “Blazing New Trails to Employment” - 04/25/2012

“People First's employment "Call to Action" and its regional forums brought together hundreds of self-advocates, family members, county board staff, providers, and staff from the Rehabilitation Services Commission and the Ohio Legal Rights Service, to understand Ohio's transition and job service systems; hear about the types of jobs and training people with developmental and intellectual disabilities (DD/ID) want; and plan for more job opportunities, and better wages and benefits for people with disabilities. People First fully supports the Governor's Executive Order 2012-0SK to make Ohio an "Employment First" state.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

VR SE Partnership

This booklet outlines implementation strategies for collaboration between local offices of state vocational rehabilitation (VR) services and mental health service organizations that provide Supported Employment, the evidence-based practice (SE-EBP), to consumers who have a severe mental illness. Strategies for the VR and SE partnership are organized into three stages of collaboration.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Mental Illness/Developmental Disabilities (MIDD) Coordinating Center of Excellence

“The MIDD CCOE promotes clinical best practices for individuals with mental illness and developmental disabilities. It is a collaborate effort involving ODMH, the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, and the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.  With the goal of providing appropriate treatment for individuals with co-occurring mental illness and developmental disabilities, the CCOE assists local systems throughout Ohio to increase their service capacity and foster collaboration.”   Supported Employment “Supported Employment/Individual Placement and Support (SE/IPS) is an evidence-based practice that helps people with mental illness and other disabilities identify and acquire part-time or full-time jobs of their choice in the community with rapid job-search and placement services. It emphasizes that employment is not the result of treatment and recovery but integral to both. SE/IPS is different from traditional vocational rehabilitation. It emphasizes consumer choice and utilizes rapid job-search and placement services, time-unlimited and individualized follow-along services, and many other important strategies.”  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio NAMI Supported Employment Family Advocacy Project

“This collaboration between NAMI Ohio and the Ohio Department of Mental Health engages families of individuals with mental illness to advocate for, create and expand high-quality Individual Placement and Support (IPS) programs. Family involvement can strengthen the partnerships between providers, family members and consumers around SE services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Partnership for Employment First Guide

The Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, in partnership with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities Agency, has announced a statewide initiative to expand community employment services for people with developmental disabilities. This opportunity will allow the state to maximize resources to support more people on their path to community employment, build system capacity, and strengthen the relationship between the developmental disability and vocational rehabilitation systems in Ohio.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Ohio Employment First Taskforce Common Principles

“The Ohio Employment First Taskforce agencies agree that community employment should be the first option for all working age adults and transition-age youth with developmental disabilities. Employment First is a philosophy of service that presumes that all Ohioans with significant disabilities can and should have opportunities to work in the community”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Mental Health and Addiction Services (Ohio MHAS) Supported Employment Project - 07/01/2014

"Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services (MHAS) and its partners are implementing the Supported Employment Project. This project reduces the high unemployment rates for young adults and adults with a severe and persistent mental illness who may have co-occurring substance use disorders.

Two local sites are implementing new programs, and a committee will oversee statewide training, policy changes, and evaluation. The evidence-based practice of Individual Placement and Support employment is being shared statewide through training and technical assistance."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Workplace Initiative Ohio - 11/01/2013

"The Central Ohio Workplace Initiative has been renamed the Workplace initiative of Ohio (WIO) to reflect the expansion of the family foundation funded project across the state.  The purpose of the Workplace Initiative of Ohio (WIO) is to create demand among Ohio businesses for talented career seekers with disabilities in healthcare, hospitality, distribution, banking, retail, and other industries. Employers benefit from streamlined candidate sourcing, pre-screening, training assistance and more.

On November 1, 2013, OHBLN and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) began working on a project funded by a grant from a private foundation concerned about the high unemployment rate of individuals with disabilities. The purpose of WIO is to work with businesses to create demand for qualified job seekers with disabilities in distribution, retail, health care and other industries."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OCALI Customized Employment Project - 03/01/2009

"With funding from the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), OCALI launched a customized employment project in March 2009 for two school based transition teams, Claymont High School with Tuscarawas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and Huber Heights High School with Montgomery County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The goal of the project was to increase community employment outcomes for transition aged youth using customized employment strategies and processes. Team members received training and consultation in the CE process, Social Security Work Incentives and working with employers. Teams included school, developmental disability, and vocational rehabilitation staff, plus a parent mentor. In November of 2009 the project received additional funding from DODD to add another team from Lucas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and to provide up to 40 paid internships for youth with disabilities using customized employment strategies and processes in the Lucas County and Montgomery County sites. The Tuscarawas County site obtained funding from DODD, “We Go To Work Grants” to fund resource ownership as an employment strategy."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Disability Employment Initiative

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2011, was awarded a Round 2 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This grant ended in 2014.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Ohio Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The…grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities”. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 40,500 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2013.  The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

2017 Transformation Series: Building Innovative Service Models - 05/01/2017

“Ohio's continued efforts to assist every individual of working age to gain community-based employment is largely supported by provider agencies across the state. These agencies are collectively working through a systems change process that will enable the strengthening and support of community-based service options for individuals with disabilities. The 2017 Transformation Series provides an opportunity for provider agencies to gather and share ideas, strategies, and practices that will assist them as they move through the systems change process and help improve person-centered planning and employment opportunities for individuals across Ohio.

Efforts are focused on two face-to-face events in the spring of 2017:

Phase 1: Provider Agency Site Visits

Phase 2: 2017 Transformation Summit”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio RSC Customized Employment, Griffin Hammis Associates, LLC - 01/25/2012

This video on the Ohio RSC Customized Employment Project includes testimonials from staff, leaders, and job seekers and business owners who have benefited from the program. It is both an interesting description of, and a compelling case for, Customized Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Ohio Employment First Transition Framework

"Ohio Employment First Transition Framework is a critical component to the Ohio Employment First structure and is intended to address barriers to transition planning and services in order to achieve meaningful adult outcomes. The Framework was developed by stakeholders from multiple agencies to create processes and highlight practices that can be used by all agencies. These common processes assist professionals to plan, prepare, empower, educate, and connect across systems so as to consistently assist youth with disabilities to realize meaningful, community employment and other valued aspects of adult life.

The Framework is built on three non-negotiable foundational elements that together create a 'filter' to examine the practices and procedures used when working and supporting transition youth. The foundational elements for the activity and practices of the Framework are:

Person-centered. The youth is where the team efforts begin and end. Policies and practices must be flexible enough to respond to individual strengths and needs. Agency-neutral. As agencies come together to collaborate, activity should occur in a manner where all involved see value for the youth and no single agency policies or procedures are considered the priority. Outcome-focused. The common focus of the collaborative efforts are the meaningful adult life outcomes."
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Loop Ohio

"Welcome to Loop Ohio, Ohio’s virtual Community of Practice! This online community is dedicated to facilitating statewide and local, cross system collaboration and learning, with a focus on promoting best practices in community development and inclusion for people with disabilities. Ohio is a national leader in these efforts, primarily because of the innovative work being done all across the state, throughout our local communities. Loop Ohio provides a platform for community members and professionals to share ideas and resources, solve problems, break down barriers, connect across distance, and engage in ongoing learning. Loop Ohio is multi-functional, enabling people to have live virtual conversations, share resources, post events, lead and participate in webinars, use discussion boards, have online chat time with subject matter experts and more."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

OH Job Seekers Toolkit

"The Job Seekers Guide will help you learn how to get a job and will give you some tools that will help along the way."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Livin’ the Dream Toolkit

"Employment among people with mental illness is very low despite research that strongly supports the critical impact that work plays in promoting recovery. The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) is committed to helping individuals find and keep jobs that help them become independent and productive. Toward this goal, OhioMHAS supports technical assistance, consultation and training to provider organizations and consumer-operated peer centers.

