Ohio

States - Big Screen

 In Ohio Employment First is for "Every person. Every talent. Every opportunity."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Ohio’s Vocational VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.26%
Change from
2017 to 2018
11,689,442
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.5%
Change from
2017 to 2018
844,409
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.23%
Change from
2017 to 2018
323,356
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.73%
Change from
2017 to 2018
38.29%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.83%
Change from
2017 to 2018
79.47%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 11,614,373 11,658,609 11,689,442
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 851,743 840,199 844,409
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 304,940 309,665 323,356
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,843,788 4,867,703 4,893,553
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.80% 36.86% 38.29%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.55% 78.81% 79.47%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90% 5.00% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.10% 22.10% 22.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.20% 12.70% 12.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 779,215 775,089 779,786
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 841,656 838,006 849,720
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,323,116 1,323,349 1,333,183
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 225,312 211,098 215,643
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 465,053 50,119 48,274
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,387 6,024 8,006
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 12,662 14,784 17,212
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 721 366 564
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 41,930 45,364 42,370
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 12,743 12,110 12,528

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 18,946 19,047 18,842
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.30% 6.40% 6.40%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 354,548 351,027 344,385

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,076 1,341 654
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 5,258 3,515 1,517
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 8,211 5,264 2,394
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 25.30% 25.50% 27.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.50% 3.00% 3.70%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20% 1.80% 2.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,857 4,004 4,111
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,897 2,372 2,693
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,029 1,747 719
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.00 0.02 0.00

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 114 135 170
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 80 85 98
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 70.00% 63.00% 58.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.69 0.73 0.84

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
13,246
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 978 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,205 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,255 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 4,229 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 3,688 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 891 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 30.70% 31.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 11,120 8,168 8,304
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 574,554 571,226 565,754
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 1,427 1,023 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,178 896 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $91,950,000 $99,531,000 $75,231,718
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $119,856,000 $114,445,000 $117,062,171
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $555,657,000 $562,605,000 $365,761,826
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00% 25.00% 28.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 18,804 18,914 17,998
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 14,407 15,514 16,449
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 71.30 76.70 79.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 65.13% 65.81% 63.28%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.77% 12.41% 11.96%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.93% 3.63% 3.60%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.27% 99.96% 99.90%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.45% 28.81% 27.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 76.61% 67.49% 70.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 83.95% 83.44% 79.49%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 40.16% 38.68% 43.33%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,552,533
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 4,128
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 175,646
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 500,082
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 675,727
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 233
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 531
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 764
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,787,410
AbilityOne wages (services). $6,697,054

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 4 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 2 0 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 94 56 81
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 101 58 83
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 71 10 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 24 0 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 15,295 9,652 8,436
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 9 9 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 15,399 9,671 8,448

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Transition services are funded by the various state agencies that serve the individual youth in accordance with requirements under WIOA, IDEA and other pertinent laws. In addition to the Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Ohio’s Employment First Task Force works across multiple systems to align policies and practices and issues guidance to the field as needed to ensure that students receive the services needed to ensure achievement of employment and other post-secondary outcomes. While OOD and ODE are the two lead agencies with regard to facilitating transition services for students with disabilities, the Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services, the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and the Ohio Department of Medicaid, as Employment First Task Force agencies also support this work, including funding services for mutually served students and youth with disabilities. (Page 153) Title I

In FFY 2013, OOD in partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) established a dual certification program as part of the Employment First Partnership Agreement. This dual certification program is designed to ensure continuity of services and allow for more successful transition from time-limited to long-term supports. In addition, it is designed to better respond to the needs of individuals served by the program as well as our business partners. Through this program, OOD provides a waiver of accreditation requirements to approved DD supported employment providers, allowing them to provide VR services to individuals being served by OOD in the Employment First Partnership. Performance-based job development is utilized to ensure a more outcome-focused method of service provision. Staff providing services under this waiver must pass an online course and attend mandatory trainings on VR services, fee schedules, billing, and reporting expectations before they can begin providing services. (Page 155) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): In 2017, OOD hired an additional five VR counselors through an expansion of the Employment First Partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities to serve an additional 300 individuals with developmental disabilities annually. OOD also hired a Work Incentives Program Administrator to oversee the agency’s delivery of work incentives consultation services. OOD implemented its new Supported Employment Services procedure and provided statewide training for all VR staff. A new rate for supported employment performance-based job development was implemented in 2017. Qualified providers of this service are dually certified by the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities in employment services or meet Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services fidelity requirements for IPS-SE. In addition, OOD in partnership with county boards of developmental disabilities are exploring innovative strategies to serve individuals with developmental disabilities with the need for more intensive job readiness training services. These opportunities prepare individuals for employment in higher wage in-demand jobs within specific industry sectors. (Page 158) Title I

As mentioned previously, OOD partners with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) to expand vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to individuals with developmental disabilities as part of the state’s overall Employment First Initiative. It also should be noted that DODD is the lead agency for Ohio’s Employment First initiative, which was signed by Governor Kasich in March 2012. OOD is an active member of the Employment First Task Force, which is examining existing practices in the state system to identify and address barriers to employment for people with developmental and other disabilities.

An Interagency Agreement between the state level Employment First Taskforce agencies has been implemented. This includes the Ohio Departments of Developmental Disabilities, Education, Job and Family Services, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Medicaid, the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council and OOD. The member agencies agree that community employment should be the first and preferred option for all working age adults and transition-age youth with developmental disabilities. The member agencies have agreed to develop or review state-level interagency agreements to ensure coordination of services and enable data sharing. The agencies have developed cross agency tools and processes to reduce duplication of services such as enrollment, eligibility, assessment and planning.

In 2015 and continuing into 2016, Ohio has been selected as a core state in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. Through this grant, which is funded through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), the Employment First Taskforce has identified action steps that each agency will complete to promote the core principles for transition in Ohio: • Competitive, integrated employment is expectation for all youth with disabilities; • Transition planning for youth requires multi-agency collaboration; • Early dialogue with individuals and families is critical to ensuring employment outcomes; • There are multiple pathways to employment; and • Person-centered planning is key to the development of effective services and supports for transition-age youth. (Page 163) Title I

In addition to the Employment First Partnership agreement with DODD, OOD also has developed a joint interagency agreement with DODD and the Ohio Department of Medicaid (ODM) in accordance with requirements of WIOA. DODD and ODM maintain a separate interagency agreement (A-1415-07-0528) that outlines programmatic and fiscal responsibilities between the two agencies, in which ODM delegates the day-to-day operations of the DODD Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waiver programs to DODD. The purpose of OOD’s interagency agreement with DODD and ODM is to improve opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities, including individuals with developmental disabilities enrolled in a home and community based services waiver administered by DODD, in accordance with its interagency agreement with ODM to achieve employment and independence. The agreement outlines a collaborative framework for coordinating services that prioritizes competitive, integrated employment and assists individuals with developmental disabilities to move from facility-based work and non-work settings to competitive, integrated employment. The agreement identifies methods to improve outreach to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families regarding VR programming and services. It also improves information sharing between the agencies and provides technical assistance and training to DODD and local county boards to increase employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities. (Page 164) Title I

OOD and the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) collaborate on a regular basis to provide guidance to educational agencies and vocational rehabilitation (VR) personnel responsible for facilitating transition services. These staff also offer consultation and technical assistance resources to assist schools and related community support entities in planning for transition of students with disabilities.

At the state level, both agencies have designated personnel to provide oversight and leadership for the development of policies, procedures, interagency training and other state-level partnership activities for transition services. On the local level, VR counselors are assigned as liaisons to schools and work with local school districts’ transition specialists.

OOD will provide targeted training to enhance personnel development. This will include targeted training on Employment First, supported employment, eligibility, transition procedures and clarification of roles and responsibilities of OOD and school personnel. (Page 173) Title I

Another key component of the CSNA involved interface with other state agencies to analyze disability data among various departments: Developmental Disabilities, Education, Job and Family Services, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Veterans’ Services. OOD wanted to understand how these agencies identify and track disability-related data in their various case management systems. Opportunity for future interface with these agencies was also introduced throughout this phase of the CSNA process and has continued to some degree, as a part of Ohio’s Employment First Initiative. OOD continues to work with its state partners as it implements service delivery activities for various populations. (Page 174) Title I

Employment First Partnership Agreement: OOD has continued its Employment First (EF) Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities. OOD has expanded the number of VR counselors providing services under the agreement from 15 to 25 counselors during this time period. In FFY 2015, the EF program exceeded all performance goals. This includes exceeding its rehabilitation goal by 150 percent and its plan development goal by 200 percent.
(Page 192) Title I

(EF): As noted above, OOD has successfully implemented its EF Partnership Agreement, which includes capacity building activities for supported employment providers. This program has expanded the number of available providers in the VR and the DD systems through the dual certification program. In addition, the program has initiated significant training initiatives for providers who provide service under the EF Partnership Agreement.

Individualized Placement and Support (IPS): OOD continues to work with the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services to develop procedures to implement IPS in Ohio. As a part of OOD’s planned updated to the VR Fee Schedule, OOD intends to develop a separate definition and rate for supported employment services. This is expected to be implemented on Oct. 1, 2016.

Policy and Procedure: OOD has finalized a draft supported employment policy and procedure based upon the above referenced activities. Once the final WIOA regulations are published, OOD will finalize these policies and procedures and provide training to field staff in the area of supported employment.
Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): OOD has continued the Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities which has assisted OOD in reaching Supported Employment goals. (Page 195) Title I

In FFY 2016 and FFY 2017, OOD’s program performance has continued trend in the positive direction. For example, in FFY 2017, the Employment First partnership agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities achieved 528 successful rehabilitations (an 83% increase from FFY 2015) and processed 1805 new applications for services (a 28.5% increase from 2015). In addition, the time from application to eligibility in FFY 2018 (as of April 20, 2018) averaged 26 days, down from 28 days in FFY 2015. (Page196) Title I

Historical WIA and current WIOA data exists for these cohorts for us to use in calculations and projections. Applying the employed second quarter after exit to the historical WIA population yields only a modest difference between WIA’s entered employment first quarter after exit and WIOA’s employment second quarter after exit for these two cohorts. Therefore, we propose using the PY 2015 WIA common measure level as a starting point for establishing a performance history for the second quarter after exit measure. For the fourth quarter after exit, Ohio has noted an average of a 6percentage point drop from second to fourth quarter after exit for the Adult population and a 4 percentage drop for the Dislocated Worker population. Therefore, Ohio submits the resultant as a starting point for establishing a performance history for the fourth quarter after exit measure. State efforts will focus on minimizing these drop offs. (Page 323) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~In accordance with federal requirements, supported employment services provided include the following: • Assessment services needed to ensure appropriate job match and supports;Job development; • Job placement; • Intensive on-the-job training or coaching of individuals with the disability, their employer, supervisor and/or coworkers by skilled employment consultants; • Other VR or support services needed to ensure success in community employment; • Follow-up and monitoring of job performance during the stabilization process; • Discrete post-employment services not commonly available from those who provide extended services; • Identification and development/facilitation of natural supports; and • Customized employment. (Pages 197-198) Title I

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Each Aspire grantee is encouraged to have a postsecondary education and training partnership or Bridge Program. Bridge programs prepare adults with limited academic or limited English skills to enter and succeed in postsecondary education and training programs, thus reducing the need for remedial education provided in the postsecondary institutions. (Page 50) Title I

Nine recommendations have stemmed from the analysis in the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA). These recommendations will be addressed through specific strategic initiatives outlined on OOD’s Strategic Plan. These recommendations are as follows: 1. Actively engage OOD VR counselors in the early stages of a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) development and utilize the VR services that have yielded positive outcomes. 2. Formalize efforts to increase services to individuals with visual and hearing disabilities; specifically evaluate and prioritize identified recommendations cited in the Workforce Integration Task Force (WIT). 3. Expand and leverage new employer and state agency partnerships to achieve Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act common performance measure outcomes. 4. Meet the workforce needs of employers by evaluating in-demand occupations as a standard approach of VR counselors’ work in developing job goals and service plans for OOD job seekers. 5. Work with the Social Security Administration to identify strategies for referring disability claimants to the vocational rehabilitation program. 6. Concentrate efforts to bring awareness and assist OOD VR served individuals to register with OhioMeansJobs.com as a means to achieving their employment goals. 7. Utilize technology to increase access to OOD services and improve operational efficiencies. 8. Design a formal business plan model that allows for agile deployment of human and financial resources across Ohio counties when new opportunities to expand VR services arise. 9. Re-evaluate the partnership with the Ohio Department of Aging, leveraging both Vocational Rehabilitation and the Independent Living and Older Blind programs. (Page 191) Title I

In addition to leveraging services, training and experience through OhioMeansJobs center partnerships and host agencies, SCSEP participants will also benefit from services leveraged through civic engagement programming. For example, the Encore Career Network in partnership with Cleveland Foundation’s Cleveland Encore Network will make available job search coaches to provide individualized assistance in finding unsubsidized employment and staff to support program management. The Encore movement is a nationwide effort to tap the talents and experience of retirees and near-retirees to help community agencies further their missions. Other potential civic engagement partners will include the Retired Senior Volunteer Program or in some locations VISTA. (Pages 288-289) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~In 2011, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) received a three-year Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) demonstration grant project to improve the education, training, and employment opportunities and outcomes for adults who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. ODA’s SCSEP administrator served on the project’s review team. Three OhioMeansJobs centers in Cleveland, Portsmouth and Toledo operated the DEI grant project. Disability resource coordinator staff in OhioMeansJobs centers implemented Ohio’s strategic components, which included deploying integrated resource teams, leveraging partner funds and resources, customized employment, and asset development. Through this initiative OhioMeansAccessibility.com was added to OhioMeansJob.com. (Page 294) Title IV

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~WIOA one-stop partner programs, such as vocational rehabilitation and Adult Basic and Literacy Education (ABLE) will use the same primary performance outcome measures. However, each program will negotiate its own statewide and local standards. The failure of any of the six WIOA core programs (adult, dislocated workers, youth, ABLE, vocational rehabilitation and Wagner-Peyser) on their established statewide performance standards could potentially lead to sanctions in the form of reduced WIOA funding to the state, which would apply to all of the WIOA core programs. Additional partner programs, such as the Trade Adjustment Assistance program and Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP), will use their own performance measures, standards and monitoring for program compliance and improvement. (Page 79) Title I

ODHE’s network of Aspire programs play a vital role in the economic advancement of SCSEP participants and all older adults with limited English proficiency, low literacy skills or both. There are currently 56 local Aspire providers serving all 88 Ohio counties. These free services assist adults in acquiring the skills they need to be successful in post-secondary education and training, and employment, and include:
• Basic math, reading and writing skills;
• Adult secondary education/GED preparation;
• English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL);
• Transition services to post-secondary and employment;
• Family literacy; and
• Workplace literacy.

Program 60: Audit Coursework as a Bridge to Credit Coursework for SCSEP Participants
Ohio’s state universities and colleges provide Program 60. This unique program allows any person who is 60 years of age or older and who has resided in the state for at least one year to attend courses and classes without charging that person a tuition or matriculation fee provided the attendance is on a noncredit basis, is in courses where classroom space is available, and is approved by the instructors of the courses involved. The Ohio SCSEP will promote the use of Program 60 as a bridge to credit coursework for SCSEP participants. Auditing courses allows learners to become familiar with programs of study before making a financial investment. Additionally, participation in noncredit coursework has been recognized as a strategy to help learners who have been away from the classroom for a long period of time or were not successful during earlier classroom experiences. (Page 291-292) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~In September 2015, OOD and ODE/OEC launched the Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP). This statewide collaboration between the two agencies expands transition services for students with disabilities, ages 14 to 21, who are receiving services under an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and meet OOD eligibility criteria. Through the OTSP model, VR staff has an increased presence in each of the 91 career technical planning districts (CTPDs) and other local education agencies statewide. OTSP:
• Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence;
• Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross-agency planning and earlier career preparation; (Page 34) Title I

The Ohio Department of Education estimates there are more than 50,000 school-age youth (starting at age 14), with an IEP and who also have identified disabilities, potentially qualifying them for OOD VR services. In 2014, OOD served nearly 12,000 youth between the ages of 14 and 24, indicating a significant need to expand services to youth and students with disabilities throughout Ohio.

The OTSP model utilizes a person-centered, agency-neutral and outcome-focused approach to comprehensive career planning that is based on established evidence-based predictors of success. It is a progressive service delivery model designed to increase independence and career readiness. While a full range of VR services are available, service provision is based on individual specific data driven decisions and is designed to meet people where they are on their unique path to employment. (Page 35) Title I

OOD finalized its Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Transition Services procedure (Procedure 80-VR-11-12) in September 2014 after months of development with multiple stakeholders, including the Ohio Departments of Education, Developmental Disabilities, and Mental Health and Addiction Services, and other entities. The purpose of the transition procedure is to provide direction for the application, eligibility determination and provision of transition services, including pre-employment transition services for VR-eligible students with disabilities. The procedure complies with 34 CFR 361.5, ensuring that the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for students with disabilities is developed as early as is reasonably possible, but no later than the time at which the student leaves the school setting. Specifically, the transition procedure states that the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) must be completed prior to the eligible student exiting school. (Page 150) Title I

The transition procedure describes a service delivery process focused on progressive career development for eligible students with disabilities. It is designed to be person-centered to meet the needs of students who are ready for progressive career development and those youth who may need developmental activities, including students as young as 14, to prepare them for progressive career development. The flexibility of this service delivery model allows VR program staff to become involved with the student at an earlier age, thus becoming a more active participant in the transition planning process overall. To meet the progressive career development needs of students who are at various places in their development, OOD updated its VR Fee Schedule in April 2014 to expand services for transition youth, adding Summer Career Exploration and Summer Job Development. OOD has worked with the Ohio Department of Education, Office for Exceptional Children to develop a publication titled “A Guide to Transition Services: Helping Students with Disabilities Move from School to Work”. This publication is widely distributed to school personnel, as well as to students with disabilities and their families. This publication was updated in FFY 2014 (October 2013), and will continue to be used in training measures to promote collaboration between local education authorities and OOD field staff. (Page 150) Title I

In September 2015, OOD and ODE/OEC launched the Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP). This statewide collaboration between the two agencies expands transition services for students with disabilities, ages 14 to 21, who are receiving services under an Individualized Education Program (IEP) and meet OOD eligibility criteria. Through the OTSP model, VR staff has an increased presence in each of the 91 career technical planning districts (CTPDs) and other local education agencies statewide. OTSP: • Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence; • Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross-agency planning and earlier career preparation; and • Improves strategies to ensure that students with disabilities secure employment prior to graduation and connect with long-term supports services when needed and available to ensure long term success.

The Ohio Department of Education estimates there are more than 50,000 school-age youth (starting at age 14), with an IEP and who also have identified disabilities, potentially qualifying them for OOD VR services. In 2014, OOD served nearly 12,000 youth between the ages of 14 and 24, indicating a significant need to expand services to youth and students with disabilities throughout Ohio. (Page 151) Title I

OOD staff at the state and local level provides consultation and technical assistance to school personnel, students, families and other agency partners through formal and informal trainings, joint problem solving and the exchange of information on policies and procedures. VR counselors serve as liaisons to local schools, attend IEP meetings regularly for prospective referrals and serve on state and local interagency groups. They also present at state and local conferences and training seminars and participate in local district career fairs and other interagency forums on VR eligibility and services. (Page 152) Title I

The Interagency Agreement outlines how transition planning is to occur at the local level for individual students with disabilities. Specifically, the agreement provides for consultation and technical assistance to educational agencies and VR personnel in planning for the transition of students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of individualized plans prior to the student exiting school. This includes the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), the 504 Plan, the Individualized Education Program (IEP), and any other plans that lead to post-secondary vocational outcomes. The agreement encourages educational agencies to develop linkages with VR offices as early as possible in the transition process. The agreement also specifies training efforts to promote the use of evidence-based practices and predictors to improve youth skills for competitive, integrated employment and community participation, driven by principles of informed choice, community-based services and measurable results. Additionally, Ohio Administrative Code now requires transition planning and services under an IEP to begin no later than age 14 and include a statement describing appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability. (Page 152-153) Title 1

The Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities outlines roles and responsibilities for education and vocational rehabilitation staff, including assurances that local education agencies are implementing Ohio’s Operating Standards for the Education of Children with Disabilities. This means that transition services are based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences, and interests, and includes: instruction, related services, community experiences, the development of employment in an integrated competitive environment and other post-school adult living objectives, and when assessment data supports, a need for acquisition of daily living skills and provision of a functional vocational evaluation. Additionally, as previously mentioned, transition services must be provided by staff who have obtained the Transition to Work Endorsement or who possess equivalent skills and knowledge. Roles and responsibilities for VR staff under the Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities include providing a liaison counselor for each school district to formalize collaboration in planning and referral development and facilitating identification of students with disabilities who may benefit from VR services as early as possible during the transition planning process. This ensures that transition services and goals on a student’s IPE are aligned with the IEP, utilizing ready and existing documentation of the student’s disability as well as information needed to determine appropriate services whenever possible. Staff also finalizes the IPE prior to a student existing school. VR services should complement services funded by schools, but not replace those services. This means that neither the local education agency nor OOD may shift the financial burden for providing a service for which it would be responsible to the other entity. (Page 153) Title I

Alignment with In-Demand Occupations: OOD utilizes resources provided by ODJFS and OhioMeansJobs.com that provide information on the available jobs by employers in all 88 Ohio counties. OOD’s Business Engagement Team will utilize this information to establish partnerships with the identified employers for the purposes of sourcing qualified OOD eligible individuals for the available jobs. OOD’s Business Engagement Team will also use these partnership opportunities to offer the Windmills training to the employers to assist them in their movement to a culture of inclusion of people with disabilities. OOD will also identify Ohio’s in-demand occupations, as published on OhioMeansJobs.com and evidenced by employers, job opportunities to assist OOD’s VR counselors in writing Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE) that align with the in-demand occupations in their particular area and by industry cluster. (Page 161) Title I

OOD seeks to provide meaningful training for all personnel. Staff development begins on day one. Every new staff member is required to attend new staff training. After new staff training, OOD has designed position job specific training that aids in the development of skills that are needed for a designated position. For example, new counselor training provides job specific information including topics such as standardized intake process, eligibility, assessments, Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) development, and case closure. New counselors report directly to training supervisors for their first six months on the job. This allows training to extend well beyond what is covered in the classroom. It also allows other training techniques to be included such as observation, on-the-job training, in depth case analysis and caseload specific topics. During the past year, new counselor training has become more comprehensive so new counselors are better prepared to meet the VR needs of consumers. Specific trainings have also been developed for supervisory staff, accountant examiners, Employment First staff, job development staff, and business sourcing analysts. These trainings provide the foundation to all future trainings (Page 171) Title I

OOD seeks to provide meaningful training for all personnel. Staff development begins on day one. Every new staff member is required to attend new staff training. After new staff training, OOD has designed position job specific training that aids in the development of skills that are needed for a designated position. For example, new counselor training provides job specific information including topics such as standardized intake process, eligibility, assessments, Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) development, and case closure. New counselors report directly to training supervisors for their first six months on the job. This allows training to extend well beyond what is covered in the classroom. It also allows other training techniques to be included such as observation, on-the-job training, in depth case analysis and caseload specific topics. During the past year, new counselor training has become more comprehensive so new counselors are better prepared to meet the VR needs of consumers. Specific trainings have also been developed for supervisory staff, accountant examiners, Employment First staff, job development staff, and business sourcing analysts. These trainings provide the foundation to all future trainings. (Page 171) Title IV

OOD and the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) collaborate on a regular basis to provide guidance to educational agencies and vocational rehabilitation (VR) personnel responsible for facilitating transition services. These staff also offer consultation and technical assistance resources to assist schools and related community support entities in planning for transition of students with disabilities.

At the state level, both agencies have designated personnel to provide oversight and leadership for the development of policies, procedures, interagency training and other state-level partnership activities for transition services. On the local level, VR counselors are assigned as liaisons to schools and work with local school districts’ transition specialists.

OOD will provide targeted training to enhance personnel development. This will include targeted training on Employment First, supported employment, eligibility, transition procedures and clarification of roles and responsibilities of OOD and school personnel. (Page 173) Title I

Data for the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) suggests that more than 50,000 youth statewide, with an individualized education program (IEP), who also have identified disabilities, could meet OOD eligibility criteria for VR services. Fifteen counties, 12 of which are located in the North Central and Northwest Ohio, have service rates higher than 40 percent. Three counties have services rates below 10 percent. The remaining 70 counties have service rates between 10 and 40 percent. As OOD partners with ODE and local education agencies, this information is being used to prioritize outreach efforts based on geographic areas.

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): OOD will be updating Ohio’s Comprehensive Needs Assessment in FFY 2018. The report is expected to be complete in the summer of 2018. (Page 178) Title I

In FFY 2015, OOD expended all Title VI, Part B funds on direct supported employment case services. OOD intends to continue to expend supported employment grant funding in this manner. Individuals with an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that includes an employment outcome of supported employment are targeted for the use of these funds. OOD utilizes an auto-budget feature in its case management system to ensure the proper expenditure of supported employment grant funds. (Page 185) Title I

OOD has partnered, in particular, with DODD and 26 county boards of developmental disabilities to provide high quality transition services to students and youth with developmental disabilities in the Bridges to Transition program. This program model has recently been enhanced to promote improved employment outcomes and cost effectiveness of the program. This service delivery model involves VR counselors working with county transition specialists to provide intensive transition services to students, ages 14 to 21, who are eligible for county board of DD and VR services. The model utilizes a team approach to increase collaboration and local connection with families, schools, providers and business, and facilitate the transition to long-term supports.

Two Year Modification Update: OOD has updated its Supported Employment policies and procedures to align with requirements under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including the provision of extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years.  (Page 186) Title 1

OOD has several Interagency Agreements that are designed to implement service delivery models that will increase outcomes for specific populations served by the VR program. The Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and the Ohio Transition Support Program with the Ohio Department of Education are both examples of this. Details about these strategic initiatives are located in (d) and (f).

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): OOD has accomplished the following since implementation of this State Plan:

o Updated the Vocational Rehabilitation Fee Schedule as well as the Medical, Psychological and Dental Fee Schedules,

o Hired additional “in-house” job developers who provide direct service to individuals with disabilities,

o Continued the Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and expanded the Ohio Transition Support Program with the Ohio Department of Education,  (Page 187) Title I

At present, the transition to extended supports begins at the point of job stabilization and at least 90 days prior to successful case closure, but for a period not to exceed four years. This ensures a smooth transition VR funded supports to ongoing and/or natural supports as outlined in the IPE. (Page 198) Title IV

All program administration activities are intended to support the following Perkins Act vision for the state of Ohio. From FY2016 through FY2020: • All state—approved secondary career—technical programs will be based on a state—approved career pathway and program of study (POS); o A POS is a pathway of secondary and postsecondary non—duplicative course sequences that culminates in a diploma, credential(s) and/or degree(s). o A POS must minimally span grades 9 to 14 and is encouraged to span grades 7 to 16. o A POS should emphasize Ohio’s in—demand occupations, identified in OhioMeansJobs.com. • State—approved secondary career—technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS); o The Office of CTE created an instrument to guide and facilitate program improvement with a common set of standards. The Quality Program Standards instrument is designed to serve all secondary career—technical education programs. o Career Technical Planning Districts (CTPDs) will have access to the monitoring system to aid in evaluating a program to determine how to improve the quality of the CTE program. o Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state—approved career—technical program and for state supplemental career—technical funding. o The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS. • A secondary program that operates under a state—approved POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria; • All secondary programs operating under a state—approved POS and meeting QPS, will continue being identified as Tech Prep programs; • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students; • Effective academic/career counseling and comprehensive transition planning and provision of transition services beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is 14 years of age. IEP and Section 504 development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs; • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success; and • High expectations will continue to be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers:” o A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high—level academic and technical achievement. o A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. The purpose of programs of study is to ensure, through collaboration between secondary and postsecondary institutions, that CTE programs will: • Support 100 percent graduation from high school and successful transition to and through completion of postsecondary education, including matriculation without the need for remediation; • Provide rigorous coursework at the secondary and postsecondary levels that will prepare learners for the attainment of a diploma, industry credentials and college degrees without remediation. (Page 218) Title IV

Ohio’s career—technical education programs will serve all learners in a fair and equitable manner and ensure that students with disabilities have equal access to an education. Ohio does not differentiate between the degrees, diplomas, or credentials earned by learners with an identified disability and those earned by learners without an identified disability. Moreover, at the secondary level, there is no distinction made regarding technical assessments administered to students with disabilities. Through a system whereby performance measures, learner outcomes and provider accountability are the “same for all,” Ohio will make every effort to assure that students with disabilities are provided the necessary modifications, accommodations and support services under their Individual Education Programs (IEPs) needed for success in both academic and career—technical coursework. State products/services will consider how to best assist high—need districts, including Ohio’s urban districts. (Page 223) Title IV

• Maintain a teacher-preparation network of universities that provide programs that prepare new career-technical teachers and emphasize with that network the need to prepare pre-service and in-service CTE teachers, especially those coming directly from business and industry, to effectively serve members of special populations. • Support the provision of career information for special populations through OhioMeansJobs.com and the Student Success Plan and other personalized learning tools into which OhioMeansJobs.com and the Student Success Plan may be integrated. • Promote increased collaboration at the secondary level among all districts, schools and units within schools relative to the development, use and updating of Individualized Education Programs (IEP) for students with disabilities who are enrolled in career-technical education programs. Cross-agency and external stakeholder committees will address areas of needed improvement such as effective use of IEPs in career-technical education (CTE) classrooms and effective use of career assessment for identifying needed services, facilitating appropriate placement and enhancing transition from secondary to postsecondary programming. (Page 239) Title IV

Ohio’s career-technical education (CTE) programs will serve all learners in a fair and equitable way, including those who are members of special populations. Ohio does not differentiate between the degrees, diplomas, or credentials earned by learners with an identified disability and those earned by learners without an identified disability. Moreover, at the secondary level there is no distinction made regarding technical assessments or academic achievement tests administered to learners with disabilities unless at the secondary level such distinction is specifically mandated within a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). Through a system whereby performance measures, learner outcomes and provider accountability are the “same for all” (unless at the secondary level mandated by an IEP), Ohio will make every effort to assure that members of special populations are provided the necessary support and services needed for success in both academic and career-technical coursework.

The state will require all sub-recipients to describe, as part of their local plans, how special populations learners of all categories will have equitable access to and participate in approved career-technical programs at all levels and meet or exceed state adjusted levels of performance and prepare for further learning and high-skill, high-wage or high-demand occupations. Local recipients will be required to identify barriers to participation for members of special populations and how they will take appropriate steps to eliminate them. Services to be used by local recipients to enable special population learners to meet or exceed state adjusted levels of performance may include, but are not limited to: • Specialized support services as required by an IEP; • “Support for learner success” and implementing common reforms that identify the way students best learn in career-technical programs and provide appropriate interventions to help all students in career-technical programs achieve at a high level; • Career information and assessment; • Limited English proficiency support services; • Services designed to facilitate the effective transition from secondary to postsecondary programs; and • Educator professional development activities. (Pages 240- 241) Title IV

 The number of students with disabilities served in career technical programs was approximately 602. Of this number, 587 were served in the Ohio Department of Youth Services career-technical education (CTE) programs, and approximately 15 were served in Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction programs. The CTE services and activities carried out in institutions serving students with disabilities were nearly the same as those provided to non-disabled students. The difference for students with disabilities is that programs were provided with Specially Designed Instruction, Accommodations, Modifications and Related Services indicated in students’ Individual Education Program (IEP). (Pages 242) Title IV

All state-approved secondary career-technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS); o Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state-approved career-technical program and for state weighted career-technical funding. o The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS. • A secondary program that operates under a state-approved POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria; • Once all secondary programs operate under a state-approved POS and meet QPS, all programs can also be identified as Tech Prep programs; • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students; • Effective academic/career counseling and effective Individual Education Plan (IEP) development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs; • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success; • High expectations will be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers;” o A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high level academic and technical achievement. o A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. (Pages 258-259) Title IV

Ohio’s Tech Prep programs will serve all learners in a fair and equitable way, especially those who are members of special populations. Ohio does not differentiate between the degrees, diplomas, or credentials earned by learners with an identified disability and those earned by learners without an identified disability. Moreover, at the secondary level there is no distinction made regarding technical assessments or academic achievement tests administered to students with disabilities unless at the secondary level such distinction is specifically mandated within a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). Through a system whereby performance measures, learner outcomes and provider accountability are the “same for all” (unless at the secondary level mandated by an IEP), Ohio will make every effort to assure that members of special populations are provided the necessary support and services in Tech Prep programs to be prepared for postsecondary education (including apprenticeships) and for success in Ohio’s in-demand occupations careers. (Pages 262-263) Title IV

All state—approved secondary career—technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS); o Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state—approved career—technical program and for State weighted career—technical funding. o The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS. • A secondary program that operates under a state—approved career pathways and POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria; • Once all secondary programs operate under a state—approved career pathways and POS and meet QPS, all programs can also be identified as Tech Prep programs; • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students; • Effective academic/career counseling and effective Individual Education Plan (IEP) development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs; • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success; • High expectations will be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers;” o A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high level academic and technical achievement. o A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. (Page 265) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~On-the-Job Training (OJT): OOD intends to reintroduce the use of OJT to facilitate increased skill gains and wages for individuals served by the VR program. This will allow OOD to work with employers to hire individuals with disabilities into more skilled and higher paying positions within their business. OOD plans to align the VR OJT policy and procedure with Ohio’s Title I funded OJT, as much as possible, by using the same forms, training plan templates, agreements, and invoice template. Aligning VR OJT with those funded by WIOA Title I employment and training and Trade Adjustment Assistance Reauthorization Act of 2015 (TAA) will make it easier for the employers who are accustom to Title I- and TAA-funded OJT to also work with OOD consumers on VR-funded OJT. This also supports better alignment across workforce programs. (Page 160) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Alignment with In-Demand Occupations: OOD utilizes resources provided by ODJFS and OhioMeansJobs.com that provide information on the available jobs by employers in all 88 Ohio counties. OOD’s Business Engagement Team will utilize this information to establish partnerships with the identified employers for the purposes of sourcing qualified OOD eligible individuals for the available jobs. OOD’s Business Engagement Team will also use these partnership opportunities to offer the Windmills training to the employers to assist them in their movement to a culture of inclusion of people with disabilities. OOD will also identify Ohio’s in-demand occupations, as published on OhioMeansJobs.com and evidenced by employers, job opportunities to assist OOD’s VR counselors in writing Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE) that align with the in-demand occupations in their particular area and by industry cluster. The Business Relations Team has been engaged with a number of in-demand occupation employers such as those who employ skilled apprentice-able occupations. The Business Relations Manager has engaged with the Ohio Statewide Apprenticeship Council to discuss strategies for OOD transition students to access pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship training programs as well as the ability of OOD to help them retain their seasoned employees who could be experiencing onset disabilities as a strategy to retain the talent they already have on board. This engagement has led to more opportunities to offer Windmills training and for OOD to evaluate the training programs and knowledge, skills and abilities required by these various programs to increase participation and success of OOD qualified candidates. (Page 161) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~In September 2015, OOD and ODE/OEC launched the Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP). This statewide collaboration between the two agencies expands transition services for students with disabilities, ages 14 to 21, who are receiving services under an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and meet OOD eligibility criteria. Through the OTSP model, VR staff has an increased presence in each of the 91 career technical planning districts (CTPDs) and other local education agencies statewide. OTSP:
• Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence;
• Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross-agency planning and earlier career preparation;
• Improves strategies to ensure that students with disabilities secure employment prior to graduation and connect with long-term supports services when needed and available to ensure long term success; and Educates parents and youth on work incentives planning by comparing benefits of work versus SSI. (Page 34) Title I

It should be noted that OOD also maintains Medical, Dental, and Psychological Fee Schedules to establish rates for purchasing VR services such as exams and assessments, restoration and treatment and durable medical equipment such as hearing aids and eyeglasses. In FFY 2016, OOD intends to update these Fee Schedules and align with the Ohio Department of Medicaid service definitions and rates. This will: • Align the VR program with purchasing practices of other state and local partner agencies; • Increase consistency among these fee schedules; • Expand the number of VR purchased services that have established standards and rates; • Make available a pool of potential providers that meet requirements established by the Ohio Department of Medicaid; and • Simplify the approach to purchasing many of these services. (Page 155) Title I

Ohio is an Employment First state with an active taskforce of state agency representatives, including OOD. The taskforce meets regularly to align policies, funding and planning for services and supports that prioritize competitive, integrated employment for Ohioans with developmental (and other) disabilities. As part of the Employment First Initiative, OOD and DODD have established an Interagency Agreement to expand supported employment services for working-age adults with developmental disabilities. According to DODD data, there are more than 30,000 working-age adults who receive adult services, the vast majority of which are in facility-based settings. This statewide initiative supports job seekers to transition from facility-based work and non-work settings into competitive, integrated employment. Twenty-five OOD VR counselors provide VR services to eligible individuals served by the partnership. Counselors work with local county boards of developmental disabilities to identify candidates for the program. They deliver individualized, person-centered career planning services to assist in the development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) and purchase supported employment services, including performance-based job development, from approved providers. In addition, five caseload assistants were hired specifically for the partnership to provide work incentives services to individuals served by the project. The staff holds Community Partner Work Incentives Counselor (CWIC) certifications and is tasked with expanding the availability of work incentives counseling for individuals with developmental disabilities who are served as part of the partnership. (Page 157) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): In 2017, OOD hired an additional five VR counselors through an expansion of the Employment First Partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities to serve an additional 300 individuals with developmental disabilities annually. OOD also hired a Work Incentives Program Administrator to oversee the agency’s delivery of work incentives consultation services. OOD implemented its new Supported Employment Services procedure and provided statewide training for all VR staff. A new rate for supported employment performance-based job development was implemented in 2017. Qualified providers of this service are dually certified by the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities in employment services or meet Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services fidelity requirements for IPS-SE. In addition, OOD in partnership with county boards of developmental disabilities are exploring innovative strategies to serve individuals with developmental disabilities with the need for more intensive job readiness training services. These opportunities prepare individuals for employment in higher wage in-demand jobs within specific industry sectors. (Page 158) Title I

OOD projects a continued need to hire VR staff in the above referenced classifications over the course of this Combined State Plan. OOD prioritizes the use of available resources to hire direct service personnel and therefore, the greatest area of need will likely continue to be VR counselors and caseload assistants as well as supervisory staff. OOD has been aggressively pursuing strategies to improve the cost effectiveness of the VR program. Identified cost savings are reinvested strategically to further improve performance for the VR program. A projected area of increased need over the course of this plan will likely be for staff hired to provide “in-house” job development and/or work incentives counseling services. OOD has been piloting these new service delivery models during FFY 2015 and, based upon the success of the pilots, is poised to increase investments in this area. Figure 23 shows the personnel projections by position. (Page 165-166) Title I

To continue OOD’s staff development, monthly web-based trainings are provided. These monthly trainings are designed to provide up-to-date information on agency policy and procedures, share information about community resources, and maintain state and licensure requirements for ethics trainings, as well as train on other topics as needed. Specific topics included presumptive eligibility, confidentiality, VR assessments, the medical and dental fee schedules, application, intake and eligibility, policies and procedures, and agency updates. These regular trainings provide OOD with the ability to disseminate information regarding the most current agency and industry information. To improve quality and access, OOD utilizes a GoToTraining format where staff can attend the training online at their desk. This reduces travel while improving the overall technical quality of the trainings. In addition, by using the GoToTraining format, trainings are recorded so staff who missed the training or who would like to review the material can view it at a later time. Development opportunities continue throughout the year. Staff is encouraged to maintain and increase technical skills by attending required and/or continuing education opportunities. Examples of other training provided by OOD include: Technology for People with Disabilities, Medical and Psychological Aspects of Disabilities, Jobsites Supports and Training, Transition for Success: An Outcome-Driven Approach, Social Security Work Incentives, Ethical Dilemmas, and Career and Person-Centered Planning. (Page 171) Title I

To do this, OOD identified several strategies to promote cost efficiencies and increased effectiveness of services. These strategies include, but are not limited to: • On October 1, 2012, OOD implemented a VR Fee Schedule for the first time. This Fee Schedule established consistent service definitions and rates for 29 VR services and has provided a foundation for increased consistency in services provided statewide. OOD is currently in the process of updating this VR Fee Schedule through an engagement with a consulting firm that is recommending cost informed rates (instead of the market based rates in the first iteration) as well as fee structures that might promote improved outcomes for the program. This revised fee schedule is expected to be implemented on Oct. 1, 2016. • In FFY 2015, OOD conducted a pilot to evaluate the cost effectiveness and improvement of outcomes that could be achieved using in-house staff to provide job development services. OOD is also evaluating this model of service delivery for work incentives counseling (i.e. benefits analysis). OOD is currently reviewing pilot results to determine if this service delivery model should be expanded. (Page 180) Title I

OOD has traditionally relied fully on fee for service purchasing of VR services from Community Rehabilitation Programs. In FFY 2015, OOD piloted the provision of both job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning) services through “in-house” personnel. OOD is currently in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots to determine the extent to which they resulted in increased outcomes and reduced time to placement. It is anticipated that OOD will expand the use of this service delivery model over the course of this Combined State Plan. (Page 187) Title I

Ohioans with disabilities who are determined eligible for SSI or SSDI, designated as eligible for services from county boards of DD, and those designated as having a severe and persistent mental illness and eligible for services from a community mental health board, are targeted populations for supported employment. OOD has developed Interagency Agreements with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), the Ohio Department of Medicaid, and the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS), to develop and implement improved coordination of supported employment services. The Interagency Agreements include training opportunities and technical assistance for staff across all involved agencies. For all supported employment cases, OOD ensures the coordination and facilitation of extended services for individuals, which can be funded through Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers, local county board of DD or county behavioral health authorities, including natural supports. Such services provide the supports individuals with the most significant disabilities need to sustain long-term employment. (Page 197) Title I

Employer/ Business

~~Ohio’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) program is aligning its on-the-job training strategy and policies with Title I employment and training and Trade Adjustment Assistance programs for seamless service delivery for businesses. The VR program also is working to increase utilization and access to the Workforce Inventory of Education and Training - Ohio’s eligible training provider system - which includes connection with apprenticeship programs. To further that connection, VR is working with Ohio’s Apprenticeship Council to develop career pathways for transitioning youth to enter into the programs. (Pages 30-31) Title I

In FFY 2013, OOD in partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) established a dual certification program as part of the Employment First Partnership Agreement. This dual certification program is designed to ensure continuity of services and allow for more successful transition from time-limited to long-term supports. In addition, it is designed to better respond to the needs of individuals served by the program as well as our business partners. Through this program, OOD provides a waiver of accreditation requirements to approved DD supported employment providers, allowing them to provide VR services to individuals being served by OOD in the Employment First Partnership. Performance-based job development is utilized to ensure a more outcome-focused method of service provision. Staff providing services under this waiver must pass an online course and attend mandatory trainings on VR services, fee schedules, billing, and reporting expectations before they can begin providing services. They must also attend in- person trainings on employer engagement and on-the-job supports within one year of passing the online supported employment web course to continue providing services.

During FFY 16, OOD will be developing a VR Provider Portal that will allow VR service providers to electronically receive authorizations for services, upload invoices and reports, and track billing and payment status. This portal will provide the foundation for greater standardization of the reporting and billing process and will offer significant increases in the efficiency of these processes for both providers and OOD staff. (Pages 155-156) Title I

OOD and DODD have also established criteria for approval of waivers to OOD’s accreditation requirements for DODD-certified employment service providers. This dual-certification process allows DODD-certified Medicaid HCBS waiver providers to deliver both VR services and long-term follow-along supports to ensure continuity of services. To date, more than 1,200 provider staff has successfully completed the initial training and will continue to receive in-person training. Certain providers through this partnership have recently been selected to participate in targeted technical assistance to develop staff’s skills and competencies in employer engagement. (Page 157) Tittle I

The work of the Business Engagement team is focused on a number of key initiatives focused primarily on employer engagement, employer education, OOD DisAbility Job Fairs and OOD’s direct sourcing of qualified VR candidates for these employers. These initiatives will help promote a culture of diversity and inclusion among Ohio employers creating more opportunities and a quicker path to employment for OOD’s eligible individuals.

Supporting Recruitment and Onboarding and Retention of VR Consumers: OOD partners with employers in the state of Ohio for the purposes of identifying available jobs that best match with the skills and qualifications of eligible individuals served by the VR programs. As job opportunities are identified, Business Engagement staff performs a job match in OOD’s VR case management system to identify appropriate job ready candidates. VR counselors managing those cases are notified that one of their job ready consumers has been identified for a potential opportunity. VR and/or provider staff then assists the eligible individual through the application, hiring and onboarding process and ensures any services needed to support a successful rehabilitation are provided.

Through these same employer engagement activities OOD has forged relationships with employers to also promote the ability of OOD to work with employers toward the retention of qualified workers with disabilities. OOD has been engaged with targeted outreach to federal contractors concerning Sec 503 requirements and is engaged with helping these employers understand OOD’s ambition to both support their hiring needs and assist them with retaining workers who have onset disabilities or perhaps have recently disclosed a disability and is in need of VR services to retain their employment. (Page 159) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): In January 2017, OOD elevated the prominence of its business engagement activities through the establishment of the Division of Employer and Innovation Services. The primary structure of the statewide Business Relations Team is to support the VR programs’ efforts to engage with employers. The core Business Relations Team consists of a centralized Business Relations Manager (BRM) and two Employer Services Liaisons, four regional Business Relations Specialists (BRSs) and nine VR Talent Sourcing Coordinators (TSCs). It should be noted that OOD will be adding a fifth BRS in 2018 to meet the needs of an increasing number of business partnerships. The work of the Business Relations Team is focused on a number of key initiatives focused on employer engagement, employer retention, employer education, OOD DisAbility Job Fairs and OOD’s direct sourcing of qualified VR candidates for these employers. These initiatives promote a culture of diversity and inclusion among Ohio employers creating more opportunities and a quicker path to employment for OOD’s eligible individuals. (Page 162) Title I

Data Collection

The vocational rehabilitation program, in accordance with WIOA requirements, is currently in the process of making changes to its case management system and data collection activities to align with common measures. In addition, OOD is collecting and evaluating baseline performance data to prepare for the negotiation of performance levels with the Rehabilitation Services Administration. OOD has robust reporting capabilities through the VR case management system and associated reporting tools. In addition, OOD has a created a data warehouse allowing for a variety of dashboards for the vocational rehabilitation program to help monitor case progression and timeliness of eligibility decisions, and plan development and time in service. Collectively, these tools provide an important foundation for ensuring that performance measures are achieved by the vocational rehabilitation program. (Page 78) Title I

OOD implemented a standardized VR Fee Schedule in FFY 2013 that is designed to ensure a consistent pattern and quality of services purchased statewide. The VR Fee Schedule provides an important foundation for improved quality of purchased services through the development of standardized service definitions and rates, service reporting and billing templates and provider scorecards. It should be noted that OOD is currently working with a consulting firm to update the VR Fee Schedule with the intention of moving from market based rates to cost informed rates. This involves collecting cost reports from providers to accurately capture expenses associated with carrying out services under the VR Fee Schedule and inform the development of updated rates. As a part of this project, OOD is also considering alternate rate structures, such as performance based fee structures, that would incentivize achievement of common performance measures under WIOA. OOD is seeking to simplify fee structures to reduce administrative activities associated with billing and reporting as well. (Page 155) Title I

Building upon the foundation set from the 2012 CSNA methodology, OOD developed 2016 projections of the number of individuals with disabilities by category and county of residence in Ohio. Similarly, service data from OOD’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) case management system and employment statistics were utilized to develop estimates of the number of individuals likely to need VR services by disability category and by county. This provided a basis for developing estimates of the number of individuals actively participating in the labor force that need services to assist them in finding a job and could benefit from OOD VR services. As a follow-up to the 2012 CSNA recommendations, OOD has aggressively gathered and analyzed data through the Workforce Integration Taskforce, focused on services for the deaf and blind, as well as service delivery capacity available through Ohio’s network of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). Data collection strategies included surveys of individuals with disabilities and employers. OOD contracted with Kent State University, as a compliment to the Ohio Longitudinal Transition Study, to specifically address the six questions regarding youth and students with disabilities. Finally, Mathematica conducted a Survey of Disability and Employment (SDE), of over 1,000 OOD VR applicants, that will assist OOD to better understand the needs of individuals with disabilities. Another key component of the CSNA involved interface with other state agencies to analyze disability data among various departments: Developmental Disabilities, Education, Job and Family Services, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Veterans’ Services. OOD wanted to understand how these agencies identify and track disability-related data in their various case management systems. Opportunity for future interface with these agencies was also introduced throughout this phase of the CSNA process and has continued to some degree, as a part of Ohio’s Employment First Initiative. OOD continues to work with its state partners as it implements service delivery activities for various populations. (Page 174) Title I

Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) establishes an agency strategic plan on a biannual basis. Strategic initiatives on the strategic plan are directly tied to program performance measures and the extent to which they promote the ability for the agency to improve employment outcomes, accountability, cost effectiveness and efficiency. OOD’s strategic plan is approved by OOD’s Commissioners. OOD has developed a strategic plan for Fiscal Years 2016-2017. OOD’s current strategic plan incorporates a mission statement, core values for the organization, goals, and objectives as listed below. Strategic initiatives associated with this strategic plan are detailed throughout this Combined State Plan. (Page 182) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): OOD has completed several updates to the AWARE case management system over the past several years that have been necessary to allow OOD to report on new common performance measures. OOD has been able to submit the new quarterly RSA 911 report for both open and closed cases by the deadlines established by RSA. In addition, OOD is on track to include wage record information in the May submission. OOD continues to work with state level partners on data sharing agreements that will facilitate the most efficient and accurate data reporting possible, in particular related to the credential and skill gain measures. OOD is establishing baseline level performance across common performance measures in FFY 2018. (Page 196) Title I

Ohio’s career—technical education programs will serve all learners in a fair and equitable manner and ensure that the student with a disability has equal access to an education. Ohio does not differentiate between the degrees, diplomas, or credentials earned by learners with an identified disability and those earned by learners without an identified disability. Moreover, at the secondary level, there is no distinction made regarding technical assessments administered to students with disabilities. Through a system whereby performance measures, learner outcomes and provider accountability are the “same for all”, Ohio will make every effort to assure that students with disabilities are provided the necessary modifications, accommodations and support services to be prepared for postsecondary education and for success in Ohio’s in—demand occupations careers. For secondary programs, state products/services will consider how to best assist high—need districts, including Ohio’s urban districts. (Page 224) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Ohio has several initiatives to provide access to services for individuals with disabilities. Ohio’s Workforce Inventory of Education and Training not only provides the institutional and program data needed, but also will contain information on how providers are making reasonable accommodations for those individuals with disabilities and special needs. Local workforce development professionals also will be able to rate providers on how well they accommodated their participants with disabilities enrolled in training. Ohio’s standards for OhioMeansJobs center certification also will include requirements to not only comply with the ADA, but also Sec 188 of WIOA. Certification will require OhioMeansJobs staff to receive training to understand and better serve individuals with disabilities. (Page 53) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) in collaboration with the OhioMeansJobs centers will comply with the language detailed in the State’s Methods of Administration Element 5: Compliance with 504 Disability Requirements. In part, ODJFS and the OhioMeansJobs centers will continue to work together to ensure all centers are in compliance with all federal and state laws as it relates to disabilities. (Page 92) Title I

Ohio has a strong history of addressing WIOA Section 188 in a number of ways. A collaboration was formed between ODJFS, the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD, the state vocational rehabilitation agency), and the Office of Workforce Transformation (OWT) to address the specific issue of improving service and emphasis for those individuals with disabilities. The group, the Workforce Integration Task Force, focused on how center accessibility could be improved for individuals with disabilities due to the fact the centers are under-utilized by this community. Both physical and programmatic accessibility were addressed along with creating a greater awareness of center staff on recognizing and working with individuals with disabilities and how to market this demographic group to employers. (Page 92) Title 1

Ohio’s third One-Stop certification program under WIOA is again addressing the needs of those with disabilities by developing an ADA Tool Box that will include, but is not limited to: on-site disability awareness training (including “Windmills” and At Your Service training), an ADA Checklist Guide, examples of State Term Contract information, Internet links and resources to be used by OhioMeansJobs centers, an ADA plan outlying the process for identifying an ADA local coordinator, a reasonable accommodations policy, and a self-assessment tool to assist in ensuring compliance as it relates to Section 188. The attainment of full certification will require full center staff training on issues relating to working with individuals with disabilities. Specific benchmarks and critical success factors are included in the certification documents that directly relate to being compliant with ADA requirements and serving individuals with disabilities. (Pages 92-93) Title I

Vets

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

Creating jobs and economic opportunity drives every policy decision and reform priority in Ohio. To that point, the first bill introduced in Ohio’s General Assembly under Governor Kasich’s leadership changed the way Ohio does economic development and replaced its government—driven, calcified job creation efforts with a new private—sector approach. JobsOhio, a private, non—profit corporation, was created under that legislation and is singularly focused on growing existing Ohio companies and attracting new businesses to the state. JobsOhio has focused its work on nine main industry clusters that research shows will drive Ohio’s economy now and into the future. This work has laid the foundation for the creation of Ohio’s In—Demand Jobs List and sets the education and training priorities for the state. (Page 20) Title I

The state also developed an OhioMeansVeteranJobs.com website customized to comprehensively address veterans’ needs. It incorporates information related to services and resources available through the Department of Veterans Services, a military skills translator, information about military friendly employers, and much more. Similarly, Ohio developed OhioMeansAccessibility.com, which provides resources to help Ohioans with disabilities as well as the employers and service providers who support them. Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Employment First, Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities, Assistive Technology of Ohio, and the Ohio Departments of Aging, Developmental Disabilities, Job and Family Services, Medicaid, and Mental Health and Addiction Services collaborated on the creation of the site. (Page 48) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist.

Ohio continues to cut bureaucratic red tape to prioritize workforce services for veterans, military service members and their families. The Office of Workforce Transformation (OWT), together with state agency partners, is assisting military service members, veterans and their families compete for Ohio’s in-demand jobs. Several key initiatives have been implemented:

• Ohio’s licensing departments, boards and commissions, and state institutions of higher education now award course credit for military education and experience;

• Veterans in Ohio can now use GI Bill benefits to pay for national and state occupational licensing testing;

• The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services developed the Veterans Business Support Center - accessible at OhioMeansJobs.com - to better connect employers to qualified veterans, all for free;

• OhioMeansJobs.com prioritizes veteran resumes, allowing employers to review these first when looking for perspective employees; (Page 89) Title I

Disabled veterans’ outreach program (DVOP) specialist personnel in the OhioMeansJobs centers provide intensive services to those veterans and eligible spouses who are identified as having a significant barrier to employment, as defined by USDOL. When veterans enter an OhioMeansJobs center, they are asked to fill out a Veterans Questionnaire to determine if there are any identified significant barriers to employment. If the individual meets the definition of eligible veteran for the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) program or is an eligible spouse, has at least one significant barrier to employment, and/or is age 18 to 24 years, the OhioMeansJobs center staff refers this covered person to the DVOP specialist within the JVSG program. A covered person should also be referred to the DVOP specialist if he or she is later, after further assessment, determined by OhioMeansJobs center staff to have a significant barrier to employment. The DVOP specialist will provide intensive services to mitigate the significant barriers to employment and transition these individuals into the civilian workforce.

DVOP specialists develop job and training opportunities for veterans, with special emphasis on veterans with service-connected disabilities. They provide direct services to veterans enabling them to be competitive in the labor market. In addition, they provide outreach and offer assistance to disabled and other veterans by promoting community and employer support for employment and training opportunities, including apprenticeship and on-the-job training. DVOP specialists work with employers, veterans’ organizations, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Defense, and community-based organizations to link veterans with appropriate jobs and training opportunities. (Page 91) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually.

In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes:

A. HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG

The goal of ODJFS Bureau of Veterans Workforce Services is to have the top veterans’ employment program in the nation. To accomplish this, Ohio determines the optimal DVOP/LVER staff alignment and resource distribution. This methodology is based on U.S. Census data showing the number of veteran job seekers in each county versus the number of veteran job seekers in the entire state. This percentage is then applied to determine the appropriate number of veteran staff in each area. This allows Ohio to position the DVOP staff in areas of greatest need while maintaining WIOA-mandated presence in the state’s OhioMeansJobs centers. (Page 275) Title IV

The Workforce Specialist utilizes dedicated labor market research and electronic tools, such as the Analyst Resource Center (ARC) database, and conducts personalized outreach to individual employers. Workforce Specialists plan and participate in career and information fairs as part of their efforts to maintain relationships with employers, educational institutions and training providers. They also promote apprenticeship and on-the-job (OJT) training opportunities for veterans. These registered Apprenticeship programs combine work-based learning and classroom training to help successful program completers obtain secure, full-time journeyman positions. Ohio offers more than 1,100 registered apprenticeship programs in fields as diverse as: aerospace, construction, energy, health care, manufacturing, and utilities. The OJT program helps employers hire and train individuals for long-term employment. OJT optimizes the resources available under workforce development initiatives to meet the needs of employers and job seekers. The expected outcomes for these activities are increased employment and training opportunities for veterans, as well as a heightened awareness of the qualities veterans bring to the business and educational communities. This will be measured through increased entered employment rates, as identified through the state negotiated performance goals.

The measures the State is evaluated on address the outcomes experienced by eligible veterans and spouses with significant barriers to employment who are served by DVOP Specialists. The measures are as follows:

Intensive Services provided by DVOP Specialists divided by the total veterans and eligible persons served by DVOP Specialists/Total veterans and eligible persons served by DVOP Specialists in the State;

Veterans’ Entered Employment Rate (weighted);

Veterans’ Employment Retention Rate;

Veterans’ Average Earnings (6 months);

Disabled Veterans’ Entered Employment Rate;

Disabled Veterans’ Employment Retention Rate; and

Disabled Veterans’ Average Earnings (6 months). (Page 280) Title IV

Mental Health

~~Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities’ (OOD) Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program provides the full array of vocational rehabilitation services to eligible individuals in all of Ohio’s 88 counties, ensuring that eligible individuals with disabilities are served through Ohio’s workforce system. Individuals are referred to the VR program through any number of avenues including OhioMeansJobs centers and WIOA CORE partner programs. In addition, OOD partners with other systems such as mental health and recovery, developmental disabilities, and education, providing the VR program with expanded opportunity to reach more potentially eligible individuals and increase our focus in serving transition age youth. Because the VR program no longer has a wait-list and projects to have adequate resources to serve 29,000 eligible individuals in FFY16, OOD will not operate under an Order of Selection and is positioned to provide services for all eligible individuals in MSD, SD and D categories. (Page 26) Title I

Workforce development boards are responsible for developing the local workforce development area plan, engaging employers, providing program oversight, negotiating performance measures, and procuring youth program providers. In addition, the local workforce development board, in collaboration with the CCMEP lead agency, determines the criteria to be used when awarding contracts or grants for WIOA youth providers. Contract or grant awarding criteria should include consideration of the provider’s ability to work with youth and young adults in Ohio Works First, the financial assistance portion of the TANF program, other TANF-eligible youth, as well as Title I youth. Also, criteria should include the service provider’s ability to link youth to additional social services to assist in addressing non-employment and training barriers such as mental health needs and substance abuse treatment. The criteria for selection of youth providers must also consider the providers ability to provide the necessary assistance and services for those participants to enter into unsubsidized employment or training opportunities. (Page 109) Title I

CCMEP ends the siloed, fragmented approach that has tried to treat the collected “symptoms” of poverty instead of seeking a cure for the underlying challenges that needy Ohioans face. Ohio’s teens and young adults face higher rates of unemployment than any other age group and many struggle to complete high school. Many of these youth also encounter additional barriers to reaching their full potential including homelessness, substance abuse, teen pregnancy, and mental health issues. Addressing these issues and barriers early on in a coordinated way, could break the cycle of poverty.

Most of the CCMEP population will be out-of-school youth. By connecting clients to the right resources and services across various programs and partners, including adult and family literacy, Carl Perkins Career Tech, and local community-based organizations, standardizing eligibility, and combining resources to improve education and training outcomes, the participants will establish pathways to employment and begin to move up and out of poverty. This program integrates the funding from two existing programs, TANF and WIOA, to focus on each individual’s unique needs and to make better use of these existing funds which are already allocated for purposes of employment and training and reaching self-sufficiency. (Page 110) Title I

Aspire providers will coordinate with other workforce partners in the community for the development of career pathways. Providers also coordinate with local support services such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning to enable all students to attend and complete programs.

Aspire programs were required to provide the following adult education and literacy activities the first two years of the Combined State Plan: adult education, literacy, which include English language acquisition, integrated English literacy and civics education, and workforce preparation activities. These same activities will be required in PY 2018 and PY 2019. Details of these activities will be provided in each program’s proposal. (Page 135) Title 1

OOD finalized its Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Transition Services procedure (Procedure 80-VR-11-12) in September 2014 after months of development with multiple stakeholders, including the Ohio Departments of Education, Developmental Disabilities, and Mental Health and Addiction Services, and other entities. The purpose of the transition procedure is to provide direction for the application, eligibility determination and provision of transition services, including pre-employment transition services for VR-eligible students with disabilities. The procedure complies with 34 CFR 361.5, ensuring that the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for students with disabilities is developed as early as is reasonably possible, but no later than the time at which the student leaves the school setting. Specifically, the transition procedure states that the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) must be completed prior to the eligible student exiting school. (Page 150) Title I

OOD, the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), and the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) have consistently worked together to serve mutually eligible individuals with disabilities. As OOD provides services to an increased number of individuals with the most significant disabilities, the development of long-term supports and services is essential to the maintenance of the employment outcomes achieved. (Page 156) Title I 

For individuals with developmental disabilities who are eligible for Medicaid home and community based services (HCBS) waivers, OOD works with local county boards of developmental disabilities and providers to transition individuals with developmental disabilities into long-term supports needed to maintain competitive employment once the individual’s case has been successfully closed. For those individuals with developmental disabilities who are not eligible for an HCBS waiver, OOD will coordinate with the county board to establish alternative dollars for long-term supports. (Page 156) Title I

OhioMHAS funds the Coordinating Center for Excellence (CCOE) for Evidence-Based Supported Employment for individuals with serious mental illness through block grant funding. The CCOE has provided past training and technical assistance to OOD staff. OOD actively participates on the statewide employment committee and is working with the group to develop future training for OOD staff and mental health partners. OOD, OhioMHAS and the CCOE continue as active participants of the Johnson & Johnson - Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program. This program works with selected states to implement IPS for individuals with SPMI who are interested in gaining employment.

During FFY 2015, the statewide employment committee developed recommendations for an IPS procedure protocol. The procedure identifies potential candidates for IPS, outlines the VR referral process, coordinated planning with the job seeker’s employment team, rapid engagement in the job search process, ongoing support, and transition to long-term supports through the local mental health agency. (Page 157-158) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): In 2017, OOD hired an additional five VR counselors through an expansion of the Employment First Partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities to serve an additional 300 individuals with developmental disabilities annually. OOD also hired a Work Incentives Program Administrator to oversee the agency’s delivery of work incentives consultation services. OOD implemented its new Supported Employment Services procedure and provided statewide training for all VR staff. A new rate for supported employment performance-based job development was implemented in 2017. Qualified providers of this service are dually certified by the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities in employment services or meet Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services fidelity requirements for IPS-SE. In addition, OOD in partnership with county boards of developmental disabilities are exploring innovative strategies to serve individuals with developmental disabilities with the need for more intensive job readiness training services. These opportunities prepare individuals for employment in higher wage in-demand jobs within specific industry sectors. (Page 158) Title I

Another key component of the CSNA involved interface with other state agencies to analyze disability data among various departments: Developmental Disabilities, Education, Job and Family Services, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Veterans’ Services. OOD wanted to understand how these agencies identify and track disability-related data in their various case management systems. Opportunity for future interface with these agencies was also introduced throughout this phase of the CSNA process and has continued to some degree, as a part of Ohio’s Employment First Initiative. OOD continues to work with its state partners as it implements service delivery activities for various populations. (Page 174) Title I

OOD’s service provision is higher for individuals with psychosocial and cognitive impairments. This is most likely explained by the fact that OOD in the past four years has concentrated efforts through focused contracts with local Mental Health and Drug Addiction boards, local Developmental Disabilities boards, and most recently through the Ohio Department Developmental Disabilities funding for Employment First. Each of these populations also has an organized representative presence through established county public agencies across the state. (Page 176) Title I

OOD partners with a variety of local agencies related to the provision of extended services needed for individuals pursuing an employment outcome of supported employment. In particular, this includes partnership with local county boards of developmental disabilities as well as local behavioral health authorities. OOD works at the state level with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services in this regard as well.

OOD has partnered, in particular, with DODD and 26 county boards of developmental disabilities to provide high quality transition services to students and youth with developmental disabilities in the Bridges to Transition program. This program model has recently been enhanced to promote improved employment outcomes and cost effectiveness of the program. This service delivery model involves VR counselors working with county transition specialists to provide intensive transition services to students, ages 14 to 21, who are eligible for county board of DD and VR services. The model utilizes a team approach to increase collaboration and local connection with families, schools, providers and business, and facilitate the transition to long-term supports. (Page 186) Title I

Ohioans with disabilities who are determined eligible for SSI or SSDI, designated as eligible for services from county boards of DD, and those designated as having a severe and persistent mental illness and eligible for services from a community mental health board, are targeted populations for supported employment. OOD has developed Interagency Agreements with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), the Ohio Department of Medicaid, and the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS), to develop and implement improved coordination of supported employment services. The Interagency Agreements include training opportunities and technical assistance for staff across all involved agencies. For all supported employment cases, OOD ensures the coordination and facilitation of extended services for individuals, which can be funded through Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers, local county board of DD or county behavioral health authorities, including natural supports. Such services provide the supports individuals with the most significant disabilities need to sustain long-term employment. (Page 197) Title I

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

To provide early intervention services to individuals who receive workforce and employment-related services, the ODJFS offices of Unemployment Insurance Operations and Workforce Development provide local workforce administrative entities data and information. Local areas requesting data enter into a Data Sharing and Confidentiality Agreement with OWD. Each quarter, OWD pulls participants enrolled in Title I employment and training from the Ohio Workforce Case Management System (OWCMS) who received services during the reference quarter or four previous quarters; combined with participants who exited the program during the reference quarter or four previous quarters. These participants are matched against the Ohio Wage Record data identified in the Data Sharing and Confidentiality Agreement. From the wage record file, local area points of contact receive wages, number of weeks worked, the year and quarter wages are reported, NAICS 6-digit code, and NAICS title. The point of contact will also receive the information to identify each participant. In addition, on a monthly basis, the Office of Unemployment Insurance Operations emails a report that lists claimants who are within four weeks of exhausting their UI benefits and claimants who were profiled for RESEA and UCRS (WPRS) services. On a weekly basis, a list of individuals who recently applied for unemployment benefits is sent. The goal of this initiative is to improve information sharing and coordination of program activities so unemployed Ohioans can be served earlier and return to work more quickly. (Page 53) Title 1

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 51 - 60 of 94

OH Vocational Rehabilitation Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment - 09/30/2015

“Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD), Division of Performance and Innovation (DPI), produced this 2015 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) building upon the framework methodology developed from the 2012 CSNA, which was designed to assess the vocational rehabilitation (VR) service needs of individuals related to six primary disability categories. These disabilities include visual impairments, hearing impairments, communicative impairments, physical impairments, psychosocial impairments and cognitive impairments. This methodology focuses on penetration rates (of the extent to which OOD was serving prospective jobseekers with disabilities), and proportionality (how well OOD is balanced in serving the cross-section of individuals with disabilities who are seeking employment).” The VR sets forth 9 recommendations to be set as priorities over the next year in order to improve integrated employment opportunities and community inclusion.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio ESEA Flexibility Request - 08/21/2015

“By submitting this updated ESEA flexibility request, the SEA renews its request for flexibility through waivers of the nine ESEA requirements listed below and their associated regulatory, administrative, and reporting requirements, as well as any optional waivers the SEA has chosen to request under ESEA flexibility…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio’s HCBS Transition Plan - 03/13/2015

“Governor John Kasich created the Office of Health Transformation (OHT) to lead the Administration’s efforts to modernize Medicaid and streamline health and human services programs. Using an innovative approach that involves collaboration among multiple state agency partners and a set of shared guiding principles, reform initiatives are improving services, thus enabling seniors and people with disabilities to live with dignity in the setting they prefer, especially their own home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan (VR Rehabilitation Services Program) - FY 2015 - 09/30/2014

The State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program: Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 states that staff should build competencies on, and promote the employment practices such as customized employment, self-employment, and supported employment, among others.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Guide to Policy and Procedure Development - 07/31/2014

"The Employment First Rule, 5123: 2-2-05, requires county boards to adopt and implement a local Employment First Policy which clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age. The following is guidance developed in response to multiple requests from county boards."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Mental Health and Addiction Services (Ohio MHAS) Supported Employment Project - 07/01/2014

"Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services (MHAS) and its partners are implementing the Supported Employment Project. This project reduces the high unemployment rates for young adults and adults with a severe and persistent mental illness who may have co-occurring substance use disorders.

Two local sites are implementing new programs, and a committee will oversee statewide training, policy changes, and evaluation. The evidence-based practice of Individual Placement and Support employment is being shared statewide through training and technical assistance."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Funding System Re-Design for Ohio’s Employment First Initiative: Review of Promising Models from Other States - 06/02/2014

This report aims to provide DODD with a comparison of funding structures from multiple states with high rates of integrated employment, including at least one state with a local tax base funding structure. The first 3 Key Principles for establishing a funding system to support Employment First uphold that, “The system should be based upon a presumption of competency, employability and ‘zero reject’ for each person with a disability, regardless of complexity; The system should reward providers for best practice implementation of Individual Supported Employment; [and] The system should require provider standards and staff training/certification to assure equal statewide access to and opportunity for Individual Supported Employment.” There are 9 principles in total that guide that together guide the structure and implementation of Employment First.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Administrative Rule (5123: 2-2-05) - 04/01/2014

“The purpose of this rule is to implement the employment first policy in accordance with section 5123.022 of the Revised Code… This rule applies to county boards of developmental disabilities and providers responsible for planning, coordinating, or providing employment services, regardless of funding source, to individuals with developmental disabilities.”

·       Community Employment is competitive employment that takes place in an integrated setting

·       Every individual of working age will have a person-centered planning process to identify their desired employment outcome and their place on the path to community employment

·       Services and supports will be provided to help the individual move along the path to community employment

·       County boards are required to develop and implement an Employment First policy, set benchmarks to increase community employment outcomes, partner with schools to enhance transition planning, share information with individuals, families, schools, employers, providers and others in the community about Medicaid Buy-In, and collect employment data on individuals served

·       Providers are required to submit progress reports at least every 12 months to ensure the individual is moving along the path to community employment and collect employment data on individuals served

   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio's Path to Employment First - 02/01/2014

“Successful implementation of Employment First requires a multi-pronged approach and a long-term commitment to systems change…. A comprehensive approach must focus on key strategies; all designed to work synergistically to impact a service structure that better supports people to achieve community employment and directs more resources toward that preferred outcome.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Balancing Incentives Program - 06/15/2013

~~“Ohio Benefits Long-Term Services and Supports (OBLTSS)The Ohio Department of Medicaid is committed to removing barriers and expanding access to long-term services and supports received in community-based settings. In conjunction with the Governor’s Office of Health Transformation and additional state agencies, the Ohio Department of Medicaid participated in the Balancing Incentive Program (BIP). The Ohio Benefits Long-Term Services and Supports (OBLTSS) program was created from the state’s involvement in BIP.