The Main Place, a Consumer Operated Services (COS) organization, developed a non-proprietary curriculum and training materials that can be used by COS organizations statewide to address issues related the impact of poverty on the recovery of adults experiencing serious and persistent mental illness, as well as encourage consumers in obtaining employment. The working title for the Tool Kit is "Livin' the Dream". The Main Place trained staff and consumer volunteers as facilitators to implement the curriculum in Licking and Knox Counties. Consumers throughout the state can now have access to the workbooks for programming and services in their own communities."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Customized Employment Training Series

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services and Griffin-Hammis Associates are sponsoring classroom training, on-line instruction, special topics webinars, and technical assistance on Customized Employment for designated Job Center staff and partners, to support individuals with significant disabilities and complex barriers to employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Orientation to Supported Employment Web Course

This Web-based training is an introduction to the competencies for effective supported employment. Please follow this link to register:

https://trn-store.com/trn-courses/entry/OHIntroductionRegister.php

Seven lessons will cover the following topics:

Values, Definitions, History Legislation, Funding, Ohio’s Employment First Roles and Rights Supported Employment Process and Benefits Career Planning, Discovery, Vocational Profile Marketing and Job Development Job Design and Training, Natural Supports
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Customized Employment Guide

“This guide provides a look at the strategies used in Customized Employment (CE) and links to more information and resources for those who are just beginning to explore CE. It explains how CE might benefit individuals with disabilities seeking employment and students in transition from school to work. CE is based on several evidence based transition practices such as self-determination, using self-advocacy strategies, and providing community based instruction. Learn about OCALI’s experience with three teams in Ohio that served transition age youth. In addition to traditional funding sources these teams had access to funding for internships and resource ownership.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Customized Employment: Best Practice of Today

This presentation intertwines Customized Employment into Employment First as a key component to the state’s efforts in promoting community-based, integrated employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Disability Rights OH, National Federation of the Blind, and Autistic Self Advocacy Network Celebrate Landmark Decision Ordering Fair Pay - 02/03/2016

COLUMBUS, OHIO – In a precedent-setting opinion issued by an administrative law judge from the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL), three clients have been awarded minimum wage going forward and back pay from Seneca Re-Ad, a sheltered workshop run by the Seneca County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The original petition was filed by Disability Rights Ohio (DRO), the National Federation of the Blind, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and the Baltimore law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Fair Pay from Sheltered Workshops (2016) - 02/02/2016

This case arises under Section 214(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act ("Act"), 29 U.S.C. §214(c). Ralph ("Joe") Magers, Pamela Steward and Mark Felton ("Petitioners") are employees of Seneca Re-Ad Industries ("Respondent"), which is located in Fostoria, Ohio. Each of the Petitioners has been diagnosed with one or more developmental disabilities and each receives services from the Seneca County (Ohio) Board of Developmental Disabilities ("DD").  Employment at Respondent's Fostoria manufacturing facility is one of the services provided by DD.  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

DOL - 08/03/2016

WIASRD elements for IWT: Waiver to allow states to discontinue collection of 7 WIASRD data elements for incumbent workers. requested: 9/12 decided: 12/12 expires: 6/17

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Citations

Ohio ESEA Flexibility Request - 08/21/2015

“By submitting this updated ESEA flexibility request, the SEA renews its request for flexibility through waivers of the nine ESEA requirements listed below and their associated regulatory, administrative, and reporting requirements, as well as any optional waivers the SEA has chosen to request under ESEA flexibility…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio’s HCBS Transition Plan - 03/13/2015

“Governor John Kasich created the Office of Health Transformation (OHT) to lead the Administration’s efforts to modernize Medicaid and streamline health and human services programs. Using an innovative approach that involves collaboration among multiple state agency partners and a set of shared guiding principles, reform initiatives are improving services, thus enabling seniors and people with disabilities to live with dignity in the setting they prefer, especially their own home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Balancing Incentives Program - 06/15/2013

"The Ohio Department of Medicaid is committed to removing barriers and expanding access to long-term care received in home and community-based settings. In conjunction with the Governor’s Office of Health Transformation and additional state agencies, Ohio Medicaid is an active participant in the Balancing Incentive Program.

In June 2013, the Ohio Department of Medicaid was awarded more than $169 million in additional federal medical assistance percentage (FMAP) for its commitment to direct half of all Medicaid long-term care funding to home and community-based services (HCBS) by September 30, 2015."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Buy-in for Workers with Disabilities - 04/01/2008

"Medicaid Buy-In for Workers with Disabilities (MBIWD) is an Ohio Medicaid program that provides health care coverage to working Ohioans with disabilities. Historically, people with disabilities were often discouraged from working because their earnings made them ineligible for Medicaid coverage. MBIWD was created to enable Ohioans with disabilities to work and still keep their health care coverage."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Ohio Medicaid State Plan

The State Plan is a comprehensive written statement that describes the nature and scope of the Ohio Medicaid program and assures that it is administered in conformity with federal requirements and regulations.  The information provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and ODM disclaims any obligation or liability based upon its use. The formally adopted state plan, statutes, and rules governing the Ohio Medicaid program prevail over any conflicting information provided here.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 40,500 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2013.  The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Ohio until 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

How Does Work Impact My Benefits?

“If you are receiving benefits from the government (money, services, staff, medical care), you may be worried that if you work, you will not get those services. This page can help you learn what will change as you start to make your own money. You will also learn about some special benefits for workers!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

States - Phablet

Snapshot

 In Ohio Employment First is for "Every person. Every talent. Every opportunity

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Ohio’s Vocational VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.17%
Change from
2014 to 2015
11,613,423
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.87%
Change from
2014 to 2015
847,932
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.55%
Change from
2014 to 2015
298,233
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.71%
Change from
2014 to 2015
35.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.85%
Change from
2014 to 2015
77.69%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 11,613,423
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 847,932
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 298,233
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,814,281
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.69%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 758,987
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 834,325
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,310,817
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 215,042
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 42,867
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,523
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 12,705
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 507
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 40,094
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 9,624

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 18,435
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 356,826

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 10,079
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 28,199
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 47,662
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,450
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,037
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 719
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.00

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 135
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 85
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.73

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
12,039
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 908
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 760
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,252
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 3,533
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 3,718
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 868
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,377
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 570,448
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $91,872,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $132,663,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $539,890,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 22.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 17,902
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 13,537
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 64.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.92%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.34%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 29.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 37.18%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,552,533
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 4,128
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 175,646
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 500,082
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 675,727
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 233
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 531
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 764
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,787,410
AbilityOne wages (services). $6,697,054

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 62
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 64
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 21
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8,076
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8,097

 

WIOA Proflie

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Employment First, Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities, Assistive Technology of Ohio, and the Ohio Departments of Aging, Developmental Disabilities, Job and Family Services, Medicaid, and Mental Health and Addiction Services collaborated on the creation of the site. (Page 46)

Transition services are funded by the various state agencies that serve the individual youth in accordance with requirements under WIOA, IDEA and other pertinent laws. In addition to the Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Ohio’s Employment First Task Force works across multiple systems to align policies and practices and issues guidance to the field as needed to ensure that students receive the services needed to ensure achievement of employment and other post-secondary outcomes. (Page 150)

In FFY 2013, OOD in partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) established a dual certification program as part of the Employment First Partnership Agreement. This dual certification program is designed to ensure continuity of services and allow for more successful transition from time–limited to long–term supports. In addition, it is designed to better respond to the needs of individuals served by the program as well as our business partners.151-allowing them to provide VR services to individuals being served by OOD in the Employment First Partnership. Performance–based job development is utilized to ensure a more outcome–focused method of service provision. Staff providing services under this waiver must pass an online course and attend mandatory trainings on VR services, fee schedules, billing, and reporting expectations before they can begin providing services. They must also attend in–person trainings on employer engagement and on–the–job supports within one year of passing the online supported employment web course to continue providing services. (Page 151-152)

As mentioned previously, OOD partners with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) to expand vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to individuals with developmental disabilities as part of the state’s overall Employment First Initiative. It also should be noted that DODD is the lead agency for Ohio’s Employment First initiative, which was signed by Governor Kasich in March 2012. OOD is an active member of the Employment First Task Force, which is examining existing practices in the state system to identify and address barriers to employment for people with developmental and other disabilities. (Page 157)

In 2015 and continuing into 2016, Ohio has been selected as a core state in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. Through this grant, which is funded through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), the Employment First Taskforce has identified action steps that each agency will complete to promote the core principles for transition in Ohio:

  • Competitive, integrated employment is expectation for all youth with disabilities;
  • Transition planning for youth requires multi–agency collaboration;
  • Early dialogue with individuals and families is critical to ensuring employment outcomes;
  • There are multiple pathways to employment; and
  • Person–centered planning is key to the development of effective services and supports for transition–age youth. (Page 158)

OOD will provide targeted training to enhance personnel development. This will include targeted training on Employment First, supported employment, eligibility, transition procedures and clarification of roles and responsibilities of OOD and school personnel. (Page 160)

Mental health: OOD’s service provision is higher for individuals with psychosocial and cognitive impairments. This is most likely explained by the fact that OOD in the past four years has concentrated efforts through focused contracts with local Mental Health and Drug Addiction boards, local Developmental Disabilities boards, and most recently through the Ohio Department Developmental Disabilities funding for Employment First. Each of these populations also has an organized representative presence through established county public agencies across the state. (Page 169)

OOD has several Interagency Agreements that are designed to implement service delivery models that will increase outcomes for specific populations served by the VR program. The Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and the Ohio Transition Support Program with the Ohio Department of Education are both examples of this. (Page 179)

Employment First Partnership Agreement: OOD has continued its Employment First (EF) Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities. OOD has expanded the number of VR counselors providing services under the agreement from 15 to 25 counselors during this time period. In FFY 2015, the EF program exceeded all performance goals. This includes exceeding its rehabilitation goal by 150 percent and its plan development goal by 200 percent. (Page184) and (Page 186)