Through the Balancing Incentive Program Ohio earned over $180 million in matched funds, to improve access to home and community-based long-term services and supports (LTSS). Participating states were required to:◾Establish a no-wrong-door/single entry point system eligibility determination and enrollment system;◾Implement a case management system that is free of conflicts of interest; and◾Develop core standardized assessments.

The OBLTSS program meets all the requirements set forth by BIP and creates a unified way for individuals to connect to the various home and community-based programs and services for which they may be eligible. This new “front door” for information streamlines the process for individuals and their families to learn more about vital long-term services and supports information and resources.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Ohio HB 155 - 10/15/2015

A bill to amend section 2329.66 and to enact sections 113.50, 113.51, 113.52, 113.53, 113.54, 113.55, and 113.56 of the Revised Code to require the Treasurer of State to create a program [ABLE] offering federally tax-advantaged savings accounts used to pay for a person's qualified disability expenses and to disregard the value of and income from that account in determining whether that person is eligible for state or local means-tested public assistance.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Ohio SB 316: IEP and Post-secondary Transition Requirements - 09/24/2012

Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is fourteen years of age, and update annually thereafter, a statement describing:

Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills; Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described in divisions (H)(1) and (2) of this section.

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Rev. Code §5126.05: County Board - Powers & Duties - 09/24/2012

“Implement an employment first policy that clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age who receives services from the board…”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

5123.022 OH State Policy Regarding Community Employment for Disabled - 09/24/2012

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of this state that employment services for individuals with developmental disabilities be directed at community employment. Every individual with a developmental disability is presumed capable of community employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OH Rev. Code Ann. §§123.152 - Encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program. - 09/29/2005

As used in this section, "EDGE business enterprise" means a sole proprietorship, association, partnership, corporation, limited liability corporation, or joint venture certified as a participant in the encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program by the director of administrative services under this section of the Revised Code.   Social disadvantage based on any of the following:  - A rebuttable presumption when the business owner or owners demonstrate membership in a racial minority group or show personal disadvantage due to color, ethnic origin, gender, physical disability, long-term residence in an environment isolated from the mainstream of American society, location in an area of high unemployment;   
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order 2019-03D Establishing Ohio as a Disability Inclusion State and Model Employer of Individuals with Disabilities - 01/14/2019

~~1.  The Department of Administrative Services, in consultation with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, shall identify and appoint a State ADA Coordinator, who shall be responsible for advising all state agencies, departments, boards, and commissions within the executive branch on disability policy and compliance with state and federal disability rights laws.

2.  Each state agency shall annually review its hiring practices to identify any barriers to employment of individuals with disabilities, and, in consultation with the State ADA Coordinator, take appropriate action to eliminate any non-job-related barriers to the integration of individuals with disabilities into the workforce.

3.  All state agencies, departments, boards and commissions shall utilize best efforts with respect to recruitment, hiring, and advancement, and issue clear, written directives to their managers and supervisors prohibiting discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities.

4.  All state agencies, departments, boards and commissions shall collect and evaluate self-disclosed data through the state personnel system to be used to measure progress in hiring people with disabilities. This data will be used to develop a strategic plan in consultation with the State ADA Coordinator and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities with a goal for hiring individuals with disabilities who self-disclose.

5.  The Ohio Department of Administrative Services and the State ADA Coordinator, in coordination with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, shall ensure all state employees participate in regular disability etiquette and awareness training to build and sustain a culture of inclusion in the workplace.  All State employees shall also participate in periodic training on the ways that technology can be used to make work sites more accessible and available to people with disabilities....

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Ohio Employment First Executive Order - 03/19/2012

~~“Governor John Kasich officially launched Ohio’s Employment First Initiative when he signed Executive Order 2012-05K on March 19, 2012. The Executive Order established statewide collaboration and coordination by creating the Employment First Taskforce and Advisory Committee, and made community employment the preferred outcome for individuals with developmental disabilities.The taskforce is charged with expanding community employment opportunities by reducing barriers and aligning state policy.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 21 - 28 of 28

Funding System Re-Design for Ohio’s Employment First Initiative: Review of Promising Models from Other States - 06/02/2014

This report aims to provide DODD with a comparison of funding structures from multiple states with high rates of integrated employment, including at least one state with a local tax base funding structure. The first 3 Key Principles for establishing a funding system to support Employment First uphold that, “The system should be based upon a presumption of competency, employability and ‘zero reject’ for each person with a disability, regardless of complexity; The system should reward providers for best practice implementation of Individual Supported Employment; [and] The system should require provider standards and staff training/certification to assure equal statewide access to and opportunity for Individual Supported Employment.” There are 9 principles in total that guide that together guide the structure and implementation of Employment First.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Administrative Rule (5123: 2-2-05) - 04/01/2014

“The purpose of this rule is to implement the employment first policy in accordance with section 5123.022 of the Revised Code… This rule applies to county boards of developmental disabilities and providers responsible for planning, coordinating, or providing employment services, regardless of funding source, to individuals with developmental disabilities.”

·       Community Employment is competitive employment that takes place in an integrated setting

·       Every individual of working age will have a person-centered planning process to identify their desired employment outcome and their place on the path to community employment

·       Services and supports will be provided to help the individual move along the path to community employment

·       County boards are required to develop and implement an Employment First policy, set benchmarks to increase community employment outcomes, partner with schools to enhance transition planning, share information with individuals, families, schools, employers, providers and others in the community about Medicaid Buy-In, and collect employment data on individuals served

·       Providers are required to submit progress reports at least every 12 months to ensure the individual is moving along the path to community employment and collect employment data on individuals served

   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio's Path to Employment First - 02/01/2014

“Successful implementation of Employment First requires a multi-pronged approach and a long-term commitment to systems change…. A comprehensive approach must focus on key strategies; all designed to work synergistically to impact a service structure that better supports people to achieve community employment and directs more resources toward that preferred outcome.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio - “New Requirements for Secondary Transition Services for Students with Disabilities: Frequently Asked Questions” - 09/19/2012

The New Requirements state that IEPs must start at age 14, update annually and contain,

“Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills;  Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; and The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described [above]…”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OH Department of Education Job Training Coordinating Program Manual

This manual contains information on Individualized Education Plans (IEPs and school-to-work transition for students with disabilities. It recommends the use of Customized Employment as a good technique for harder to place students.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio DD System Requirements

“In order to make community employment the expected and preferred outcome for people with developmental disabilities, the Ohio DD system is required to align policies, procedures, eligibility, enrollment, and planning for services across state agencies… Other requirements include development of universal tools for documentation, eligibility, selection, assessment, and planning of services. Identification of best practices, partnerships, funding sources, opportunities for shared services among County Boards of DD and other providers is required along with expanding model programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Transition Planning Requirements in IEPs

“Transition assessment affords the opportunity for professionals from across agencies to co-plan and review information that will highlight the youth's preferences, interests, needs and skills relevant to building a profile of the youth as a future employee.  A  team approach to assessment –adult service personnel, educators, youth and family working collaboratively—results in a profile that informs the pathway to community employment that is the 'best fit' for the youth.”

Transition planning is required to begin formally and be documented in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) by age 14.  The IEP must include a post-secondary goal for employment that is based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Employment First Administrative Rule

The Administrative Rules assert that, “Community Employment is competitive employment that takes place in an integrated setting;

Every individual of working age will have a person-centered planning process to identify their desired employment outcome and their place on the path to community employment; and Services and supports will be provided to help the individual move along the path to community employment.” It also outlines the responsibilities of the County Boards and Providers.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Partnership for Employment First - 05/20/2019

~~“The Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, in partnership with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities agency, continues a statewide initiative to expand community employment services for people with developmental disabilities. This opportunity allows the state to maximize resources to support more people on their path to community employment, build system capacity, and strengthen the relationship between the developmental disability and vocational rehabilitation systems in Ohio.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Partnership FFY 18 Annual Report - 05/20/2019

~~“Since implementation in Federal Fiscal Year 2014, the Employment First Partnership between Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) and the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) has improved competitive integrated employment outcomes for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities who want to work in their community. As a result of the success, resources dedicated to helping adults with developmental disabilities find jobs have doubled since 2013. This growth increased capacity from 900 people being served to 1,800 people with developmental disabilities being served annually.

In addition, the partnership has five certified work incentive consultants who are dedicated to provide work incentive planning and counseling services to all people served through the Employment First Partnership receiving federal, state, and local benefits.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities “About Us” - 01/14/2019

~~“Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) is the State of Ohio agency that partners with Ohioans with disabilities to achieve quality employment, independence and Social Security disability determination outcomes.It is accomplished through its Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR), Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired (BSVI) and Division of Disability Determination (DDD). A fourth area is the Division of Employer and Innovation Services (EIS), which is responsible for establishing and maintaining partnerships with employers. • Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR)• Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired (BSVI)• Division of Disability Determination (DDD)• Employer and Innovation Services (EIS)” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OCALI Supports Schools to Ensure Post-Secondary Success - 07/10/2018

~~“Through the Ohio DD Council, OCALI, or the Ohio Center for Autism and Low Incidence, received a grant titled “Realizing Employment First for Youth: Evidence Based Practices and Predictors of Adult Success.”

The pilot program called “What Works for Work”, studied how evidence-based practices and predictors that supported school-based teams help achieve post-secondary success – or life after high school - for students with developmental disabilities.

The grant support school-based teams, “find successful methods that would improve transitions into employment, independent living skills and community living,” said Madeline Rosenshein, OCALI consultant and grantee.

Through research focused on transition youth, it was found that certain evidence-based practices and predictors, if implemented during the school years, can improve adult outcomes, which includes employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

IPS Supported Employment - 07/01/2018

~~“Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) Supported Employment is an evidence-based practice that helps people with severe and persistent mental illness and/or co-occurring substance use disorders identify, acquire and maintain integrated competitive employment in their communities. IPS is assertive about helping people find the work they want as soon as they express a desire to become employed. IPS increases employment in integrated competitive jobs, the number of hours worked, and the amount of income earned in competitive jobs."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

SAMHSA Supported Employment Grant - 07/01/2018

~~“OhioMHAS was recently awarded the Transforming Lives through Supported Employment grant for $4.8 million dollars over 5 years. This will be a partnership between OhioMHAS, the state training, technical assistance and evaluation partners, and other state departments including Vocational Rehabilitation and two community behavioral health agencies: Firelands Counseling and Recovery Services and Daybreak, Inc. The mission of this project is to modernize, enhance, and increase availability and quality of IPS services to meet the needs of individuals with a severe and persistent mental illness or co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders.The expected outcome is for Ohio to have the necessary infrastructure in place to maintain, expand, and sustain IPS throughout the state and to increase the number of individuals with a severe and persistent mental illness and co-occurring mental health and substance use disorder that obtain and retain integrated competitive employment of their choosing.” 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP) - 10/18/2017

“In 2015, the Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans (OOD) launched the Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP). This innovative collaboration changed the nature and impact of transition services for students with disabilities in Ohio. The Partnership increases the availability of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors for students with disabilities beginning at age 14 to improve post-school outcomes. This earlier engagement helps students with disabilities get a head start on becoming job ready and better prepared to enter the workforce with the skills and experiences necessary to be successful.

Because of this increased investment in transition, OOD is serving more students with disabilities than ever before. This increased demand led to an expansion of the Partnership in 2017. Now, 30 OOD counselors and 21 caseload assistants are partnering with local education agencies to serve students with disabilities throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio NAMI Supported Employment Family Advocacy Project

“This collaboration between NAMI Ohio and the Ohio Department of Mental Health engages families of individuals with mental illness to advocate for, create and expand high-quality Individual Placement and Support (IPS) programs. Family involvement can strengthen the partnerships between providers, family members and consumers around SE services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Employment First Taskforce Common Principles

“The Ohio Employment First Taskforce agencies agree that community employment should be the first option for all working age adults and transition-age youth with developmental disabilities. Employment First is a philosophy of service that presumes that all Ohioans with significant disabilities can and should have opportunities to work in the community”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Retaining Employment and Talent After Injury/Illness Network (RETAIN) Demonstration Project - 06/15/2019

~~“Research has shown that individuals with non-occupational back, knee and/or shoulder injuries who work in the manufacturing industry are at high risk of becoming unemployed. To see whether providing intensive return-to-work coordination hastens their recovery and improves their chances of remaining employed, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services applied for and received a RETAIN grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. This grant will allow Ohio to develop and pilot a model that, if successful, can be replicated across the state.”

Systems
  • Other

Transforming Lives Through Supported Employment: SAMHSA’s Supported Employment Grant Program (SEP) - 06/29/2018

The purpose of the Supported Employment Program is "to enhance state and community capacity to provide and expand evidence-based SEPs (such as the Individual Placement and Support [IPS] model) to adults with serious mental illnesses, including persons with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders." 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council Current Grant Projects - 07/01/2017

This page lists the current grant projects of the OH Developmental Disabilities Council for the 2017-2021 State Plan. Grant topics include Assistive Technology, Children & Health, Community Living, Employment, Leadership Development, Outreach, and Public Policy.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Mental Health and Addiction Services (Ohio MHAS) Supported Employment Project - 07/01/2014

"Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services (MHAS) and its partners are implementing the Supported Employment Project. This project reduces the high unemployment rates for young adults and adults with a severe and persistent mental illness who may have co-occurring substance use disorders.

Two local sites are implementing new programs, and a committee will oversee statewide training, policy changes, and evaluation. The evidence-based practice of Individual Placement and Support employment is being shared statewide through training and technical assistance."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

OCALI Customized Employment Project - 03/01/2009

"With funding from the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), OCALI launched a customized employment project in March 2009 for two school based transition teams, Claymont High School with Tuscarawas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and Huber Heights High School with Montgomery County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The goal of the project was to increase community employment outcomes for transition aged youth using customized employment strategies and processes. Team members received training and consultation in the CE process, Social Security Work Incentives and working with employers. Teams included school, developmental disability, and vocational rehabilitation staff, plus a parent mentor. In November of 2009 the project received additional funding from DODD to add another team from Lucas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and to provide up to 40 paid internships for youth with disabilities using customized employment strategies and processes in the Lucas County and Montgomery County sites. The Tuscarawas County site obtained funding from DODD, “We Go To Work Grants” to fund resource ownership as an employment strategy."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Disability Employment Initiative

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2011, was awarded a Round 2 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This grant ended in 2014.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Ohio Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The…grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities”. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Money Follows the Person

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 75,151 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from  institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2016. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply. There are currently forty-three states and the District of Columbia participating in the demonstration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 19 of 19

Ohio Employment First Transition Framework

"Ohio Employment First Transition Framework is a critical component to the Ohio Employment First structure and is intended to address barriers to transition planning and services in order to achieve meaningful adult outcomes. The Framework was developed by stakeholders from multiple agencies to create processes and highlight practices that can be used by all agencies. These common processes assist professionals to plan, prepare, empower, educate, and connect across systems so as to consistently assist youth with disabilities to realize meaningful, community employment and other valued aspects of adult life.

The Framework is built on three non-negotiable foundational elements that together create a 'filter' to examine the practices and procedures used when working and supporting transition youth. The foundational elements for the activity and practices of the Framework are:

Person-centered. The youth is where the team efforts begin and end. Policies and practices must be flexible enough to respond to individual strengths and needs. Agency-neutral. As agencies come together to collaborate, activity should occur in a manner where all involved see value for the youth and no single agency policies or procedures are considered the priority. Outcome-focused. The common focus of the collaborative efforts are the meaningful adult life outcomes."
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Loop Ohio

"Welcome to Loop Ohio, Ohio’s virtual Community of Practice! This online community is dedicated to facilitating statewide and local, cross system collaboration and learning, with a focus on promoting best practices in community development and inclusion for people with disabilities. Ohio is a national leader in these efforts, primarily because of the innovative work being done all across the state, throughout our local communities. Loop Ohio provides a platform for community members and professionals to share ideas and resources, solve problems, break down barriers, connect across distance, and engage in ongoing learning. Loop Ohio is multi-functional, enabling people to have live virtual conversations, share resources, post events, lead and participate in webinars, use discussion boards, have online chat time with subject matter experts and more."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

OH Job Seekers Guide

"The Job Seekers Guide will help you learn how to get a job and will give you some tools that will help along the way."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Customized Employment Training Series

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services and Griffin-Hammis Associates are sponsoring classroom training, on-line instruction, special topics webinars, and technical assistance on Customized Employment for designated Job Center staff and partners, to support individuals with significant disabilities and complex barriers to employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Orientation to Supported Employment Web Course

This Web-based training is an introduction to the competencies for effective supported employment. Please follow this link to register:

https://trn-store.com/trn-courses/entry/OHIntroductionRegister.php

Seven lessons will cover the following topics:

Values, Definitions, History Legislation, Funding, Ohio’s Employment First Roles and Rights Supported Employment Process and Benefits Career Planning, Discovery, Vocational Profile Marketing and Job Development Job Design and Training, Natural Supports
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Customized Employment Guide

“This guide provides a look at the strategies used in Customized Employment (CE) and links to more information and resources for those who are just beginning to explore CE. It explains how CE might benefit individuals with disabilities seeking employment and students in transition from school to work. CE is based on several evidence based transition practices such as self-determination, using self-advocacy strategies, and providing community based instruction. Learn about OCALI’s experience with three teams in Ohio that served transition age youth. In addition to traditional funding sources these teams had access to funding for internships and resource ownership.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Customized Employment: Best Practice of Today

This presentation intertwines Customized Employment into Employment First as a key component to the state’s efforts in promoting community-based, integrated employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Project SEARCH: Opening Doors to Employment for Young People with Disabilities (2009)

“In the mid-1990s, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital began a broad diversity campaign to build a stable, reliable workforce that represented the surrounding community. Although medical professionals make up about 70 percent of the hospital’s workforce, the remaining employees are support personnel who receive on-the-job training and tend to experience high turnover. As part of its diversity effort, the hospital formed a partnership with Great Oaks Career Campuses, a career technical school with a significant proportion of students (28 percent) with developmental disabilities (DD). The resulting job training and placement program was named Project SEARCH and focused on training high school students with DD who are making the transition from school to work. The Project SEARCH model is based on an active collaboration between the hospital, Great Oaks, and the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission, the state’s vocational rehabilitation agency (SVRA). Over the past 15 years, this model has been implemented in 140 additional sites in the United States and the United Kingdom, mostly in hospitals, although some programs have been implemented in banks, insurance companies, state and local government agencies, zoos, senior care facilities, and universities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio Employment First Provider Support Trainings

Professional development activities are available to providers by the Ohio Employment First Initiative.  Trainings include, but are not limited to Mobile Technology as Employment Supports; Task Analysis for Job Coaches; The Role of the Occupational Therapist in Supporting Employment; Transformation: Sustaining Conversation, Raising the Bar and Changing Lives; Worksite Analysis for Job Coaches; Employment supports for those with IDD and Autism; andEmployment supports for those with Physical or Sensory involvement.

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Disability Rights OH, National Federation of the Blind, and Autistic Self Advocacy Network Celebrate Landmark Decision Ordering Fair Pay - 02/03/2016

COLUMBUS, OHIO – In a precedent-setting opinion issued by an administrative law judge from the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL), three clients have been awarded minimum wage going forward and back pay from Seneca Re-Ad, a sheltered workshop run by the Seneca County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The original petition was filed by Disability Rights Ohio (DRO), the National Federation of the Blind, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and the Baltimore law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Fair Pay from Sheltered Workshops (2016) - 02/02/2016

This case arises under Section 214(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act ("Act"), 29 U.S.C. §214(c). Ralph ("Joe") Magers, Pamela Steward and Mark Felton ("Petitioners") are employees of Seneca Re-Ad Industries ("Respondent"), which is located in Fostoria, Ohio. Each of the Petitioners has been diagnosed with one or more developmental disabilities and each receives services from the Seneca County (Ohio) Board of Developmental Disabilities ("DD").  Employment at Respondent's Fostoria manufacturing facility is one of the services provided by DD.  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Ohio’s HCBS Transition Plan - 03/13/2015

“Governor John Kasich created the Office of Health Transformation (OHT) to lead the Administration’s efforts to modernize Medicaid and streamline health and human services programs. Using an innovative approach that involves collaboration among multiple state agency partners and a set of shared guiding principles, reform initiatives are improving services, thus enabling seniors and people with disabilities to live with dignity in the setting they prefer, especially their own home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Balancing Incentives Program - 06/15/2013

~~“Ohio Benefits Long-Term Services and Supports (OBLTSS)The Ohio Department of Medicaid is committed to removing barriers and expanding access to long-term services and supports received in community-based settings. In conjunction with the Governor’s Office of Health Transformation and additional state agencies, the Ohio Department of Medicaid participated in the Balancing Incentive Program (BIP). The Ohio Benefits Long-Term Services and Supports (OBLTSS) program was created from the state’s involvement in BIP.

Through the Balancing Incentive Program Ohio earned over $180 million in matched funds, to improve access to home and community-based long-term services and supports (LTSS). Participating states were required to:◾Establish a no-wrong-door/single entry point system eligibility determination and enrollment system;◾Implement a case management system that is free of conflicts of interest; and◾Develop core standardized assessments.

The OBLTSS program meets all the requirements set forth by BIP and creates a unified way for individuals to connect to the various home and community-based programs and services for which they may be eligible. This new “front door” for information streamlines the process for individuals and their families to learn more about vital long-term services and supports information and resources.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Buy-in for Workers with Disabilities - 04/01/2008

"Medicaid Buy-In for Workers with Disabilities (MBIWD) is an Ohio Medicaid program that provides health care coverage to working Ohioans with disabilities. Historically, people with disabilities were often discouraged from working because their earnings made them ineligible for Medicaid coverage. MBIWD was created to enable Ohioans with disabilities to work and still keep their health care coverage."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Money Follows the Person

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 75,151 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from  institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2016. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply. There are currently forty-three states and the District of Columbia participating in the demonstration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Ohio until 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

How Does Work Impact My Benefits?

“If you are receiving benefits from the government (money, services, staff, medical care), you may be worried that if you work, you will not get those services. This page can help you learn what will change as you start to make your own money. You will also learn about some special benefits for workers!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

OH Disability Benefits 101: Working with a Disability in Ohio

“Disability Benefits 101 gives you tools and information on health coverage, benefits, and employment. You can plan ahead and learn how work and benefits go together.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The…grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities”. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Self Empowered Life Funding (SELF) (0877.R01.00)

"--Provides participant-directed homemaker/personal care, residential respite, supported employment – enclave, participant-directed goods and services, participant/family stability assistance, support brokerage, career planning, clinical/therapeutic intervention, community inclusion, community respite, functional behavioral assessment, group employment support, habilitation - adult day support, habilitation - vocational habilitation, individual employment support, integrated employment, non-medical transportation, remote monitoring equipment, remote monitoring, transportation, waiver nursing delegation for individuals w/ID and DD ages 0 - no max age"

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio Medicaid Waiver: Individual Options (0231.R05.00)

"~~Provides community respite, habilitation - adult day support, homemaker/personal care, supported employment – community, adaptive and assistive equipment, adult family living, adult foster care, career planning, environmental accessibility adaptations, group employment support, habilitation - vocational habilitation, home delivered meals, homemaker/personal care - daily billing unit, individual employment support, interpreter, money management, non-medical transportation, nutrition, participant-directed homemaker/personal care, remote monitoring equipment, remote monitoring, residential respite, shared living, social work, supported employment – enclave, transportation, waiver nursing delegation, waiver nursing for individuals w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age"

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

 In Ohio Employment First is for "Every person. Every talent. Every opportunity."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Ohio’s Vocational VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.26%
Change from
2017 to 2018
11,689,442
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.5%
Change from
2017 to 2018
844,409
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.23%
Change from
2017 to 2018
323,356
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.73%
Change from
2017 to 2018
38.29%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.83%
Change from
2017 to 2018
79.47%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 11,614,373 11,658,609 11,689,442
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 851,743 840,199 844,409
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 304,940 309,665 323,356
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,843,788 4,867,703 4,893,553
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.80% 36.86% 38.29%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.55% 78.81% 79.47%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90% 5.00% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.10% 22.10% 22.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.20% 12.70% 12.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 779,215 775,089 779,786
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 841,656 838,006 849,720
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,323,116 1,323,349 1,333,183
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 225,312 211,098 215,643
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 465,053 50,119 48,274
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,387 6,024 8,006
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 12,662 14,784 17,212
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 721 366 564
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 41,930 45,364 42,370
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 12,743 12,110 12,528

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 18,946 19,047 18,842
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.30% 6.40% 6.40%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 354,548 351,027 344,385

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,076 1,341 654
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 5,258 3,515 1,517
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 8,211 5,264 2,394
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 25.30% 25.50% 27.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.50% 3.00% 3.70%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20% 1.80% 2.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,857 4,004 4,111
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,897 2,372 2,693
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,029 1,747 719
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.00 0.02 0.00

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 114 135 170
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 80 85 98
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 70.00% 63.00% 58.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.69 0.73 0.84

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
13,246
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 978 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,205 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,255 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 4,229 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 3,688 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 891 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 30.70% 31.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 11,120 8,168 8,304
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 574,554 571,226 565,754
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 1,427 1,023 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,178 896 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $91,950,000 $99,531,000 $75,231,718
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $119,856,000 $114,445,000 $117,062,171
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $555,657,000 $562,605,000 $365,761,826
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00% 25.00% 28.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 18,804 18,914 17,998
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 14,407 15,514 16,449
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 71.30 76.70 79.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 65.13% 65.81% 63.28%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.77% 12.41% 11.96%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.93% 3.63% 3.60%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.27% 99.96% 99.90%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.45% 28.81% 27.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 76.61% 67.49% 70.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 83.95% 83.44% 79.49%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 40.16% 38.68% 43.33%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,552,533
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 4,128
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 175,646
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 500,082
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 675,727
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 233
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 531
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 764
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,787,410
AbilityOne wages (services). $6,697,054

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 4 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 2 0 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 94 56 81
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 101 58 83
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 71 10 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 24 0 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 15,295 9,652 8,436
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 9 9 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 15,399 9,671 8,448

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Transition services are funded by the various state agencies that serve the individual youth in accordance with requirements under WIOA, IDEA and other pertinent laws. In addition to the Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Ohio’s Employment First Task Force works across multiple systems to align policies and practices and issues guidance to the field as needed to ensure that students receive the services needed to ensure achievement of employment and other post-secondary outcomes. While OOD and ODE are the two lead agencies with regard to facilitating transition services for students with disabilities, the Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services, the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and the Ohio Department of Medicaid, as Employment First Task Force agencies also support this work, including funding services for mutually served students and youth with disabilities. (Page 153) Title I

In FFY 2013, OOD in partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) established a dual certification program as part of the Employment First Partnership Agreement. This dual certification program is designed to ensure continuity of services and allow for more successful transition from time-limited to long-term supports. In addition, it is designed to better respond to the needs of individuals served by the program as well as our business partners. Through this program, OOD provides a waiver of accreditation requirements to approved DD supported employment providers, allowing them to provide VR services to individuals being served by OOD in the Employment First Partnership. Performance-based job development is utilized to ensure a more outcome-focused method of service provision. Staff providing services under this waiver must pass an online course and attend mandatory trainings on VR services, fee schedules, billing, and reporting expectations before they can begin providing services. (Page 155) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): In 2017, OOD hired an additional five VR counselors through an expansion of the Employment First Partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities to serve an additional 300 individuals with developmental disabilities annually. OOD also hired a Work Incentives Program Administrator to oversee the agency’s delivery of work incentives consultation services. OOD implemented its new Supported Employment Services procedure and provided statewide training for all VR staff. A new rate for supported employment performance-based job development was implemented in 2017. Qualified providers of this service are dually certified by the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities in employment services or meet Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services fidelity requirements for IPS-SE. In addition, OOD in partnership with county boards of developmental disabilities are exploring innovative strategies to serve individuals with developmental disabilities with the need for more intensive job readiness training services. These opportunities prepare individuals for employment in higher wage in-demand jobs within specific industry sectors. (Page 158) Title I

As mentioned previously, OOD partners with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) to expand vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to individuals with developmental disabilities as part of the state’s overall Employment First Initiative. It also should be noted that DODD is the lead agency for Ohio’s Employment First initiative, which was signed by Governor Kasich in March 2012. OOD is an active member of the Employment First Task Force, which is examining existing practices in the state system to identify and address barriers to employment for people with developmental and other disabilities.

An Interagency Agreement between the state level Employment First Taskforce agencies has been implemented. This includes the Ohio Departments of Developmental Disabilities, Education, Job and Family Services, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Medicaid, the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council and OOD. The member agencies agree that community employment should be the first and preferred option for all working age adults and transition-age youth with developmental disabilities. The member agencies have agreed to develop or review state-level interagency agreements to ensure coordination of services and enable data sharing. The agencies have developed cross agency tools and processes to reduce duplication of services such as enrollment, eligibility, assessment and planning.

In 2015 and continuing into 2016, Ohio has been selected as a core state in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. Through this grant, which is funded through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), the Employment First Taskforce has identified action steps that each agency will complete to promote the core principles for transition in Ohio: • Competitive, integrated employment is expectation for all youth with disabilities; • Transition planning for youth requires multi-agency collaboration; • Early dialogue with individuals and families is critical to ensuring employment outcomes; • There are multiple pathways to employment; and • Person-centered planning is key to the development of effective services and supports for transition-age youth. (Page 163) Title I

In addition to the Employment First Partnership agreement with DODD, OOD also has developed a joint interagency agreement with DODD and the Ohio Department of Medicaid (ODM) in accordance with requirements of WIOA. DODD and ODM maintain a separate interagency agreement (A-1415-07-0528) that outlines programmatic and fiscal responsibilities between the two agencies, in which ODM delegates the day-to-day operations of the DODD Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waiver programs to DODD. The purpose of OOD’s interagency agreement with DODD and ODM is to improve opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities, including individuals with developmental disabilities enrolled in a home and community based services waiver administered by DODD, in accordance with its interagency agreement with ODM to achieve employment and independence. The agreement outlines a collaborative framework for coordinating services that prioritizes competitive, integrated employment and assists individuals with developmental disabilities to move from facility-based work and non-work settings to competitive, integrated employment. The agreement identifies methods to improve outreach to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families regarding VR programming and services. It also improves information sharing between the agencies and provides technical assistance and training to DODD and local county boards to increase employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities. (Page 164) Title I

OOD and the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) collaborate on a regular basis to provide guidance to educational agencies and vocational rehabilitation (VR) personnel responsible for facilitating transition services. These staff also offer consultation and technical assistance resources to assist schools and related community support entities in planning for transition of students with disabilities.

At the state level, both agencies have designated personnel to provide oversight and leadership for the development of policies, procedures, interagency training and other state-level partnership activities for transition services. On the local level, VR counselors are assigned as liaisons to schools and work with local school districts’ transition specialists.

OOD will provide targeted training to enhance personnel development. This will include targeted training on Employment First, supported employment, eligibility, transition procedures and clarification of roles and responsibilities of OOD and school personnel. (Page 173) Title I

Another key component of the CSNA involved interface with other state agencies to analyze disability data among various departments: Developmental Disabilities, Education, Job and Family Services, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Veterans’ Services. OOD wanted to understand how these agencies identify and track disability-related data in their various case management systems. Opportunity for future interface with these agencies was also introduced throughout this phase of the CSNA process and has continued to some degree, as a part of Ohio’s Employment First Initiative. OOD continues to work with its state partners as it implements service delivery activities for various populations. (Page 174) Title I

Employment First Partnership Agreement: OOD has continued its Employment First (EF) Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities. OOD has expanded the number of VR counselors providing services under the agreement from 15 to 25 counselors during this time period. In FFY 2015, the EF program exceeded all performance goals. This includes exceeding its rehabilitation goal by 150 percent and its plan development goal by 200 percent.
(Page 192) Title I

(EF): As noted above, OOD has successfully implemented its EF Partnership Agreement, which includes capacity building activities for supported employment providers. This program has expanded the number of available providers in the VR and the DD systems through the dual certification program. In addition, the program has initiated significant training initiatives for providers who provide service under the EF Partnership Agreement.

Individualized Placement and Support (IPS): OOD continues to work with the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services to develop procedures to implement IPS in Ohio. As a part of OOD’s planned updated to the VR Fee Schedule, OOD intends to develop a separate definition and rate for supported employment services. This is expected to be implemented on Oct. 1, 2016.

Policy and Procedure: OOD has finalized a draft supported employment policy and procedure based upon the above referenced activities. Once the final WIOA regulations are published, OOD will finalize these policies and procedures and provide training to field staff in the area of supported employment.
Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): OOD has continued the Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities which has assisted OOD in reaching Supported Employment goals. (Page 195) Title I

In FFY 2016 and FFY 2017, OOD’s program performance has continued trend in the positive direction. For example, in FFY 2017, the Employment First partnership agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities achieved 528 successful rehabilitations (an 83% increase from FFY 2015) and processed 1805 new applications for services (a 28.5% increase from 2015). In addition, the time from application to eligibility in FFY 2018 (as of April 20, 2018) averaged 26 days, down from 28 days in FFY 2015. (Page196) Title I

Historical WIA and current WIOA data exists for these cohorts for us to use in calculations and projections. Applying the employed second quarter after exit to the historical WIA population yields only a modest difference between WIA’s entered employment first quarter after exit and WIOA’s employment second quarter after exit for these two cohorts. Therefore, we propose using the PY 2015 WIA common measure level as a starting point for establishing a performance history for the second quarter after exit measure. For the fourth quarter after exit, Ohio has noted an average of a 6percentage point drop from second to fourth quarter after exit for the Adult population and a 4 percentage drop for the Dislocated Worker population. Therefore, Ohio submits the resultant as a starting point for establishing a performance history for the fourth quarter after exit measure. State efforts will focus on minimizing these drop offs. (Page 323) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~In accordance with federal requirements, supported employment services provided include the following: • Assessment services needed to ensure appropriate job match and supports;Job development; • Job placement; • Intensive on-the-job training or coaching of individuals with the disability, their employer, supervisor and/or coworkers by skilled employment consultants; • Other VR or support services needed to ensure success in community employment; • Follow-up and monitoring of job performance during the stabilization process; • Discrete post-employment services not commonly available from those who provide extended services; • Identification and development/facilitation of natural supports; and • Customized employment. (Pages 197-198) Title I

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Each Aspire grantee is encouraged to have a postsecondary education and training partnership or Bridge Program. Bridge programs prepare adults with limited academic or limited English skills to enter and succeed in postsecondary education and training programs, thus reducing the need for remedial education provided in the postsecondary institutions. (Page 50) Title I

Nine recommendations have stemmed from the analysis in the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA). These recommendations will be addressed through specific strategic initiatives outlined on OOD’s Strategic Plan. These recommendations are as follows: 1. Actively engage OOD VR counselors in the early stages of a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) development and utilize the VR services that have yielded positive outcomes. 2. Formalize efforts to increase services to individuals with visual and hearing disabilities; specifically evaluate and prioritize identified recommendations cited in the Workforce Integration Task Force (WIT). 3. Expand and leverage new employer and state agency partnerships to achieve Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act common performance measure outcomes. 4. Meet the workforce needs of employers by evaluating in-demand occupations as a standard approach of VR counselors’ work in developing job goals and service plans for OOD job seekers. 5. Work with the Social Security Administration to identify strategies for referring disability claimants to the vocational rehabilitation program. 6. Concentrate efforts to bring awareness and assist OOD VR served individuals to register with OhioMeansJobs.com as a means to achieving their employment goals. 7. Utilize technology to increase access to OOD services and improve operational efficiencies. 8. Design a formal business plan model that allows for agile deployment of human and financial resources across Ohio counties when new opportunities to expand VR services arise. 9. Re-evaluate the partnership with the Ohio Department of Aging, leveraging both Vocational Rehabilitation and the Independent Living and Older Blind programs. (Page 191) Title I

In addition to leveraging services, training and experience through OhioMeansJobs center partnerships and host agencies, SCSEP participants will also benefit from services leveraged through civic engagement programming. For example, the Encore Career Network in partnership with Cleveland Foundation’s Cleveland Encore Network will make available job search coaches to provide individualized assistance in finding unsubsidized employment and staff to support program management. The Encore movement is a nationwide effort to tap the talents and experience of retirees and near-retirees to help community agencies further their missions. Other potential civic engagement partners will include the Retired Senior Volunteer Program or in some locations VISTA. (Pages 288-289) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~In 2011, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) received a three-year Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) demonstration grant project to improve the education, training, and employment opportunities and outcomes for adults who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. ODA’s SCSEP administrator served on the project’s review team. Three OhioMeansJobs centers in Cleveland, Portsmouth and Toledo operated the DEI grant project. Disability resource coordinator staff in OhioMeansJobs centers implemented Ohio’s strategic components, which included deploying integrated resource teams, leveraging partner funds and resources, customized employment, and asset development. Through this initiative OhioMeansAccessibility.com was added to OhioMeansJob.com. (Page 294) Title IV

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~WIOA one-stop partner programs, such as vocational rehabilitation and Adult Basic and Literacy Education (ABLE) will use the same primary performance outcome measures. However, each program will negotiate its own statewide and local standards. The failure of any of the six WIOA core programs (adult, dislocated workers, youth, ABLE, vocational rehabilitation and Wagner-Peyser) on their established statewide performance standards could potentially lead to sanctions in the form of reduced WIOA funding to the state, which would apply to all of the WIOA core programs. Additional partner programs, such as the Trade Adjustment Assistance program and Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP), will use their own performance measures, standards and monitoring for program compliance and improvement. (Page 79) Title I

ODHE’s network of Aspire programs play a vital role in the economic advancement of SCSEP participants and all older adults with limited English proficiency, low literacy skills or both. There are currently 56 local Aspire providers serving all 88 Ohio counties. These free services assist adults in acquiring the skills they need to be successful in post-secondary education and training, and employment, and include:
• Basic math, reading and writing skills;
• Adult secondary education/GED preparation;
• English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL);
• Transition services to post-secondary and employment;
• Family literacy; and
• Workplace literacy.

Program 60: Audit Coursework as a Bridge to Credit Coursework for SCSEP Participants
Ohio’s state universities and colleges provide Program 60. This unique program allows any person who is 60 years of age or older and who has resided in the state for at least one year to attend courses and classes without charging that person a tuition or matriculation fee provided the attendance is on a noncredit basis, is in courses where classroom space is available, and is approved by the instructors of the courses involved. The Ohio SCSEP will promote the use of Program 60 as a bridge to credit coursework for SCSEP participants. Auditing courses allows learners to become familiar with programs of study before making a financial investment. Additionally, participation in noncredit coursework has been recognized as a strategy to help learners who have been away from the classroom for a long period of time or were not successful during earlier classroom experiences. (Page 291-292) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~In September 2015, OOD and ODE/OEC launched the Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP). This statewide collaboration between the two agencies expands transition services for students with disabilities, ages 14 to 21, who are receiving services under an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and meet OOD eligibility criteria. Through the OTSP model, VR staff has an increased presence in each of the 91 career technical planning districts (CTPDs) and other local education agencies statewide. OTSP:
• Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence;
• Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross-agency planning and earlier career preparation; (Page 34) Title I

The Ohio Department of Education estimates there are more than 50,000 school-age youth (starting at age 14), with an IEP and who also have identified disabilities, potentially qualifying them for OOD VR services. In 2014, OOD served nearly 12,000 youth between the ages of 14 and 24, indicating a significant need to expand services to youth and students with disabilities throughout Ohio.

The OTSP model utilizes a person-centered, agency-neutral and outcome-focused approach to comprehensive career planning that is based on established evidence-based predictors of success. It is a progressive service delivery model designed to increase independence and career readiness. While a full range of VR services are available, service provision is based on individual specific data driven decisions and is designed to meet people where they are on their unique path to employment. (Page 35) Title I

OOD finalized its Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Transition Services procedure (Procedure 80-VR-11-12) in September 2014 after months of development with multiple stakeholders, including the Ohio Departments of Education, Developmental Disabilities, and Mental Health and Addiction Services, and other entities. The purpose of the transition procedure is to provide direction for the application, eligibility determination and provision of transition services, including pre-employment transition services for VR-eligible students with disabilities. The procedure complies with 34 CFR 361.5, ensuring that the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for students with disabilities is developed as early as is reasonably possible, but no later than the time at which the student leaves the school setting. Specifically, the transition procedure states that the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) must be completed prior to the eligible student exiting school. (Page 150) Title I

The transition procedure describes a service delivery process focused on progressive career development for eligible students with disabilities. It is designed to be person-centered to meet the needs of students who are ready for progressive career development and those youth who may need developmental activities, including students as young as 14, to prepare them for progressive career development. The flexibility of this service delivery model allows VR program staff to become involved with the student at an earlier age, thus becoming a more active participant in the transition planning process overall. To meet the progressive career development needs of students who are at various places in their development, OOD updated its VR Fee Schedule in April 2014 to expand services for transition youth, adding Summer Career Exploration and Summer Job Development. OOD has worked with the Ohio Department of Education, Office for Exceptional Children to develop a publication titled “A Guide to Transition Services: Helping Students with Disabilities Move from School to Work”. This publication is widely distributed to school personnel, as well as to students with disabilities and their families. This publication was updated in FFY 2014 (October 2013), and will continue to be used in training measures to promote collaboration between local education authorities and OOD field staff. (Page 150) Title I

In September 2015, OOD and ODE/OEC launched the Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP). This statewide collaboration between the two agencies expands transition services for students with disabilities, ages 14 to 21, who are receiving services under an Individualized Education Program (IEP) and meet OOD eligibility criteria. Through the OTSP model, VR staff has an increased presence in each of the 91 career technical planning districts (CTPDs) and other local education agencies statewide. OTSP: • Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence; • Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross-agency planning and earlier career preparation; and • Improves strategies to ensure that students with disabilities secure employment prior to graduation and connect with long-term supports services when needed and available to ensure long term success.

The Ohio Department of Education estimates there are more than 50,000 school-age youth (starting at age 14), with an IEP and who also have identified disabilities, potentially qualifying them for OOD VR services. In 2014, OOD served nearly 12,000 youth between the ages of 14 and 24, indicating a significant need to expand services to youth and students with disabilities throughout Ohio. (Page 151) Title I

OOD staff at the state and local level provides consultation and technical assistance to school personnel, students, families and other agency partners through formal and informal trainings, joint problem solving and the exchange of information on policies and procedures. VR counselors serve as liaisons to local schools, attend IEP meetings regularly for prospective referrals and serve on state and local interagency groups. They also present at state and local conferences and training seminars and participate in local district career fairs and other interagency forums on VR eligibility and services. (Page 152) Title I

The Interagency Agreement outlines how transition planning is to occur at the local level for individual students with disabilities. Specifically, the agreement provides for consultation and technical assistance to educational agencies and VR personnel in planning for the transition of students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of individualized plans prior to the student exiting school. This includes the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), the 504 Plan, the Individualized Education Program (IEP), and any other plans that lead to post-secondary vocational outcomes. The agreement encourages educational agencies to develop linkages with VR offices as early as possible in the transition process. The agreement also specifies training efforts to promote the use of evidence-based practices and predictors to improve youth skills for competitive, integrated employment and community participation, driven by principles of informed choice, community-based services and measurable results. Additionally, Ohio Administrative Code now requires transition planning and services under an IEP to begin no later than age 14 and include a statement describing appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability. (Page 152-153) Title 1

The Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities outlines roles and responsibilities for education and vocational rehabilitation staff, including assurances that local education agencies are implementing Ohio’s Operating Standards for the Education of Children with Disabilities. This means that transition services are based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences, and interests, and includes: instruction, related services, community experiences, the development of employment in an integrated competitive environment and other post-school adult living objectives, and when assessment data supports, a need for acquisition of daily living skills and provision of a functional vocational evaluation. Additionally, as previously mentioned, transition services must be provided by staff who have obtained the Transition to Work Endorsement or who possess equivalent skills and knowledge. Roles and responsibilities for VR staff under the Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities include providing a liaison counselor for each school district to formalize collaboration in planning and referral development and facilitating identification of students with disabilities who may benefit from VR services as early as possible during the transition planning process. This ensures that transition services and goals on a student’s IPE are aligned with the IEP, utilizing ready and existing documentation of the student’s disability as well as information needed to determine appropriate services whenever possible. Staff also finalizes the IPE prior to a student existing school. VR services should complement services funded by schools, but not replace those services. This means that neither the local education agency nor OOD may shift the financial burden for providing a service for which it would be responsible to the other entity. (Page 153) Title I

Alignment with In-Demand Occupations: OOD utilizes resources provided by ODJFS and OhioMeansJobs.com that provide information on the available jobs by employers in all 88 Ohio counties. OOD’s Business Engagement Team will utilize this information to establish partnerships with the identified employers for the purposes of sourcing qualified OOD eligible individuals for the available jobs. OOD’s Business Engagement Team will also use these partnership opportunities to offer the Windmills training to the employers to assist them in their movement to a culture of inclusion of people with disabilities. OOD will also identify Ohio’s in-demand occupations, as published on OhioMeansJobs.com and evidenced by employers, job opportunities to assist OOD’s VR counselors in writing Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE) that align with the in-demand occupations in their particular area and by industry cluster. (Page 161) Title I

OOD seeks to provide meaningful training for all personnel. Staff development begins on day one. Every new staff member is required to attend new staff training. After new staff training, OOD has designed position job specific training that aids in the development of skills that are needed for a designated position. For example, new counselor training provides job specific information including topics such as standardized intake process, eligibility, assessments, Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) development, and case closure. New counselors report directly to training supervisors for their first six months on the job. This allows training to extend well beyond what is covered in the classroom. It also allows other training techniques to be included such as observation, on-the-job training, in depth case analysis and caseload specific topics. During the past year, new counselor training has become more comprehensive so new counselors are better prepared to meet the VR needs of consumers. Specific trainings have also been developed for supervisory staff, accountant examiners, Employment First staff, job development staff, and business sourcing analysts. These trainings provide the foundation to all future trainings (Page 171) Title I

OOD seeks to provide meaningful training for all personnel. Staff development begins on day one. Every new staff member is required to attend new staff training. After new staff training, OOD has designed position job specific training that aids in the development of skills that are needed for a designated position. For example, new counselor training provides job specific information including topics such as standardized intake process, eligibility, assessments, Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) development, and case closure. New counselors report directly to training supervisors for their first six months on the job. This allows training to extend well beyond what is covered in the classroom. It also allows other training techniques to be included such as observation, on-the-job training, in depth case analysis and caseload specific topics. During the past year, new counselor training has become more comprehensive so new counselors are better prepared to meet the VR needs of consumers. Specific trainings have also been developed for supervisory staff, accountant examiners, Employment First staff, job development staff, and business sourcing analysts. These trainings provide the foundation to all future trainings. (Page 171) Title IV

OOD and the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) collaborate on a regular basis to provide guidance to educational agencies and vocational rehabilitation (VR) personnel responsible for facilitating transition services. These staff also offer consultation and technical assistance resources to assist schools and related community support entities in planning for transition of students with disabilities.

At the state level, both agencies have designated personnel to provide oversight and leadership for the development of policies, procedures, interagency training and other state-level partnership activities for transition services. On the local level, VR counselors are assigned as liaisons to schools and work with local school districts’ transition specialists.

OOD will provide targeted training to enhance personnel development. This will include targeted training on Employment First, supported employment, eligibility, transition procedures and clarification of roles and responsibilities of OOD and school personnel. (Page 173) Title I

Data for the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) suggests that more than 50,000 youth statewide, with an individualized education program (IEP), who also have identified disabilities, could meet OOD eligibility criteria for VR services. Fifteen counties, 12 of which are located in the North Central and Northwest Ohio, have service rates higher than 40 percent. Three counties have services rates below 10 percent. The remaining 70 counties have service rates between 10 and 40 percent. As OOD partners with ODE and local education agencies, this information is being used to prioritize outreach efforts based on geographic areas.

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): OOD will be updating Ohio’s Comprehensive Needs Assessment in FFY 2018. The report is expected to be complete in the summer of 2018. (Page 178) Title I

In FFY 2015, OOD expended all Title VI, Part B funds on direct supported employment case services. OOD intends to continue to expend supported employment grant funding in this manner. Individuals with an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that includes an employment outcome of supported employment are targeted for the use of these funds. OOD utilizes an auto-budget feature in its case management system to ensure the proper expenditure of supported employment grant funds. (Page 185) Title I

OOD has partnered, in particular, with DODD and 26 county boards of developmental disabilities to provide high quality transition services to students and youth with developmental disabilities in the Bridges to Transition program. This program model has recently been enhanced to promote improved employment outcomes and cost effectiveness of the program. This service delivery model involves VR counselors working with county transition specialists to provide intensive transition services to students, ages 14 to 21, who are eligible for county board of DD and VR services. The model utilizes a team approach to increase collaboration and local connection with families, schools, providers and business, and facilitate the transition to long-term supports.

Two Year Modification Update: OOD has updated its Supported Employment policies and procedures to align with requirements under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including the provision of extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years.  (Page 186) Title 1

OOD has several Interagency Agreements that are designed to implement service delivery models that will increase outcomes for specific populations served by the VR program. The Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and the Ohio Transition Support Program with the Ohio Department of Education are both examples of this. Details about these strategic initiatives are located in (d) and (f).

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): OOD has accomplished the following since implementation of this State Plan:

o Updated the Vocational Rehabilitation Fee Schedule as well as the Medical, Psychological and Dental Fee Schedules,

o Hired additional “in-house” job developers who provide direct service to individuals with disabilities,

o Continued the Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and expanded the Ohio Transition Support Program with the Ohio Department of Education,  (Page 187) Title I

At present, the transition to extended supports begins at the point of job stabilization and at least 90 days prior to successful case closure, but for a period not to exceed four years. This ensures a smooth transition VR funded supports to ongoing and/or natural supports as outlined in the IPE. (Page 198) Title IV

All program administration activities are intended to support the following Perkins Act vision for the state of Ohio. From FY2016 through FY2020: • All state—approved secondary career—technical programs will be based on a state—approved career pathway and program of study (POS); o A POS is a pathway of secondary and postsecondary non—duplicative course sequences that culminates in a diploma, credential(s) and/or degree(s). o A POS must minimally span grades 9 to 14 and is encouraged to span grades 7 to 16. o A POS should emphasize Ohio’s in—demand occupations, identified in OhioMeansJobs.com. • State—approved secondary career—technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS); o The Office of CTE created an instrument to guide and facilitate program improvement with a common set of standards. The Quality Program Standards instrument is designed to serve all secondary career—technical education programs. o Career Technical Planning Districts (CTPDs) will have access to the monitoring system to aid in evaluating a program to determine how to improve the quality of the CTE program. o Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state—approved career—technical program and for state supplemental career—technical funding. o The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS. • A secondary program that operates under a state—approved POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria; • All secondary programs operating under a state—approved POS and meeting QPS, will continue being identified as Tech Prep programs; • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students; • Effective academic/career counseling and comprehensive transition planning and provision of transition services beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is 14 years of age. IEP and Section 504 development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs; • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success; and • High expectations will continue to be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers:” o A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high—level academic and technical achievement. o A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. The purpose of programs of study is to ensure, through collaboration between secondary and postsecondary institutions, that CTE programs will: • Support 100 percent graduation from high school and successful transition to and through completion of postsecondary education, including matriculation without the need for remediation; • Provide rigorous coursework at the secondary and postsecondary levels that will prepare learners for the attainment of a diploma, industry credentials and college degrees without remediation. (Page 218) Title IV

Ohio’s career—technical education programs will serve all learners in a fair and equitable manner and ensure that students with disabilities have equal access to an education. Ohio does not differentiate between the degrees, diplomas, or credentials earned by learners with an identified disability and those earned by learners without an identified disability. Moreover, at the secondary level, there is no distinction made regarding technical assessments administered to students with disabilities. Through a system whereby performance measures, learner outcomes and provider accountability are the “same for all,” Ohio will make every effort to assure that students with disabilities are provided the necessary modifications, accommodations and support services under their Individual Education Programs (IEPs) needed for success in both academic and career—technical coursework. State products/services will consider how to best assist high—need districts, including Ohio’s urban districts. (Page 223) Title IV

• Maintain a teacher-preparation network of universities that provide programs that prepare new career-technical teachers and emphasize with that network the need to prepare pre-service and in-service CTE teachers, especially those coming directly from business and industry, to effectively serve members of special populations. • Support the provision of career information for special populations through OhioMeansJobs.com and the Student Success Plan and other personalized learning tools into which OhioMeansJobs.com and the Student Success Plan may be integrated. • Promote increased collaboration at the secondary level among all districts, schools and units within schools relative to the development, use and updating of Individualized Education Programs (IEP) for students with disabilities who are enrolled in career-technical education programs. Cross-agency and external stakeholder committees will address areas of needed improvement such as effective use of IEPs in career-technical education (CTE) classrooms and effective use of career assessment for identifying needed services, facilitating appropriate placement and enhancing transition from secondary to postsecondary programming. (Page 239) Title IV

Ohio’s career-technical education (CTE) programs will serve all learners in a fair and equitable way, including those who are members of special populations. Ohio does not differentiate between the degrees, diplomas, or credentials earned by learners with an identified disability and those earned by learners without an identified disability. Moreover, at the secondary level there is no distinction made regarding technical assessments or academic achievement tests administered to learners with disabilities unless at the secondary level such distinction is specifically mandated within a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). Through a system whereby performance measures, learner outcomes and provider accountability are the “same for all” (unless at the secondary level mandated by an IEP), Ohio will make every effort to assure that members of special populations are provided the necessary support and services needed for success in both academic and career-technical coursework.

The state will require all sub-recipients to describe, as part of their local plans, how special populations learners of all categories will have equitable access to and participate in approved career-technical programs at all levels and meet or exceed state adjusted levels of performance and prepare for further learning and high-skill, high-wage or high-demand occupations. Local recipients will be required to identify barriers to participation for members of special populations and how they will take appropriate steps to eliminate them. Services to be used by local recipients to enable special population learners to meet or exceed state adjusted levels of performance may include, but are not limited to: • Specialized support services as required by an IEP; • “Support for learner success” and implementing common reforms that identify the way students best learn in career-technical programs and provide appropriate interventions to help all students in career-technical programs achieve at a high level; • Career information and assessment; • Limited English proficiency support services; • Services designed to facilitate the effective transition from secondary to postsecondary programs; and • Educator professional development activities. (Pages 240- 241) Title IV

 The number of students with disabilities served in career technical programs was approximately 602. Of this number, 587 were served in the Ohio Department of Youth Services career-technical education (CTE) programs, and approximately 15 were served in Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction programs. The CTE services and activities carried out in institutions serving students with disabilities were nearly the same as those provided to non-disabled students. The difference for students with disabilities is that programs were provided with Specially Designed Instruction, Accommodations, Modifications and Related Services indicated in students’ Individual Education Program (IEP). (Pages 242) Title IV

All state-approved secondary career-technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS); o Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state-approved career-technical program and for state weighted career-technical funding. o The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS. • A secondary program that operates under a state-approved POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria; • Once all secondary programs operate under a state-approved POS and meet QPS, all programs can also be identified as Tech Prep programs; • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students; • Effective academic/career counseling and effective Individual Education Plan (IEP) development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs; • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success; • High expectations will be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers;” o A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high level academic and technical achievement. o A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. (Pages 258-259) Title IV

Ohio’s Tech Prep programs will serve all learners in a fair and equitable way, especially those who are members of special populations. Ohio does not differentiate between the degrees, diplomas, or credentials earned by learners with an identified disability and those earned by learners without an identified disability. Moreover, at the secondary level there is no distinction made regarding technical assessments or academic achievement tests administered to students with disabilities unless at the secondary level such distinction is specifically mandated within a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). Through a system whereby performance measures, learner outcomes and provider accountability are the “same for all” (unless at the secondary level mandated by an IEP), Ohio will make every effort to assure that members of special populations are provided the necessary support and services in Tech Prep programs to be prepared for postsecondary education (including apprenticeships) and for success in Ohio’s in-demand occupations careers. (Pages 262-263) Title IV

All state—approved secondary career—technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS); o Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state—approved career—technical program and for State weighted career—technical funding. o The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS. • A secondary program that operates under a state—approved career pathways and POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria; • Once all secondary programs operate under a state—approved career pathways and POS and meet QPS, all programs can also be identified as Tech Prep programs; • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students; • Effective academic/career counseling and effective Individual Education Plan (IEP) development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs; • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success; • High expectations will be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers;” o A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high level academic and technical achievement. o A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. (Page 265) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~On-the-Job Training (OJT): OOD intends to reintroduce the use of OJT to facilitate increased skill gains and wages for individuals served by the VR program. This will allow OOD to work with employers to hire individuals with disabilities into more skilled and higher paying positions within their business. OOD plans to align the VR OJT policy and procedure with Ohio’s Title I funded OJT, as much as possible, by using the same forms, training plan templates, agreements, and invoice template. Aligning VR OJT with those funded by WIOA Title I employment and training and Trade Adjustment Assistance Reauthorization Act of 2015 (TAA) will make it easier for the employers who are accustom to Title I- and TAA-funded OJT to also work with OOD consumers on VR-funded OJT. This also supports better alignment across workforce programs. (Page 160) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Alignment with In-Demand Occupations: OOD utilizes resources provided by ODJFS and OhioMeansJobs.com that provide information on the available jobs by employers in all 88 Ohio counties. OOD’s Business Engagement Team will utilize this information to establish partnerships with the identified employers for the purposes of sourcing qualified OOD eligible individuals for the available jobs. OOD’s Business Engagement Team will also use these partnership opportunities to offer the Windmills training to the employers to assist them in their movement to a culture of inclusion of people with disabilities. OOD will also identify Ohio’s in-demand occupations, as published on OhioMeansJobs.com and evidenced by employers, job opportunities to assist OOD’s VR counselors in writing Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE) that align with the in-demand occupations in their particular area and by industry cluster. The Business Relations Team has been engaged with a number of in-demand occupation employers such as those who employ skilled apprentice-able occupations. The Business Relations Manager has engaged with the Ohio Statewide Apprenticeship Council to discuss strategies for OOD transition students to access pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship training programs as well as the ability of OOD to help them retain their seasoned employees who could be experiencing onset disabilities as a strategy to retain the talent they already have on board. This engagement has led to more opportunities to offer Windmills training and for OOD to evaluate the training programs and knowledge, skills and abilities required by these various programs to increase participation and success of OOD qualified candidates. (Page 161) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~In September 2015, OOD and ODE/OEC launched the Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP). This statewide collaboration between the two agencies expands transition services for students with disabilities, ages 14 to 21, who are receiving services under an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and meet OOD eligibility criteria. Through the OTSP model, VR staff has an increased presence in each of the 91 career technical planning districts (CTPDs) and other local education agencies statewide. OTSP:
• Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence;
• Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross-agency planning and earlier career preparation;
• Improves strategies to ensure that students with disabilities secure employment prior to graduation and connect with long-term supports services when needed and available to ensure long term success; and Educates parents and youth on work incentives planning by comparing benefits of work versus SSI. (Page 34) Title I

It should be noted that OOD also maintains Medical, Dental, and Psychological Fee Schedules to establish rates for purchasing VR services such as exams and assessments, restoration and treatment and durable medical equipment such as hearing aids and eyeglasses. In FFY 2016, OOD intends to update these Fee Schedules and align with the Ohio Department of Medicaid service definitions and rates. This will: • Align the VR program with purchasing practices of other state and local partner agencies; • Increase consistency among these fee schedules; • Expand the number of VR purchased services that have established standards and rates; • Make available a pool of potential providers that meet requirements established by the Ohio Department of Medicaid; and • Simplify the approach to purchasing many of these services. (Page 155) Title I

Ohio is an Employment First state with an active taskforce of state agency representatives, including OOD. The taskforce meets regularly to align policies, funding and planning for services and supports that prioritize competitive, integrated employment for Ohioans with developmental (and other) disabilities. As part of the Employment First Initiative, OOD and DODD have established an Interagency Agreement to expand supported employment services for working-age adults with developmental disabilities. According to DODD data, there are more than 30,000 working-age adults who receive adult services, the vast majority of which are in facility-based settings. This statewide initiative supports job seekers to transition from facility-based work and non-work settings into competitive, integrated employment. Twenty-five OOD VR counselors provide VR services to eligible individuals served by the partnership. Counselors work with local county boards of developmental disabilities to identify candidates for the program. They deliver individualized, person-centered career planning services to assist in the development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) and purchase supported employment services, including performance-based job development, from approved providers. In addition, five caseload assistants were hired specifically for the partnership to provide work incentives services to individuals served by the project. The staff holds Community Partner Work Incentives Counselor (CWIC) certifications and is tasked with expanding the availability of work incentives counseling for individuals with developmental disabilities who are served as part of the partnership. (Page 157) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): In 2017, OOD hired an additional five VR counselors through an expansion of the Employment First Partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities to serve an additional 300 individuals with developmental disabilities annually. OOD also hired a Work Incentives Program Administrator to oversee the agency’s delivery of work incentives consultation services. OOD implemented its new Supported Employment Services procedure and provided statewide training for all VR staff. A new rate for supported employment performance-based job development was implemented in 2017. Qualified providers of this service are dually certified by the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities in employment services or meet Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services fidelity requirements for IPS-SE. In addition, OOD in partnership with county boards of developmental disabilities are exploring innovative strategies to serve individuals with developmental disabilities with the need for more intensive job readiness training services. These opportunities prepare individuals for employment in higher wage in-demand jobs within specific industry sectors. (Page 158) Title I

OOD projects a continued need to hire VR staff in the above referenced classifications over the course of this Combined State Plan. OOD prioritizes the use of available resources to hire direct service personnel and therefore, the greatest area of need will likely continue to be VR counselors and caseload assistants as well as supervisory staff. OOD has been aggressively pursuing strategies to improve the cost effectiveness of the VR program. Identified cost savings are reinvested strategically to further improve performance for the VR program. A projected area of increased need over the course of this plan will likely be for staff hired to provide “in-house” job development and/or work incentives counseling services. OOD has been piloting these new service delivery models during FFY 2015 and, based upon the success of the pilots, is poised to increase investments in this area. Figure 23 shows the personnel projections by position. (Page 165-166) Title I

To continue OOD’s staff development, monthly web-based trainings are provided. These monthly trainings are designed to provide up-to-date information on agency policy and procedures, share information about community resources, and maintain state and licensure requirements for ethics trainings, as well as train on other topics as needed. Specific topics included presumptive eligibility, confidentiality, VR assessments, the medical and dental fee schedules, application, intake and eligibility, policies and procedures, and agency updates. These regular trainings provide OOD with the ability to disseminate information regarding the most current agency and industry information. To improve quality and access, OOD utilizes a GoToTraining format where staff can attend the training online at their desk. This reduces travel while improving the overall technical quality of the trainings. In addition, by using the GoToTraining format, trainings are recorded so staff who missed the training or who would like to review the material can view it at a later time. Development opportunities continue throughout the year. Staff is encouraged to maintain and increase technical skills by attending required and/or continuing education opportunities. Examples of other training provided by OOD include: Technology for People with Disabilities, Medical and Psychological Aspects of Disabilities, Jobsites Supports and Training, Transition for Success: An Outcome-Driven Approach, Social Security Work Incentives, Ethical Dilemmas, and Career and Person-Centered Planning. (Page 171) Title I

To do this, OOD identified several strategies to promote cost efficiencies and increased effectiveness of services. These strategies include, but are not limited to: • On October 1, 2012, OOD implemented a VR Fee Schedule for the first time. This Fee Schedule established consistent service definitions and rates for 29 VR services and has provided a foundation for increased consistency in services provided statewide. OOD is currently in the process of updating this VR Fee Schedule through an engagement with a consulting firm that is recommending cost informed rates (instead of the market based rates in the first iteration) as well as fee structures that might promote improved outcomes for the program. This revised fee schedule is expected to be implemented on Oct. 1, 2016. • In FFY 2015, OOD conducted a pilot to evaluate the cost effectiveness and improvement of outcomes that could be achieved using in-house staff to provide job development services. OOD is also evaluating this model of service delivery for work incentives counseling (i.e. benefits analysis). OOD is currently reviewing pilot results to determine if this service delivery model should be expanded. (Page 180) Title I

OOD has traditionally relied fully on fee for service purchasing of VR services from Community Rehabilitation Programs. In FFY 2015, OOD piloted the provision of both job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning) services through “in-house” personnel. OOD is currently in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots to determine the extent to which they resulted in increased outcomes and reduced time to placement. It is anticipated that OOD will expand the use of this service delivery model over the course of this Combined State Plan. (Page 187) Title I

Ohioans with disabilities who are determined eligible for SSI or SSDI, designated as eligible for services from county boards of DD, and those designated as having a severe and persistent mental illness and eligible for services from a community mental health board, are targeted populations for supported employment. OOD has developed Interagency Agreements with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), the Ohio Department of Medicaid, and the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS), to develop and implement improved coordination of supported employment services. The Interagency Agreements include training opportunities and technical assistance for staff across all involved agencies. For all supported employment cases, OOD ensures the coordination and facilitation of extended services for individuals, which can be funded through Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers, local county board of DD or county behavioral health authorities, including natural supports. Such services provide the supports individuals with the most significant disabilities need to sustain long-term employment. (Page 197) Title I

Employer/ Business

~~Ohio’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) program is aligning its on-the-job training strategy and policies with Title I employment and training and Trade Adjustment Assistance programs for seamless service delivery for businesses. The VR program also is working to increase utilization and access to the Workforce Inventory of Education and Training - Ohio’s eligible training provider system - which includes connection with apprenticeship programs. To further that connection, VR is working with Ohio’s Apprenticeship Council to develop career pathways for transitioning youth to enter into the programs. (Pages 30-31) Title I

In FFY 2013, OOD in partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) established a dual certification program as part of the Employment First Partnership Agreement. This dual certification program is designed to ensure continuity of services and allow for more successful transition from time-limited to long-term supports. In addition, it is designed to better respond to the needs of individuals served by the program as well as our business partners. Through this program, OOD provides a waiver of accreditation requirements to approved DD supported employment providers, allowing them to provide VR services to individuals being served by OOD in the Employment First Partnership. Performance-based job development is utilized to ensure a more outcome-focused method of service provision. Staff providing services under this waiver must pass an online course and attend mandatory trainings on VR services, fee schedules, billing, and reporting expectations before they can begin providing services. They must also attend in- person trainings on employer engagement and on-the-job supports within one year of passing the online supported employment web course to continue providing services.

During FFY 16, OOD will be developing a VR Provider Portal that will allow VR service providers to electronically receive authorizations for services, upload invoices and reports, and track billing and payment status. This portal will provide the foundation for greater standardization of the reporting and billing process and will offer significant increases in the efficiency of these processes for both providers and OOD staff. (Pages 155-156) Title I

OOD and DODD have also established criteria for approval of waivers to OOD’s accreditation requirements for DODD-certified employment service providers. This dual-certification process allows DODD-certified Medicaid HCBS waiver providers to deliver both VR services and long-term follow-along supports to ensure continuity of services. To date, more than 1,200 provider staff has successfully completed the initial training and will continue to receive in-person training. Certain providers through this partnership have recently been selected to participate in targeted technical assistance to develop staff’s skills and competencies in employer engagement. (Page 157) Tittle I

The work of the Business Engagement team is focused on a number of key initiatives focused primarily on employer engagement, employer education, OOD DisAbility Job Fairs and OOD’s direct sourcing of qualified VR candidates for these employers. These initiatives will help promote a culture of diversity and inclusion among Ohio employers creating more opportunities and a quicker path to employment for OOD’s eligible individuals.

Supporting Recruitment and Onboarding and Retention of VR Consumers: OOD partners with employers in the state of Ohio for the purposes of identifying available jobs that best match with the skills and qualifications of eligible individuals served by the VR programs. As job opportunities are identified, Business Engagement staff performs a job match in OOD’s VR case management system to identify appropriate job ready candidates. VR counselors managing those cases are notified that one of their job ready consumers has been identified for a potential opportunity. VR and/or provider staff then assists the eligible individual through the application, hiring and onboarding process and ensures any services needed to support a successful rehabilitation are provided.