Employment (second and fourth Quarter after exit): Adult and Dislocated Worker: Historical WIA data exists for these cohorts for us to use in calculations and projections. Applying the employed second quarter after exit to the historical WIA population yields only a modest difference between WIA’s entered employment first quarter after exit and WIOA’s employment second quarter after exit for these two cohorts. Therefore, we propose using the PY 2015 WIA common measure level as a starting point for establishing a performance history for the second quarter after exit measure. For the fourth quarter after exit, (Page 310)

Customized Employment

Other VR or support services needed to ensure success in community employment;

  • Follow–up and monitoring of job performance during the stabilization process;
  • Discrete post–employment services not commonly available from those who provide extended services;
  • Identification and development/facilitation of natural supports; and
  • Customized employment. (Page 188)
Braiding/Blending Resources

Disability resource coordinator staff in OhioMeansJobs centers implemented Ohio’s strategic components, which included deploying integrated resource teams, leveraging partner funds and resources, customized employment, and asset development. Through this initiative OhioMeansAccessibility.com was added to OhioMeansJob.com. (Page 284)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

How the local board will facilitate access to services provided through the OhioMeansJobs delivery system through the use of technology and other means;

  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities. (Page 348)
  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities;
  • How the local board will coordinate with the regional JobsOhio; and
  • The roles and resource contributions of the OhioMeansJobs center partners. 351 Ohio’s standards for OhioMeansJobs center certification also will include requirements to not only comply with the ADA, but also Sec 188 of WIOA. Certification will require OhioMeansJobs staff to receive training to understand and better serve individuals with disabilities. Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Pages 84-85)
DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

One In 2011, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) received a three–year Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) demonstration grant project to improve the education, training, and employment opportunities and outcomes for adults who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Three OhioMeansJobs centers in Cleveland, Portsmouth and Toledo operated the DEI grant project. Disability resource coordinator staff in OhioMeansJobs centers implemented Ohio’s strategic components, which included deploying integrated resource teams, leveraging partner funds and resources, customized employment, and asset development. Through this initiative OhioMeansAccessibility.com was added to OhioMeansJobs.com. (Page 248)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

OOD projects a continued need to hire VR staff in the above referenced classifications over the course of this Combined State Plan. OOD prioritizes the use of available resources to hire direct service personnel and therefore, the greatest area of need will likely continue to be VR counselors and caseload assistants as well as supervisory staff. OOD has been aggressively pursuing strategies to improve the cost effectiveness of the VR program. Identified cost savings are reinvested strategically to further improve performance for the VR program. A projected area of increased need over the course of this plan will likely be for staff hired to provide “in–house” job development and/or work incentives counseling services. OOD has been piloting these new service delivery models during FFY 2015 and, based upon the success of the pilots, is poised to increase investments in this area. (Page 160)

In FFY 2015, OOD piloted the provision of both job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning) services through “in–house” personnel. OOD is currently in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots to determine the extent to which they resulted in increased outcomes and reduced time to placement. It is anticipated that OOD will expand the use of this service delivery model over the course of this Combined State Plan. (Page 179)In–House Service Delivery: In FFY 2015, OOD conducted in–house service delivery pilots in the areas of job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning). OOD is in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots and expects to expand this service delivery model in FFY 2016. (Page 184)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Follow–up services for not less than 12 months;

  • Comprehensive guidance and counseling;
  • Financial literacy education;
  • Entrepreneurial skills training;
  • Labor market and employment information; and
  • Activities to prepare for and transition to post–secondary education and training.

These services will be made available and/or will be provided through the procured youth provider. Assurance that all local workforce development areas and the lead agency are making the 14 program elements available and implemented will be done through the state monitoring program. (Page 101)

Through collaboration with local workforce development partners and alignment with the regional or local plan, ABLE programs will assist English language learners with career goals by offering integrated English literacy and civics education concurrently with integrated education and training as part of a career pathway. Integrated education and training will focus on in–demand occupations that lead to economic self–sufficiency. Successful career pathways, leading to educational and career advancement for ABLE students, will require coordinated design, delivery, and evaluation amongst all local workforce development partners In PY2016, ODHE will plan and coordinate with state-level workforce development partners to provide guidance and technical assistance to eligible providers who seek to implement, beginning PY2017, an IELCE program in combination with integrated education and training under section 243. (Page 136)

Benefits

Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence;

  • Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross–agency planning and earlier career preparation; and
  • Improves strategies to ensure that students with disabilities secure employment prior to graduation and connect with long–term supports services when needed and available to ensure long term success.
  • Educates parents and youth on work incentives planning by comparing benefits of work versus SSI. (Page 37)

OOD has traditionally relied fully on fee for service purchasing of VR services from Community Rehabilitation Programs. In FFY 2015, OOD piloted the provision of both job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning) services through “in–house” personnel. OOD is currently in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots to determine the extent to which they resulted in increased outcomes and reduced time to placement. It is anticipated that OOD will expand the use of this service delivery model over the course of this Combined State Plan. (Page 179)

School to Work Transition

Under WIA, the vocational rehabilitation (VR) program was evaluated by standards and indicators unique to the VR program. OOD has met compliance with program standards and indicators, which relate to the number and quality of employment outcomes achieved by the program. As noted previously, OOD is currently in the process of making changes in its case management system to align with the common measures under WIOA. In addition baseline data related to the common measures is being established and evaluated. It should be noted that for newly required data elements, such as skill gains and attainment, a period of data collection will be required to establish this baseline data. (Page 147)

Data Collection

Under Title IV’s OhioMeansJobs Center partner program, OOD’s vocational rehabilitation program’s case management system – AWARE – is used by approximately 37 state vocational rehabilitation agencies nationwide. OOD also partners with ODJFS to obtain Ohio employment verification and wage data. It should be noted that access to only Ohio wage information limits the VR program from accurately identifying the full population of individuals employed after receiving services (i.e., individuals who may be employed out of state with a federal agency or as an independent contractor are not in the Ohio wage file). OOD will continue to research opportunities to develop additional data collection activities that will support the accurate identification of the full population of individuals employed after receiving vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 62)

Under Title II’s OhioMeansJobs partner program, the ABLELink system is ABLE’s online student information management system. The system collects student information for local program (Page 62)

The vocational rehabilitation program, in accordance with WIOA requirements, is currently in the process of making changes to its case management system and data collection activities to align with common measures. In addition, OOD is collecting and evaluating baseline performance data to prepare for the negotiation of performance levels with the Rehabilitation Services Administration. (Page 69)

Under WIA, the vocational rehabilitation (VR) program was evaluated by standards and indicators unique to the VR program. OOD has met compliance with program standards and indicators, which relate to the number and quality of employment outcomes achieved by the program. As noted previously, OOD is currently in the process of making changes in its case management system to align with the common measures under WIOA. In addition baseline data related to the common measures is being established and evaluated. It should be noted that for newly required data elements, such as skill gains and attainment, a period of data collection will be required to establish this baseline data. (Page 73)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Using the vision of a workforce system that is driven by the needs of business, adaptive to rapid change, innovative and integrated in design and delivery, and entrepreneurial in spirit as its starting point, through OWT, the state prioritized its work into goals for preparing an educated and skilled workforce, including youth and individuals with barriers to employment and other populations, and the goals for meeting the skilled workforce needs of employers. The state established three strategic goals to accomplish WIOA’s primary purposes: (Page 36)

How the local board will strategize to implement the goals and reform principles of the Combined State Plan.

5.The examination of how the local board will coordinate local workforce developmentactivities with regional economic development activities that are carried out in the localarea and how the local board will promote entrepreneurial skills training andmicroenterprise services.

6. An explanation of the OhioMeansJobs delivery system in the local area, including:

  • How the local board will ensure the continuous improvement of eligible providers ofservices through the system and that such providers will meet the employment needs oflocal employers, workers, and jobseekers (Page 348)
  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities;
  • How the local board will coordinate with the regional JobsOhio; and
  • The roles and resource contributions of the OhioMeansJobs center partners. (Page 351)

Ohio’s standards for OhioMeansJobs center certification also will include requirements to not only comply with the ADA, but also Sec 188 of WIOA. Certification will require OhioMeansJobs staff to receive training to understand and better serve individuals with disabilities. Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Pages 84-85)

Many small businesses get their start and/or are supported by local business incubators, chambers of commerce and small business development centers. ODA and Ohio’s SCSEP operators will continue to cultivate relationships with these organizations at the local and state levels and where appropriate develop host–agency relationships. By serving as host agencies and utilizing SCSEP participates these organizations can highlight the benefits of older workers to their members and constituencies and make the SCSEP program a referral source for unsubsidized employment. (Page 278)

Career Pathways

ABLE is Ohio’s front–line program to help adults without a high school diploma or equivalency. ABLE is the foundation on which workforce education is built, therefore providing the fundamental skills for individuals to be successful in job training and employment. Remedial services provided through ABLE are contextualized to meet the diverse needs of individuals’ career pathways. The single biggest challenge the ABLE program faces in Ohio is a lack of awareness about what ABLE is and the wide–range of free services the program provides. (Pages 27-28)