Through these same employer engagement activities OOD has forged relationships with employers to also promote the ability of OOD to work with employers toward the retention of qualified workers with disabilities. OOD has been engaged with targeted outreach to federal contractors concerning Sec 503 requirements and is engaged with helping these employers understand OOD’s ambition to both support their hiring needs and assist them with retaining workers who have onset disabilities or perhaps have recently disclosed a disability and is in need of VR services to retain their employment. (Page 159) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): In January 2017, OOD elevated the prominence of its business engagement activities through the establishment of the Division of Employer and Innovation Services. The primary structure of the statewide Business Relations Team is to support the VR programs’ efforts to engage with employers. The core Business Relations Team consists of a centralized Business Relations Manager (BRM) and two Employer Services Liaisons, four regional Business Relations Specialists (BRSs) and nine VR Talent Sourcing Coordinators (TSCs). It should be noted that OOD will be adding a fifth BRS in 2018 to meet the needs of an increasing number of business partnerships. The work of the Business Relations Team is focused on a number of key initiatives focused on employer engagement, employer retention, employer education, OOD DisAbility Job Fairs and OOD’s direct sourcing of qualified VR candidates for these employers. These initiatives promote a culture of diversity and inclusion among Ohio employers creating more opportunities and a quicker path to employment for OOD’s eligible individuals. (Page 162) Title I

Data Collection

The vocational rehabilitation program, in accordance with WIOA requirements, is currently in the process of making changes to its case management system and data collection activities to align with common measures. In addition, OOD is collecting and evaluating baseline performance data to prepare for the negotiation of performance levels with the Rehabilitation Services Administration. OOD has robust reporting capabilities through the VR case management system and associated reporting tools. In addition, OOD has a created a data warehouse allowing for a variety of dashboards for the vocational rehabilitation program to help monitor case progression and timeliness of eligibility decisions, and plan development and time in service. Collectively, these tools provide an important foundation for ensuring that performance measures are achieved by the vocational rehabilitation program. (Page 78) Title I

OOD implemented a standardized VR Fee Schedule in FFY 2013 that is designed to ensure a consistent pattern and quality of services purchased statewide. The VR Fee Schedule provides an important foundation for improved quality of purchased services through the development of standardized service definitions and rates, service reporting and billing templates and provider scorecards. It should be noted that OOD is currently working with a consulting firm to update the VR Fee Schedule with the intention of moving from market based rates to cost informed rates. This involves collecting cost reports from providers to accurately capture expenses associated with carrying out services under the VR Fee Schedule and inform the development of updated rates. As a part of this project, OOD is also considering alternate rate structures, such as performance based fee structures, that would incentivize achievement of common performance measures under WIOA. OOD is seeking to simplify fee structures to reduce administrative activities associated with billing and reporting as well. (Page 155) Title I

Building upon the foundation set from the 2012 CSNA methodology, OOD developed 2016 projections of the number of individuals with disabilities by category and county of residence in Ohio. Similarly, service data from OOD’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) case management system and employment statistics were utilized to develop estimates of the number of individuals likely to need VR services by disability category and by county. This provided a basis for developing estimates of the number of individuals actively participating in the labor force that need services to assist them in finding a job and could benefit from OOD VR services. As a follow-up to the 2012 CSNA recommendations, OOD has aggressively gathered and analyzed data through the Workforce Integration Taskforce, focused on services for the deaf and blind, as well as service delivery capacity available through Ohio’s network of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). Data collection strategies included surveys of individuals with disabilities and employers. OOD contracted with Kent State University, as a compliment to the Ohio Longitudinal Transition Study, to specifically address the six questions regarding youth and students with disabilities. Finally, Mathematica conducted a Survey of Disability and Employment (SDE), of over 1,000 OOD VR applicants, that will assist OOD to better understand the needs of individuals with disabilities. Another key component of the CSNA involved interface with other state agencies to analyze disability data among various departments: Developmental Disabilities, Education, Job and Family Services, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Veterans’ Services. OOD wanted to understand how these agencies identify and track disability-related data in their various case management systems. Opportunity for future interface with these agencies was also introduced throughout this phase of the CSNA process and has continued to some degree, as a part of Ohio’s Employment First Initiative. OOD continues to work with its state partners as it implements service delivery activities for various populations. (Page 174) Title I

Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) establishes an agency strategic plan on a biannual basis. Strategic initiatives on the strategic plan are directly tied to program performance measures and the extent to which they promote the ability for the agency to improve employment outcomes, accountability, cost effectiveness and efficiency. OOD’s strategic plan is approved by OOD’s Commissioners. OOD has developed a strategic plan for Fiscal Years 2016-2017. OOD’s current strategic plan incorporates a mission statement, core values for the organization, goals, and objectives as listed below. Strategic initiatives associated with this strategic plan are detailed throughout this Combined State Plan. (Page 182) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): OOD has completed several updates to the AWARE case management system over the past several years that have been necessary to allow OOD to report on new common performance measures. OOD has been able to submit the new quarterly RSA 911 report for both open and closed cases by the deadlines established by RSA. In addition, OOD is on track to include wage record information in the May submission. OOD continues to work with state level partners on data sharing agreements that will facilitate the most efficient and accurate data reporting possible, in particular related to the credential and skill gain measures. OOD is establishing baseline level performance across common performance measures in FFY 2018. (Page 196) Title I

Ohio’s career—technical education programs will serve all learners in a fair and equitable manner and ensure that the student with a disability has equal access to an education. Ohio does not differentiate between the degrees, diplomas, or credentials earned by learners with an identified disability and those earned by learners without an identified disability. Moreover, at the secondary level, there is no distinction made regarding technical assessments administered to students with disabilities. Through a system whereby performance measures, learner outcomes and provider accountability are the “same for all”, Ohio will make every effort to assure that students with disabilities are provided the necessary modifications, accommodations and support services to be prepared for postsecondary education and for success in Ohio’s in—demand occupations careers. For secondary programs, state products/services will consider how to best assist high—need districts, including Ohio’s urban districts. (Page 224) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Ohio has several initiatives to provide access to services for individuals with disabilities. Ohio’s Workforce Inventory of Education and Training not only provides the institutional and program data needed, but also will contain information on how providers are making reasonable accommodations for those individuals with disabilities and special needs. Local workforce development professionals also will be able to rate providers on how well they accommodated their participants with disabilities enrolled in training. Ohio’s standards for OhioMeansJobs center certification also will include requirements to not only comply with the ADA, but also Sec 188 of WIOA. Certification will require OhioMeansJobs staff to receive training to understand and better serve individuals with disabilities. (Page 53) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) in collaboration with the OhioMeansJobs centers will comply with the language detailed in the State’s Methods of Administration Element 5: Compliance with 504 Disability Requirements. In part, ODJFS and the OhioMeansJobs centers will continue to work together to ensure all centers are in compliance with all federal and state laws as it relates to disabilities. (Page 92) Title I

Ohio has a strong history of addressing WIOA Section 188 in a number of ways. A collaboration was formed between ODJFS, the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD, the state vocational rehabilitation agency), and the Office of Workforce Transformation (OWT) to address the specific issue of improving service and emphasis for those individuals with disabilities. The group, the Workforce Integration Task Force, focused on how center accessibility could be improved for individuals with disabilities due to the fact the centers are under-utilized by this community. Both physical and programmatic accessibility were addressed along with creating a greater awareness of center staff on recognizing and working with individuals with disabilities and how to market this demographic group to employers. (Page 92) Title 1

Ohio’s third One-Stop certification program under WIOA is again addressing the needs of those with disabilities by developing an ADA Tool Box that will include, but is not limited to: on-site disability awareness training (including “Windmills” and At Your Service training), an ADA Checklist Guide, examples of State Term Contract information, Internet links and resources to be used by OhioMeansJobs centers, an ADA plan outlying the process for identifying an ADA local coordinator, a reasonable accommodations policy, and a self-assessment tool to assist in ensuring compliance as it relates to Section 188. The attainment of full certification will require full center staff training on issues relating to working with individuals with disabilities. Specific benchmarks and critical success factors are included in the certification documents that directly relate to being compliant with ADA requirements and serving individuals with disabilities. (Pages 92-93) Title I

Vets

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

Creating jobs and economic opportunity drives every policy decision and reform priority in Ohio. To that point, the first bill introduced in Ohio’s General Assembly under Governor Kasich’s leadership changed the way Ohio does economic development and replaced its government—driven, calcified job creation efforts with a new private—sector approach. JobsOhio, a private, non—profit corporation, was created under that legislation and is singularly focused on growing existing Ohio companies and attracting new businesses to the state. JobsOhio has focused its work on nine main industry clusters that research shows will drive Ohio’s economy now and into the future. This work has laid the foundation for the creation of Ohio’s In—Demand Jobs List and sets the education and training priorities for the state. (Page 20) Title I

The state also developed an OhioMeansVeteranJobs.com website customized to comprehensively address veterans’ needs. It incorporates information related to services and resources available through the Department of Veterans Services, a military skills translator, information about military friendly employers, and much more. Similarly, Ohio developed OhioMeansAccessibility.com, which provides resources to help Ohioans with disabilities as well as the employers and service providers who support them. Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Employment First, Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities, Assistive Technology of Ohio, and the Ohio Departments of Aging, Developmental Disabilities, Job and Family Services, Medicaid, and Mental Health and Addiction Services collaborated on the creation of the site. (Page 48) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist.

Ohio continues to cut bureaucratic red tape to prioritize workforce services for veterans, military service members and their families. The Office of Workforce Transformation (OWT), together with state agency partners, is assisting military service members, veterans and their families compete for Ohio’s in-demand jobs. Several key initiatives have been implemented:

• Ohio’s licensing departments, boards and commissions, and state institutions of higher education now award course credit for military education and experience;

• Veterans in Ohio can now use GI Bill benefits to pay for national and state occupational licensing testing;

• The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services developed the Veterans Business Support Center - accessible at OhioMeansJobs.com - to better connect employers to qualified veterans, all for free;

• OhioMeansJobs.com prioritizes veteran resumes, allowing employers to review these first when looking for perspective employees; (Page 89) Title I

Disabled veterans’ outreach program (DVOP) specialist personnel in the OhioMeansJobs centers provide intensive services to those veterans and eligible spouses who are identified as having a significant barrier to employment, as defined by USDOL. When veterans enter an OhioMeansJobs center, they are asked to fill out a Veterans Questionnaire to determine if there are any identified significant barriers to employment. If the individual meets the definition of eligible veteran for the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) program or is an eligible spouse, has at least one significant barrier to employment, and/or is age 18 to 24 years, the OhioMeansJobs center staff refers this covered person to the DVOP specialist within the JVSG program. A covered person should also be referred to the DVOP specialist if he or she is later, after further assessment, determined by OhioMeansJobs center staff to have a significant barrier to employment. The DVOP specialist will provide intensive services to mitigate the significant barriers to employment and transition these individuals into the civilian workforce.

DVOP specialists develop job and training opportunities for veterans, with special emphasis on veterans with service-connected disabilities. They provide direct services to veterans enabling them to be competitive in the labor market. In addition, they provide outreach and offer assistance to disabled and other veterans by promoting community and employer support for employment and training opportunities, including apprenticeship and on-the-job training. DVOP specialists work with employers, veterans’ organizations, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Defense, and community-based organizations to link veterans with appropriate jobs and training opportunities. (Page 91) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually.

In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes:

A. HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG

The goal of ODJFS Bureau of Veterans Workforce Services is to have the top veterans’ employment program in the nation. To accomplish this, Ohio determines the optimal DVOP/LVER staff alignment and resource distribution. This methodology is based on U.S. Census data showing the number of veteran job seekers in each county versus the number of veteran job seekers in the entire state. This percentage is then applied to determine the appropriate number of veteran staff in each area. This allows Ohio to position the DVOP staff in areas of greatest need while maintaining WIOA-mandated presence in the state’s OhioMeansJobs centers. (Page 275) Title IV

The Workforce Specialist utilizes dedicated labor market research and electronic tools, such as the Analyst Resource Center (ARC) database, and conducts personalized outreach to individual employers. Workforce Specialists plan and participate in career and information fairs as part of their efforts to maintain relationships with employers, educational institutions and training providers. They also promote apprenticeship and on-the-job (OJT) training opportunities for veterans. These registered Apprenticeship programs combine work-based learning and classroom training to help successful program completers obtain secure, full-time journeyman positions. Ohio offers more than 1,100 registered apprenticeship programs in fields as diverse as: aerospace, construction, energy, health care, manufacturing, and utilities. The OJT program helps employers hire and train individuals for long-term employment. OJT optimizes the resources available under workforce development initiatives to meet the needs of employers and job seekers. The expected outcomes for these activities are increased employment and training opportunities for veterans, as well as a heightened awareness of the qualities veterans bring to the business and educational communities. This will be measured through increased entered employment rates, as identified through the state negotiated performance goals.

The measures the State is evaluated on address the outcomes experienced by eligible veterans and spouses with significant barriers to employment who are served by DVOP Specialists. The measures are as follows:

Intensive Services provided by DVOP Specialists divided by the total veterans and eligible persons served by DVOP Specialists/Total veterans and eligible persons served by DVOP Specialists in the State;

Veterans’ Entered Employment Rate (weighted);

Veterans’ Employment Retention Rate;

Veterans’ Average Earnings (6 months);

Disabled Veterans’ Entered Employment Rate;

Disabled Veterans’ Employment Retention Rate; and

Disabled Veterans’ Average Earnings (6 months). (Page 280) Title IV

Mental Health

~~Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities’ (OOD) Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program provides the full array of vocational rehabilitation services to eligible individuals in all of Ohio’s 88 counties, ensuring that eligible individuals with disabilities are served through Ohio’s workforce system. Individuals are referred to the VR program through any number of avenues including OhioMeansJobs centers and WIOA CORE partner programs. In addition, OOD partners with other systems such as mental health and recovery, developmental disabilities, and education, providing the VR program with expanded opportunity to reach more potentially eligible individuals and increase our focus in serving transition age youth. Because the VR program no longer has a wait-list and projects to have adequate resources to serve 29,000 eligible individuals in FFY16, OOD will not operate under an Order of Selection and is positioned to provide services for all eligible individuals in MSD, SD and D categories. (Page 26) Title I

Workforce development boards are responsible for developing the local workforce development area plan, engaging employers, providing program oversight, negotiating performance measures, and procuring youth program providers. In addition, the local workforce development board, in collaboration with the CCMEP lead agency, determines the criteria to be used when awarding contracts or grants for WIOA youth providers. Contract or grant awarding criteria should include consideration of the provider’s ability to work with youth and young adults in Ohio Works First, the financial assistance portion of the TANF program, other TANF-eligible youth, as well as Title I youth. Also, criteria should include the service provider’s ability to link youth to additional social services to assist in addressing non-employment and training barriers such as mental health needs and substance abuse treatment. The criteria for selection of youth providers must also consider the providers ability to provide the necessary assistance and services for those participants to enter into unsubsidized employment or training opportunities. (Page 109) Title I

CCMEP ends the siloed, fragmented approach that has tried to treat the collected “symptoms” of poverty instead of seeking a cure for the underlying challenges that needy Ohioans face. Ohio’s teens and young adults face higher rates of unemployment than any other age group and many struggle to complete high school. Many of these youth also encounter additional barriers to reaching their full potential including homelessness, substance abuse, teen pregnancy, and mental health issues. Addressing these issues and barriers early on in a coordinated way, could break the cycle of poverty.

Most of the CCMEP population will be out-of-school youth. By connecting clients to the right resources and services across various programs and partners, including adult and family literacy, Carl Perkins Career Tech, and local community-based organizations, standardizing eligibility, and combining resources to improve education and training outcomes, the participants will establish pathways to employment and begin to move up and out of poverty. This program integrates the funding from two existing programs, TANF and WIOA, to focus on each individual’s unique needs and to make better use of these existing funds which are already allocated for purposes of employment and training and reaching self-sufficiency. (Page 110) Title I

Aspire providers will coordinate with other workforce partners in the community for the development of career pathways. Providers also coordinate with local support services such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning to enable all students to attend and complete programs.

Aspire programs were required to provide the following adult education and literacy activities the first two years of the Combined State Plan: adult education, literacy, which include English language acquisition, integrated English literacy and civics education, and workforce preparation activities. These same activities will be required in PY 2018 and PY 2019. Details of these activities will be provided in each program’s proposal. (Page 135) Title 1

OOD finalized its Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Transition Services procedure (Procedure 80-VR-11-12) in September 2014 after months of development with multiple stakeholders, including the Ohio Departments of Education, Developmental Disabilities, and Mental Health and Addiction Services, and other entities. The purpose of the transition procedure is to provide direction for the application, eligibility determination and provision of transition services, including pre-employment transition services for VR-eligible students with disabilities. The procedure complies with 34 CFR 361.5, ensuring that the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for students with disabilities is developed as early as is reasonably possible, but no later than the time at which the student leaves the school setting. Specifically, the transition procedure states that the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) must be completed prior to the eligible student exiting school. (Page 150) Title I

OOD, the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), and the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) have consistently worked together to serve mutually eligible individuals with disabilities. As OOD provides services to an increased number of individuals with the most significant disabilities, the development of long-term supports and services is essential to the maintenance of the employment outcomes achieved. (Page 156) Title I 

For individuals with developmental disabilities who are eligible for Medicaid home and community based services (HCBS) waivers, OOD works with local county boards of developmental disabilities and providers to transition individuals with developmental disabilities into long-term supports needed to maintain competitive employment once the individual’s case has been successfully closed. For those individuals with developmental disabilities who are not eligible for an HCBS waiver, OOD will coordinate with the county board to establish alternative dollars for long-term supports. (Page 156) Title I

OhioMHAS funds the Coordinating Center for Excellence (CCOE) for Evidence-Based Supported Employment for individuals with serious mental illness through block grant funding. The CCOE has provided past training and technical assistance to OOD staff. OOD actively participates on the statewide employment committee and is working with the group to develop future training for OOD staff and mental health partners. OOD, OhioMHAS and the CCOE continue as active participants of the Johnson & Johnson - Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program. This program works with selected states to implement IPS for individuals with SPMI who are interested in gaining employment.

During FFY 2015, the statewide employment committee developed recommendations for an IPS procedure protocol. The procedure identifies potential candidates for IPS, outlines the VR referral process, coordinated planning with the job seeker’s employment team, rapid engagement in the job search process, ongoing support, and transition to long-term supports through the local mental health agency. (Page 157-158) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): In 2017, OOD hired an additional five VR counselors through an expansion of the Employment First Partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities to serve an additional 300 individuals with developmental disabilities annually. OOD also hired a Work Incentives Program Administrator to oversee the agency’s delivery of work incentives consultation services. OOD implemented its new Supported Employment Services procedure and provided statewide training for all VR staff. A new rate for supported employment performance-based job development was implemented in 2017. Qualified providers of this service are dually certified by the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities in employment services or meet Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services fidelity requirements for IPS-SE. In addition, OOD in partnership with county boards of developmental disabilities are exploring innovative strategies to serve individuals with developmental disabilities with the need for more intensive job readiness training services. These opportunities prepare individuals for employment in higher wage in-demand jobs within specific industry sectors. (Page 158) Title I

Another key component of the CSNA involved interface with other state agencies to analyze disability data among various departments: Developmental Disabilities, Education, Job and Family Services, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Veterans’ Services. OOD wanted to understand how these agencies identify and track disability-related data in their various case management systems. Opportunity for future interface with these agencies was also introduced throughout this phase of the CSNA process and has continued to some degree, as a part of Ohio’s Employment First Initiative. OOD continues to work with its state partners as it implements service delivery activities for various populations. (Page 174) Title I

OOD’s service provision is higher for individuals with psychosocial and cognitive impairments. This is most likely explained by the fact that OOD in the past four years has concentrated efforts through focused contracts with local Mental Health and Drug Addiction boards, local Developmental Disabilities boards, and most recently through the Ohio Department Developmental Disabilities funding for Employment First. Each of these populations also has an organized representative presence through established county public agencies across the state. (Page 176) Title I

OOD partners with a variety of local agencies related to the provision of extended services needed for individuals pursuing an employment outcome of supported employment. In particular, this includes partnership with local county boards of developmental disabilities as well as local behavioral health authorities. OOD works at the state level with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services in this regard as well.

OOD has partnered, in particular, with DODD and 26 county boards of developmental disabilities to provide high quality transition services to students and youth with developmental disabilities in the Bridges to Transition program. This program model has recently been enhanced to promote improved employment outcomes and cost effectiveness of the program. This service delivery model involves VR counselors working with county transition specialists to provide intensive transition services to students, ages 14 to 21, who are eligible for county board of DD and VR services. The model utilizes a team approach to increase collaboration and local connection with families, schools, providers and business, and facilitate the transition to long-term supports. (Page 186) Title I

Ohioans with disabilities who are determined eligible for SSI or SSDI, designated as eligible for services from county boards of DD, and those designated as having a severe and persistent mental illness and eligible for services from a community mental health board, are targeted populations for supported employment. OOD has developed Interagency Agreements with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), the Ohio Department of Medicaid, and the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS), to develop and implement improved coordination of supported employment services. The Interagency Agreements include training opportunities and technical assistance for staff across all involved agencies. For all supported employment cases, OOD ensures the coordination and facilitation of extended services for individuals, which can be funded through Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers, local county board of DD or county behavioral health authorities, including natural supports. Such services provide the supports individuals with the most significant disabilities need to sustain long-term employment. (Page 197) Title I

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

To provide early intervention services to individuals who receive workforce and employment-related services, the ODJFS offices of Unemployment Insurance Operations and Workforce Development provide local workforce administrative entities data and information. Local areas requesting data enter into a Data Sharing and Confidentiality Agreement with OWD. Each quarter, OWD pulls participants enrolled in Title I employment and training from the Ohio Workforce Case Management System (OWCMS) who received services during the reference quarter or four previous quarters; combined with participants who exited the program during the reference quarter or four previous quarters. These participants are matched against the Ohio Wage Record data identified in the Data Sharing and Confidentiality Agreement. From the wage record file, local area points of contact receive wages, number of weeks worked, the year and quarter wages are reported, NAICS 6-digit code, and NAICS title. The point of contact will also receive the information to identify each participant. In addition, on a monthly basis, the Office of Unemployment Insurance Operations emails a report that lists claimants who are within four weeks of exhausting their UI benefits and claimants who were profiled for RESEA and UCRS (WPRS) services. On a weekly basis, a list of individuals who recently applied for unemployment benefits is sent. The goal of this initiative is to improve information sharing and coordination of program activities so unemployed Ohioans can be served earlier and return to work more quickly. (Page 53) Title 1

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 51 - 60 of 94

OH Vocational Rehabilitation Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment - 09/30/2015

“Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD), Division of Performance and Innovation (DPI), produced this 2015 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) building upon the framework methodology developed from the 2012 CSNA, which was designed to assess the vocational rehabilitation (VR) service needs of individuals related to six primary disability categories. These disabilities include visual impairments, hearing impairments, communicative impairments, physical impairments, psychosocial impairments and cognitive impairments. This methodology focuses on penetration rates (of the extent to which OOD was serving prospective jobseekers with disabilities), and proportionality (how well OOD is balanced in serving the cross-section of individuals with disabilities who are seeking employment).” The VR sets forth 9 recommendations to be set as priorities over the next year in order to improve integrated employment opportunities and community inclusion.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio ESEA Flexibility Request - 08/21/2015

“By submitting this updated ESEA flexibility request, the SEA renews its request for flexibility through waivers of the nine ESEA requirements listed below and their associated regulatory, administrative, and reporting requirements, as well as any optional waivers the SEA has chosen to request under ESEA flexibility…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio’s HCBS Transition Plan - 03/13/2015

“Governor John Kasich created the Office of Health Transformation (OHT) to lead the Administration’s efforts to modernize Medicaid and streamline health and human services programs. Using an innovative approach that involves collaboration among multiple state agency partners and a set of shared guiding principles, reform initiatives are improving services, thus enabling seniors and people with disabilities to live with dignity in the setting they prefer, especially their own home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan (VR Rehabilitation Services Program) - FY 2015 - 09/30/2014

The State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program: Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 states that staff should build competencies on, and promote the employment practices such as customized employment, self-employment, and supported employment, among others.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Guide to Policy and Procedure Development - 07/31/2014

"The Employment First Rule, 5123: 2-2-05, requires county boards to adopt and implement a local Employment First Policy which clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age. The following is guidance developed in response to multiple requests from county boards."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Mental Health and Addiction Services (Ohio MHAS) Supported Employment Project - 07/01/2014

"Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services (MHAS) and its partners are implementing the Supported Employment Project. This project reduces the high unemployment rates for young adults and adults with a severe and persistent mental illness who may have co-occurring substance use disorders.

Two local sites are implementing new programs, and a committee will oversee statewide training, policy changes, and evaluation. The evidence-based practice of Individual Placement and Support employment is being shared statewide through training and technical assistance."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Funding System Re-Design for Ohio’s Employment First Initiative: Review of Promising Models from Other States - 06/02/2014

This report aims to provide DODD with a comparison of funding structures from multiple states with high rates of integrated employment, including at least one state with a local tax base funding structure. The first 3 Key Principles for establishing a funding system to support Employment First uphold that, “The system should be based upon a presumption of competency, employability and ‘zero reject’ for each person with a disability, regardless of complexity; The system should reward providers for best practice implementation of Individual Supported Employment; [and] The system should require provider standards and staff training/certification to assure equal statewide access to and opportunity for Individual Supported Employment.” There are 9 principles in total that guide that together guide the structure and implementation of Employment First.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Administrative Rule (5123: 2-2-05) - 04/01/2014

“The purpose of this rule is to implement the employment first policy in accordance with section 5123.022 of the Revised Code… This rule applies to county boards of developmental disabilities and providers responsible for planning, coordinating, or providing employment services, regardless of funding source, to individuals with developmental disabilities.”

·       Community Employment is competitive employment that takes place in an integrated setting

·       Every individual of working age will have a person-centered planning process to identify their desired employment outcome and their place on the path to community employment

·       Services and supports will be provided to help the individual move along the path to community employment

·       County boards are required to develop and implement an Employment First policy, set benchmarks to increase community employment outcomes, partner with schools to enhance transition planning, share information with individuals, families, schools, employers, providers and others in the community about Medicaid Buy-In, and collect employment data on individuals served

·       Providers are required to submit progress reports at least every 12 months to ensure the individual is moving along the path to community employment and collect employment data on individuals served

   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio's Path to Employment First - 02/01/2014

“Successful implementation of Employment First requires a multi-pronged approach and a long-term commitment to systems change…. A comprehensive approach must focus on key strategies; all designed to work synergistically to impact a service structure that better supports people to achieve community employment and directs more resources toward that preferred outcome.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Balancing Incentives Program - 06/15/2013

~~“Ohio Benefits Long-Term Services and Supports (OBLTSS)The Ohio Department of Medicaid is committed to removing barriers and expanding access to long-term services and supports received in community-based settings. In conjunction with the Governor’s Office of Health Transformation and additional state agencies, the Ohio Department of Medicaid participated in the Balancing Incentive Program (BIP). The Ohio Benefits Long-Term Services and Supports (OBLTSS) program was created from the state’s involvement in BIP.

Through the Balancing Incentive Program Ohio earned over $180 million in matched funds, to improve access to home and community-based long-term services and supports (LTSS). Participating states were required to:◾Establish a no-wrong-door/single entry point system eligibility determination and enrollment system;◾Implement a case management system that is free of conflicts of interest; and◾Develop core standardized assessments.

The OBLTSS program meets all the requirements set forth by BIP and creates a unified way for individuals to connect to the various home and community-based programs and services for which they may be eligible. This new “front door” for information streamlines the process for individuals and their families to learn more about vital long-term services and supports information and resources.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Ohio HB 155 - 10/15/2015

A bill to amend section 2329.66 and to enact sections 113.50, 113.51, 113.52, 113.53, 113.54, 113.55, and 113.56 of the Revised Code to require the Treasurer of State to create a program [ABLE] offering federally tax-advantaged savings accounts used to pay for a person's qualified disability expenses and to disregard the value of and income from that account in determining whether that person is eligible for state or local means-tested public assistance.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Ohio SB 316: IEP and Post-secondary Transition Requirements - 09/24/2012

Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is fourteen years of age, and update annually thereafter, a statement describing:

Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills; Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described in divisions (H)(1) and (2) of this section.

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Rev. Code §5126.05: County Board - Powers & Duties - 09/24/2012

“Implement an employment first policy that clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age who receives services from the board…”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

5123.022 OH State Policy Regarding Community Employment for Disabled - 09/24/2012

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of this state that employment services for individuals with developmental disabilities be directed at community employment. Every individual with a developmental disability is presumed capable of community employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OH Rev. Code Ann. §§123.152 - Encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program. - 09/29/2005

As used in this section, "EDGE business enterprise" means a sole proprietorship, association, partnership, corporation, limited liability corporation, or joint venture certified as a participant in the encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program by the director of administrative services under this section of the Revised Code.   Social disadvantage based on any of the following:  - A rebuttable presumption when the business owner or owners demonstrate membership in a racial minority group or show personal disadvantage due to color, ethnic origin, gender, physical disability, long-term residence in an environment isolated from the mainstream of American society, location in an area of high unemployment;   
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order 2019-03D Establishing Ohio as a Disability Inclusion State and Model Employer of Individuals with Disabilities - 01/14/2019

~~1.  The Department of Administrative Services, in consultation with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, shall identify and appoint a State ADA Coordinator, who shall be responsible for advising all state agencies, departments, boards, and commissions within the executive branch on disability policy and compliance with state and federal disability rights laws.

2.  Each state agency shall annually review its hiring practices to identify any barriers to employment of individuals with disabilities, and, in consultation with the State ADA Coordinator, take appropriate action to eliminate any non-job-related barriers to the integration of individuals with disabilities into the workforce.

3.  All state agencies, departments, boards and commissions shall utilize best efforts with respect to recruitment, hiring, and advancement, and issue clear, written directives to their managers and supervisors prohibiting discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities.

4.  All state agencies, departments, boards and commissions shall collect and evaluate self-disclosed data through the state personnel system to be used to measure progress in hiring people with disabilities. This data will be used to develop a strategic plan in consultation with the State ADA Coordinator and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities with a goal for hiring individuals with disabilities who self-disclose.

5.  The Ohio Department of Administrative Services and the State ADA Coordinator, in coordination with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, shall ensure all state employees participate in regular disability etiquette and awareness training to build and sustain a culture of inclusion in the workplace.  All State employees shall also participate in periodic training on the ways that technology can be used to make work sites more accessible and available to people with disabilities....

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Ohio Employment First Executive Order - 03/19/2012

~~“Governor John Kasich officially launched Ohio’s Employment First Initiative when he signed Executive Order 2012-05K on March 19, 2012. The Executive Order established statewide collaboration and coordination by creating the Employment First Taskforce and Advisory Committee, and made community employment the preferred outcome for individuals with developmental disabilities.The taskforce is charged with expanding community employment opportunities by reducing barriers and aligning state policy.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 21 - 28 of 28

Funding System Re-Design for Ohio’s Employment First Initiative: Review of Promising Models from Other States - 06/02/2014

This report aims to provide DODD with a comparison of funding structures from multiple states with high rates of integrated employment, including at least one state with a local tax base funding structure. The first 3 Key Principles for establishing a funding system to support Employment First uphold that, “The system should be based upon a presumption of competency, employability and ‘zero reject’ for each person with a disability, regardless of complexity; The system should reward providers for best practice implementation of Individual Supported Employment; [and] The system should require provider standards and staff training/certification to assure equal statewide access to and opportunity for Individual Supported Employment.” There are 9 principles in total that guide that together guide the structure and implementation of Employment First.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Administrative Rule (5123: 2-2-05) - 04/01/2014

“The purpose of this rule is to implement the employment first policy in accordance with section 5123.022 of the Revised Code… This rule applies to county boards of developmental disabilities and providers responsible for planning, coordinating, or providing employment services, regardless of funding source, to individuals with developmental disabilities.”

·       Community Employment is competitive employment that takes place in an integrated setting

·       Every individual of working age will have a person-centered planning process to identify their desired employment outcome and their place on the path to community employment

·       Services and supports will be provided to help the individual move along the path to community employment

·       County boards are required to develop and implement an Employment First policy, set benchmarks to increase community employment outcomes, partner with schools to enhance transition planning, share information with individuals, families, schools, employers, providers and others in the community about Medicaid Buy-In, and collect employment data on individuals served

·       Providers are required to submit progress reports at least every 12 months to ensure the individual is moving along the path to community employment and collect employment data on individuals served

   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio's Path to Employment First - 02/01/2014

“Successful implementation of Employment First requires a multi-pronged approach and a long-term commitment to systems change…. A comprehensive approach must focus on key strategies; all designed to work synergistically to impact a service structure that better supports people to achieve community employment and directs more resources toward that preferred outcome.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio - “New Requirements for Secondary Transition Services for Students with Disabilities: Frequently Asked Questions” - 09/19/2012

The New Requirements state that IEPs must start at age 14, update annually and contain,

“Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills;  Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; and The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described [above]…”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OH Department of Education Job Training Coordinating Program Manual

This manual contains information on Individualized Education Plans (IEPs and school-to-work transition for students with disabilities. It recommends the use of Customized Employment as a good technique for harder to place students.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio DD System Requirements

“In order to make community employment the expected and preferred outcome for people with developmental disabilities, the Ohio DD system is required to align policies, procedures, eligibility, enrollment, and planning for services across state agencies… Other requirements include development of universal tools for documentation, eligibility, selection, assessment, and planning of services. Identification of best practices, partnerships, funding sources, opportunities for shared services among County Boards of DD and other providers is required along with expanding model programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Transition Planning Requirements in IEPs

“Transition assessment affords the opportunity for professionals from across agencies to co-plan and review information that will highlight the youth's preferences, interests, needs and skills relevant to building a profile of the youth as a future employee.  A  team approach to assessment –adult service personnel, educators, youth and family working collaboratively—results in a profile that informs the pathway to community employment that is the 'best fit' for the youth.”

Transition planning is required to begin formally and be documented in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) by age 14.  The IEP must include a post-secondary goal for employment that is based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Employment First Administrative Rule

The Administrative Rules assert that, “Community Employment is competitive employment that takes place in an integrated setting;

Every individual of working age will have a person-centered planning process to identify their desired employment outcome and their place on the path to community employment; and Services and supports will be provided to help the individual move along the path to community employment.” It also outlines the responsibilities of the County Boards and Providers.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Partnership for Employment First - 05/20/2019

~~“The Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, in partnership with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities agency, continues a statewide initiative to expand community employment services for people with developmental disabilities. This opportunity allows the state to maximize resources to support more people on their path to community employment, build system capacity, and strengthen the relationship between the developmental disability and vocational rehabilitation systems in Ohio.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Partnership FFY 18 Annual Report - 05/20/2019

~~“Since implementation in Federal Fiscal Year 2014, the Employment First Partnership between Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) and the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) has improved competitive integrated employment outcomes for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities who want to work in their community. As a result of the success, resources dedicated to helping adults with developmental disabilities find jobs have doubled since 2013. This growth increased capacity from 900 people being served to 1,800 people with developmental disabilities being served annually.

In addition, the partnership has five certified work incentive consultants who are dedicated to provide work incentive planning and counseling services to all people served through the Employment First Partnership receiving federal, state, and local benefits.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities “About Us” - 01/14/2019

~~“Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) is the State of Ohio agency that partners with Ohioans with disabilities to achieve quality employment, independence and Social Security disability determination outcomes.It is accomplished through its Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR), Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired (BSVI) and Division of Disability Determination (DDD). A fourth area is the Division of Employer and Innovation Services (EIS), which is responsible for establishing and maintaining partnerships with employers. • Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR)• Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired (BSVI)• Division of Disability Determination (DDD)• Employer and Innovation Services (EIS)” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OCALI Supports Schools to Ensure Post-Secondary Success - 07/10/2018

~~“Through the Ohio DD Council, OCALI, or the Ohio Center for Autism and Low Incidence, received a grant titled “Realizing Employment First for Youth: Evidence Based Practices and Predictors of Adult Success.”

The pilot program called “What Works for Work”, studied how evidence-based practices and predictors that supported school-based teams help achieve post-secondary success – or life after high school - for students with developmental disabilities.

The grant support school-based teams, “find successful methods that would improve transitions into employment, independent living skills and community living,” said Madeline Rosenshein, OCALI consultant and grantee.

Through research focused on transition youth, it was found that certain evidence-based practices and predictors, if implemented during the school years, can improve adult outcomes, which includes employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

IPS Supported Employment - 07/01/2018

~~“Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) Supported Employment is an evidence-based practice that helps people with severe and persistent mental illness and/or co-occurring substance use disorders identify, acquire and maintain integrated competitive employment in their communities. IPS is assertive about helping people find the work they want as soon as they express a desire to become employed. IPS increases employment in integrated competitive jobs, the number of hours worked, and the amount of income earned in competitive jobs."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

SAMHSA Supported Employment Grant - 07/01/2018

~~“OhioMHAS was recently awarded the Transforming Lives through Supported Employment grant for $4.8 million dollars over 5 years. This will be a partnership between OhioMHAS, the state training, technical assistance and evaluation partners, and other state departments including Vocational Rehabilitation and two community behavioral health agencies: Firelands Counseling and Recovery Services and Daybreak, Inc. The mission of this project is to modernize, enhance, and increase availability and quality of IPS services to meet the needs of individuals with a severe and persistent mental illness or co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders.The expected outcome is for Ohio to have the necessary infrastructure in place to maintain, expand, and sustain IPS throughout the state and to increase the number of individuals with a severe and persistent mental illness and co-occurring mental health and substance use disorder that obtain and retain integrated competitive employment of their choosing.” 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP) - 10/18/2017

“In 2015, the Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans (OOD) launched the Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP). This innovative collaboration changed the nature and impact of transition services for students with disabilities in Ohio. The Partnership increases the availability of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors for students with disabilities beginning at age 14 to improve post-school outcomes. This earlier engagement helps students with disabilities get a head start on becoming job ready and better prepared to enter the workforce with the skills and experiences necessary to be successful.

Because of this increased investment in transition, OOD is serving more students with disabilities than ever before. This increased demand led to an expansion of the Partnership in 2017. Now, 30 OOD counselors and 21 caseload assistants are partnering with local education agencies to serve students with disabilities throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio NAMI Supported Employment Family Advocacy Project

“This collaboration between NAMI Ohio and the Ohio Department of Mental Health engages families of individuals with mental illness to advocate for, create and expand high-quality Individual Placement and Support (IPS) programs. Family involvement can strengthen the partnerships between providers, family members and consumers around SE services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Employment First Taskforce Common Principles

“The Ohio Employment First Taskforce agencies agree that community employment should be the first option for all working age adults and transition-age youth with developmental disabilities. Employment First is a philosophy of service that presumes that all Ohioans with significant disabilities can and should have opportunities to work in the community”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Retaining Employment and Talent After Injury/Illness Network (RETAIN) Demonstration Project - 06/15/2019

~~“Research has shown that individuals with non-occupational back, knee and/or shoulder injuries who work in the manufacturing industry are at high risk of becoming unemployed. To see whether providing intensive return-to-work coordination hastens their recovery and improves their chances of remaining employed, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services applied for and received a RETAIN grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. This grant will allow Ohio to develop and pilot a model that, if successful, can be replicated across the state.”

Systems
  • Other

Transforming Lives Through Supported Employment: SAMHSA’s Supported Employment Grant Program (SEP) - 06/29/2018

The purpose of the Supported Employment Program is "to enhance state and community capacity to provide and expand evidence-based SEPs (such as the Individual Placement and Support [IPS] model) to adults with serious mental illnesses, including persons with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders." 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council Current Grant Projects - 07/01/2017

This page lists the current grant projects of the OH Developmental Disabilities Council for the 2017-2021 State Plan. Grant topics include Assistive Technology, Children & Health, Community Living, Employment, Leadership Development, Outreach, and Public Policy.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Mental Health and Addiction Services (Ohio MHAS) Supported Employment Project - 07/01/2014

"Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services (MHAS) and its partners are implementing the Supported Employment Project. This project reduces the high unemployment rates for young adults and adults with a severe and persistent mental illness who may have co-occurring substance use disorders.

Two local sites are implementing new programs, and a committee will oversee statewide training, policy changes, and evaluation. The evidence-based practice of Individual Placement and Support employment is being shared statewide through training and technical assistance."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

OCALI Customized Employment Project - 03/01/2009

"With funding from the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), OCALI launched a customized employment project in March 2009 for two school based transition teams, Claymont High School with Tuscarawas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and Huber Heights High School with Montgomery County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The goal of the project was to increase community employment outcomes for transition aged youth using customized employment strategies and processes. Team members received training and consultation in the CE process, Social Security Work Incentives and working with employers. Teams included school, developmental disability, and vocational rehabilitation staff, plus a parent mentor. In November of 2009 the project received additional funding from DODD to add another team from Lucas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and to provide up to 40 paid internships for youth with disabilities using customized employment strategies and processes in the Lucas County and Montgomery County sites. The Tuscarawas County site obtained funding from DODD, “We Go To Work Grants” to fund resource ownership as an employment strategy."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Disability Employment Initiative

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2011, was awarded a Round 2 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This grant ended in 2014.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Ohio Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The…grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities”. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Money Follows the Person

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 75,151 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from  institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2016. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply. There are currently forty-three states and the District of Columbia participating in the demonstration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 19 of 19

Ohio Employment First Transition Framework

"Ohio Employment First Transition Framework is a critical component to the Ohio Employment First structure and is intended to address barriers to transition planning and services in order to achieve meaningful adult outcomes. The Framework was developed by stakeholders from multiple agencies to create processes and highlight practices that can be used by all agencies. These common processes assist professionals to plan, prepare, empower, educate, and connect across systems so as to consistently assist youth with disabilities to realize meaningful, community employment and other valued aspects of adult life.

The Framework is built on three non-negotiable foundational elements that together create a 'filter' to examine the practices and procedures used when working and supporting transition youth. The foundational elements for the activity and practices of the Framework are:

Person-centered. The youth is where the team efforts begin and end. Policies and practices must be flexible enough to respond to individual strengths and needs. Agency-neutral. As agencies come together to collaborate, activity should occur in a manner where all involved see value for the youth and no single agency policies or procedures are considered the priority. Outcome-focused. The common focus of the collaborative efforts are the meaningful adult life outcomes."
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Loop Ohio

"Welcome to Loop Ohio, Ohio’s virtual Community of Practice! This online community is dedicated to facilitating statewide and local, cross system collaboration and learning, with a focus on promoting best practices in community development and inclusion for people with disabilities. Ohio is a national leader in these efforts, primarily because of the innovative work being done all across the state, throughout our local communities. Loop Ohio provides a platform for community members and professionals to share ideas and resources, solve problems, break down barriers, connect across distance, and engage in ongoing learning. Loop Ohio is multi-functional, enabling people to have live virtual conversations, share resources, post events, lead and participate in webinars, use discussion boards, have online chat time with subject matter experts and more."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

OH Job Seekers Guide

"The Job Seekers Guide will help you learn how to get a job and will give you some tools that will help along the way."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Customized Employment Training Series

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services and Griffin-Hammis Associates are sponsoring classroom training, on-line instruction, special topics webinars, and technical assistance on Customized Employment for designated Job Center staff and partners, to support individuals with significant disabilities and complex barriers to employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Orientation to Supported Employment Web Course

This Web-based training is an introduction to the competencies for effective supported employment. Please follow this link to register:

https://trn-store.com/trn-courses/entry/OHIntroductionRegister.php

Seven lessons will cover the following topics:

Values, Definitions, History Legislation, Funding, Ohio’s Employment First Roles and Rights Supported Employment Process and Benefits Career Planning, Discovery, Vocational Profile Marketing and Job Development Job Design and Training, Natural Supports
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Customized Employment Guide

“This guide provides a look at the strategies used in Customized Employment (CE) and links to more information and resources for those who are just beginning to explore CE. It explains how CE might benefit individuals with disabilities seeking employment and students in transition from school to work. CE is based on several evidence based transition practices such as self-determination, using self-advocacy strategies, and providing community based instruction. Learn about OCALI’s experience with three teams in Ohio that served transition age youth. In addition to traditional funding sources these teams had access to funding for internships and resource ownership.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Customized Employment: Best Practice of Today

This presentation intertwines Customized Employment into Employment First as a key component to the state’s efforts in promoting community-based, integrated employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Project SEARCH: Opening Doors to Employment for Young People with Disabilities (2009)

“In the mid-1990s, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital began a broad diversity campaign to build a stable, reliable workforce that represented the surrounding community. Although medical professionals make up about 70 percent of the hospital’s workforce, the remaining employees are support personnel who receive on-the-job training and tend to experience high turnover. As part of its diversity effort, the hospital formed a partnership with Great Oaks Career Campuses, a career technical school with a significant proportion of students (28 percent) with developmental disabilities (DD). The resulting job training and placement program was named Project SEARCH and focused on training high school students with DD who are making the transition from school to work. The Project SEARCH model is based on an active collaboration between the hospital, Great Oaks, and the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission, the state’s vocational rehabilitation agency (SVRA). Over the past 15 years, this model has been implemented in 140 additional sites in the United States and the United Kingdom, mostly in hospitals, although some programs have been implemented in banks, insurance companies, state and local government agencies, zoos, senior care facilities, and universities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio Employment First Provider Support Trainings

Professional development activities are available to providers by the Ohio Employment First Initiative.  Trainings include, but are not limited to Mobile Technology as Employment Supports; Task Analysis for Job Coaches; The Role of the Occupational Therapist in Supporting Employment; Transformation: Sustaining Conversation, Raising the Bar and Changing Lives; Worksite Analysis for Job Coaches; Employment supports for those with IDD and Autism; andEmployment supports for those with Physical or Sensory involvement.

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Disability Rights OH, National Federation of the Blind, and Autistic Self Advocacy Network Celebrate Landmark Decision Ordering Fair Pay - 02/03/2016

COLUMBUS, OHIO – In a precedent-setting opinion issued by an administrative law judge from the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL), three clients have been awarded minimum wage going forward and back pay from Seneca Re-Ad, a sheltered workshop run by the Seneca County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The original petition was filed by Disability Rights Ohio (DRO), the National Federation of the Blind, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and the Baltimore law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Fair Pay from Sheltered Workshops (2016) - 02/02/2016

This case arises under Section 214(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act ("Act"), 29 U.S.C. §214(c). Ralph ("Joe") Magers, Pamela Steward and Mark Felton ("Petitioners") are employees of Seneca Re-Ad Industries ("Respondent"), which is located in Fostoria, Ohio. Each of the Petitioners has been diagnosed with one or more developmental disabilities and each receives services from the Seneca County (Ohio) Board of Developmental Disabilities ("DD").  Employment at Respondent's Fostoria manufacturing facility is one of the services provided by DD.  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Ohio’s HCBS Transition Plan - 03/13/2015

“Governor John Kasich created the Office of Health Transformation (OHT) to lead the Administration’s efforts to modernize Medicaid and streamline health and human services programs. Using an innovative approach that involves collaboration among multiple state agency partners and a set of shared guiding principles, reform initiatives are improving services, thus enabling seniors and people with disabilities to live with dignity in the setting they prefer, especially their own home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Balancing Incentives Program - 06/15/2013

~~“Ohio Benefits Long-Term Services and Supports (OBLTSS)The Ohio Department of Medicaid is committed to removing barriers and expanding access to long-term services and supports received in community-based settings. In conjunction with the Governor’s Office of Health Transformation and additional state agencies, the Ohio Department of Medicaid participated in the Balancing Incentive Program (BIP). The Ohio Benefits Long-Term Services and Supports (OBLTSS) program was created from the state’s involvement in BIP.

Through the Balancing Incentive Program Ohio earned over $180 million in matched funds, to improve access to home and community-based long-term services and supports (LTSS). Participating states were required to:◾Establish a no-wrong-door/single entry point system eligibility determination and enrollment system;◾Implement a case management system that is free of conflicts of interest; and◾Develop core standardized assessments.

The OBLTSS program meets all the requirements set forth by BIP and creates a unified way for individuals to connect to the various home and community-based programs and services for which they may be eligible. This new “front door” for information streamlines the process for individuals and their families to learn more about vital long-term services and supports information and resources.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Buy-in for Workers with Disabilities - 04/01/2008

"Medicaid Buy-In for Workers with Disabilities (MBIWD) is an Ohio Medicaid program that provides health care coverage to working Ohioans with disabilities. Historically, people with disabilities were often discouraged from working because their earnings made them ineligible for Medicaid coverage. MBIWD was created to enable Ohioans with disabilities to work and still keep their health care coverage."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Money Follows the Person

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 75,151 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from  institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2016. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply. There are currently forty-three states and the District of Columbia participating in the demonstration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Ohio until 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

How Does Work Impact My Benefits?

“If you are receiving benefits from the government (money, services, staff, medical care), you may be worried that if you work, you will not get those services. This page can help you learn what will change as you start to make your own money. You will also learn about some special benefits for workers!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

OH Disability Benefits 101: Working with a Disability in Ohio

“Disability Benefits 101 gives you tools and information on health coverage, benefits, and employment. You can plan ahead and learn how work and benefits go together.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The…grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities”. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Self Empowered Life Funding (SELF) (0877.R01.00)

"--Provides participant-directed homemaker/personal care, residential respite, supported employment – enclave, participant-directed goods and services, participant/family stability assistance, support brokerage, career planning, clinical/therapeutic intervention, community inclusion, community respite, functional behavioral assessment, group employment support, habilitation - adult day support, habilitation - vocational habilitation, individual employment support, integrated employment, non-medical transportation, remote monitoring equipment, remote monitoring, transportation, waiver nursing delegation for individuals w/ID and DD ages 0 - no max age"

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio Medicaid Waiver: Individual Options (0231.R05.00)

"~~Provides community respite, habilitation - adult day support, homemaker/personal care, supported employment – community, adaptive and assistive equipment, adult family living, adult foster care, career planning, environmental accessibility adaptations, group employment support, habilitation - vocational habilitation, home delivered meals, homemaker/personal care - daily billing unit, individual employment support, interpreter, money management, non-medical transportation, nutrition, participant-directed homemaker/personal care, remote monitoring equipment, remote monitoring, residential respite, shared living, social work, supported employment – enclave, transportation, waiver nursing delegation, waiver nursing for individuals w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age"

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

 In Ohio Employment First is for "Every person. Every talent. Every opportunity."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Ohio’s Vocational VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.26%
Change from
2017 to 2018
11,689,442
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.5%
Change from
2017 to 2018
844,409
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.23%
Change from
2017 to 2018
323,356
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.73%
Change from
2017 to 2018
38.29%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.83%
Change from
2017 to 2018
79.47%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 11,614,373 11,658,609 11,689,442
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 851,743 840,199 844,409
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 304,940 309,665 323,356
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,843,788 4,867,703 4,893,553
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.80% 36.86% 38.29%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.55% 78.81% 79.47%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90% 5.00% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.10% 22.10% 22.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.20% 12.70% 12.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 779,215 775,089 779,786
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 841,656 838,006 849,720
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 1,323,116 1,323,349 1,333,183
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 225,312 211,098 215,643
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 465,053 50,119 48,274
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,387 6,024 8,006
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 12,662 14,784 17,212
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 721 366 564
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 41,930 45,364 42,370
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 12,743 12,110 12,528

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 18,946 19,047 18,842
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.30% 6.40% 6.40%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 354,548 351,027 344,385

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,076 1,341 654
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 5,258 3,515 1,517
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 8,211 5,264 2,394
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 25.30% 25.50% 27.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.50% 3.00% 3.70%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20% 1.80% 2.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,857 4,004 4,111
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,897 2,372 2,693
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,029 1,747 719
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.00 0.02 0.00

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 114 135 170
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 80 85 98
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 70.00% 63.00% 58.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.69 0.73 0.84

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
13,246
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 978 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,205 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,255 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 4,229 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 3,688 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 891 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 30.70% 31.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 11,120 8,168 8,304
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 574,554 571,226 565,754
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 1,427 1,023 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,178 896 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $91,950,000 $99,531,000 $75,231,718
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $119,856,000 $114,445,000 $117,062,171
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $555,657,000 $562,605,000 $365,761,826
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00% 25.00% 28.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 18,804 18,914 17,998
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 14,407 15,514 16,449
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 71.30 76.70 79.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 65.13% 65.81% 63.28%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.77% 12.41% 11.96%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.93% 3.63% 3.60%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.27% 99.96% 99.90%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.45% 28.81% 27.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 76.61% 67.49% 70.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 83.95% 83.44% 79.49%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 40.16% 38.68% 43.33%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,552,533
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 4,128
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 175,646
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 500,082
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 675,727
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 233
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 531
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 764
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,787,410
AbilityOne wages (services). $6,697,054

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 4 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 2 0 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 94 56 81
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 101 58 83
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 71 10 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 24 0 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 15,295 9,652 8,436
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 9 9 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 15,399 9,671 8,448

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Transition services are funded by the various state agencies that serve the individual youth in accordance with requirements under WIOA, IDEA and other pertinent laws. In addition to the Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Ohio’s Employment First Task Force works across multiple systems to align policies and practices and issues guidance to the field as needed to ensure that students receive the services needed to ensure achievement of employment and other post-secondary outcomes. While OOD and ODE are the two lead agencies with regard to facilitating transition services for students with disabilities, the Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services, the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and the Ohio Department of Medicaid, as Employment First Task Force agencies also support this work, including funding services for mutually served students and youth with disabilities. (Page 153) Title I

In FFY 2013, OOD in partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) established a dual certification program as part of the Employment First Partnership Agreement. This dual certification program is designed to ensure continuity of services and allow for more successful transition from time-limited to long-term supports. In addition, it is designed to better respond to the needs of individuals served by the program as well as our business partners. Through this program, OOD provides a waiver of accreditation requirements to approved DD supported employment providers, allowing them to provide VR services to individuals being served by OOD in the Employment First Partnership. Performance-based job development is utilized to ensure a more outcome-focused method of service provision. Staff providing services under this waiver must pass an online course and attend mandatory trainings on VR services, fee schedules, billing, and reporting expectations before they can begin providing services. (Page 155) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): In 2017, OOD hired an additional five VR counselors through an expansion of the Employment First Partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities to serve an additional 300 individuals with developmental disabilities annually. OOD also hired a Work Incentives Program Administrator to oversee the agency’s delivery of work incentives consultation services. OOD implemented its new Supported Employment Services procedure and provided statewide training for all VR staff. A new rate for supported employment performance-based job development was implemented in 2017. Qualified providers of this service are dually certified by the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities in employment services or meet Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services fidelity requirements for IPS-SE. In addition, OOD in partnership with county boards of developmental disabilities are exploring innovative strategies to serve individuals with developmental disabilities with the need for more intensive job readiness training services. These opportunities prepare individuals for employment in higher wage in-demand jobs within specific industry sectors. (Page 158) Title I

As mentioned previously, OOD partners with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) to expand vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to individuals with developmental disabilities as part of the state’s overall Employment First Initiative. It also should be noted that DODD is the lead agency for Ohio’s Employment First initiative, which was signed by Governor Kasich in March 2012. OOD is an active member of the Employment First Task Force, which is examining existing practices in the state system to identify and address barriers to employment for people with developmental and other disabilities.

An Interagency Agreement between the state level Employment First Taskforce agencies has been implemented. This includes the Ohio Departments of Developmental Disabilities, Education, Job and Family Services, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Medicaid, the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council and OOD. The member agencies agree that community employment should be the first and preferred option for all working age adults and transition-age youth with developmental disabilities. The member agencies have agreed to develop or review state-level interagency agreements to ensure coordination of services and enable data sharing. The agencies have developed cross agency tools and processes to reduce duplication of services such as enrollment, eligibility, assessment and planning.

In 2015 and continuing into 2016, Ohio has been selected as a core state in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. Through this grant, which is funded through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), the Employment First Taskforce has identified action steps that each agency will complete to promote the core principles for transition in Ohio: • Competitive, integrated employment is expectation for all youth with disabilities; • Transition planning for youth requires multi-agency collaboration; • Early dialogue with individuals and families is critical to ensuring employment outcomes; • There are multiple pathways to employment; and • Person-centered planning is key to the development of effective services and supports for transition-age youth. (Page 163) Title I

In addition to the Employment First Partnership agreement with DODD, OOD also has developed a joint interagency agreement with DODD and the Ohio Department of Medicaid (ODM) in accordance with requirements of WIOA. DODD and ODM maintain a separate interagency agreement (A-1415-07-0528) that outlines programmatic and fiscal responsibilities between the two agencies, in which ODM delegates the day-to-day operations of the DODD Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waiver programs to DODD. The purpose of OOD’s interagency agreement with DODD and ODM is to improve opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities, including individuals with developmental disabilities enrolled in a home and community based services waiver administered by DODD, in accordance with its interagency agreement with ODM to achieve employment and independence. The agreement outlines a collaborative framework for coordinating services that prioritizes competitive, integrated employment and assists individuals with developmental disabilities to move from facility-based work and non-work settings to competitive, integrated employment. The agreement identifies methods to improve outreach to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families regarding VR programming and services. It also improves information sharing between the agencies and provides technical assistance and training to DODD and local county boards to increase employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities. (Page 164) Title I

OOD and the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) collaborate on a regular basis to provide guidance to educational agencies and vocational rehabilitation (VR) personnel responsible for facilitating transition services. These staff also offer consultation and technical assistance resources to assist schools and related community support entities in planning for transition of students with disabilities.

At the state level, both agencies have designated personnel to provide oversight and leadership for the development of policies, procedures, interagency training and other state-level partnership activities for transition services. On the local level, VR counselors are assigned as liaisons to schools and work with local school districts’ transition specialists.

OOD will provide targeted training to enhance personnel development. This will include targeted training on Employment First, supported employment, eligibility, transition procedures and clarification of roles and responsibilities of OOD and school personnel. (Page 173) Title I

Another key component of the CSNA involved interface with other state agencies to analyze disability data among various departments: Developmental Disabilities, Education, Job and Family Services, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Veterans’ Services. OOD wanted to understand how these agencies identify and track disability-related data in their various case management systems. Opportunity for future interface with these agencies was also introduced throughout this phase of the CSNA process and has continued to some degree, as a part of Ohio’s Employment First Initiative. OOD continues to work with its state partners as it implements service delivery activities for various populations. (Page 174) Title I

Employment First Partnership Agreement: OOD has continued its Employment First (EF) Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities. OOD has expanded the number of VR counselors providing services under the agreement from 15 to 25 counselors during this time period. In FFY 2015, the EF program exceeded all performance goals. This includes exceeding its rehabilitation goal by 150 percent and its plan development goal by 200 percent.
(Page 192) Title I

(EF): As noted above, OOD has successfully implemented its EF Partnership Agreement, which includes capacity building activities for supported employment providers. This program has expanded the number of available providers in the VR and the DD systems through the dual certification program. In addition, the program has initiated significant training initiatives for providers who provide service under the EF Partnership Agreement.

Individualized Placement and Support (IPS): OOD continues to work with the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services to develop procedures to implement IPS in Ohio. As a part of OOD’s planned updated to the VR Fee Schedule, OOD intends to develop a separate definition and rate for supported employment services. This is expected to be implemented on Oct. 1, 2016.

Policy and Procedure: OOD has finalized a draft supported employment policy and procedure based upon the above referenced activities. Once the final WIOA regulations are published, OOD will finalize these policies and procedures and provide training to field staff in the area of supported employment.
Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): OOD has continued the Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities which has assisted OOD in reaching Supported Employment goals. (Page 195) Title I

In FFY 2016 and FFY 2017, OOD’s program performance has continued trend in the positive direction. For example, in FFY 2017, the Employment First partnership agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities achieved 528 successful rehabilitations (an 83% increase from FFY 2015) and processed 1805 new applications for services (a 28.5% increase from 2015). In addition, the time from application to eligibility in FFY 2018 (as of April 20, 2018) averaged 26 days, down from 28 days in FFY 2015. (Page196) Title I

Historical WIA and current WIOA data exists for these cohorts for us to use in calculations and projections. Applying the employed second quarter after exit to the historical WIA population yields only a modest difference between WIA’s entered employment first quarter after exit and WIOA’s employment second quarter after exit for these two cohorts. Therefore, we propose using the PY 2015 WIA common measure level as a starting point for establishing a performance history for the second quarter after exit measure. For the fourth quarter after exit, Ohio has noted an average of a 6percentage point drop from second to fourth quarter after exit for the Adult population and a 4 percentage drop for the Dislocated Worker population. Therefore, Ohio submits the resultant as a starting point for establishing a performance history for the fourth quarter after exit measure. State efforts will focus on minimizing these drop offs. (Page 323) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~In accordance with federal requirements, supported employment services provided include the following: • Assessment services needed to ensure appropriate job match and supports;Job development; • Job placement; • Intensive on-the-job training or coaching of individuals with the disability, their employer, supervisor and/or coworkers by skilled employment consultants; • Other VR or support services needed to ensure success in community employment; • Follow-up and monitoring of job performance during the stabilization process; • Discrete post-employment services not commonly available from those who provide extended services; • Identification and development/facilitation of natural supports; and • Customized employment. (Pages 197-198) Title I

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Each Aspire grantee is encouraged to have a postsecondary education and training partnership or Bridge Program. Bridge programs prepare adults with limited academic or limited English skills to enter and succeed in postsecondary education and training programs, thus reducing the need for remedial education provided in the postsecondary institutions. (Page 50) Title I

Nine recommendations have stemmed from the analysis in the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA). These recommendations will be addressed through specific strategic initiatives outlined on OOD’s Strategic Plan. These recommendations are as follows: 1. Actively engage OOD VR counselors in the early stages of a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) development and utilize the VR services that have yielded positive outcomes. 2. Formalize efforts to increase services to individuals with visual and hearing disabilities; specifically evaluate and prioritize identified recommendations cited in the Workforce Integration Task Force (WIT). 3. Expand and leverage new employer and state agency partnerships to achieve Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act common performance measure outcomes. 4. Meet the workforce needs of employers by evaluating in-demand occupations as a standard approach of VR counselors’ work in developing job goals and service plans for OOD job seekers. 5. Work with the Social Security Administration to identify strategies for referring disability claimants to the vocational rehabilitation program. 6. Concentrate efforts to bring awareness and assist OOD VR served individuals to register with OhioMeansJobs.com as a means to achieving their employment goals. 7. Utilize technology to increase access to OOD services and improve operational efficiencies. 8. Design a formal business plan model that allows for agile deployment of human and financial resources across Ohio counties when new opportunities to expand VR services arise. 9. Re-evaluate the partnership with the Ohio Department of Aging, leveraging both Vocational Rehabilitation and the Independent Living and Older Blind programs. (Page 191) Title I

In addition to leveraging services, training and experience through OhioMeansJobs center partnerships and host agencies, SCSEP participants will also benefit from services leveraged through civic engagement programming. For example, the Encore Career Network in partnership with Cleveland Foundation’s Cleveland Encore Network will make available job search coaches to provide individualized assistance in finding unsubsidized employment and staff to support program management. The Encore movement is a nationwide effort to tap the talents and experience of retirees and near-retirees to help community agencies further their missions. Other potential civic engagement partners will include the Retired Senior Volunteer Program or in some locations VISTA. (Pages 288-289) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~In 2011, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) received a three-year Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) demonstration grant project to improve the education, training, and employment opportunities and outcomes for adults who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. ODA’s SCSEP administrator served on the project’s review team. Three OhioMeansJobs centers in Cleveland, Portsmouth and Toledo operated the DEI grant project. Disability resource coordinator staff in OhioMeansJobs centers implemented Ohio’s strategic components, which included deploying integrated resource teams, leveraging partner funds and resources, customized employment, and asset development. Through this initiative OhioMeansAccessibility.com was added to OhioMeansJob.com. (Page 294) Title IV

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~WIOA one-stop partner programs, such as vocational rehabilitation and Adult Basic and Literacy Education (ABLE) will use the same primary performance outcome measures. However, each program will negotiate its own statewide and local standards. The failure of any of the six WIOA core programs (adult, dislocated workers, youth, ABLE, vocational rehabilitation and Wagner-Peyser) on their established statewide performance standards could potentially lead to sanctions in the form of reduced WIOA funding to the state, which would apply to all of the WIOA core programs. Additional partner programs, such as the Trade Adjustment Assistance program and Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP), will use their own performance measures, standards and monitoring for program compliance and improvement. (Page 79) Title I

ODHE’s network of Aspire programs play a vital role in the economic advancement of SCSEP participants and all older adults with limited English proficiency, low literacy skills or both. There are currently 56 local Aspire providers serving all 88 Ohio counties. These free services assist adults in acquiring the skills they need to be successful in post-secondary education and training, and employment, and include:
• Basic math, reading and writing skills;
• Adult secondary education/GED preparation;
• English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL);
• Transition services to post-secondary and employment;
• Family literacy; and
• Workplace literacy.

Program 60: Audit Coursework as a Bridge to Credit Coursework for SCSEP Participants
Ohio’s state universities and colleges provide Program 60. This unique program allows any person who is 60 years of age or older and who has resided in the state for at least one year to attend courses and classes without charging that person a tuition or matriculation fee provided the attendance is on a noncredit basis, is in courses where classroom space is available, and is approved by the instructors of the courses involved. The Ohio SCSEP will promote the use of Program 60 as a bridge to credit coursework for SCSEP participants. Auditing courses allows learners to become familiar with programs of study before making a financial investment. Additionally, participation in noncredit coursework has been recognized as a strategy to help learners who have been away from the classroom for a long period of time or were not successful during earlier classroom experiences. (Page 291-292) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~In September 2015, OOD and ODE/OEC launched the Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP). This statewide collaboration between the two agencies expands transition services for students with disabilities, ages 14 to 21, who are receiving services under an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and meet OOD eligibility criteria. Through the OTSP model, VR staff has an increased presence in each of the 91 career technical planning districts (CTPDs) and other local education agencies statewide. OTSP:
• Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence;
• Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross-agency planning and earlier career preparation; (Page 34) Title I

The Ohio Department of Education estimates there are more than 50,000 school-age youth (starting at age 14), with an IEP and who also have identified disabilities, potentially qualifying them for OOD VR services. In 2014, OOD served nearly 12,000 youth between the ages of 14 and 24, indicating a significant need to expand services to youth and students with disabilities throughout Ohio.

The OTSP model utilizes a person-centered, agency-neutral and outcome-focused approach to comprehensive career planning that is based on established evidence-based predictors of success. It is a progressive service delivery model designed to increase independence and career readiness. While a full range of VR services are available, service provision is based on individual specific data driven decisions and is designed to meet people where they are on their unique path to employment. (Page 35) Title I

OOD finalized its Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Transition Services procedure (Procedure 80-VR-11-12) in September 2014 after months of development with multiple stakeholders, including the Ohio Departments of Education, Developmental Disabilities, and Mental Health and Addiction Services, and other entities. The purpose of the transition procedure is to provide direction for the application, eligibility determination and provision of transition services, including pre-employment transition services for VR-eligible students with disabilities. The procedure complies with 34 CFR 361.5, ensuring that the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for students with disabilities is developed as early as is reasonably possible, but no later than the time at which the student leaves the school setting. Specifically, the transition procedure states that the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) must be completed prior to the eligible student exiting school. (Page 150) Title I

The transition procedure describes a service delivery process focused on progressive career development for eligible students with disabilities. It is designed to be person-centered to meet the needs of students who are ready for progressive career development and those youth who may need developmental activities, including students as young as 14, to prepare them for progressive career development. The flexibility of this service delivery model allows VR program staff to become involved with the student at an earlier age, thus becoming a more active participant in the transition planning process overall. To meet the progressive career development needs of students who are at various places in their development, OOD updated its VR Fee Schedule in April 2014 to expand services for transition youth, adding Summer Career Exploration and Summer Job Development. OOD has worked with the Ohio Department of Education, Office for Exceptional Children to develop a publication titled “A Guide to Transition Services: Helping Students with Disabilities Move from School to Work”. This publication is widely distributed to school personnel, as well as to students with disabilities and their families. This publication was updated in FFY 2014 (October 2013), and will continue to be used in training measures to promote collaboration between local education authorities and OOD field staff. (Page 150) Title I

In September 2015, OOD and ODE/OEC launched the Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP). This statewide collaboration between the two agencies expands transition services for students with disabilities, ages 14 to 21, who are receiving services under an Individualized Education Program (IEP) and meet OOD eligibility criteria. Through the OTSP model, VR staff has an increased presence in each of the 91 career technical planning districts (CTPDs) and other local education agencies statewide. OTSP: • Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence; • Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross-agency planning and earlier career preparation; and • Improves strategies to ensure that students with disabilities secure employment prior to graduation and connect with long-term supports services when needed and available to ensure long term success.

The Ohio Department of Education estimates there are more than 50,000 school-age youth (starting at age 14), with an IEP and who also have identified disabilities, potentially qualifying them for OOD VR services. In 2014, OOD served nearly 12,000 youth between the ages of 14 and 24, indicating a significant need to expand services to youth and students with disabilities throughout Ohio. (Page 151) Title I

OOD staff at the state and local level provides consultation and technical assistance to school personnel, students, families and other agency partners through formal and informal trainings, joint problem solving and the exchange of information on policies and procedures. VR counselors serve as liaisons to local schools, attend IEP meetings regularly for prospective referrals and serve on state and local interagency groups. They also present at state and local conferences and training seminars and participate in local district career fairs and other interagency forums on VR eligibility and services. (Page 152) Title I

The Interagency Agreement outlines how transition planning is to occur at the local level for individual students with disabilities. Specifically, the agreement provides for consultation and technical assistance to educational agencies and VR personnel in planning for the transition of students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of individualized plans prior to the student exiting school. This includes the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), the 504 Plan, the Individualized Education Program (IEP), and any other plans that lead to post-secondary vocational outcomes. The agreement encourages educational agencies to develop linkages with VR offices as early as possible in the transition process. The agreement also specifies training efforts to promote the use of evidence-based practices and predictors to improve youth skills for competitive, integrated employment and community participation, driven by principles of informed choice, community-based services and measurable results. Additionally, Ohio Administrative Code now requires transition planning and services under an IEP to begin no later than age 14 and include a statement describing appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability. (Page 152-153) Title 1

The Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities outlines roles and responsibilities for education and vocational rehabilitation staff, including assurances that local education agencies are implementing Ohio’s Operating Standards for the Education of Children with Disabilities. This means that transition services are based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences, and interests, and includes: instruction, related services, community experiences, the development of employment in an integrated competitive environment and other post-school adult living objectives, and when assessment data supports, a need for acquisition of daily living skills and provision of a functional vocational evaluation. Additionally, as previously mentioned, transition services must be provided by staff who have obtained the Transition to Work Endorsement or who possess equivalent skills and knowledge. Roles and responsibilities for VR staff under the Interagency Agreement between the Ohio Department of Education and the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities include providing a liaison counselor for each school district to formalize collaboration in planning and referral development and facilitating identification of students with disabilities who may benefit from VR services as early as possible during the transition planning process. This ensures that transition services and goals on a student’s IPE are aligned with the IEP, utilizing ready and existing documentation of the student’s disability as well as information needed to determine appropriate services whenever possible. Staff also finalizes the IPE prior to a student existing school. VR services should complement services funded by schools, but not replace those services. This means that neither the local education agency nor OOD may shift the financial burden for providing a service for which it would be responsible to the other entity. (Page 153) Title I

Alignment with In-Demand Occupations: OOD utilizes resources provided by ODJFS and OhioMeansJobs.com that provide information on the available jobs by employers in all 88 Ohio counties. OOD’s Business Engagement Team will utilize this information to establish partnerships with the identified employers for the purposes of sourcing qualified OOD eligible individuals for the available jobs. OOD’s Business Engagement Team will also use these partnership opportunities to offer the Windmills training to the employers to assist them in their movement to a culture of inclusion of people with disabilities. OOD will also identify Ohio’s in-demand occupations, as published on OhioMeansJobs.com and evidenced by employers, job opportunities to assist OOD’s VR counselors in writing Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE) that align with the in-demand occupations in their particular area and by industry cluster. (Page 161) Title I

OOD seeks to provide meaningful training for all personnel. Staff development begins on day one. Every new staff member is required to attend new staff training. After new staff training, OOD has designed position job specific training that aids in the development of skills that are needed for a designated position. For example, new counselor training provides job specific information including topics such as standardized intake process, eligibility, assessments, Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) development, and case closure. New counselors report directly to training supervisors for their first six months on the job. This allows training to extend well beyond what is covered in the classroom. It also allows other training techniques to be included such as observation, on-the-job training, in depth case analysis and caseload specific topics. During the past year, new counselor training has become more comprehensive so new counselors are better prepared to meet the VR needs of consumers. Specific trainings have also been developed for supervisory staff, accountant examiners, Employment First staff, job development staff, and business sourcing analysts. These trainings provide the foundation to all future trainings (Page 171) Title I

OOD seeks to provide meaningful training for all personnel. Staff development begins on day one. Every new staff member is required to attend new staff training. After new staff training, OOD has designed position job specific training that aids in the development of skills that are needed for a designated position. For example, new counselor training provides job specific information including topics such as standardized intake process, eligibility, assessments, Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) development, and case closure. New counselors report directly to training supervisors for their first six months on the job. This allows training to extend well beyond what is covered in the classroom. It also allows other training techniques to be included such as observation, on-the-job training, in depth case analysis and caseload specific topics. During the past year, new counselor training has become more comprehensive so new counselors are better prepared to meet the VR needs of consumers. Specific trainings have also been developed for supervisory staff, accountant examiners, Employment First staff, job development staff, and business sourcing analysts. These trainings provide the foundation to all future trainings. (Page 171) Title IV

OOD and the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) collaborate on a regular basis to provide guidance to educational agencies and vocational rehabilitation (VR) personnel responsible for facilitating transition services. These staff also offer consultation and technical assistance resources to assist schools and related community support entities in planning for transition of students with disabilities.

At the state level, both agencies have designated personnel to provide oversight and leadership for the development of policies, procedures, interagency training and other state-level partnership activities for transition services. On the local level, VR counselors are assigned as liaisons to schools and work with local school districts’ transition specialists.