Ohio’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) program is aligning its on–the–job training strategy and policies with Title I employment and training and Trade Adjustment Assistance programs for seamless service delivery for businesses. The VR program also is working to increase utilization and access to the Workforce Inventory of Education and Training – Ohio’s eligible training provider system – which includes connection with apprenticeship programs. To further that connection, VR is working with Ohio’s Apprenticeship Council to develop career pathways for transitioning youth to enter into the programs. (Page 32)

  • All state-approved secondary career-technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS);
  • Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state-approved career-technical program and for state weighted career-technical funding.
  • The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS.
  • A secondary program that operates under a state-approved POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria;
  • Once all secondary programs operate under a state-approved POS and meet QPS, all programs can also be identified as Tech Prep programs;
  • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students;
  • Effective academic/career counseling and effective Individual Education Plan (IEP) development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs;
  • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success;
  • High expectations will be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers;”
    • A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high level academic and technical achievement.
    • A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. (Page 249)
Employment Networks

Aligning and implementing the best practices of the current and future Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects. Commerce, ICCB, and Department of Human Services Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) have worked with regional and local partners to increase the participation of individuals with disabilities (aged 18 and above) in integrated career pathway and academic programs through community colleges and non-profit organizations in cooperation with American Job Centers, Local Workforce Innovation Boards (LWIB), employment networks and other regional partners. (Page 135)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 68

2017 Transformation Series: Building Innovative Service Models - 05/01/2017

“Ohio's continued efforts to assist every individual of working age to gain community-based employment is largely supported by provider agencies across the state. These agencies are collectively working through a systems change process that will enable the strengthening and support of community-based service options for individuals with disabilities. The 2017 Transformation Series provides an opportunity for provider agencies to gather and share ideas, strategies, and practices that will assist them as they move through the systems change process and help improve person-centered planning and employment opportunities for individuals across Ohio.

Efforts are focused on two face-to-face events in the spring of 2017:

Phase 1: Provider Agency Site Visits

Phase 2: 2017 Transformation Summit”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

DOL - 08/03/2016

WIASRD elements for IWT: Waiver to allow states to discontinue collection of 7 WIASRD data elements for incumbent workers. requested: 9/12 decided: 12/12 expires: 6/17

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Citations

Ohio 2016-2017 Budget: Historic Investments for Ohioans with Developmental Disabilities - 07/01/2016

"Governor Kasich’s historic budget invests $286 million ($116.5 million State share) over the next two years to increase opportunities for Ohioans with disabilities to live and work in the community. The initiatives in this budget expand supports for those who are waiting for services, increase opportunities for community participation, and improve the experience for those who are receiving services by modernizing our programs and strengthening the direct care force….

The budget continues to prioritize funding to reflect the growing demand for Home and Community-Based Services. Funding will allow DODD to add nursing services to the IO waiver to enable people with medical needs to live in community settings, provide for much-deserved increase for direct care staff, increase the availability of add-on services for individuals with complex needs and behavioral challenges, provide training for those who receive, plan, and deliver waiver services, and strengthen oversight and quality assurance efforts so the person-centered plan is delivering meaningful outcomes."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Rights OH, National Federation of the Blind, and Autistic Self Advocacy Network Celebrate Landmark Decision Ordering Fair Pay - 02/03/2016

COLUMBUS, OHIO – In a precedent-setting opinion issued by an administrative law judge from the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL), three clients have been awarded minimum wage going forward and back pay from Seneca Re-Ad, a sheltered workshop run by the Seneca County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The original petition was filed by Disability Rights Ohio (DRO), the National Federation of the Blind, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and the Baltimore law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Fair Pay from Sheltered Workshops (2016) - 02/02/2016

This case arises under Section 214(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act ("Act"), 29 U.S.C. §214(c). Ralph ("Joe") Magers, Pamela Steward and Mark Felton ("Petitioners") are employees of Seneca Re-Ad Industries ("Respondent"), which is located in Fostoria, Ohio. Each of the Petitioners has been diagnosed with one or more developmental disabilities and each receives services from the Seneca County (Ohio) Board of Developmental Disabilities ("DD").  Employment at Respondent's Fostoria manufacturing facility is one of the services provided by DD.  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Employment First Project Update (February 2016) - 02/01/2016

“As part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Transition plan, services and rates are being updated for Adult Day waiver services. Input was gathered from community forums and stakeholder workgroups throughout 2014 and 2015. These new services will be focused on person centered planning and individual outcomes. New services will start being used on October 1, 2016.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio VR Provider Manual - 11/23/2015

The VR Provider Manual provides service descriptions and requirements for services including career exploration, job development, retention, job seeking skills training, and customized employment, among others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio HB 155 - 10/15/2015

A bill to amend section 2329.66 and to enact sections 113.50, 113.51, 113.52, 113.53, 113.54, 113.55, and 113.56 of the Revised Code to require the Treasurer of State to create a program [ABLE] offering federally tax-advantaged savings accounts used to pay for a person's qualified disability expenses and to disregard the value of and income from that account in determining whether that person is eligible for state or local means-tested public assistance.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Ohio HB 155 - 10/15/2015

A bill to amend section 2329.66 and to enact sections 113.50, 113.51, 113.52, 113.53, 113.54, 113.55, and 113.56 of the Revised Code to require the Treasurer of State to create a program [ABLE] offering federally tax-advantaged savings accounts used to pay for a person's qualified disability expenses and to disregard the value of and income from that account in determining whether that person is eligible for state or local means-tested public assistance.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Ohio SB 316: IEP and Post-secondary Transition Requirements - 09/24/2012

Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is fourteen years of age, and update annually thereafter, a statement describing:

Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills; Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described in divisions (H)(1) and (2) of this section.

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Rev. Code §5126.05: County Board - Powers & Duties - 09/24/2012

“Implement an employment first policy that clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age who receives services from the board…”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

5123.022 OH State Policy Regarding Community Employment for Disabled - 09/24/2012

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of this state that employment services for individuals with developmental disabilities be directed at community employment. Every individual with a developmental disability is presumed capable of community employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OH Rev. Code Ann. §§123.152 - Encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program. - 09/29/2005

As used in this section, "EDGE business enterprise" means a sole proprietorship, association, partnership, corporation, limited liability corporation, or joint venture certified as a participant in the encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program by the director of administrative services under this section of the Revised Code.   Social disadvantage based on any of the following:  - A rebuttable presumption when the business owner or owners demonstrate membership in a racial minority group or show personal disadvantage due to color, ethnic origin, gender, physical disability, long-term residence in an environment isolated from the mainstream of American society, location in an area of high unemployment;   
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Ohio Employment First Executive Order - 03/19/2012

All state agencies providing supports and services to Ohio’s individuals with developmental disabilities are required to align policies and procedures to support community employment and fulfill the Employment First requirement that community employment is the preferred outcome for working-age adults.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Ohio 2016-2017 Budget: Historic Investments for Ohioans with Developmental Disabilities - 07/01/2016

"Governor Kasich’s historic budget invests $286 million ($116.5 million State share) over the next two years to increase opportunities for Ohioans with disabilities to live and work in the community. The initiatives in this budget expand supports for those who are waiting for services, increase opportunities for community participation, and improve the experience for those who are receiving services by modernizing our programs and strengthening the direct care force….

The budget continues to prioritize funding to reflect the growing demand for Home and Community-Based Services. Funding will allow DODD to add nursing services to the IO waiver to enable people with medical needs to live in community settings, provide for much-deserved increase for direct care staff, increase the availability of add-on services for individuals with complex needs and behavioral challenges, provide training for those who receive, plan, and deliver waiver services, and strengthen oversight and quality assurance efforts so the person-centered plan is delivering meaningful outcomes."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment First Project Update (February 2016) - 02/01/2016

“As part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Transition plan, services and rates are being updated for Adult Day waiver services. Input was gathered from community forums and stakeholder workgroups throughout 2014 and 2015. These new services will be focused on person centered planning and individual outcomes. New services will start being used on October 1, 2016.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio VR Provider Manual - 11/23/2015

The VR Provider Manual provides service descriptions and requirements for services including career exploration, job development, retention, job seeking skills training, and customized employment, among others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

OH Vocational Rehabilitation Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment - 09/30/2015

“Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD), Division of Performance and Innovation (DPI), produced this 2015 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) building upon the framework methodology developed from the 2012 CSNA, which was designed to assess the vocational rehabilitation (VR) service needs of individuals related to six primary disability categories. These disabilities include visual impairments, hearing impairments, communicative impairments, physical impairments, psychosocial impairments and cognitive impairments. This methodology focuses on penetration rates (of the extent to which OOD was serving prospective jobseekers with disabilities), and proportionality (how well OOD is balanced in serving the cross-section of individuals with disabilities who are seeking employment).” The VR sets forth 9 recommendations to be set as priorities over the next year in order to improve integrated employment opportunities and community inclusion.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan (VR Rehabilitation Services Program) - FY 2015 - 09/30/2014

The State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program: Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 states that staff should build competencies on, and promote the employment practices such as customized employment, self-employment, and supported employment, among others.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Guide to Policy and Procedure Development - 07/31/2014

"The Employment First Rule, 5123: 2-2-05, requires county boards to adopt and implement a local Employment First Policy which clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age. The following is guidance developed in response to multiple requests from county boards."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Funding System Re-Design for Ohio’s Employment First Initiative: Review of Promising Models from Other States - 06/02/2014

This report aims to provide DODD with a comparison of funding structures from multiple states with high rates of integrated employment, including at least one state with a local tax base funding structure. The first 3 Key Principles for establishing a funding system to support Employment First uphold that, “The system should be based upon a presumption of competency, employability and ‘zero reject’ for each person with a disability, regardless of complexity; The system should reward providers for best practice implementation of Individual Supported Employment; [and] The system should require provider standards and staff training/certification to assure equal statewide access to and opportunity for Individual Supported Employment.” There are 9 principles in total that guide that together guide the structure and implementation of Employment First.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Administrative Rule (5123: 2-2-05) - 04/01/2014

“The purpose of this rule is to implement the employment first policy in accordance with section 5123.022 of the Revised Code… This rule applies to county boards of developmental disabilities and providers responsible for planning, coordinating, or providing employment services, regardless of funding source, to individuals with developmental disabilities.”

·       Community Employment is competitive employment that takes place in an integrated setting

·       Every individual of working age will have a person-centered planning process to identify their desired employment outcome and their place on the path to community employment

·       Services and supports will be provided to help the individual move along the path to community employment

·       County boards are required to develop and implement an Employment First policy, set benchmarks to increase community employment outcomes, partner with schools to enhance transition planning, share information with individuals, families, schools, employers, providers and others in the community about Medicaid Buy-In, and collect employment data on individuals served

·       Providers are required to submit progress reports at least every 12 months to ensure the individual is moving along the path to community employment and collect employment data on individuals served

   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio's Path to Employment First - 02/01/2014

“Successful implementation of Employment First requires a multi-pronged approach and a long-term commitment to systems change…. A comprehensive approach must focus on key strategies; all designed to work synergistically to impact a service structure that better supports people to achieve community employment and directs more resources toward that preferred outcome.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio - “New Requirements for Secondary Transition Services for Students with Disabilities: Frequently Asked Questions” - 09/19/2012

The New Requirements state that IEPs must start at age 14, update annually and contain,

“Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills;  Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; and The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described [above]…”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP) - 09/01/2015

"The Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities are partnering to improve post-secondary outcomes for students with disabilities, beginning at age 14. This innovative collaboration will change the nature and impact of transition services for students with disabilities in Ohio. The new model will help students with disabilities get a head start on becoming job ready and better prepared to enter the workforce with the skills necessary to be successful in today’s workforce."

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

People First of OH comments in response to "Ohio's Draft Plan to Comply with New Federal Horne and Community-Based Services Requirements” - 01/20/2015

ORO is submitting these comments to "Ohio's Draft Plan to Comply with New Federal Home and Community-Based Services Requirements," which was released to the public o n December 15, 2014.   The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ("CMS") has issued new rules for states'1915( c) home and community-based services (" HCBS") waiver programs ("waiver programs"), defining for the first time "home and community-based settings" eligible for continued federal waiver funding. CMS has required states to create transition plans specifying how they will comply with these new rules and to allow the public to provide input on their proposed plans before they are finalized.”   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

People First of Ohio Call to Action: “Blazing New Trails to Employment” - 04/25/2012

“People First's employment "Call to Action" and its regional forums brought together hundreds of self-advocates, family members, county board staff, providers, and staff from the Rehabilitation Services Commission and the Ohio Legal Rights Service, to understand Ohio's transition and job service systems; hear about the types of jobs and training people with developmental and intellectual disabilities (DD/ID) want; and plan for more job opportunities, and better wages and benefits for people with disabilities. People First fully supports the Governor's Executive Order 2012-0SK to make Ohio an "Employment First" state.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

VR SE Partnership

This booklet outlines implementation strategies for collaboration between local offices of state vocational rehabilitation (VR) services and mental health service organizations that provide Supported Employment, the evidence-based practice (SE-EBP), to consumers who have a severe mental illness. Strategies for the VR and SE partnership are organized into three stages of collaboration.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Mental Illness/Developmental Disabilities (MIDD) Coordinating Center of Excellence

“The MIDD CCOE promotes clinical best practices for individuals with mental illness and developmental disabilities. It is a collaborate effort involving ODMH, the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, and the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.  With the goal of providing appropriate treatment for individuals with co-occurring mental illness and developmental disabilities, the CCOE assists local systems throughout Ohio to increase their service capacity and foster collaboration.”   Supported Employment “Supported Employment/Individual Placement and Support (SE/IPS) is an evidence-based practice that helps people with mental illness and other disabilities identify and acquire part-time or full-time jobs of their choice in the community with rapid job-search and placement services. It emphasizes that employment is not the result of treatment and recovery but integral to both. SE/IPS is different from traditional vocational rehabilitation. It emphasizes consumer choice and utilizes rapid job-search and placement services, time-unlimited and individualized follow-along services, and many other important strategies.”  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio NAMI Supported Employment Family Advocacy Project

“This collaboration between NAMI Ohio and the Ohio Department of Mental Health engages families of individuals with mental illness to advocate for, create and expand high-quality Individual Placement and Support (IPS) programs. Family involvement can strengthen the partnerships between providers, family members and consumers around SE services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Partnership for Employment First Guide

The Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, in partnership with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities Agency, has announced a statewide initiative to expand community employment services for people with developmental disabilities. This opportunity will allow the state to maximize resources to support more people on their path to community employment, build system capacity, and strengthen the relationship between the developmental disability and vocational rehabilitation systems in Ohio.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Ohio Employment First Taskforce Common Principles

“The Ohio Employment First Taskforce agencies agree that community employment should be the first option for all working age adults and transition-age youth with developmental disabilities. Employment First is a philosophy of service that presumes that all Ohioans with significant disabilities can and should have opportunities to work in the community”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Mental Health and Addiction Services (Ohio MHAS) Supported Employment Project - 07/01/2014

"Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services (MHAS) and its partners are implementing the Supported Employment Project. This project reduces the high unemployment rates for young adults and adults with a severe and persistent mental illness who may have co-occurring substance use disorders.

Two local sites are implementing new programs, and a committee will oversee statewide training, policy changes, and evaluation. The evidence-based practice of Individual Placement and Support employment is being shared statewide through training and technical assistance."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Workplace Initiative Ohio - 11/01/2013

"The Central Ohio Workplace Initiative has been renamed the Workplace initiative of Ohio (WIO) to reflect the expansion of the family foundation funded project across the state.  The purpose of the Workplace Initiative of Ohio (WIO) is to create demand among Ohio businesses for talented career seekers with disabilities in healthcare, hospitality, distribution, banking, retail, and other industries. Employers benefit from streamlined candidate sourcing, pre-screening, training assistance and more.

On November 1, 2013, OHBLN and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) began working on a project funded by a grant from a private foundation concerned about the high unemployment rate of individuals with disabilities. The purpose of WIO is to work with businesses to create demand for qualified job seekers with disabilities in distribution, retail, health care and other industries."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OCALI Customized Employment Project - 03/01/2009

"With funding from the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), OCALI launched a customized employment project in March 2009 for two school based transition teams, Claymont High School with Tuscarawas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and Huber Heights High School with Montgomery County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The goal of the project was to increase community employment outcomes for transition aged youth using customized employment strategies and processes. Team members received training and consultation in the CE process, Social Security Work Incentives and working with employers. Teams included school, developmental disability, and vocational rehabilitation staff, plus a parent mentor. In November of 2009 the project received additional funding from DODD to add another team from Lucas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and to provide up to 40 paid internships for youth with disabilities using customized employment strategies and processes in the Lucas County and Montgomery County sites. The Tuscarawas County site obtained funding from DODD, “We Go To Work Grants” to fund resource ownership as an employment strategy."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Disability Employment Initiative

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2011, was awarded a Round 2 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This grant ended in 2014.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Ohio Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The…grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities”. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 40,500 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2013.  The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

2017 Transformation Series: Building Innovative Service Models - 05/01/2017

“Ohio's continued efforts to assist every individual of working age to gain community-based employment is largely supported by provider agencies across the state. These agencies are collectively working through a systems change process that will enable the strengthening and support of community-based service options for individuals with disabilities. The 2017 Transformation Series provides an opportunity for provider agencies to gather and share ideas, strategies, and practices that will assist them as they move through the systems change process and help improve person-centered planning and employment opportunities for individuals across Ohio.