OOD will provide targeted training to enhance personnel development. This will include targeted training on Employment First, supported employment, eligibility, transition procedures and clarification of roles and responsibilities of OOD and school personnel. (Page 173) Title I

Data for the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) suggests that more than 50,000 youth statewide, with an individualized education program (IEP), who also have identified disabilities, could meet OOD eligibility criteria for VR services. Fifteen counties, 12 of which are located in the North Central and Northwest Ohio, have service rates higher than 40 percent. Three counties have services rates below 10 percent. The remaining 70 counties have service rates between 10 and 40 percent. As OOD partners with ODE and local education agencies, this information is being used to prioritize outreach efforts based on geographic areas.

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): OOD will be updating Ohio’s Comprehensive Needs Assessment in FFY 2018. The report is expected to be complete in the summer of 2018. (Page 178) Title I

In FFY 2015, OOD expended all Title VI, Part B funds on direct supported employment case services. OOD intends to continue to expend supported employment grant funding in this manner. Individuals with an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that includes an employment outcome of supported employment are targeted for the use of these funds. OOD utilizes an auto-budget feature in its case management system to ensure the proper expenditure of supported employment grant funds. (Page 185) Title I

OOD has partnered, in particular, with DODD and 26 county boards of developmental disabilities to provide high quality transition services to students and youth with developmental disabilities in the Bridges to Transition program. This program model has recently been enhanced to promote improved employment outcomes and cost effectiveness of the program. This service delivery model involves VR counselors working with county transition specialists to provide intensive transition services to students, ages 14 to 21, who are eligible for county board of DD and VR services. The model utilizes a team approach to increase collaboration and local connection with families, schools, providers and business, and facilitate the transition to long-term supports.

Two Year Modification Update: OOD has updated its Supported Employment policies and procedures to align with requirements under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including the provision of extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years.  (Page 186) Title 1

OOD has several Interagency Agreements that are designed to implement service delivery models that will increase outcomes for specific populations served by the VR program. The Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and the Ohio Transition Support Program with the Ohio Department of Education are both examples of this. Details about these strategic initiatives are located in (d) and (f).

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): OOD has accomplished the following since implementation of this State Plan:

o Updated the Vocational Rehabilitation Fee Schedule as well as the Medical, Psychological and Dental Fee Schedules,

o Hired additional “in-house” job developers who provide direct service to individuals with disabilities,

o Continued the Employment First Partnership Agreement with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and expanded the Ohio Transition Support Program with the Ohio Department of Education,  (Page 187) Title I

At present, the transition to extended supports begins at the point of job stabilization and at least 90 days prior to successful case closure, but for a period not to exceed four years. This ensures a smooth transition VR funded supports to ongoing and/or natural supports as outlined in the IPE. (Page 198) Title IV

All program administration activities are intended to support the following Perkins Act vision for the state of Ohio. From FY2016 through FY2020: • All state—approved secondary career—technical programs will be based on a state—approved career pathway and program of study (POS); o A POS is a pathway of secondary and postsecondary non—duplicative course sequences that culminates in a diploma, credential(s) and/or degree(s). o A POS must minimally span grades 9 to 14 and is encouraged to span grades 7 to 16. o A POS should emphasize Ohio’s in—demand occupations, identified in OhioMeansJobs.com. • State—approved secondary career—technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS); o The Office of CTE created an instrument to guide and facilitate program improvement with a common set of standards. The Quality Program Standards instrument is designed to serve all secondary career—technical education programs. o Career Technical Planning Districts (CTPDs) will have access to the monitoring system to aid in evaluating a program to determine how to improve the quality of the CTE program. o Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state—approved career—technical program and for state supplemental career—technical funding. o The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS. • A secondary program that operates under a state—approved POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria; • All secondary programs operating under a state—approved POS and meeting QPS, will continue being identified as Tech Prep programs; • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students; • Effective academic/career counseling and comprehensive transition planning and provision of transition services beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is 14 years of age. IEP and Section 504 development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs; • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success; and • High expectations will continue to be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers:” o A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high—level academic and technical achievement. o A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. The purpose of programs of study is to ensure, through collaboration between secondary and postsecondary institutions, that CTE programs will: • Support 100 percent graduation from high school and successful transition to and through completion of postsecondary education, including matriculation without the need for remediation; • Provide rigorous coursework at the secondary and postsecondary levels that will prepare learners for the attainment of a diploma, industry credentials and college degrees without remediation. (Page 218) Title IV

Ohio’s career—technical education programs will serve all learners in a fair and equitable manner and ensure that students with disabilities have equal access to an education. Ohio does not differentiate between the degrees, diplomas, or credentials earned by learners with an identified disability and those earned by learners without an identified disability. Moreover, at the secondary level, there is no distinction made regarding technical assessments administered to students with disabilities. Through a system whereby performance measures, learner outcomes and provider accountability are the “same for all,” Ohio will make every effort to assure that students with disabilities are provided the necessary modifications, accommodations and support services under their Individual Education Programs (IEPs) needed for success in both academic and career—technical coursework. State products/services will consider how to best assist high—need districts, including Ohio’s urban districts. (Page 223) Title IV

• Maintain a teacher-preparation network of universities that provide programs that prepare new career-technical teachers and emphasize with that network the need to prepare pre-service and in-service CTE teachers, especially those coming directly from business and industry, to effectively serve members of special populations. • Support the provision of career information for special populations through OhioMeansJobs.com and the Student Success Plan and other personalized learning tools into which OhioMeansJobs.com and the Student Success Plan may be integrated. • Promote increased collaboration at the secondary level among all districts, schools and units within schools relative to the development, use and updating of Individualized Education Programs (IEP) for students with disabilities who are enrolled in career-technical education programs. Cross-agency and external stakeholder committees will address areas of needed improvement such as effective use of IEPs in career-technical education (CTE) classrooms and effective use of career assessment for identifying needed services, facilitating appropriate placement and enhancing transition from secondary to postsecondary programming. (Page 239) Title IV

Ohio’s career-technical education (CTE) programs will serve all learners in a fair and equitable way, including those who are members of special populations. Ohio does not differentiate between the degrees, diplomas, or credentials earned by learners with an identified disability and those earned by learners without an identified disability. Moreover, at the secondary level there is no distinction made regarding technical assessments or academic achievement tests administered to learners with disabilities unless at the secondary level such distinction is specifically mandated within a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). Through a system whereby performance measures, learner outcomes and provider accountability are the “same for all” (unless at the secondary level mandated by an IEP), Ohio will make every effort to assure that members of special populations are provided the necessary support and services needed for success in both academic and career-technical coursework.

The state will require all sub-recipients to describe, as part of their local plans, how special populations learners of all categories will have equitable access to and participate in approved career-technical programs at all levels and meet or exceed state adjusted levels of performance and prepare for further learning and high-skill, high-wage or high-demand occupations. Local recipients will be required to identify barriers to participation for members of special populations and how they will take appropriate steps to eliminate them. Services to be used by local recipients to enable special population learners to meet or exceed state adjusted levels of performance may include, but are not limited to: • Specialized support services as required by an IEP; • “Support for learner success” and implementing common reforms that identify the way students best learn in career-technical programs and provide appropriate interventions to help all students in career-technical programs achieve at a high level; • Career information and assessment; • Limited English proficiency support services; • Services designed to facilitate the effective transition from secondary to postsecondary programs; and • Educator professional development activities. (Pages 240- 241) Title IV

 The number of students with disabilities served in career technical programs was approximately 602. Of this number, 587 were served in the Ohio Department of Youth Services career-technical education (CTE) programs, and approximately 15 were served in Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction programs. The CTE services and activities carried out in institutions serving students with disabilities were nearly the same as those provided to non-disabled students. The difference for students with disabilities is that programs were provided with Specially Designed Instruction, Accommodations, Modifications and Related Services indicated in students’ Individual Education Program (IEP). (Pages 242) Title IV

All state-approved secondary career-technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS); o Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state-approved career-technical program and for state weighted career-technical funding. o The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS. • A secondary program that operates under a state-approved POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria; • Once all secondary programs operate under a state-approved POS and meet QPS, all programs can also be identified as Tech Prep programs; • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students; • Effective academic/career counseling and effective Individual Education Plan (IEP) development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs; • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success; • High expectations will be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers;” o A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high level academic and technical achievement. o A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. (Pages 258-259) Title IV

Ohio’s Tech Prep programs will serve all learners in a fair and equitable way, especially those who are members of special populations. Ohio does not differentiate between the degrees, diplomas, or credentials earned by learners with an identified disability and those earned by learners without an identified disability. Moreover, at the secondary level there is no distinction made regarding technical assessments or academic achievement tests administered to students with disabilities unless at the secondary level such distinction is specifically mandated within a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). Through a system whereby performance measures, learner outcomes and provider accountability are the “same for all” (unless at the secondary level mandated by an IEP), Ohio will make every effort to assure that members of special populations are provided the necessary support and services in Tech Prep programs to be prepared for postsecondary education (including apprenticeships) and for success in Ohio’s in-demand occupations careers. (Pages 262-263) Title IV

All state—approved secondary career—technical programs will meet State Quality Program Standards (QPS); o Evaluation of adherence to QPS will be part of a periodic renewal of eligibility as a state—approved career—technical program and for State weighted career—technical funding. o The state will provide technical assistance for and monitoring of QPS. • A secondary program that operates under a state—approved career pathways and POS and meets secondary state QPS will also, by definition, meet Tech Prep criteria; • Once all secondary programs operate under a state—approved career pathways and POS and meet QPS, all programs can also be identified as Tech Prep programs; • Tech Prep programs will be characterized by open entry for all secondary students; • Effective academic/career counseling and effective Individual Education Plan (IEP) development will be available in schools to ensure that students are in appropriate programs for their individual needs; • All educators, especially teachers, will be supported with access to products/services that will help them ensure student success; • High expectations will be in place for students to exit secondary Tech Prep programs as successful secondary “completers;” o A successful secondary completer is a student that demonstrates high level academic and technical achievement. o A successful secondary completer is a student that is well prepared to move seamlessly to postsecondary Tech Prep programs. (Page 265) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~On-the-Job Training (OJT): OOD intends to reintroduce the use of OJT to facilitate increased skill gains and wages for individuals served by the VR program. This will allow OOD to work with employers to hire individuals with disabilities into more skilled and higher paying positions within their business. OOD plans to align the VR OJT policy and procedure with Ohio’s Title I funded OJT, as much as possible, by using the same forms, training plan templates, agreements, and invoice template. Aligning VR OJT with those funded by WIOA Title I employment and training and Trade Adjustment Assistance Reauthorization Act of 2015 (TAA) will make it easier for the employers who are accustom to Title I- and TAA-funded OJT to also work with OOD consumers on VR-funded OJT. This also supports better alignment across workforce programs. (Page 160) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Alignment with In-Demand Occupations: OOD utilizes resources provided by ODJFS and OhioMeansJobs.com that provide information on the available jobs by employers in all 88 Ohio counties. OOD’s Business Engagement Team will utilize this information to establish partnerships with the identified employers for the purposes of sourcing qualified OOD eligible individuals for the available jobs. OOD’s Business Engagement Team will also use these partnership opportunities to offer the Windmills training to the employers to assist them in their movement to a culture of inclusion of people with disabilities. OOD will also identify Ohio’s in-demand occupations, as published on OhioMeansJobs.com and evidenced by employers, job opportunities to assist OOD’s VR counselors in writing Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE) that align with the in-demand occupations in their particular area and by industry cluster. The Business Relations Team has been engaged with a number of in-demand occupation employers such as those who employ skilled apprentice-able occupations. The Business Relations Manager has engaged with the Ohio Statewide Apprenticeship Council to discuss strategies for OOD transition students to access pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship training programs as well as the ability of OOD to help them retain their seasoned employees who could be experiencing onset disabilities as a strategy to retain the talent they already have on board. This engagement has led to more opportunities to offer Windmills training and for OOD to evaluate the training programs and knowledge, skills and abilities required by these various programs to increase participation and success of OOD qualified candidates. (Page 161) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~In September 2015, OOD and ODE/OEC launched the Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP). This statewide collaboration between the two agencies expands transition services for students with disabilities, ages 14 to 21, who are receiving services under an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and meet OOD eligibility criteria. Through the OTSP model, VR staff has an increased presence in each of the 91 career technical planning districts (CTPDs) and other local education agencies statewide. OTSP:
• Expands access for students with disabilities to engage in career exploration and skill development at a younger age, launching them on a path to career success and independence;
• Increases participation of VR counselors in IEP team meetings ensuring cross-agency planning and earlier career preparation;
• Improves strategies to ensure that students with disabilities secure employment prior to graduation and connect with long-term supports services when needed and available to ensure long term success; and Educates parents and youth on work incentives planning by comparing benefits of work versus SSI. (Page 34) Title I

It should be noted that OOD also maintains Medical, Dental, and Psychological Fee Schedules to establish rates for purchasing VR services such as exams and assessments, restoration and treatment and durable medical equipment such as hearing aids and eyeglasses. In FFY 2016, OOD intends to update these Fee Schedules and align with the Ohio Department of Medicaid service definitions and rates. This will: • Align the VR program with purchasing practices of other state and local partner agencies; • Increase consistency among these fee schedules; • Expand the number of VR purchased services that have established standards and rates; • Make available a pool of potential providers that meet requirements established by the Ohio Department of Medicaid; and • Simplify the approach to purchasing many of these services. (Page 155) Title I

Ohio is an Employment First state with an active taskforce of state agency representatives, including OOD. The taskforce meets regularly to align policies, funding and planning for services and supports that prioritize competitive, integrated employment for Ohioans with developmental (and other) disabilities. As part of the Employment First Initiative, OOD and DODD have established an Interagency Agreement to expand supported employment services for working-age adults with developmental disabilities. According to DODD data, there are more than 30,000 working-age adults who receive adult services, the vast majority of which are in facility-based settings. This statewide initiative supports job seekers to transition from facility-based work and non-work settings into competitive, integrated employment. Twenty-five OOD VR counselors provide VR services to eligible individuals served by the partnership. Counselors work with local county boards of developmental disabilities to identify candidates for the program. They deliver individualized, person-centered career planning services to assist in the development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) and purchase supported employment services, including performance-based job development, from approved providers. In addition, five caseload assistants were hired specifically for the partnership to provide work incentives services to individuals served by the project. The staff holds Community Partner Work Incentives Counselor (CWIC) certifications and is tasked with expanding the availability of work incentives counseling for individuals with developmental disabilities who are served as part of the partnership. (Page 157) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): In 2017, OOD hired an additional five VR counselors through an expansion of the Employment First Partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities to serve an additional 300 individuals with developmental disabilities annually. OOD also hired a Work Incentives Program Administrator to oversee the agency’s delivery of work incentives consultation services. OOD implemented its new Supported Employment Services procedure and provided statewide training for all VR staff. A new rate for supported employment performance-based job development was implemented in 2017. Qualified providers of this service are dually certified by the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities in employment services or meet Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services fidelity requirements for IPS-SE. In addition, OOD in partnership with county boards of developmental disabilities are exploring innovative strategies to serve individuals with developmental disabilities with the need for more intensive job readiness training services. These opportunities prepare individuals for employment in higher wage in-demand jobs within specific industry sectors. (Page 158) Title I

OOD projects a continued need to hire VR staff in the above referenced classifications over the course of this Combined State Plan. OOD prioritizes the use of available resources to hire direct service personnel and therefore, the greatest area of need will likely continue to be VR counselors and caseload assistants as well as supervisory staff. OOD has been aggressively pursuing strategies to improve the cost effectiveness of the VR program. Identified cost savings are reinvested strategically to further improve performance for the VR program. A projected area of increased need over the course of this plan will likely be for staff hired to provide “in-house” job development and/or work incentives counseling services. OOD has been piloting these new service delivery models during FFY 2015 and, based upon the success of the pilots, is poised to increase investments in this area. Figure 23 shows the personnel projections by position. (Page 165-166) Title I

To continue OOD’s staff development, monthly web-based trainings are provided. These monthly trainings are designed to provide up-to-date information on agency policy and procedures, share information about community resources, and maintain state and licensure requirements for ethics trainings, as well as train on other topics as needed. Specific topics included presumptive eligibility, confidentiality, VR assessments, the medical and dental fee schedules, application, intake and eligibility, policies and procedures, and agency updates. These regular trainings provide OOD with the ability to disseminate information regarding the most current agency and industry information. To improve quality and access, OOD utilizes a GoToTraining format where staff can attend the training online at their desk. This reduces travel while improving the overall technical quality of the trainings. In addition, by using the GoToTraining format, trainings are recorded so staff who missed the training or who would like to review the material can view it at a later time. Development opportunities continue throughout the year. Staff is encouraged to maintain and increase technical skills by attending required and/or continuing education opportunities. Examples of other training provided by OOD include: Technology for People with Disabilities, Medical and Psychological Aspects of Disabilities, Jobsites Supports and Training, Transition for Success: An Outcome-Driven Approach, Social Security Work Incentives, Ethical Dilemmas, and Career and Person-Centered Planning. (Page 171) Title I

To do this, OOD identified several strategies to promote cost efficiencies and increased effectiveness of services. These strategies include, but are not limited to: • On October 1, 2012, OOD implemented a VR Fee Schedule for the first time. This Fee Schedule established consistent service definitions and rates for 29 VR services and has provided a foundation for increased consistency in services provided statewide. OOD is currently in the process of updating this VR Fee Schedule through an engagement with a consulting firm that is recommending cost informed rates (instead of the market based rates in the first iteration) as well as fee structures that might promote improved outcomes for the program. This revised fee schedule is expected to be implemented on Oct. 1, 2016. • In FFY 2015, OOD conducted a pilot to evaluate the cost effectiveness and improvement of outcomes that could be achieved using in-house staff to provide job development services. OOD is also evaluating this model of service delivery for work incentives counseling (i.e. benefits analysis). OOD is currently reviewing pilot results to determine if this service delivery model should be expanded. (Page 180) Title I

OOD has traditionally relied fully on fee for service purchasing of VR services from Community Rehabilitation Programs. In FFY 2015, OOD piloted the provision of both job development and work incentives counseling (i.e., benefits planning) services through “in-house” personnel. OOD is currently in the process of evaluating the results of these pilots to determine the extent to which they resulted in increased outcomes and reduced time to placement. It is anticipated that OOD will expand the use of this service delivery model over the course of this Combined State Plan. (Page 187) Title I

Ohioans with disabilities who are determined eligible for SSI or SSDI, designated as eligible for services from county boards of DD, and those designated as having a severe and persistent mental illness and eligible for services from a community mental health board, are targeted populations for supported employment. OOD has developed Interagency Agreements with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), the Ohio Department of Medicaid, and the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS), to develop and implement improved coordination of supported employment services. The Interagency Agreements include training opportunities and technical assistance for staff across all involved agencies. For all supported employment cases, OOD ensures the coordination and facilitation of extended services for individuals, which can be funded through Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers, local county board of DD or county behavioral health authorities, including natural supports. Such services provide the supports individuals with the most significant disabilities need to sustain long-term employment. (Page 197) Title I

Employer/ Business

~~Ohio’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) program is aligning its on-the-job training strategy and policies with Title I employment and training and Trade Adjustment Assistance programs for seamless service delivery for businesses. The VR program also is working to increase utilization and access to the Workforce Inventory of Education and Training - Ohio’s eligible training provider system - which includes connection with apprenticeship programs. To further that connection, VR is working with Ohio’s Apprenticeship Council to develop career pathways for transitioning youth to enter into the programs. (Pages 30-31) Title I

In FFY 2013, OOD in partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) established a dual certification program as part of the Employment First Partnership Agreement. This dual certification program is designed to ensure continuity of services and allow for more successful transition from time-limited to long-term supports. In addition, it is designed to better respond to the needs of individuals served by the program as well as our business partners. Through this program, OOD provides a waiver of accreditation requirements to approved DD supported employment providers, allowing them to provide VR services to individuals being served by OOD in the Employment First Partnership. Performance-based job development is utilized to ensure a more outcome-focused method of service provision. Staff providing services under this waiver must pass an online course and attend mandatory trainings on VR services, fee schedules, billing, and reporting expectations before they can begin providing services. They must also attend in- person trainings on employer engagement and on-the-job supports within one year of passing the online supported employment web course to continue providing services.

During FFY 16, OOD will be developing a VR Provider Portal that will allow VR service providers to electronically receive authorizations for services, upload invoices and reports, and track billing and payment status. This portal will provide the foundation for greater standardization of the reporting and billing process and will offer significant increases in the efficiency of these processes for both providers and OOD staff. (Pages 155-156) Title I

OOD and DODD have also established criteria for approval of waivers to OOD’s accreditation requirements for DODD-certified employment service providers. This dual-certification process allows DODD-certified Medicaid HCBS waiver providers to deliver both VR services and long-term follow-along supports to ensure continuity of services. To date, more than 1,200 provider staff has successfully completed the initial training and will continue to receive in-person training. Certain providers through this partnership have recently been selected to participate in targeted technical assistance to develop staff’s skills and competencies in employer engagement. (Page 157) Tittle I

The work of the Business Engagement team is focused on a number of key initiatives focused primarily on employer engagement, employer education, OOD DisAbility Job Fairs and OOD’s direct sourcing of qualified VR candidates for these employers. These initiatives will help promote a culture of diversity and inclusion among Ohio employers creating more opportunities and a quicker path to employment for OOD’s eligible individuals.

Supporting Recruitment and Onboarding and Retention of VR Consumers: OOD partners with employers in the state of Ohio for the purposes of identifying available jobs that best match with the skills and qualifications of eligible individuals served by the VR programs. As job opportunities are identified, Business Engagement staff performs a job match in OOD’s VR case management system to identify appropriate job ready candidates. VR counselors managing those cases are notified that one of their job ready consumers has been identified for a potential opportunity. VR and/or provider staff then assists the eligible individual through the application, hiring and onboarding process and ensures any services needed to support a successful rehabilitation are provided.

Through these same employer engagement activities OOD has forged relationships with employers to also promote the ability of OOD to work with employers toward the retention of qualified workers with disabilities. OOD has been engaged with targeted outreach to federal contractors concerning Sec 503 requirements and is engaged with helping these employers understand OOD’s ambition to both support their hiring needs and assist them with retaining workers who have onset disabilities or perhaps have recently disclosed a disability and is in need of VR services to retain their employment. (Page 159) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): In January 2017, OOD elevated the prominence of its business engagement activities through the establishment of the Division of Employer and Innovation Services. The primary structure of the statewide Business Relations Team is to support the VR programs’ efforts to engage with employers. The core Business Relations Team consists of a centralized Business Relations Manager (BRM) and two Employer Services Liaisons, four regional Business Relations Specialists (BRSs) and nine VR Talent Sourcing Coordinators (TSCs). It should be noted that OOD will be adding a fifth BRS in 2018 to meet the needs of an increasing number of business partnerships. The work of the Business Relations Team is focused on a number of key initiatives focused on employer engagement, employer retention, employer education, OOD DisAbility Job Fairs and OOD’s direct sourcing of qualified VR candidates for these employers. These initiatives promote a culture of diversity and inclusion among Ohio employers creating more opportunities and a quicker path to employment for OOD’s eligible individuals. (Page 162) Title I

Data Collection

The vocational rehabilitation program, in accordance with WIOA requirements, is currently in the process of making changes to its case management system and data collection activities to align with common measures. In addition, OOD is collecting and evaluating baseline performance data to prepare for the negotiation of performance levels with the Rehabilitation Services Administration. OOD has robust reporting capabilities through the VR case management system and associated reporting tools. In addition, OOD has a created a data warehouse allowing for a variety of dashboards for the vocational rehabilitation program to help monitor case progression and timeliness of eligibility decisions, and plan development and time in service. Collectively, these tools provide an important foundation for ensuring that performance measures are achieved by the vocational rehabilitation program. (Page 78) Title I

OOD implemented a standardized VR Fee Schedule in FFY 2013 that is designed to ensure a consistent pattern and quality of services purchased statewide. The VR Fee Schedule provides an important foundation for improved quality of purchased services through the development of standardized service definitions and rates, service reporting and billing templates and provider scorecards. It should be noted that OOD is currently working with a consulting firm to update the VR Fee Schedule with the intention of moving from market based rates to cost informed rates. This involves collecting cost reports from providers to accurately capture expenses associated with carrying out services under the VR Fee Schedule and inform the development of updated rates. As a part of this project, OOD is also considering alternate rate structures, such as performance based fee structures, that would incentivize achievement of common performance measures under WIOA. OOD is seeking to simplify fee structures to reduce administrative activities associated with billing and reporting as well. (Page 155) Title I

Building upon the foundation set from the 2012 CSNA methodology, OOD developed 2016 projections of the number of individuals with disabilities by category and county of residence in Ohio. Similarly, service data from OOD’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) case management system and employment statistics were utilized to develop estimates of the number of individuals likely to need VR services by disability category and by county. This provided a basis for developing estimates of the number of individuals actively participating in the labor force that need services to assist them in finding a job and could benefit from OOD VR services. As a follow-up to the 2012 CSNA recommendations, OOD has aggressively gathered and analyzed data through the Workforce Integration Taskforce, focused on services for the deaf and blind, as well as service delivery capacity available through Ohio’s network of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). Data collection strategies included surveys of individuals with disabilities and employers. OOD contracted with Kent State University, as a compliment to the Ohio Longitudinal Transition Study, to specifically address the six questions regarding youth and students with disabilities. Finally, Mathematica conducted a Survey of Disability and Employment (SDE), of over 1,000 OOD VR applicants, that will assist OOD to better understand the needs of individuals with disabilities. Another key component of the CSNA involved interface with other state agencies to analyze disability data among various departments: Developmental Disabilities, Education, Job and Family Services, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Veterans’ Services. OOD wanted to understand how these agencies identify and track disability-related data in their various case management systems. Opportunity for future interface with these agencies was also introduced throughout this phase of the CSNA process and has continued to some degree, as a part of Ohio’s Employment First Initiative. OOD continues to work with its state partners as it implements service delivery activities for various populations. (Page 174) Title I

Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) establishes an agency strategic plan on a biannual basis. Strategic initiatives on the strategic plan are directly tied to program performance measures and the extent to which they promote the ability for the agency to improve employment outcomes, accountability, cost effectiveness and efficiency. OOD’s strategic plan is approved by OOD’s Commissioners. OOD has developed a strategic plan for Fiscal Years 2016-2017. OOD’s current strategic plan incorporates a mission statement, core values for the organization, goals, and objectives as listed below. Strategic initiatives associated with this strategic plan are detailed throughout this Combined State Plan. (Page 182) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): OOD has completed several updates to the AWARE case management system over the past several years that have been necessary to allow OOD to report on new common performance measures. OOD has been able to submit the new quarterly RSA 911 report for both open and closed cases by the deadlines established by RSA. In addition, OOD is on track to include wage record information in the May submission. OOD continues to work with state level partners on data sharing agreements that will facilitate the most efficient and accurate data reporting possible, in particular related to the credential and skill gain measures. OOD is establishing baseline level performance across common performance measures in FFY 2018. (Page 196) Title I

Ohio’s career—technical education programs will serve all learners in a fair and equitable manner and ensure that the student with a disability has equal access to an education. Ohio does not differentiate between the degrees, diplomas, or credentials earned by learners with an identified disability and those earned by learners without an identified disability. Moreover, at the secondary level, there is no distinction made regarding technical assessments administered to students with disabilities. Through a system whereby performance measures, learner outcomes and provider accountability are the “same for all”, Ohio will make every effort to assure that students with disabilities are provided the necessary modifications, accommodations and support services to be prepared for postsecondary education and for success in Ohio’s in—demand occupations careers. For secondary programs, state products/services will consider how to best assist high—need districts, including Ohio’s urban districts. (Page 224) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Ohio has several initiatives to provide access to services for individuals with disabilities. Ohio’s Workforce Inventory of Education and Training not only provides the institutional and program data needed, but also will contain information on how providers are making reasonable accommodations for those individuals with disabilities and special needs. Local workforce development professionals also will be able to rate providers on how well they accommodated their participants with disabilities enrolled in training. Ohio’s standards for OhioMeansJobs center certification also will include requirements to not only comply with the ADA, but also Sec 188 of WIOA. Certification will require OhioMeansJobs staff to receive training to understand and better serve individuals with disabilities. (Page 53) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) in collaboration with the OhioMeansJobs centers will comply with the language detailed in the State’s Methods of Administration Element 5: Compliance with 504 Disability Requirements. In part, ODJFS and the OhioMeansJobs centers will continue to work together to ensure all centers are in compliance with all federal and state laws as it relates to disabilities. (Page 92) Title I

Ohio has a strong history of addressing WIOA Section 188 in a number of ways. A collaboration was formed between ODJFS, the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD, the state vocational rehabilitation agency), and the Office of Workforce Transformation (OWT) to address the specific issue of improving service and emphasis for those individuals with disabilities. The group, the Workforce Integration Task Force, focused on how center accessibility could be improved for individuals with disabilities due to the fact the centers are under-utilized by this community. Both physical and programmatic accessibility were addressed along with creating a greater awareness of center staff on recognizing and working with individuals with disabilities and how to market this demographic group to employers. (Page 92) Title 1

Ohio’s third One-Stop certification program under WIOA is again addressing the needs of those with disabilities by developing an ADA Tool Box that will include, but is not limited to: on-site disability awareness training (including “Windmills” and At Your Service training), an ADA Checklist Guide, examples of State Term Contract information, Internet links and resources to be used by OhioMeansJobs centers, an ADA plan outlying the process for identifying an ADA local coordinator, a reasonable accommodations policy, and a self-assessment tool to assist in ensuring compliance as it relates to Section 188. The attainment of full certification will require full center staff training on issues relating to working with individuals with disabilities. Specific benchmarks and critical success factors are included in the certification documents that directly relate to being compliant with ADA requirements and serving individuals with disabilities. (Pages 92-93) Title I

Vets

Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

Creating jobs and economic opportunity drives every policy decision and reform priority in Ohio. To that point, the first bill introduced in Ohio’s General Assembly under Governor Kasich’s leadership changed the way Ohio does economic development and replaced its government—driven, calcified job creation efforts with a new private—sector approach. JobsOhio, a private, non—profit corporation, was created under that legislation and is singularly focused on growing existing Ohio companies and attracting new businesses to the state. JobsOhio has focused its work on nine main industry clusters that research shows will drive Ohio’s economy now and into the future. This work has laid the foundation for the creation of Ohio’s In—Demand Jobs List and sets the education and training priorities for the state. (Page 20) Title I

The state also developed an OhioMeansVeteranJobs.com website customized to comprehensively address veterans’ needs. It incorporates information related to services and resources available through the Department of Veterans Services, a military skills translator, information about military friendly employers, and much more. Similarly, Ohio developed OhioMeansAccessibility.com, which provides resources to help Ohioans with disabilities as well as the employers and service providers who support them. Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Employment First, Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities, Assistive Technology of Ohio, and the Ohio Departments of Aging, Developmental Disabilities, Job and Family Services, Medicaid, and Mental Health and Addiction Services collaborated on the creation of the site. (Page 48) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist.

Ohio continues to cut bureaucratic red tape to prioritize workforce services for veterans, military service members and their families. The Office of Workforce Transformation (OWT), together with state agency partners, is assisting military service members, veterans and their families compete for Ohio’s in-demand jobs. Several key initiatives have been implemented:

• Ohio’s licensing departments, boards and commissions, and state institutions of higher education now award course credit for military education and experience;

• Veterans in Ohio can now use GI Bill benefits to pay for national and state occupational licensing testing;

• The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services developed the Veterans Business Support Center - accessible at OhioMeansJobs.com - to better connect employers to qualified veterans, all for free;

• OhioMeansJobs.com prioritizes veteran resumes, allowing employers to review these first when looking for perspective employees; (Page 89) Title I

Disabled veterans’ outreach program (DVOP) specialist personnel in the OhioMeansJobs centers provide intensive services to those veterans and eligible spouses who are identified as having a significant barrier to employment, as defined by USDOL. When veterans enter an OhioMeansJobs center, they are asked to fill out a Veterans Questionnaire to determine if there are any identified significant barriers to employment. If the individual meets the definition of eligible veteran for the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) program or is an eligible spouse, has at least one significant barrier to employment, and/or is age 18 to 24 years, the OhioMeansJobs center staff refers this covered person to the DVOP specialist within the JVSG program. A covered person should also be referred to the DVOP specialist if he or she is later, after further assessment, determined by OhioMeansJobs center staff to have a significant barrier to employment. The DVOP specialist will provide intensive services to mitigate the significant barriers to employment and transition these individuals into the civilian workforce.

DVOP specialists develop job and training opportunities for veterans, with special emphasis on veterans with service-connected disabilities. They provide direct services to veterans enabling them to be competitive in the labor market. In addition, they provide outreach and offer assistance to disabled and other veterans by promoting community and employer support for employment and training opportunities, including apprenticeship and on-the-job training. DVOP specialists work with employers, veterans’ organizations, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Defense, and community-based organizations to link veterans with appropriate jobs and training opportunities. (Page 91) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually.

In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes:

A. HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG

The goal of ODJFS Bureau of Veterans Workforce Services is to have the top veterans’ employment program in the nation. To accomplish this, Ohio determines the optimal DVOP/LVER staff alignment and resource distribution. This methodology is based on U.S. Census data showing the number of veteran job seekers in each county versus the number of veteran job seekers in the entire state. This percentage is then applied to determine the appropriate number of veteran staff in each area. This allows Ohio to position the DVOP staff in areas of greatest need while maintaining WIOA-mandated presence in the state’s OhioMeansJobs centers. (Page 275) Title IV

The Workforce Specialist utilizes dedicated labor market research and electronic tools, such as the Analyst Resource Center (ARC) database, and conducts personalized outreach to individual employers. Workforce Specialists plan and participate in career and information fairs as part of their efforts to maintain relationships with employers, educational institutions and training providers. They also promote apprenticeship and on-the-job (OJT) training opportunities for veterans. These registered Apprenticeship programs combine work-based learning and classroom training to help successful program completers obtain secure, full-time journeyman positions. Ohio offers more than 1,100 registered apprenticeship programs in fields as diverse as: aerospace, construction, energy, health care, manufacturing, and utilities. The OJT program helps employers hire and train individuals for long-term employment. OJT optimizes the resources available under workforce development initiatives to meet the needs of employers and job seekers. The expected outcomes for these activities are increased employment and training opportunities for veterans, as well as a heightened awareness of the qualities veterans bring to the business and educational communities. This will be measured through increased entered employment rates, as identified through the state negotiated performance goals.

The measures the State is evaluated on address the outcomes experienced by eligible veterans and spouses with significant barriers to employment who are served by DVOP Specialists. The measures are as follows:

Intensive Services provided by DVOP Specialists divided by the total veterans and eligible persons served by DVOP Specialists/Total veterans and eligible persons served by DVOP Specialists in the State;

Veterans’ Entered Employment Rate (weighted);

Veterans’ Employment Retention Rate;

Veterans’ Average Earnings (6 months);

Disabled Veterans’ Entered Employment Rate;

Disabled Veterans’ Employment Retention Rate; and

Disabled Veterans’ Average Earnings (6 months). (Page 280) Title IV

Mental Health

~~Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities’ (OOD) Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program provides the full array of vocational rehabilitation services to eligible individuals in all of Ohio’s 88 counties, ensuring that eligible individuals with disabilities are served through Ohio’s workforce system. Individuals are referred to the VR program through any number of avenues including OhioMeansJobs centers and WIOA CORE partner programs. In addition, OOD partners with other systems such as mental health and recovery, developmental disabilities, and education, providing the VR program with expanded opportunity to reach more potentially eligible individuals and increase our focus in serving transition age youth. Because the VR program no longer has a wait-list and projects to have adequate resources to serve 29,000 eligible individuals in FFY16, OOD will not operate under an Order of Selection and is positioned to provide services for all eligible individuals in MSD, SD and D categories. (Page 26) Title I

Workforce development boards are responsible for developing the local workforce development area plan, engaging employers, providing program oversight, negotiating performance measures, and procuring youth program providers. In addition, the local workforce development board, in collaboration with the CCMEP lead agency, determines the criteria to be used when awarding contracts or grants for WIOA youth providers. Contract or grant awarding criteria should include consideration of the provider’s ability to work with youth and young adults in Ohio Works First, the financial assistance portion of the TANF program, other TANF-eligible youth, as well as Title I youth. Also, criteria should include the service provider’s ability to link youth to additional social services to assist in addressing non-employment and training barriers such as mental health needs and substance abuse treatment. The criteria for selection of youth providers must also consider the providers ability to provide the necessary assistance and services for those participants to enter into unsubsidized employment or training opportunities. (Page 109) Title I

CCMEP ends the siloed, fragmented approach that has tried to treat the collected “symptoms” of poverty instead of seeking a cure for the underlying challenges that needy Ohioans face. Ohio’s teens and young adults face higher rates of unemployment than any other age group and many struggle to complete high school. Many of these youth also encounter additional barriers to reaching their full potential including homelessness, substance abuse, teen pregnancy, and mental health issues. Addressing these issues and barriers early on in a coordinated way, could break the cycle of poverty.