Efforts are focused on two face-to-face events in the spring of 2017:

Phase 1: Provider Agency Site Visits

Phase 2: 2017 Transformation Summit”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio RSC Customized Employment, Griffin Hammis Associates, LLC - 01/25/2012

This video on the Ohio RSC Customized Employment Project includes testimonials from staff, leaders, and job seekers and business owners who have benefited from the program. It is both an interesting description of, and a compelling case for, Customized Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Ohio Employment First Transition Framework

"Ohio Employment First Transition Framework is a critical component to the Ohio Employment First structure and is intended to address barriers to transition planning and services in order to achieve meaningful adult outcomes. The Framework was developed by stakeholders from multiple agencies to create processes and highlight practices that can be used by all agencies. These common processes assist professionals to plan, prepare, empower, educate, and connect across systems so as to consistently assist youth with disabilities to realize meaningful, community employment and other valued aspects of adult life.

The Framework is built on three non-negotiable foundational elements that together create a 'filter' to examine the practices and procedures used when working and supporting transition youth. The foundational elements for the activity and practices of the Framework are:

Person-centered. The youth is where the team efforts begin and end. Policies and practices must be flexible enough to respond to individual strengths and needs. Agency-neutral. As agencies come together to collaborate, activity should occur in a manner where all involved see value for the youth and no single agency policies or procedures are considered the priority. Outcome-focused. The common focus of the collaborative efforts are the meaningful adult life outcomes."
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Loop Ohio

"Welcome to Loop Ohio, Ohio’s virtual Community of Practice! This online community is dedicated to facilitating statewide and local, cross system collaboration and learning, with a focus on promoting best practices in community development and inclusion for people with disabilities. Ohio is a national leader in these efforts, primarily because of the innovative work being done all across the state, throughout our local communities. Loop Ohio provides a platform for community members and professionals to share ideas and resources, solve problems, break down barriers, connect across distance, and engage in ongoing learning. Loop Ohio is multi-functional, enabling people to have live virtual conversations, share resources, post events, lead and participate in webinars, use discussion boards, have online chat time with subject matter experts and more."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

OH Job Seekers Toolkit

"The Job Seekers Guide will help you learn how to get a job and will give you some tools that will help along the way."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Livin’ the Dream Toolkit

"Employment among people with mental illness is very low despite research that strongly supports the critical impact that work plays in promoting recovery. The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) is committed to helping individuals find and keep jobs that help them become independent and productive. Toward this goal, OhioMHAS supports technical assistance, consultation and training to provider organizations and consumer-operated peer centers.

The Main Place, a Consumer Operated Services (COS) organization, developed a non-proprietary curriculum and training materials that can be used by COS organizations statewide to address issues related the impact of poverty on the recovery of adults experiencing serious and persistent mental illness, as well as encourage consumers in obtaining employment. The working title for the Tool Kit is "Livin' the Dream". The Main Place trained staff and consumer volunteers as facilitators to implement the curriculum in Licking and Knox Counties. Consumers throughout the state can now have access to the workbooks for programming and services in their own communities."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Customized Employment Training Series

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services and Griffin-Hammis Associates are sponsoring classroom training, on-line instruction, special topics webinars, and technical assistance on Customized Employment for designated Job Center staff and partners, to support individuals with significant disabilities and complex barriers to employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Orientation to Supported Employment Web Course

This Web-based training is an introduction to the competencies for effective supported employment. Please follow this link to register:

https://trn-store.com/trn-courses/entry/OHIntroductionRegister.php

Seven lessons will cover the following topics:

Values, Definitions, History Legislation, Funding, Ohio’s Employment First Roles and Rights Supported Employment Process and Benefits Career Planning, Discovery, Vocational Profile Marketing and Job Development Job Design and Training, Natural Supports
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Customized Employment Guide

“This guide provides a look at the strategies used in Customized Employment (CE) and links to more information and resources for those who are just beginning to explore CE. It explains how CE might benefit individuals with disabilities seeking employment and students in transition from school to work. CE is based on several evidence based transition practices such as self-determination, using self-advocacy strategies, and providing community based instruction. Learn about OCALI’s experience with three teams in Ohio that served transition age youth. In addition to traditional funding sources these teams had access to funding for internships and resource ownership.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Customized Employment: Best Practice of Today

This presentation intertwines Customized Employment into Employment First as a key component to the state’s efforts in promoting community-based, integrated employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Disability Rights OH, National Federation of the Blind, and Autistic Self Advocacy Network Celebrate Landmark Decision Ordering Fair Pay - 02/03/2016

COLUMBUS, OHIO – In a precedent-setting opinion issued by an administrative law judge from the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL), three clients have been awarded minimum wage going forward and back pay from Seneca Re-Ad, a sheltered workshop run by the Seneca County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The original petition was filed by Disability Rights Ohio (DRO), the National Federation of the Blind, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and the Baltimore law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Fair Pay from Sheltered Workshops (2016) - 02/02/2016

This case arises under Section 214(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act ("Act"), 29 U.S.C. §214(c). Ralph ("Joe") Magers, Pamela Steward and Mark Felton ("Petitioners") are employees of Seneca Re-Ad Industries ("Respondent"), which is located in Fostoria, Ohio. Each of the Petitioners has been diagnosed with one or more developmental disabilities and each receives services from the Seneca County (Ohio) Board of Developmental Disabilities ("DD").  Employment at Respondent's Fostoria manufacturing facility is one of the services provided by DD.  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

DOL - 08/03/2016

WIASRD elements for IWT: Waiver to allow states to discontinue collection of 7 WIASRD data elements for incumbent workers. requested: 9/12 decided: 12/12 expires: 6/17

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Citations

Ohio ESEA Flexibility Request - 08/21/2015

“By submitting this updated ESEA flexibility request, the SEA renews its request for flexibility through waivers of the nine ESEA requirements listed below and their associated regulatory, administrative, and reporting requirements, as well as any optional waivers the SEA has chosen to request under ESEA flexibility…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio’s HCBS Transition Plan - 03/13/2015

“Governor John Kasich created the Office of Health Transformation (OHT) to lead the Administration’s efforts to modernize Medicaid and streamline health and human services programs. Using an innovative approach that involves collaboration among multiple state agency partners and a set of shared guiding principles, reform initiatives are improving services, thus enabling seniors and people with disabilities to live with dignity in the setting they prefer, especially their own home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Balancing Incentives Program - 06/15/2013

"The Ohio Department of Medicaid is committed to removing barriers and expanding access to long-term care received in home and community-based settings. In conjunction with the Governor’s Office of Health Transformation and additional state agencies, Ohio Medicaid is an active participant in the Balancing Incentive Program.

In June 2013, the Ohio Department of Medicaid was awarded more than $169 million in additional federal medical assistance percentage (FMAP) for its commitment to direct half of all Medicaid long-term care funding to home and community-based services (HCBS) by September 30, 2015."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Buy-in for Workers with Disabilities - 04/01/2008

"Medicaid Buy-In for Workers with Disabilities (MBIWD) is an Ohio Medicaid program that provides health care coverage to working Ohioans with disabilities. Historically, people with disabilities were often discouraged from working because their earnings made them ineligible for Medicaid coverage. MBIWD was created to enable Ohioans with disabilities to work and still keep their health care coverage."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Ohio Medicaid State Plan

The State Plan is a comprehensive written statement that describes the nature and scope of the Ohio Medicaid program and assures that it is administered in conformity with federal requirements and regulations.  The information provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and ODM disclaims any obligation or liability based upon its use. The formally adopted state plan, statutes, and rules governing the Ohio Medicaid program prevail over any conflicting information provided here.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 40,500 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2013.  The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Ohio until 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

How Does Work Impact My Benefits?

“If you are receiving benefits from the government (money, services, staff, medical care), you may be worried that if you work, you will not get those services. This page can help you learn what will change as you start to make your own money. You will also learn about some special benefits for workers!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

States - Phone

Snapshot

 In Ohio Employment First is for "Every person. Every talent. Every opportunity

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Ohio’s Vocational VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.17%
Change from
2014 to 2015
11,613,423
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.87%
Change from
2014 to 2015
847,932
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.55%
Change from
2014 to 2015
298,233
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.71%
Change from
2014 to 2015
35.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.85%
Change from
2014 to 2015
77.69%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 11,613,423
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 847,932
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 298,233
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,814,281
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.69%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 758,987
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 834,325
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,310,817
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 215,042
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 42,867
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,523
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 12,705
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 507
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 40,094
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 9,624

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 18,435
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 356,826

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 10,079
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 28,199
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 47,662
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,450
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,037
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 719
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.00

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 135
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 85
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.73

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
12,039
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 908
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 760
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,252
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 3,533
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 3,718
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 868
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,377
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 570,448
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $91,872,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $132,663,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $539,890,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 22.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 17,902
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 13,537
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 64.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.92%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.79%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.34%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 29.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 37.18%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,552,533
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 4,128
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 175,646
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 500,082
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 675,727
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 233
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 531
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 764
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,787,410
AbilityOne wages (services). $6,697,054

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 62
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 64
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 21
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8,076
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8,097

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Employment First, Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities, Assistive Technology of Ohio, and the Ohio Departments of Aging, Developmental Disabilities, Job and Family Services, Medicaid, and Mental Health and Addiction Services collaborated on the creation of the site. (Page 46)

Transition services are funded by the various state agencies that serve the individual youth in accordance with requirements under WIOA, IDEA and other pertinent laws. In addition to the Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Ohio’s Employment First Task Force works across multiple systems to align policies and practices and issues guidance to the field as needed to ensure that students receive the services needed to ensure achievement of employment and other post-secondary outcomes. (Page 150)

In FFY 2013, OOD in partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) established a dual certification program as part of the Employment First Partnership Agreement. This dual certification program is designed to ensure continuity of services and allow for more successful transition from time–limited to long–term supports. In addition, it is designed to better respond to the needs of individuals served by the program as well as our business partners.151-allowing them to provide VR services to individuals being served by OOD in the Employment First Partnership. Performance–based job development is utilized to ensure a more outcome–focused method of service provision. Staff providing services under this waiver must pass an online course and attend mandatory trainings on VR services, fee schedules, billing, and reporting expectations before they can begin providing services. They must also attend in–person trainings on employer engagement and on–the–job supports within one year of passing the online supported employment web course to continue providing services. (Page 151-152)

As mentioned previously, OOD partners with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) to expand vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to individuals with developmental disabilities as part of the state’s overall Employment First Initiative. It also should be noted that DODD is the lead agency for Ohio’s Employment First initiative, which was signed by Governor Kasich in March 2012. OOD is an active member of the Employment First Task Force, which is examining existing practices in the state system to identify and address barriers to employment for people with developmental and other disabilities. (Page 157)

In 2015 and continuing into 2016, Ohio has been selected as a core state in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. Through this grant, which is funded through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), the Employment First Taskforce has identified action steps that each agency will complete to promote the core principles for transition in Ohio:

  • Competitive, integrated employment is expectation for all youth with disabilities;
  • Transition planning for youth requires multi–agency collaboration;
  • Early dialogue with individuals and families is critical to ensuring employment outcomes;
  • There are multiple pathways to employment; and
  • Person–centered planning is key to the development of effective services and supports for transition–age youth. (Page 158)

OOD will provide targeted training to enhance personnel development. This will include targeted training on Employment First, supported employment, eligibility, transition procedures and clarification of roles and responsibilities of OOD and school personnel. (Page 160)

Mental health: OOD’s service provision is higher for individuals with psychosocial and cognitive impairments. This is most likely explained by the fact that OOD in the past four years has concentrated efforts through focused contracts with local Mental Health and Drug Addiction boards, local Developmental Disabilities boards, and most recently through the Ohio Department Developmental Disabilities funding for Employment First. Each of these populations also has an organized representative presence through established county public agencies across the state. (Page 169)

OOD has several Interagency Agreements that are designed to implement service delivery models that will increase outcomes for specific populations served by the VR program. The Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and the Ohio Transition Support Program with the Ohio Department of Education are both examples of this. (Page 179)

Employment First Partnership Agreement: OOD has continued its Employment First (EF) Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities. OOD has expanded the number of VR counselors providing services under the agreement from 15 to 25 counselors during this time period. In FFY 2015, the EF program exceeded all performance goals. This includes exceeding its rehabilitation goal by 150 percent and its plan development goal by 200 percent. (Page184) and (Page 186)

Employment (second and fourth Quarter after exit): Adult and Dislocated Worker: Historical WIA data exists for these cohorts for us to use in calculations and projections. Applying the employed second quarter after exit to the historical WIA population yields only a modest difference between WIA’s entered employment first quarter after exit and WIOA’s employment second quarter after exit for these two cohorts. Therefore, we propose using the PY 2015 WIA common measure level as a starting point for establishing a performance history for the second quarter after exit measure. For the fourth quarter after exit, (Page 310)

Customized Employment

Other VR or support services needed to ensure success in community employment;

  • Follow–up and monitoring of job performance during the stabilization process;
  • Discrete post–employment services not commonly available from those who provide extended services;
  • Identification and development/facilitation of natural supports; and
  • Customized employment. (Page 188)
Braiding/Blending Resources

Disability resource coordinator staff in OhioMeansJobs centers implemented Ohio’s strategic components, which included deploying integrated resource teams, leveraging partner funds and resources, customized employment, and asset development. Through this initiative OhioMeansAccessibility.com was added to OhioMeansJob.com. (Page 284)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

How the local board will facilitate access to services provided through the OhioMeansJobs delivery system through the use of technology and other means;

  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities. (Page 348)
  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities;
  • How the local board will coordinate with the regional JobsOhio; and
  • The roles and resource contributions of the OhioMeansJobs center partners. 351 Ohio’s standards for OhioMeansJobs center certification also will include requirements to not only comply with the ADA, but also Sec 188 of WIOA. Certification will require OhioMeansJobs staff to receive training to understand and better serve individuals with disabilities. Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Pages 84-85)
DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

One In 2011, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) received a three–year Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) demonstration grant project to improve the education, training, and employment opportunities and outcomes for adults who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Three OhioMeansJobs centers in Cleveland, Portsmouth and Toledo operated the DEI grant project. Disability resource coordinator staff in OhioMeansJobs centers implemented Ohio’s strategic components, which included deploying integrated resource teams, leveraging partner funds and resources, customized employment, and asset development. Through this initiative OhioMeansAccessibility.com was added to OhioMeansJobs.com. (Page 248)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

OOD projects a continued need to hire VR staff in the above referenced classifications over the course of this Combined State Plan. OOD prioritizes the use of available resources to hire direct service personnel and therefore, the greatest area of need will likely continue to be VR counselors and caseload assistants as well as supervisory staff. OOD has been aggressively pursuing strategies to improve the cost effectiveness of the VR program. Identified cost savings are reinvested strategically to further improve performance for the VR program. A projected area of increased need over the course of this plan will likely be for staff hired to provide “in–house” job development and/or work incentives counseling services. OOD has been piloting these new service delivery models during FFY 2015 and, based upon the success of the pilots, is poised to increase investments in this area. (Page 160)

In FFY 2015, OOD piloted the provision of both job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning) services through “in–house” personnel. OOD is currently in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots to determine the extent to which they resulted in increased outcomes and reduced time to placement. It is anticipated that OOD will expand the use of this service delivery model over the course of this Combined State Plan. (Page 179)In–House Service Delivery: In FFY 2015, OOD conducted in–house service delivery pilots in the areas of job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning). OOD is in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots and expects to expand this service delivery model in FFY 2016. (Page 184)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Follow–up services for not less than 12 months;

  • Comprehensive guidance and counseling;
  • Financial literacy education;
  • Entrepreneurial skills training;
  • Labor market and employment information; and
  • Activities to prepare for and transition to post–secondary education and training.

These services will be made available and/or will be provided through the procured youth provider. Assurance that all local workforce development areas and the lead agency are making the 14 program elements available and implemented will be done through the state monitoring program. (Page 101)

Through collaboration with local workforce development partners and alignment with the regional or local plan, ABLE programs will assist English language learners with career goals by offering integrated English literacy and civics education concurrently with integrated education and training as part of a career pathway. Integrated education and training will focus on in–demand occupations that lead to economic self–sufficiency. Successful career pathways, leading to educational and career advancement for ABLE students, will require coordinated design, delivery, and evaluation amongst all local workforce development partners In PY2016, ODHE will plan and coordinate with state-level workforce development partners to provide guidance and technical assistance to eligible providers who seek to implement, beginning PY2017, an IELCE program in combination with integrated education and training under section 243. (Page 136)

Benefits

Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence;

  • Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross–agency planning and earlier career preparation; and
  • Improves strategies to ensure that students with disabilities secure employment prior to graduation and connect with long–term supports services when needed and available to ensure long term success.
  • Educates parents and youth on work incentives planning by comparing benefits of work versus SSI. (Page 37)

OOD has traditionally relied fully on fee for service purchasing of VR services from Community Rehabilitation Programs. In FFY 2015, OOD piloted the provision of both job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning) services through “in–house” personnel. OOD is currently in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots to determine the extent to which they resulted in increased outcomes and reduced time to placement. It is anticipated that OOD will expand the use of this service delivery model over the course of this Combined State Plan. (Page 179)

School to Work Transition

Under WIA, the vocational rehabilitation (VR) program was evaluated by standards and indicators unique to the VR program. OOD has met compliance with program standards and indicators, which relate to the number and quality of employment outcomes achieved by the program. As noted previously, OOD is currently in the process of making changes in its case management system to align with the common measures under WIOA. In addition baseline data related to the common measures is being established and evaluated. It should be noted that for newly required data elements, such as skill gains and attainment, a period of data collection will be required to establish this baseline data. (Page 147)

Data Collection

Under Title IV’s OhioMeansJobs Center partner program, OOD’s vocational rehabilitation program’s case management system – AWARE – is used by approximately 37 state vocational rehabilitation agencies nationwide. OOD also partners with ODJFS to obtain Ohio employment verification and wage data. It should be noted that access to only Ohio wage information limits the VR program from accurately identifying the full population of individuals employed after receiving services (i.e., individuals who may be employed out of state with a federal agency or as an independent contractor are not in the Ohio wage file). OOD will continue to research opportunities to develop additional data collection activities that will support the accurate identification of the full population of individuals employed after receiving vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 62)