Most of the CCMEP population will be out-of-school youth. By connecting clients to the right resources and services across various programs and partners, including adult and family literacy, Carl Perkins Career Tech, and local community-based organizations, standardizing eligibility, and combining resources to improve education and training outcomes, the participants will establish pathways to employment and begin to move up and out of poverty. This program integrates the funding from two existing programs, TANF and WIOA, to focus on each individual’s unique needs and to make better use of these existing funds which are already allocated for purposes of employment and training and reaching self-sufficiency. (Page 110) Title I

Aspire providers will coordinate with other workforce partners in the community for the development of career pathways. Providers also coordinate with local support services such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning to enable all students to attend and complete programs.

Aspire programs were required to provide the following adult education and literacy activities the first two years of the Combined State Plan: adult education, literacy, which include English language acquisition, integrated English literacy and civics education, and workforce preparation activities. These same activities will be required in PY 2018 and PY 2019. Details of these activities will be provided in each program’s proposal. (Page 135) Title 1

OOD finalized its Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Transition Services procedure (Procedure 80-VR-11-12) in September 2014 after months of development with multiple stakeholders, including the Ohio Departments of Education, Developmental Disabilities, and Mental Health and Addiction Services, and other entities. The purpose of the transition procedure is to provide direction for the application, eligibility determination and provision of transition services, including pre-employment transition services for VR-eligible students with disabilities. The procedure complies with 34 CFR 361.5, ensuring that the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for students with disabilities is developed as early as is reasonably possible, but no later than the time at which the student leaves the school setting. Specifically, the transition procedure states that the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) must be completed prior to the eligible student exiting school. (Page 150) Title I

OOD, the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), and the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) have consistently worked together to serve mutually eligible individuals with disabilities. As OOD provides services to an increased number of individuals with the most significant disabilities, the development of long-term supports and services is essential to the maintenance of the employment outcomes achieved. (Page 156) Title I 

For individuals with developmental disabilities who are eligible for Medicaid home and community based services (HCBS) waivers, OOD works with local county boards of developmental disabilities and providers to transition individuals with developmental disabilities into long-term supports needed to maintain competitive employment once the individual’s case has been successfully closed. For those individuals with developmental disabilities who are not eligible for an HCBS waiver, OOD will coordinate with the county board to establish alternative dollars for long-term supports. (Page 156) Title I

OhioMHAS funds the Coordinating Center for Excellence (CCOE) for Evidence-Based Supported Employment for individuals with serious mental illness through block grant funding. The CCOE has provided past training and technical assistance to OOD staff. OOD actively participates on the statewide employment committee and is working with the group to develop future training for OOD staff and mental health partners. OOD, OhioMHAS and the CCOE continue as active participants of the Johnson & Johnson - Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program. This program works with selected states to implement IPS for individuals with SPMI who are interested in gaining employment.

During FFY 2015, the statewide employment committee developed recommendations for an IPS procedure protocol. The procedure identifies potential candidates for IPS, outlines the VR referral process, coordinated planning with the job seeker’s employment team, rapid engagement in the job search process, ongoing support, and transition to long-term supports through the local mental health agency. (Page 157-158) Title I

Two-Year Modification Update (February 2018): In 2017, OOD hired an additional five VR counselors through an expansion of the Employment First Partnership with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities to serve an additional 300 individuals with developmental disabilities annually. OOD also hired a Work Incentives Program Administrator to oversee the agency’s delivery of work incentives consultation services. OOD implemented its new Supported Employment Services procedure and provided statewide training for all VR staff. A new rate for supported employment performance-based job development was implemented in 2017. Qualified providers of this service are dually certified by the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities in employment services or meet Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services fidelity requirements for IPS-SE. In addition, OOD in partnership with county boards of developmental disabilities are exploring innovative strategies to serve individuals with developmental disabilities with the need for more intensive job readiness training services. These opportunities prepare individuals for employment in higher wage in-demand jobs within specific industry sectors. (Page 158) Title I

Another key component of the CSNA involved interface with other state agencies to analyze disability data among various departments: Developmental Disabilities, Education, Job and Family Services, Mental Health and Addiction Services, and Veterans’ Services. OOD wanted to understand how these agencies identify and track disability-related data in their various case management systems. Opportunity for future interface with these agencies was also introduced throughout this phase of the CSNA process and has continued to some degree, as a part of Ohio’s Employment First Initiative. OOD continues to work with its state partners as it implements service delivery activities for various populations. (Page 174) Title I

OOD’s service provision is higher for individuals with psychosocial and cognitive impairments. This is most likely explained by the fact that OOD in the past four years has concentrated efforts through focused contracts with local Mental Health and Drug Addiction boards, local Developmental Disabilities boards, and most recently through the Ohio Department Developmental Disabilities funding for Employment First. Each of these populations also has an organized representative presence through established county public agencies across the state. (Page 176) Title I

OOD partners with a variety of local agencies related to the provision of extended services needed for individuals pursuing an employment outcome of supported employment. In particular, this includes partnership with local county boards of developmental disabilities as well as local behavioral health authorities. OOD works at the state level with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services in this regard as well.

OOD has partnered, in particular, with DODD and 26 county boards of developmental disabilities to provide high quality transition services to students and youth with developmental disabilities in the Bridges to Transition program. This program model has recently been enhanced to promote improved employment outcomes and cost effectiveness of the program. This service delivery model involves VR counselors working with county transition specialists to provide intensive transition services to students, ages 14 to 21, who are eligible for county board of DD and VR services. The model utilizes a team approach to increase collaboration and local connection with families, schools, providers and business, and facilitate the transition to long-term supports. (Page 186) Title I

Ohioans with disabilities who are determined eligible for SSI or SSDI, designated as eligible for services from county boards of DD, and those designated as having a severe and persistent mental illness and eligible for services from a community mental health board, are targeted populations for supported employment. OOD has developed Interagency Agreements with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), the Ohio Department of Medicaid, and the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS), to develop and implement improved coordination of supported employment services. The Interagency Agreements include training opportunities and technical assistance for staff across all involved agencies. For all supported employment cases, OOD ensures the coordination and facilitation of extended services for individuals, which can be funded through Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers, local county board of DD or county behavioral health authorities, including natural supports. Such services provide the supports individuals with the most significant disabilities need to sustain long-term employment. (Page 197) Title I

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

To provide early intervention services to individuals who receive workforce and employment-related services, the ODJFS offices of Unemployment Insurance Operations and Workforce Development provide local workforce administrative entities data and information. Local areas requesting data enter into a Data Sharing and Confidentiality Agreement with OWD. Each quarter, OWD pulls participants enrolled in Title I employment and training from the Ohio Workforce Case Management System (OWCMS) who received services during the reference quarter or four previous quarters; combined with participants who exited the program during the reference quarter or four previous quarters. These participants are matched against the Ohio Wage Record data identified in the Data Sharing and Confidentiality Agreement. From the wage record file, local area points of contact receive wages, number of weeks worked, the year and quarter wages are reported, NAICS 6-digit code, and NAICS title. The point of contact will also receive the information to identify each participant. In addition, on a monthly basis, the Office of Unemployment Insurance Operations emails a report that lists claimants who are within four weeks of exhausting their UI benefits and claimants who were profiled for RESEA and UCRS (WPRS) services. On a weekly basis, a list of individuals who recently applied for unemployment benefits is sent. The goal of this initiative is to improve information sharing and coordination of program activities so unemployed Ohioans can be served earlier and return to work more quickly. (Page 53) Title 1

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 51 - 60 of 94

OH Vocational Rehabilitation Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment - 09/30/2015

“Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD), Division of Performance and Innovation (DPI), produced this 2015 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) building upon the framework methodology developed from the 2012 CSNA, which was designed to assess the vocational rehabilitation (VR) service needs of individuals related to six primary disability categories. These disabilities include visual impairments, hearing impairments, communicative impairments, physical impairments, psychosocial impairments and cognitive impairments. This methodology focuses on penetration rates (of the extent to which OOD was serving prospective jobseekers with disabilities), and proportionality (how well OOD is balanced in serving the cross-section of individuals with disabilities who are seeking employment).” The VR sets forth 9 recommendations to be set as priorities over the next year in order to improve integrated employment opportunities and community inclusion.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio ESEA Flexibility Request - 08/21/2015

“By submitting this updated ESEA flexibility request, the SEA renews its request for flexibility through waivers of the nine ESEA requirements listed below and their associated regulatory, administrative, and reporting requirements, as well as any optional waivers the SEA has chosen to request under ESEA flexibility…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio’s HCBS Transition Plan - 03/13/2015

“Governor John Kasich created the Office of Health Transformation (OHT) to lead the Administration’s efforts to modernize Medicaid and streamline health and human services programs. Using an innovative approach that involves collaboration among multiple state agency partners and a set of shared guiding principles, reform initiatives are improving services, thus enabling seniors and people with disabilities to live with dignity in the setting they prefer, especially their own home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan (VR Rehabilitation Services Program) - FY 2015 - 09/30/2014

The State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program: Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 states that staff should build competencies on, and promote the employment practices such as customized employment, self-employment, and supported employment, among others.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Guide to Policy and Procedure Development - 07/31/2014

"The Employment First Rule, 5123: 2-2-05, requires county boards to adopt and implement a local Employment First Policy which clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age. The following is guidance developed in response to multiple requests from county boards."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Mental Health and Addiction Services (Ohio MHAS) Supported Employment Project - 07/01/2014

"Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services (MHAS) and its partners are implementing the Supported Employment Project. This project reduces the high unemployment rates for young adults and adults with a severe and persistent mental illness who may have co-occurring substance use disorders.

Two local sites are implementing new programs, and a committee will oversee statewide training, policy changes, and evaluation. The evidence-based practice of Individual Placement and Support employment is being shared statewide through training and technical assistance."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Funding System Re-Design for Ohio’s Employment First Initiative: Review of Promising Models from Other States - 06/02/2014

This report aims to provide DODD with a comparison of funding structures from multiple states with high rates of integrated employment, including at least one state with a local tax base funding structure. The first 3 Key Principles for establishing a funding system to support Employment First uphold that, “The system should be based upon a presumption of competency, employability and ‘zero reject’ for each person with a disability, regardless of complexity; The system should reward providers for best practice implementation of Individual Supported Employment; [and] The system should require provider standards and staff training/certification to assure equal statewide access to and opportunity for Individual Supported Employment.” There are 9 principles in total that guide that together guide the structure and implementation of Employment First.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Administrative Rule (5123: 2-2-05) - 04/01/2014

“The purpose of this rule is to implement the employment first policy in accordance with section 5123.022 of the Revised Code… This rule applies to county boards of developmental disabilities and providers responsible for planning, coordinating, or providing employment services, regardless of funding source, to individuals with developmental disabilities.”

·       Community Employment is competitive employment that takes place in an integrated setting

·       Every individual of working age will have a person-centered planning process to identify their desired employment outcome and their place on the path to community employment

·       Services and supports will be provided to help the individual move along the path to community employment

·       County boards are required to develop and implement an Employment First policy, set benchmarks to increase community employment outcomes, partner with schools to enhance transition planning, share information with individuals, families, schools, employers, providers and others in the community about Medicaid Buy-In, and collect employment data on individuals served

·       Providers are required to submit progress reports at least every 12 months to ensure the individual is moving along the path to community employment and collect employment data on individuals served

   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio's Path to Employment First - 02/01/2014

“Successful implementation of Employment First requires a multi-pronged approach and a long-term commitment to systems change…. A comprehensive approach must focus on key strategies; all designed to work synergistically to impact a service structure that better supports people to achieve community employment and directs more resources toward that preferred outcome.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Balancing Incentives Program - 06/15/2013

~~“Ohio Benefits Long-Term Services and Supports (OBLTSS)The Ohio Department of Medicaid is committed to removing barriers and expanding access to long-term services and supports received in community-based settings. In conjunction with the Governor’s Office of Health Transformation and additional state agencies, the Ohio Department of Medicaid participated in the Balancing Incentive Program (BIP). The Ohio Benefits Long-Term Services and Supports (OBLTSS) program was created from the state’s involvement in BIP.

Through the Balancing Incentive Program Ohio earned over $180 million in matched funds, to improve access to home and community-based long-term services and supports (LTSS). Participating states were required to:◾Establish a no-wrong-door/single entry point system eligibility determination and enrollment system;◾Implement a case management system that is free of conflicts of interest; and◾Develop core standardized assessments.

The OBLTSS program meets all the requirements set forth by BIP and creates a unified way for individuals to connect to the various home and community-based programs and services for which they may be eligible. This new “front door” for information streamlines the process for individuals and their families to learn more about vital long-term services and supports information and resources.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Ohio Revised Code 5123:2-9-16 - Home and community-based services waivers - 04/01/2017

“This rule defines group employment support and sets forth provider qualifications, requirements for service delivery and documentation of services, and payment standards for the service. The expected outcome of group employment support is paid employment and work experience leading to further career development and competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Ohio HB 155 - 10/15/2015

A bill to amend section 2329.66 and to enact sections 113.50, 113.51, 113.52, 113.53, 113.54, 113.55, and 113.56 of the Revised Code to require the Treasurer of State to create a program [ABLE] offering federally tax-advantaged savings accounts used to pay for a person's qualified disability expenses and to disregard the value of and income from that account in determining whether that person is eligible for state or local means-tested public assistance.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Ohio SB 316: IEP and Post-secondary Transition Requirements - 09/24/2012

Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is fourteen years of age, and update annually thereafter, a statement describing:

Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills; Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described in divisions (H)(1) and (2) of this section.

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Rev. Code §5126.05: County Board - Powers & Duties - 09/24/2012

“Implement an employment first policy that clearly identifies community employment as the desired outcome for every individual of working age who receives services from the board…”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

5123.022 OH State Policy Regarding Community Employment for Disabled - 09/24/2012

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of this state that employment services for individuals with developmental disabilities be directed at community employment. Every individual with a developmental disability is presumed capable of community employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OH Rev. Code Ann. §§123.152 - Encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program. - 09/29/2005

As used in this section, "EDGE business enterprise" means a sole proprietorship, association, partnership, corporation, limited liability corporation, or joint venture certified as a participant in the encouraging diversity, growth, and equity program by the director of administrative services under this section of the Revised Code.   Social disadvantage based on any of the following:  - A rebuttable presumption when the business owner or owners demonstrate membership in a racial minority group or show personal disadvantage due to color, ethnic origin, gender, physical disability, long-term residence in an environment isolated from the mainstream of American society, location in an area of high unemployment;   
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order 2019-03D Establishing Ohio as a Disability Inclusion State and Model Employer of Individuals with Disabilities - 01/14/2019

~~1.  The Department of Administrative Services, in consultation with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, shall identify and appoint a State ADA Coordinator, who shall be responsible for advising all state agencies, departments, boards, and commissions within the executive branch on disability policy and compliance with state and federal disability rights laws.

2.  Each state agency shall annually review its hiring practices to identify any barriers to employment of individuals with disabilities, and, in consultation with the State ADA Coordinator, take appropriate action to eliminate any non-job-related barriers to the integration of individuals with disabilities into the workforce.

3.  All state agencies, departments, boards and commissions shall utilize best efforts with respect to recruitment, hiring, and advancement, and issue clear, written directives to their managers and supervisors prohibiting discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities.

4.  All state agencies, departments, boards and commissions shall collect and evaluate self-disclosed data through the state personnel system to be used to measure progress in hiring people with disabilities. This data will be used to develop a strategic plan in consultation with the State ADA Coordinator and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities with a goal for hiring individuals with disabilities who self-disclose.

5.  The Ohio Department of Administrative Services and the State ADA Coordinator, in coordination with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, shall ensure all state employees participate in regular disability etiquette and awareness training to build and sustain a culture of inclusion in the workplace.  All State employees shall also participate in periodic training on the ways that technology can be used to make work sites more accessible and available to people with disabilities....

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Ohio Employment First Executive Order - 03/19/2012

~~“Governor John Kasich officially launched Ohio’s Employment First Initiative when he signed Executive Order 2012-05K on March 19, 2012. The Executive Order established statewide collaboration and coordination by creating the Employment First Taskforce and Advisory Committee, and made community employment the preferred outcome for individuals with developmental disabilities.The taskforce is charged with expanding community employment opportunities by reducing barriers and aligning state policy.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 21 - 28 of 28

Funding System Re-Design for Ohio’s Employment First Initiative: Review of Promising Models from Other States - 06/02/2014

This report aims to provide DODD with a comparison of funding structures from multiple states with high rates of integrated employment, including at least one state with a local tax base funding structure. The first 3 Key Principles for establishing a funding system to support Employment First uphold that, “The system should be based upon a presumption of competency, employability and ‘zero reject’ for each person with a disability, regardless of complexity; The system should reward providers for best practice implementation of Individual Supported Employment; [and] The system should require provider standards and staff training/certification to assure equal statewide access to and opportunity for Individual Supported Employment.” There are 9 principles in total that guide that together guide the structure and implementation of Employment First.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Administrative Rule (5123: 2-2-05) - 04/01/2014

“The purpose of this rule is to implement the employment first policy in accordance with section 5123.022 of the Revised Code… This rule applies to county boards of developmental disabilities and providers responsible for planning, coordinating, or providing employment services, regardless of funding source, to individuals with developmental disabilities.”

·       Community Employment is competitive employment that takes place in an integrated setting

·       Every individual of working age will have a person-centered planning process to identify their desired employment outcome and their place on the path to community employment

·       Services and supports will be provided to help the individual move along the path to community employment

·       County boards are required to develop and implement an Employment First policy, set benchmarks to increase community employment outcomes, partner with schools to enhance transition planning, share information with individuals, families, schools, employers, providers and others in the community about Medicaid Buy-In, and collect employment data on individuals served

·       Providers are required to submit progress reports at least every 12 months to ensure the individual is moving along the path to community employment and collect employment data on individuals served

   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio's Path to Employment First - 02/01/2014

“Successful implementation of Employment First requires a multi-pronged approach and a long-term commitment to systems change…. A comprehensive approach must focus on key strategies; all designed to work synergistically to impact a service structure that better supports people to achieve community employment and directs more resources toward that preferred outcome.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio - “New Requirements for Secondary Transition Services for Students with Disabilities: Frequently Asked Questions” - 09/19/2012

The New Requirements state that IEPs must start at age 14, update annually and contain,

“Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education and independent living skills;  Appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability; and The transition services including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals described [above]…”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OH Department of Education Job Training Coordinating Program Manual

This manual contains information on Individualized Education Plans (IEPs and school-to-work transition for students with disabilities. It recommends the use of Customized Employment as a good technique for harder to place students.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio DD System Requirements

“In order to make community employment the expected and preferred outcome for people with developmental disabilities, the Ohio DD system is required to align policies, procedures, eligibility, enrollment, and planning for services across state agencies… Other requirements include development of universal tools for documentation, eligibility, selection, assessment, and planning of services. Identification of best practices, partnerships, funding sources, opportunities for shared services among County Boards of DD and other providers is required along with expanding model programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Transition Planning Requirements in IEPs

“Transition assessment affords the opportunity for professionals from across agencies to co-plan and review information that will highlight the youth's preferences, interests, needs and skills relevant to building a profile of the youth as a future employee.  A  team approach to assessment –adult service personnel, educators, youth and family working collaboratively—results in a profile that informs the pathway to community employment that is the 'best fit' for the youth.”

Transition planning is required to begin formally and be documented in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) by age 14.  The IEP must include a post-secondary goal for employment that is based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Employment First Administrative Rule

The Administrative Rules assert that, “Community Employment is competitive employment that takes place in an integrated setting;

Every individual of working age will have a person-centered planning process to identify their desired employment outcome and their place on the path to community employment; and Services and supports will be provided to help the individual move along the path to community employment.” It also outlines the responsibilities of the County Boards and Providers.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Partnership for Employment First - 05/20/2019

~~“The Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, in partnership with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities agency, continues a statewide initiative to expand community employment services for people with developmental disabilities. This opportunity allows the state to maximize resources to support more people on their path to community employment, build system capacity, and strengthen the relationship between the developmental disability and vocational rehabilitation systems in Ohio.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Partnership FFY 18 Annual Report - 05/20/2019

~~“Since implementation in Federal Fiscal Year 2014, the Employment First Partnership between Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) and the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) has improved competitive integrated employment outcomes for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities who want to work in their community. As a result of the success, resources dedicated to helping adults with developmental disabilities find jobs have doubled since 2013. This growth increased capacity from 900 people being served to 1,800 people with developmental disabilities being served annually.

In addition, the partnership has five certified work incentive consultants who are dedicated to provide work incentive planning and counseling services to all people served through the Employment First Partnership receiving federal, state, and local benefits.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities “About Us” - 01/14/2019

~~“Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) is the State of Ohio agency that partners with Ohioans with disabilities to achieve quality employment, independence and Social Security disability determination outcomes.It is accomplished through its Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR), Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired (BSVI) and Division of Disability Determination (DDD). A fourth area is the Division of Employer and Innovation Services (EIS), which is responsible for establishing and maintaining partnerships with employers. • Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR)• Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired (BSVI)• Division of Disability Determination (DDD)• Employer and Innovation Services (EIS)” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OCALI Supports Schools to Ensure Post-Secondary Success - 07/10/2018

~~“Through the Ohio DD Council, OCALI, or the Ohio Center for Autism and Low Incidence, received a grant titled “Realizing Employment First for Youth: Evidence Based Practices and Predictors of Adult Success.”

The pilot program called “What Works for Work”, studied how evidence-based practices and predictors that supported school-based teams help achieve post-secondary success – or life after high school - for students with developmental disabilities.

The grant support school-based teams, “find successful methods that would improve transitions into employment, independent living skills and community living,” said Madeline Rosenshein, OCALI consultant and grantee.

Through research focused on transition youth, it was found that certain evidence-based practices and predictors, if implemented during the school years, can improve adult outcomes, which includes employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

IPS Supported Employment - 07/01/2018

~~“Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) Supported Employment is an evidence-based practice that helps people with severe and persistent mental illness and/or co-occurring substance use disorders identify, acquire and maintain integrated competitive employment in their communities. IPS is assertive about helping people find the work they want as soon as they express a desire to become employed. IPS increases employment in integrated competitive jobs, the number of hours worked, and the amount of income earned in competitive jobs."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

SAMHSA Supported Employment Grant - 07/01/2018

~~“OhioMHAS was recently awarded the Transforming Lives through Supported Employment grant for $4.8 million dollars over 5 years. This will be a partnership between OhioMHAS, the state training, technical assistance and evaluation partners, and other state departments including Vocational Rehabilitation and two community behavioral health agencies: Firelands Counseling and Recovery Services and Daybreak, Inc. The mission of this project is to modernize, enhance, and increase availability and quality of IPS services to meet the needs of individuals with a severe and persistent mental illness or co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders.The expected outcome is for Ohio to have the necessary infrastructure in place to maintain, expand, and sustain IPS throughout the state and to increase the number of individuals with a severe and persistent mental illness and co-occurring mental health and substance use disorder that obtain and retain integrated competitive employment of their choosing.” 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP) - 10/18/2017

“In 2015, the Ohio Department of Education and Opportunities for Ohioans (OOD) launched the Ohio Transition Support Partnership (OTSP). This innovative collaboration changed the nature and impact of transition services for students with disabilities in Ohio. The Partnership increases the availability of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors for students with disabilities beginning at age 14 to improve post-school outcomes. This earlier engagement helps students with disabilities get a head start on becoming job ready and better prepared to enter the workforce with the skills and experiences necessary to be successful.

Because of this increased investment in transition, OOD is serving more students with disabilities than ever before. This increased demand led to an expansion of the Partnership in 2017. Now, 30 OOD counselors and 21 caseload assistants are partnering with local education agencies to serve students with disabilities throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio NAMI Supported Employment Family Advocacy Project

“This collaboration between NAMI Ohio and the Ohio Department of Mental Health engages families of individuals with mental illness to advocate for, create and expand high-quality Individual Placement and Support (IPS) programs. Family involvement can strengthen the partnerships between providers, family members and consumers around SE services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Employment First Taskforce Common Principles

“The Ohio Employment First Taskforce agencies agree that community employment should be the first option for all working age adults and transition-age youth with developmental disabilities. Employment First is a philosophy of service that presumes that all Ohioans with significant disabilities can and should have opportunities to work in the community”.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Retaining Employment and Talent After Injury/Illness Network (RETAIN) Demonstration Project - 06/15/2019

~~“Research has shown that individuals with non-occupational back, knee and/or shoulder injuries who work in the manufacturing industry are at high risk of becoming unemployed. To see whether providing intensive return-to-work coordination hastens their recovery and improves their chances of remaining employed, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services applied for and received a RETAIN grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. This grant will allow Ohio to develop and pilot a model that, if successful, can be replicated across the state.”

Systems
  • Other

Transforming Lives Through Supported Employment: SAMHSA’s Supported Employment Grant Program (SEP) - 06/29/2018

The purpose of the Supported Employment Program is "to enhance state and community capacity to provide and expand evidence-based SEPs (such as the Individual Placement and Support [IPS] model) to adults with serious mental illnesses, including persons with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders." 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council Current Grant Projects - 07/01/2017

This page lists the current grant projects of the OH Developmental Disabilities Council for the 2017-2021 State Plan. Grant topics include Assistive Technology, Children & Health, Community Living, Employment, Leadership Development, Outreach, and Public Policy.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Mental Health and Addiction Services (Ohio MHAS) Supported Employment Project - 07/01/2014

"Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services (MHAS) and its partners are implementing the Supported Employment Project. This project reduces the high unemployment rates for young adults and adults with a severe and persistent mental illness who may have co-occurring substance use disorders.

Two local sites are implementing new programs, and a committee will oversee statewide training, policy changes, and evaluation. The evidence-based practice of Individual Placement and Support employment is being shared statewide through training and technical assistance."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

OCALI Customized Employment Project - 03/01/2009

"With funding from the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), OCALI launched a customized employment project in March 2009 for two school based transition teams, Claymont High School with Tuscarawas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and Huber Heights High School with Montgomery County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The goal of the project was to increase community employment outcomes for transition aged youth using customized employment strategies and processes. Team members received training and consultation in the CE process, Social Security Work Incentives and working with employers. Teams included school, developmental disability, and vocational rehabilitation staff, plus a parent mentor. In November of 2009 the project received additional funding from DODD to add another team from Lucas County Board of Developmental Disabilities and to provide up to 40 paid internships for youth with disabilities using customized employment strategies and processes in the Lucas County and Montgomery County sites. The Tuscarawas County site obtained funding from DODD, “We Go To Work Grants” to fund resource ownership as an employment strategy."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Ohio Disability Employment Initiative

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2011, was awarded a Round 2 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This grant ended in 2014.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Ohio Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The…grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities”. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Money Follows the Person

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 75,151 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from  institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2016. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply. There are currently forty-three states and the District of Columbia participating in the demonstration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 19 of 19

Ohio Employment First Transition Framework

"Ohio Employment First Transition Framework is a critical component to the Ohio Employment First structure and is intended to address barriers to transition planning and services in order to achieve meaningful adult outcomes. The Framework was developed by stakeholders from multiple agencies to create processes and highlight practices that can be used by all agencies. These common processes assist professionals to plan, prepare, empower, educate, and connect across systems so as to consistently assist youth with disabilities to realize meaningful, community employment and other valued aspects of adult life.

The Framework is built on three non-negotiable foundational elements that together create a 'filter' to examine the practices and procedures used when working and supporting transition youth. The foundational elements for the activity and practices of the Framework are:

Person-centered. The youth is where the team efforts begin and end. Policies and practices must be flexible enough to respond to individual strengths and needs. Agency-neutral. As agencies come together to collaborate, activity should occur in a manner where all involved see value for the youth and no single agency policies or procedures are considered the priority. Outcome-focused. The common focus of the collaborative efforts are the meaningful adult life outcomes."
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Loop Ohio

"Welcome to Loop Ohio, Ohio’s virtual Community of Practice! This online community is dedicated to facilitating statewide and local, cross system collaboration and learning, with a focus on promoting best practices in community development and inclusion for people with disabilities. Ohio is a national leader in these efforts, primarily because of the innovative work being done all across the state, throughout our local communities. Loop Ohio provides a platform for community members and professionals to share ideas and resources, solve problems, break down barriers, connect across distance, and engage in ongoing learning. Loop Ohio is multi-functional, enabling people to have live virtual conversations, share resources, post events, lead and participate in webinars, use discussion boards, have online chat time with subject matter experts and more."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

OH Job Seekers Guide

"The Job Seekers Guide will help you learn how to get a job and will give you some tools that will help along the way."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Customized Employment Training Series

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services and Griffin-Hammis Associates are sponsoring classroom training, on-line instruction, special topics webinars, and technical assistance on Customized Employment for designated Job Center staff and partners, to support individuals with significant disabilities and complex barriers to employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Orientation to Supported Employment Web Course

This Web-based training is an introduction to the competencies for effective supported employment. Please follow this link to register:

https://trn-store.com/trn-courses/entry/OHIntroductionRegister.php

Seven lessons will cover the following topics:

Values, Definitions, History Legislation, Funding, Ohio’s Employment First Roles and Rights Supported Employment Process and Benefits Career Planning, Discovery, Vocational Profile Marketing and Job Development Job Design and Training, Natural Supports
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Customized Employment Guide

“This guide provides a look at the strategies used in Customized Employment (CE) and links to more information and resources for those who are just beginning to explore CE. It explains how CE might benefit individuals with disabilities seeking employment and students in transition from school to work. CE is based on several evidence based transition practices such as self-determination, using self-advocacy strategies, and providing community based instruction. Learn about OCALI’s experience with three teams in Ohio that served transition age youth. In addition to traditional funding sources these teams had access to funding for internships and resource ownership.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Customized Employment: Best Practice of Today

This presentation intertwines Customized Employment into Employment First as a key component to the state’s efforts in promoting community-based, integrated employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Project SEARCH: Opening Doors to Employment for Young People with Disabilities (2009)

“In the mid-1990s, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital began a broad diversity campaign to build a stable, reliable workforce that represented the surrounding community. Although medical professionals make up about 70 percent of the hospital’s workforce, the remaining employees are support personnel who receive on-the-job training and tend to experience high turnover. As part of its diversity effort, the hospital formed a partnership with Great Oaks Career Campuses, a career technical school with a significant proportion of students (28 percent) with developmental disabilities (DD). The resulting job training and placement program was named Project SEARCH and focused on training high school students with DD who are making the transition from school to work. The Project SEARCH model is based on an active collaboration between the hospital, Great Oaks, and the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission, the state’s vocational rehabilitation agency (SVRA). Over the past 15 years, this model has been implemented in 140 additional sites in the United States and the United Kingdom, mostly in hospitals, although some programs have been implemented in banks, insurance companies, state and local government agencies, zoos, senior care facilities, and universities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Ohio Employment First Provider Support Trainings

Professional development activities are available to providers by the Ohio Employment First Initiative.  Trainings include, but are not limited to Mobile Technology as Employment Supports; Task Analysis for Job Coaches; The Role of the Occupational Therapist in Supporting Employment; Transformation: Sustaining Conversation, Raising the Bar and Changing Lives; Worksite Analysis for Job Coaches; Employment supports for those with IDD and Autism; andEmployment supports for those with Physical or Sensory involvement.

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Disability Rights OH, National Federation of the Blind, and Autistic Self Advocacy Network Celebrate Landmark Decision Ordering Fair Pay - 02/03/2016

COLUMBUS, OHIO – In a precedent-setting opinion issued by an administrative law judge from the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL), three clients have been awarded minimum wage going forward and back pay from Seneca Re-Ad, a sheltered workshop run by the Seneca County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The original petition was filed by Disability Rights Ohio (DRO), the National Federation of the Blind, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and the Baltimore law firm of Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

Fair Pay from Sheltered Workshops (2016) - 02/02/2016

This case arises under Section 214(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act ("Act"), 29 U.S.C. §214(c). Ralph ("Joe") Magers, Pamela Steward and Mark Felton ("Petitioners") are employees of Seneca Re-Ad Industries ("Respondent"), which is located in Fostoria, Ohio. Each of the Petitioners has been diagnosed with one or more developmental disabilities and each receives services from the Seneca County (Ohio) Board of Developmental Disabilities ("DD").  Employment at Respondent's Fostoria manufacturing facility is one of the services provided by DD.  
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Ohio’s HCBS Transition Plan - 03/13/2015

“Governor John Kasich created the Office of Health Transformation (OHT) to lead the Administration’s efforts to modernize Medicaid and streamline health and human services programs. Using an innovative approach that involves collaboration among multiple state agency partners and a set of shared guiding principles, reform initiatives are improving services, thus enabling seniors and people with disabilities to live with dignity in the setting they prefer, especially their own home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ohio Balancing Incentives Program - 06/15/2013

~~“Ohio Benefits Long-Term Services and Supports (OBLTSS)The Ohio Department of Medicaid is committed to removing barriers and expanding access to long-term services and supports received in community-based settings. In conjunction with the Governor’s Office of Health Transformation and additional state agencies, the Ohio Department of Medicaid participated in the Balancing Incentive Program (BIP). The Ohio Benefits Long-Term Services and Supports (OBLTSS) program was created from the state’s involvement in BIP.

Through the Balancing Incentive Program Ohio earned over $180 million in matched funds, to improve access to home and community-based long-term services and supports (LTSS). Participating states were required to:◾Establish a no-wrong-door/single entry point system eligibility determination and enrollment system;◾Implement a case management system that is free of conflicts of interest; and◾Develop core standardized assessments.

The OBLTSS program meets all the requirements set forth by BIP and creates a unified way for individuals to connect to the various home and community-based programs and services for which they may be eligible. This new “front door” for information streamlines the process for individuals and their families to learn more about vital long-term services and supports information and resources.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Buy-in for Workers with Disabilities - 04/01/2008

"Medicaid Buy-In for Workers with Disabilities (MBIWD) is an Ohio Medicaid program that provides health care coverage to working Ohioans with disabilities. Historically, people with disabilities were often discouraged from working because their earnings made them ineligible for Medicaid coverage. MBIWD was created to enable Ohioans with disabilities to work and still keep their health care coverage."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Money Follows the Person

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant helps states rebalance their Medicaid long-term care systems. Over 75,151 people with chronic conditions and disabilities have transitioned from  institutions back into the community through MFP programs as of December 2016. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 strengthened and expanded the MFP program allowing more states to apply. There are currently forty-three states and the District of Columbia participating in the demonstration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Ohio Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Ohio until 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

How Does Work Impact My Benefits?

“If you are receiving benefits from the government (money, services, staff, medical care), you may be worried that if you work, you will not get those services. This page can help you learn what will change as you start to make your own money. You will also learn about some special benefits for workers!”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

OH Disability Benefits 101: Working with a Disability in Ohio

“Disability Benefits 101 gives you tools and information on health coverage, benefits, and employment. You can plan ahead and learn how work and benefits go together.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Citations