Under Title II’s OhioMeansJobs partner program, the ABLELink system is ABLE’s online student information management system. The system collects student information for local program (Page 62)

The vocational rehabilitation program, in accordance with WIOA requirements, is currently in the process of making changes to its case management system and data collection activities to align with common measures. In addition, OOD is collecting and evaluating baseline performance data to prepare for the negotiation of performance levels with the Rehabilitation Services Administration. (Page 69)

Under WIA, the vocational rehabilitation (VR) program was evaluated by standards and indicators unique to the VR program. OOD has met compliance with program standards and indicators, which relate to the number and quality of employment outcomes achieved by the program. As noted previously, OOD is currently in the process of making changes in its case management system to align with the common measures under WIOA. In addition baseline data related to the common measures is being established and evaluated. It should be noted that for newly required data elements, such as skill gains and attainment, a period of data collection will be required to establish this baseline data. (Page 73)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Using the vision of a workforce system that is driven by the needs of business, adaptive to rapid change, innovative and integrated in design and delivery, and entrepreneurial in spirit as its starting point, through OWT, the state prioritized its work into goals for preparing an educated and skilled workforce, including youth and individuals with barriers to employment and other populations, and the goals for meeting the skilled workforce needs of employers. The state established three strategic goals to accomplish WIOA’s primary purposes: (Page 36)

How the local board will strategize to implement the goals and reform principles of the Combined State Plan.

5.The examination of how the local board will coordinate local workforce developmentactivities with regional economic development activities that are carried out in the localarea and how the local board will promote entrepreneurial skills training andmicroenterprise services.

6. An explanation of the OhioMeansJobs delivery system in the local area, including:

  • How the local board will ensure the continuous improvement of eligible providers ofservices through the system and that such providers will meet the employment needs oflocal employers, workers, and jobseekers (Page 348)
  • How entities within the OhioMeansJobs delivery system, including OhioMeansJobs center operators and partners, will comply section 188 of WIOA, if applicable, and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs and services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities, including providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities;
  • How the local board will coordinate with the regional JobsOhio; and
  • The roles and resource contributions of the OhioMeansJobs center partners. (Page 351)

Ohio’s standards for OhioMeansJobs center certification also will include requirements to not only comply with the ADA, but also Sec 188 of WIOA. Certification will require OhioMeansJobs staff to receive training to understand and better serve individuals with disabilities. Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Pages 84-85)

Many small businesses get their start and/or are supported by local business incubators, chambers of commerce and small business development centers. ODA and Ohio’s SCSEP operators will continue to cultivate relationships with these organizations at the local and state levels and where appropriate develop host–agency relationships. By serving as host agencies and utilizing SCSEP participates these organizations can highlight the benefits of older workers to their members and constituencies and make the SCSEP program a referral source for unsubsidized employment. (Page 278)

Career Pathways

ABLE is Ohio’s front–line program to help adults without a high school diploma or equivalency. ABLE is the foundation on which workforce education is built, therefore providing the fundamental skills for individuals to be successful in job training and employment. Remedial services provided through ABLE are contextualized to meet the diverse needs of individuals’ career pathways. The single biggest challenge the ABLE program faces in Ohio is a lack of awareness about what ABLE is and the wide–range of free services the program provides. (Pages 27-28)

Ohio’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) program is aligning its on–the–job training strategy and policies with Title I employment and training and Trade Adjustment Assistance programs for seamless service delivery for businesses. The VR program also is working to increase utilization and access to the Workforce Inventory of Education and Training – Ohio’s eligible training provider system – which includes connection with apprenticeship programs. To further that connection, VR is working with Ohio’s Apprenticeship Council to develop career pathways for transitioning youth to enter into the programs. (Page 32)

  • All state-approved secondary career-technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS);
  • Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state-approved career-technical program and for state weighted career-technical funding.
  • The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS.
  • A secondary program that operates under a state-approved POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria;
  • Once all secondary programs operate under a state-approved POS and meet QPS, all programs can also be identified as Tech Prep programs;
  • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students;
  • Effective academic/career counseling and effective Individual Education Plan (IEP) development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs;
  • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success;
  • High expectations will be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers;”
    • A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high level academic and technical achievement.
    • A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. (Page 249)
Employment Networks

Aligning and implementing the best practices of the current and future Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Projects. Commerce, ICCB, and Department of Human Services Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) have worked with regional and local partners to increase the participation of individuals with disabilities (aged 18 and above) in integrated career pathway and academic programs through community colleges and non-profit organizations in cooperation with American Job Centers, Local Workforce Innovation Boards (LWIB), employment networks and other regional partners. (Page 135)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 68

2017 Transformation Series: Building Innovative Service Models - 05/01/2017

“Ohio's continued efforts to assist every individual of working age to gain community-based employment is largely supported by provider agencies across the state. These agencies are collectively working through a systems change process that will enable the strengthening and support of community-based service options for individuals with disabilities. The 2017 Transformation Series provides an opportunity for provider agencies to gather and share ideas, strategies, and practices that will assist them as they move through the systems change process and help improve person-centered planning and employment opportunities for individuals across Ohio.

Efforts are focused on two face-to-face events in the spring of 2017:

Phase 1: Provider Agency Site Visits

Phase 2: 2017 Transformation Summit”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

DOL - 08/03/2016

WIASRD elements for IWT: Waiver to allow states to discontinue collection of 7 WIASRD data elements for incumbent workers. requested: 9/12 decided: 12/12 expires: 6/17

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Citations

Ohio 2016-2017 Budget: Historic Investments for Ohioans with Developmental Disabilities - 07/01/2016

"Governor Kasich’s historic budget invests $286 million ($116.5 million State share) over the next two years to increase opportunities for Ohioans with disabilities to live and work in the community. The initiatives in this budget expand supports for those who are waiting for services, increase opportunities for community participation, and improve the experience for those who are receiving services by modernizing our programs and strengthening the direct care force….

The budget continues to prioritize funding to reflect the growing demand for Home and Community-Based Services. Funding will allow DODD to add nursing services to the IO waiver to enable people with medical needs to live in community settings, provide for much-deserved increase for direct care staff, increase the availability of add-on services for individuals with complex needs and behavioral challenges, provide training for those who receive, plan, and deliver waiver services, and strengthen oversight and quality assurance efforts so the person-centered plan is delivering meaningful outcomes."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Disability Rights OH, National Federation of the Blind, and Autistic Self Advocacy Network Celebrate Landmark Decision Ordering Fair Pay - 02/03/2016

COLUMBUS, OHIO – In a precedent-setting opinion issued by an administrative law judge from the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL), three clients have been awarded minimum wage going forward and back pay from Seneca Re-Ad, a sheltered workshop run by the Seneca County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The original petition was filed by Disability Rights Ohio (DRO), the National Federation of the Blind, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and the Baltimore law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Fair Pay from Sheltered Workshops (2016) - 02/02/2016

This case arises under Section 214(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act ("Act"), 29 U.S.C. §214(c). Ralph ("Joe") Magers, Pamela Steward and Mark Felton ("Petitioners") are employees of Seneca Re-Ad Industries ("Respondent"), which is located in Fostoria, Ohio. Each of the Petitioners has been diagnosed with one or more developmental disabilities and each receives services from the Seneca County (Ohio) Board of Developmental Disabilities ("DD").  Employment at Respondent's Fostoria manufacturing facility is one of the services provided by DD.  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Employment First Project Update (February 2016) - 02/01/2016

“As part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Transition plan, services and rates are being updated for Adult Day waiver services. Input was gathered from community forums and stakeholder workgroups throughout 2014 and 2015. These new services will be focused on person centered planning and individual outcomes. New services will start being used on October 1, 2016.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio VR Provider Manual - 11/23/2015

The VR Provider Manual provides service descriptions and requirements for services including career exploration, job development, retention, job seeking skills training, and customized employment, among others.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio HB 155 - 10/15/2015

A bill to amend section 2329.66 and to enact sections 113.50, 113.51, 113.52, 113.53, 113.54, 113.55, and 113.56 of the Revised Code to require the Treasurer of State to create a program [ABLE] offering federally tax-advantaged savings accounts used to pay for a person's qualified disability expenses and to disregard the value of and income from that account in determining whether that person is eligible for state or local means-tested public assistance.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Ohio HB 155 - 10/15/2015

A bill to amend section 2329.66 and to enact sections 113.50, 113.51, 113.52, 113.53, 113.54, 113.55, and 113.56 of the Revised Code to require the Treasurer of State to create a program [ABLE] offering federally tax-advantaged savings accounts used to pay for a person's qualified disability expenses and to disregard the value of and income from that account in determining whether that person is eligible for state or local means-tested public assistance.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Ohio SB 316: IEP and Post-secondary Transition Requirements - 09/24/2012

Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is fourteen years of age, and update annually thereafter, a statement describing:

Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills; Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are i